Patterico's Pontifications

3/19/2013

Tuesday Evening Link Dump

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 7:59 pm



When your friendly neighborhood blogger is too busy, the link dump is what you get. Enjoy the lack of analysis!

School shooter and mass murderer: “This hand that pulled the trigger that killed your sons now masturbates to the memory. Fuck all of you.

We can’t give this guy the death penalty because he was five months short of his 18th birthday when he took the lives of three children. Thank you Anthony Kennedy.

Deport the Criminals First? No, Release the Criminals First! Detainees, including criminals, including serious criminals, released . . . rather than the ICE director asking Congress for more flexibility, or, God help us, furloughing employees.

Hollywood actor’s opinion sought, given.

The non-partisan Barack Obama yuks it up at a cartoon talking about carving up the Republican elephant for dinner. Heh, heh, we sure stuck it to those Republicans. Now let’s all work out our country’s problems, you guys!

51 Responses to “Tuesday Evening Link Dump”

  1. The judge should have had the convict removed from the courtroom and redressed. His attorney should have been cited for contempt.

    SarahW (b0e533)

  2. No Godfather/FerrisB/ Coward Robert Ford references?

    SarahW (b0e533)

  3. Patterico, I thought you opposed the death penalty. Am I mistaken?

    aunursa (7014a8)

  4. Re-dressed, rather. I still can’t believe he wasn’t hauled out of there and his lawyer reprimanded.

    SarahW (b0e533)

  5. Look if we are lucky, this vile human will go to jail, be raped daily and brutally for a few years and eventually kill himself …. or some other inmate can smash his skull in after giving him a bj.

    Rodney King's Spirit (951136)

  6. Calista Flockhart is pushing fiddy and she’s still cuter than a bug in a rug

    her husband is creepy though and I have no plans to see geriatric star wars liam neeson and samuel jackson already proved the concept doesn’t work

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  7. I really hate to say this considering the subject but, as a society, we do need to address the purpose of prison.

    In my feeble mind, the purpose of prison is to incarcerate individuals who may be a threat to society in general and as a punishment to those who violate society’s norms in a way that causes loss of property, life, freedom or injury.

    I think it should be bad, in the sense that it deprives criminals of the joy of being free. It also should involve hard labor and unrelenting restrictions on the freedoms we all enjoy as law-abiding citizens.

    I do have a problem with those who think it should be some sort of free-rape environment without regards to what that actually means.

    Don’t get me wrong. I do not think it should be a breeding pool for gangs, terrorists or criminals wanting to perfect their craft. Regardless, not all that go to prison are violent criminals.

    Regardless, the question is, should we punish, rehabilitate or just incarcerate? The deeper question is should we just kill those as this low-life deserves? Plenty of people don’t think so.

    These are not easy questions in a free society.

    Ag80 (b2c81f)

  8. Patterico, I thought you opposed the death penalty. Am I mistaken?

    Comment by aunursa (7014a8) — 3/19/2013 @ 8:59 pm

    Very much so.

    Patterico (198f23)

  9. i can’t watch the video

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  10. speaking of linky links how is this different from swatting exactly?

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  11. because it is for the chilrens, feets.

    by the by, was that your Geico car left in front of the body shop Saturday?

    redc1c4 (403dff)

  12. i’ve got no problem with the death penalty for treason or murder one, such as this douchebag.

    however, we make too big of a production about it, which, imho, encourages bad behavior to a certain extent.

    instead of the lavish events, the condemned should just get a 22 short in the base of the skull as he is being moved from one place in the prison to another in a routine manner.

    no warning, no buildup, no press, and no marker on a grave. drop them, cremate them and send the ashes to the land fill with the rest of the garbage.

    redc1c4 (403dff)

  13. Our modern penal systems have a lot to learn from Joe Arpaio.

    askeptic (2bb434)

  14. Prison is a breeding ground for criminal behavior. And it’s not only convicts.

    mg (31009b)

  15. I don’t know why his attorneys should have been reprimanded; they clearly had no control over the killer. The attorneys apologized to the victims’ families, but the killer knew that he was going to get life, and probably figured that he might as well inflict as much pain on the families as he had the ability to do.

    With life without parole, at least the victims’ families won’t have to go through testifying at several parole hearings, as has happened in so many other cases.

    The New York Daily News had an article about a lifer, who is locked up 23 hours a day and hasn’t seen a television or phone since the 80s. (Hat tip to the Lonely Conservative.) Unlike our esteemed host, I am opposed to capital punishment, but the state could simply hang a noose in the center of his cell, with a chair he can kick over, and if he wants to go to his eternal reward early, it would be his choice.

    I wonder how many of them would take that option.

    The coldly realistic Dana (3e4784)

  16. That attorney was responsible for having his client dressed in a manner respectful of the court. If it was a deliberately concealed surprise for the attorney, he should have asked the judge to take his client out.

    SarahW (b0e533)

  17. And the judge, above all, should have had the young man removed.

    SarahW (b0e533)

  18. Virginia courts are much stricter I suppose. There is no wearing a “killer” T-shirt in the courtroom. Not at sentencing, not at any other time.

    SarahW (b0e533)

  19. The jail guards are responsible for what a prisoner wears. The judge is in charge of his courtroom. The defense attorney had no say.

    nk (aebf26)

  20. Not true. The attorney saw his client, the attorney deal with his contemptuous dress.

    SarahW (b0e533)

  21. deals. As soon as the attorney is aware, it’s “you are not going into court like that.”

    SarahW (b0e533)

  22. That notwithstanding there is no excuse for the judge not having him removed and put into a prison jumper and shackled for his sentencing.

    SarahW (b0e533)

  23. speaking of linky links how is this different from swatting exactly?

    The raid on the parents’ home because their kid was pictured with a gun? It’s bad . . . but since you asked, I see no indication that police pointed guns at anyone, or that anyone was at risk of being shot and killed.

    It’s bad, but it’s not quite the same thing.

    Patterico (9c670f)

  24. Good thing to post on, though. I think someone sent me that link yesterday.

    Patterico (9c670f)

  25. While the electric chair would be justice, I imagine this punk will get worked over pretty good in prison due to his mouth getting him in trouble with the inevitable backtalk directed toward the lifers, and the fact that the lifers will have heard about this little twit who flipped off the entire courtroom while wearing a t-shirt that he wrote “K-I-L-L-E-R” on.

    That in itself, is enough to warrant some bullying in prison.

    Elephant Stone (5e600c)

  26. 25. Christopher Scarver, your country needs you once again.

    gary gulrud (dd7d4e)

  27. http://www.ktvq.com/news/ohio-school-shooter-shows-contempt-no-remorse-during-sentencing/#_

    Link goes to an article that included the defense attorney’s statement that the shirt was a surprise to him as well as others in the court – prosecutor and judge alike.

    at some point in the proceedings, the defense attorney explained to the court that he had urged and counseled his client to refrain from making any inflammatory statement.

    “Lane’s own lawyer told the court he urged his client not to make the type of statement that the attorney expected to be delivered.”

    I don’t know whether that explanation came as an advance warning or whether this happened after the fact, or if the judge demanded an explanation.

    The prosecutor told CNN his belief the judge had been unaware of the T-shirt, that all became aware at the same time. But then he’s just sitting there in that T-shirt.

    As soon as they were aware, I don’t care how tight the schedule was; letting contempt like that slip invites repeats in the future. No matter the inconvenience, he should have been taken from the court, as soon as the shirt appeared, put into a jumper, shackled and rebuked, and forbidden from making any further statement.

    SarahW (b0e533)

  28. happy, I will say that calling Child Protective Services is a tactic of SWATters. The FBI told me that in person. SWATters love to harass their targets in any way they can devise.

    And for what it’s worth, a supporter of Brett Kimberlin’s called Child Protective Services on one of the more prominent critics of Brett Kimberlin. Which is not to say the person who called Child Protective Services is a SWATter. (He is a horrible person.) It’s just an interesting fact.

    Patterico (9c670f)

  29. at some point in the proceedings, the defense attorney explained to the court that he had urged and counseled his client to refrain from making any inflammatory statement.

    “Lane’s own lawyer told the court he urged his client not to make the type of statement that the attorney expected to be delivered.”

    I don’t know whether that explanation came as an advance warning or whether this happened after the fact, or if the judge demanded an explanation.

    I’m changing my opinion of the defense attorney but for a different reason: He should not have revealed these conversations with his client. That’s pretty bad. (Makes me wonder whether the kid saw himself being sold down the river, with nothing to lose no matter what he did, so he might as well spit in the hangman’s face.)

    nk (aebf26)

  30. i guess it means that CPS stormtroopers are tools in the truest sense of the word

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  31. Couple of points here, I have followed this case for work purposes as a paralegal in the Cleveland area and just thought I would add a couple of thoughts.

    One – the Judge came out and said after the hearing he could not see what was written on the shirt, since Lane was seated almost directly in front of him. Or as you would look at the video, the Judge is sitting at the 10:00 position to Lane.

    Two – Lane against the advice of his attorneys took the plea deal in fact the Judge asked Counsel at the Plea Hearing if the deal was agreed upon by counsel, he told the court he had advised the client not to take the deal. BTW, the kid saved himself, the deal took the State’s needle out his arm that was apart of the charges.

    Finally, throughout this whole ordeal I thought Lane was just a messed up kid, until yesterday – His statement told me he was cold hearted individual with no sense of remorse.

    Tim Carroll (79f539)

  32. 29, nk, it makes me wonder if the cold blooded murdering little self-absorbed cockroach knew he was headed for a lifetime of incarceration and wanted to squeeze in another few moments of vindictively savage cruelty to help fill the long slow empty days, weeks, months, and years of deadening isolation, repetition, and remorse for his useless and pointless acts of sickening stupidity.

    ropelight (996587)

  33. On the bright side, once he’s in general population in prison, Justice Kennedy’s cock-up will be resolved.

    Rob Crawford (04f50f)

  34. Re: Harrison Ford on ATC towers. Mr. Ford is a licensed pilot. He sometimes flies non-urgent helicopter missions in the mountains near his Jackson, WY, home. I hesitate to call them rescues because he only provides airlift, but it frees up the rescue teams for other responses.
    So Mr. Ford is a prominent person with some expertise on the subject rather than just mouthing off.

    MT Geoff (a67ef4)

  35. Since I agree with our host that the death penalty should require a “we are effing sure” conclusion from the jury, I’d say this is just the kind of case that the death penalty was made for: clearly guilty, unrepentant killer of innocents.

    I hear child-killers don’t do well in prison, though.

    Kevin M (bf8ad7)

  36. MT Geoff–

    THe problem is that Ford accepts that the sequester necessarily leads to cutting vital services, and never asks why they aren’t cutting, say, the guy who plans junkets for FAA bureaucrats.

    Kevin M (bf8ad7)

  37. How did this defendant get away with this behavior? Is bad behavior now accepted everywhere, including court??

    Patricia (be0117)

  38. Patricia asked:

    How did this defendant get away with this behavior? Is bad behavior now accepted everywhere, including court??

    He was going to jail for the rest of his life, and could not be sentenced to death; what more could they do to him for his courtroom behavior?

    The realistic Dana (3e4784)

  39. In response to Dana’s question at #38 a few ideas seem to suggest themselves: punch him in the gut till he’s gasping for breath then flatten his nose, blacken his eyes, button his lip, and break his offending finger. All of which were once to be expected for such misbehavior and considered well deserved and entirely appropriate by all concerned, including the perp.

    ropelight (996587)

  40. @36 – Howdy Kevin
    I don’t know that Mr. Ford’s point was correct, I just wanted to say that, unlike Jenny McCarthy’s opinions on vaccinations or Denis Rodman’s opinions on geopolitics, Mr. Ford was at least addressing an area where he has experience. The linked article didn’t mention Mr. Ford’s aviation experience.

    MT Geoff (a67ef4)

  41. We can’t give this guy the death penalty because he was five months short of his 18th birthday when he took the lives of three children. Thank you Anthony Kennedy.

    What’s the criteria for trying children as adults? I know that notion exists. This sounds like an obvious case… WtF?

    IGotBupkis, Legally Defined Cyberbully in All 57 States and some Canadian provinces (98ae1f)

  42. Say hi to Mr. Dover, punk.

    mojo (8096f2)

  43. I don’t know that Mr. Ford’s point was correct, I just wanted to say that, unlike Jenny McCarthy’s opinions on vaccinations or Denis Rodman’s opinions on geopolitics, Mr. Ford was at least addressing an area where he has experience. The linked article didn’t mention Mr. Ford’s aviation experience.

    Well, yes, but that is like me saying that Google Glass will lead to Communism, and claiming that because I’m an engineer my option carries more weight, when the opinion is ludicrous regardless.

    Kevin M (bf8ad7)

  44. option opinion. gah.

    Kevin M (bf8ad7)

  45. The light at the end of his rope wrote:

    In response to Dana’s question at #38 a few ideas seem to suggest themselves: punch him in the gut till he’s gasping for breath then flatten his nose, blacken his eyes, button his lip, and break his offending finger. All of which were once to be expected for such misbehavior and considered well deserved and entirely appropriate by all concerned, including the perp.

    Alas! All of that was in the past. In the past, if someone was convicted of murder, he had about three days to look out his cell window and watch the gallows being built for him, too. (If capital punishment was a deterrent, it would have been then; I rather doubt it is now.)

    The killer absolutely knew that there was nothing more which could have been done to him. But even if he thought he might get punched a few times whilst being dragged out of the courtroom, he might still have thought it his last good shot to get in another attack on the victims and their families.

    The unfortunately realistic Dana (af9ec3)

  46. Three links:

    Top Prosecutor in Brooklyn Is Rebuked by U.S. Judge New York Times November 17, 2012

    <A Prosecutor Loath to Say ‘Not Guilty’ New York Times January 29, 2013
    Jailed Unjustly in the Death of a Rabbi, Man Nears Freedom – New York times front page today March 20, 2013.

    In this last one, the real killer died in a car crash while being chased by police.

    So why was another person framed. The only thing that makes sense to me is that the crooked detective was protecting the fence.

    Sammy Finkelman (d22d64)

  47. I’m reasonably confident that the decision to which Patterico was referring was Justice Kennedy’s opinion (joined by Justices Stevens, Souter, Ginsburg, and Breyer) in Roper v. Simmons, 543 U.S. 551 (2005), which overruled fairly recently reaffirmed Eighth and Fourteenth Amendment precedents like Stanford v. Kentucky, 492 U.S. 361 (1989). Roper v. Simmons declares as a bright-line inviolate rule, the death penalty may not be imposed upon anyone who was under the age of 18 when he or she committed a capital crime.

    Justice Kennedy’s reasoning in Roper v. Simmons has been described by critics — and I number myself among them — as being a classic of the “‘making sh*t up out of thin air and pretending it’s in the Constitution pretty much just because we feel like it’ school of constitutional jurisprudence.”

    Beldar (ff2834)

  48. Critics contend that “evolving standards of decency” are, by definition in a tri-partite democracy, defined by the acts of that democracy’s legislature and executive acting in concert in the manner prescribed by the democracy’s constitution. Justice Kennedy and the liberal bloc that voted with him uses that phrase as code for “we’re doing some purposeful and really fast ‘evolution‘ here and pretending that we’ve changed the Constitution of the United States without anyone voting on it.” To which we critics reply, “Bullsh*t.”

    Beldar (ff2834)

  49. Who would design a system in which a five-to-four majority on the very top tier of the one branch of government which is structurally impeded from itself evolving very quickly — the federal judicial branch, whose members enjoy life tenure on good behavior — is supposed to be, at any given moment and subject to change without notice, the sole and exclusive national arbiters of “evolving standards of decency”?

    I’m pretty sure that Jefferson, Hamilton, and John Marshall would have all torn out their hair and gnashed their teeth over that notion.

    Beldar (ff2834)

  50. A-freakin-men, Beldar. Preach it, brother.

    JD (4bb5d1)

  51. Ohio did not execute juveniles even before Roper v. Simmons. Because of its own statutes, not a judicial decision. It was one of the states, that had of their own volition abolished the death penalty for juveniles, that the Roper court looked at for evolving standards of decency. So I suppose the Ohio legislature was partly responsible for leading the Roper Court down the garden path of “making s**t up out of thin air”?

    nk (516897)


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