Patterico's Pontifications

8/10/2021

It Almost Seems Like They’re Moving Backward In Texas

Filed under: General — Dana @ 8:58 am



[guest post by Dana]

Things are looking pretty bad in Austin right now:

The number of staffed intensive care unit beds has sunk to single digits this week as the Austin area weathers the latest surge in COVID-19 cases.

As of Monday, Region O — which is made up of 2.3 million people in 11 counties: Travis, Williamson, Hays, Bastrop, Blanco, Burnet, Caldwell, Fayette, Lee, Llano and San Saba — had only six staffed ICU beds, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services.

Throughout the 11-county region, 647 patients are hospitalized for the coronavirus, out of more than 3,700 inpatients regionwide. The region has only enough staffing to care for a little more than 4,200 patients

“The problem with that is that outside COVID-19, the risk has increased for those in car crashes, having heart attacks or other health issues” that require that kind of care, said Matt Lara, a spokesperson for Austin Public Health. “We are asking people get vaccinated, wear a mask and stay home, if possible. We need to take precautions to help the hospitals.”

The surge in cases is being driven by the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus, which is spreading among the very young and the unvaccinated.

On Monday afternoon, Austin-area public health officials reported 445 new coronavirus cases and 74 new hospital admissions for COVID-19 in Travis County.

Of the 557 people currently in the hospital for COVID-19, 191 were in ICUs and 116 were on ventilators.

Meanwhile, Gov. Abbott of Texas is asking the public to put off elective surgery:

Gov. Greg Abbott appealed for out-of-state help to fight the third wave of COVID-19 in Texas while two more of the state’s largest school districts announced mask mandates in defiance of the governor.

Abbott’s request Monday came as a county-owned hospital in Houston raised tents to accommodate their COVID-19 overflow. Private hospitals in the county already were requiring their staff to be vaccinated against the coronavirus…

The Republican governor has directed the Texas Department of State Health Services to use staffing agencies to find additional medical staff from beyond the state’s borders as the delta wave began to overwhelm its present staffing resources. He also has sent a letter to the Texas Hospital Association to request that hospitals postpone all elective medical procedures voluntarily.

Hospital officials in Houston said last week that area hospitals with beds had insufficient numbers of nurses to serve them.

Abbott also directed the state health department and the Texas Division of Emergency Management to open additional COVID-19 antibody infusion centers to treat patients not needing hospital care and expand COVID-19 vaccine availability to the state’s underserved communities…

The governor is taking action short of lifting his emergency order banning county and local government entities from requiring the wearing of masks and social distancing to lower the COVID-19 risk. Abbott has said repeatedly that Texans have the information and intelligence to make their own decisions on what steps to take to protect their health and the health of those around them.

Do they? Do they really? Because it sure doesn’t seem like it.

In March 2020, when there were concerns that health systems could be overwhelmed by Covid-19 patients, it was recommended that elective surgeries be put on hold:

Containing the spread of COVID-19 and conserving resources—most notably personal protective equipment and ventilators—were key factors in the recommendation to postpone elective surgeries.

Because of those factors, the AMA offered praise for the recommendation after it was released.

The CMS guidance “on adult elective surgery is a vital step is allocating resources during the pandemic,” said AMA president Patrice A. Harris, MD, MA. “As hospitals and physician practices plan for anticipated surges of patients needing care for COVID-19 infections, health professionals must use their expertise to develop allocation policies that are fair and safeguard the welfare of patients. The CMS guidance offers needed flexibility to physicians by allowing them to consider the imperative of resource conservation, especially personal protective equipment.”

That was 17 months ago, and yet here we are. Again.

It’s a bit mind-boggling that more than a year and a half later, similar steps are necessary. Looking at the situation in Texas, one wouldn’t necessarily think that this is a country where there is sufficient availability of the Covid-19 vaccine, and the means with which to administer it to the public. And yet here we are. Still.

I’ll just drop this here. Note that Sen. Cruz is not imploring Texans to get vaccinated already but is instead ranting about how he is against mandates of any kind. (Or as Allahpundit put it, here is Cruz “campaigning for 2024”):

Yet one more politician crassly politicizing Covid-19 for his own political gain while his own state is experiencing a devastating surge in Covid hospitalizations.

Get the vaccine.

–Dana

147 Responses to “It Almost Seems Like They’re Moving Backward In Texas”

  1. Good morning.

    Pre-emptive strike: Yes, other politicians on both sides of the aisle have exploited the pandemic for their own political gain too. However, the post is looking at the problem in Texas and the thus, Texas politicians…

    Dana (174549)

  2. Any mention of Texas without mention of Biden’s invasion on the border is disappointing.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  3. What does Texas contact tracing look like? How many cases are coming from across the border?

    Hoi Polloi (ade50d)

  4. The Delta variant of COVID has surprised scientists — and not in a good way. This Washington Post article is, as far as I know, a good summary of what is currently known — and what isn’t.

    Sample:

    That leaves the open question of whether delta is the fittest — that is, the worst — version of the virus, or whether it could acquire some new mutations that make it even more formidable.

    “Nobody knows what tricks the virus has left,” said Jeremy Luban, a virologist at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. “It’s possible we’ve seen all of its chess moves, or its poker tricks, but it’s got a very big complicated genome and it probably still has some space to explore.”

    We shouldn’t underestimate this enemy. A few weeks ago, I hoped that the death toll from COVID, in the United States, would be less than 700,000; now I think that it is possible it will hit one million.

    Jim Miller (edcec1)

  5. When do we hold China liable for this biological attack?

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  6. “Any mention of Texas without mention of Biden’s invasion on the border is disappointing.”
    “When do we hold China liable for this biological attack?”

    The party of personal responsibility.

    Davethulhu (aa6793)

  7. Thulu,

    yes, holding the correct people accountable is critical for moving forward. Unlike your party that wants to blame all people of a certain race for the sins of others that were done in a different time.

    See the difference? I didn’t think so.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  8. Breaking-

    Cuomo resigns.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  9. we should make damn sure those thousands of unvaccinated illegal migrants respect our mask mandates!!

    rule of law and stuff, etc.

    JF (e1156d)

  10. “Unlike your party that wants to blame all people of a certain race for the sins of others that were done in a different time.”

    You have a problem.

    Davethulhu (aa6793)

  11. Yes I do. It’s the socialist left.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  12. When do we hold China liable for this biological attack?

    NJRob (eb56c3) — 8/10/2021 @ 9:19 am

    What do you suggest the US do? Sue China? Go to war?

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  13. “Yes I do. It’s the socialist left.”

    I’m sorry the socialist left made all these people not take the vaccine.

    Davethulhu (aa6793)

  14. @13 are you also sorry the socialist left trusted and funded china’s research?

    JF (e1156d)

  15. Masks don’t work. When I say that, it’s shorthand for that mask isn’t properly being fitted and most aren’t even rated at N95 or higher.

    Japan, has one of the highest compliance in wearing masks and is absolutely getting HAMMERED right now:
    https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/japan/

    I don’t think mandates of any kind is the way to go.

    The way to go, is honest data-driven conversations devoid of partisan flavors.

    The way to go is to encourage those are still hesitant to get vaccinated. Explain the data descrepencies between the vaccinated v. unvaccinated in hospital settings. (I think folks are being overwrought with the number of cases).

    whembly (123289)

  16. For the record: The Delta variant has been traced back to India. The Alpha variant, which was the most common in the US before Delta took over, has been traced back to Britain.

    (I would love to know where the original variant came from, but doubt that “Emperor” Xi will let our researchers find out. Assuming that’s even possible, now.

    Those who are sure they know where must have psychic powers that I am not blessed with. Or access to top, top secret intelligence — in which case they should not be discussing such matters on a public forum.)

    For the moment, I think Americans should be working together against the enemy virus, with its latest tricks, using the policies that, so far, have been shown to work best.

    Jim Miller (edcec1)

  17. #15 Yesterday, Japan had 7 new deaths from COVID, the United States 326, of which 120 were in Florida and 23 in Texas.

    (Their deaths per million is 121, ours 1902.)

    Jim Miller (edcec1)

  18. Texas?

    Backward?

    Have you ever listened to Louis Gohmert?

    Saxet!

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  19. 9.we should make damn sure those thousands of unvaccinated illegal migrants respect our mask mandates!!

    Or get a S&W shot- right at the border??? 😉

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  20. “are you also sorry the socialist left trusted and funded china’s research?”

    No, because this didn’t happen.

    Davethulhu (aa6793)

  21. 2… Rob hits a solo home run. How do you put focus on Texas without mentioning the insane Biden-Harris actions on the border?

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  22. 16. Jim Miller (edcec1) — 8/10/2021 @ 10:09 am

    For the record: The Delta variant has been traced back to India. The Alpha variant, which was the most common in the US before Delta took over, has been traced back to Britain.

    Those are the places where they first predominated. Most cases in the UK are now Delta.

    (I would love to know where the original variant came from, but doubt that “Emperor” Xi will let our researchers find out. Assuming that’s even possible, now.

    The one in Wuhan was not the most recent common ancestor. There was another variant in China, milder, that is a collateral descendant of the original.

    There were probably two lab leaks – the first one in late August or early September 2019 (but before Sept. 12 when the database of viruses collected was taken off the Internet) from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, and the second one, in mid to late October 2019 from the Wuhan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, located about 300 yards from the seafood market (although it did have some stalls with air breathing animals) that was falsely made the epicenter of the epidemic.

    On the other hand the 1977 reappearance of a 1950 variant of influenza did not come from a lab leak, either in Russia or in China, but from a test of a vaccine administered to Chinese military recruits. They apparently exposed them to flu to see if the vaccine worked. This was right after the Cultural Revolution.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/lab-leak-wuhan-virology-covid-19-coronavirus-origins-china-biden-11628280778

    It was only in 2004, thanks to a Chinese virologist’s private word to a U.S. counterpart, that the world at large finally learned the release was likely the result of a vaccine trial in which Chinese military recruits were intentionally exposed to the 1950s virus.

    http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/~bioe301/public_html/kortum/class/students/hw/Palese%20review.pdf

    Strictly speaking, there was a fourth pandemic strain in the last century, an H1N1 strain which appeared in 1977 (Fig. 2). This strain was shown by oligonucleotide mapping techniques to be closely related to viruses circulating in 1950 (ref. 8). It caused disease mostly in people
    born after 1950, because the older population had protective immunity resulting from prior experience with H1N1 strains. Although there is no hard evidence available, the introduction of this 1977 H1N1 virus is now thought to be the result of vaccine trials in the Far East involving the challenge of several thousand military recruits with live H1N1 virus (C.M. Chu, personal communication). Unfortunately, this H1N1 strain (and its descendants) has been circulating ever since, and at present both H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses continue to be present in the human population (Fig. 2)

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  23. As a result of the increase in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, the state of Florida requested 300 ventilators from the federal government, according to a Department of Health and Human Services planning document obtained by ABC News.

    The request was made on Friday “to replace expended state stores,” the document said.

    The ventilators were expected to be delivered on Monday, though it was not said how they will be allocated.

    It comes as doctors are stressed and hospitals are tapped for resources, their beds continuing to fill with unvaccinated patients infected with the virus.

    “The nurses, the physicians, they have passed burnout a long time ago,” said Dr. Joshua Lenchus, Broward Health’s chief medical officer. “This is sheer exhaustion”

    Florida reported an average of over 19,000 new coronavirus cases per day last week, and more than 13,000 hospitalizations were reported across the state Sunday.

    https://www.local10.com/news/local/2021/08/09/florida-sets-another-covid-case-record-as-hospitals-face-sheer-exhaustion/

    No doubt caused by the illegal aliens streaming over the Florida/Mexico border.

    Davethulhu (aa6793)

  24. @17

    #15 Yesterday, Japan had 7 new deaths from COVID, the United States 326, of which 120 were in Florida and 23 in Texas.

    (Their deaths per million is 121, ours 1902.)

    Jim Miller (edcec1) — 8/10/2021 @ 10:18 am

    That’s a correlation argument, not necessarily a causation that mask works.

    Other factors can account for why deaths are lower in Japan than in the US. IE, Japanese experienced more coronavirus (not just COVID19) seasons than the US which gives them a more robust natural immunity than US population.

    Others could be disparities of infected in age groups in both countries.

    Masks themselves are not a talisman. Outside of fitted and sealed respirators (ie, N95) masks are useless against aerosol transmission.

    There are complex reasons why we’re see the cases jump up.

    The government need to stop fighting these civil liberties policies by mandating mask/vaccinations and get out of the partisan muck. They need to do a much better job in delivering facts to the public.

    The irony, of irony that I keep going back to is this:
    https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/covid-19/wildfire_smoke_covid-19.html

    The CDC is full of contradictions. On the one hand, the smoke particles are too small for general masks usage to prevent smoke inhalation damage. Yet smoke particles are even LARGER than the aerosolized viral transmission of COVID19. Hell, they still don’t recommend non-hospital community to use N95 in this scenario!

    whembly (2e3fb6)

  25. @23 how many?

    where are they transported by the administration?

    you seem to know

    JF (e1156d)

  26. Are you having a stroke, JF?

    Davethulhu (aa6793)

  27. what a troll

    JF (e1156d)

  28. Any mention of Texas without mention of Biden’s invasion on the border is disappointing.

    Why, Rob? There are 6.6 million un-vaxxed adults in TX, and the number of un-vaxxed illegals are a fraction.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  29. @28 there were 320 million unvaxxed americans eighteen months ago

    you don’t seem to understand how viruses work

    JF (e1156d)

  30. New rule: No vaccination, no ICU bed.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  31. Do they? Do they really? Because it sure doesn’t seem like it.

    25% of the population has an IQ below 90.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  32. The party of personal responsibility.

    The “short-dress” argument.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  33. most aren’t even rated at N95 or higher.

    Mine are. Yours can be, too:

    https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/where-to-buy-n95-kn95-masks-online/#our-favorite-respirator-masks

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  34. 2… Rob hits a solo home run. How do you put focus on Texas without mentioning the insane Biden-Harris actions on the border?

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0) — 8/10/2021 @ 10:42 am

    And whiffed on his response to #12.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  35. We’re really wasting too much thought, not to mention money, on those people. Let Darwin sort them out!

    nk (1d9030)

  36. @35: see #30

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  37. BTW, in all these ICU stories, we are all clear that people who go on a ventilator don’t usually survive, right? I heard it was 1 out of 4 with Covid; maybe there are newer numbers.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  38. We’re really wasting too much thought, not to mention money, on those people. Let Darwin sort them out!

    Heh… now do Chicago…

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  39. you don’t seem to understand how viruses work

    More like the 6.7 million Texans don’t understand it, JF. Exactly how many un-vaxxed illegals have “invaded” Texas?

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  40. @37-

    Observational studies have consistently described poor clinical outcomes and increased ICU mortality in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who require mechanical ventilation (MV). Our study describes the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with severe COVID-19 admitted to ICU in the largest health care system in the state of Florida, United States.
    …….
    Reports of ICU mortality due to COVID-19 around the world and in the Unites States, in particular, have ranged from 20–62%. In mechanically ventilated patients, mortality has ranged from 50–97%. Observations from Wuhan have shown mortality rates of approximately 52% in COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Cohorts in New York have shown a mortality rate in the mechanically ventilated population as high as 88.1%. Based on these high mortality rates, there has been speculation that this disease process is different than typical ARDS, suggesting that standard ARDS mechanical ventilation strategies may not be as effective in reducing lung injury. Autopsy studies have highlighted the presence of microthrombi in the lung circulation as evidence of the pathophysiology of COVID pneumonia, similar to what has been described in ARDS with DIC. However, both our in-hospital and mechanical ventilation mortality rates were significantly lower than what has been reported in the literature (Table 4). In fact, our data suggests that COVID-19-induced ARDS requiring mechanical ventilation has a similar if not lower mortality than what has been previously observed in ARDS due to other infectious etiologies.

    Footnotes removed.

    ICU outcomes and survival in patients with severe COVID-19 in the largest health care system in central Florida

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  41. @39 i’m supposed to know lol

    you don’t know, but you’re sure they’re just fine

    JF (e1156d)

  42. Either Abbott took a page from DeSantis, or verse visa, regarding mask/vaccine mandates. Either way, he governs more like a Trumpalesque strongman than conservative decentralizer.
    That aside, his four steps are in the right direction. However, TX is a not success story. They’re middle of the pack in deaths and cases per million, and they’re 37th in vaccinations. Also, new cases and deaths are still on the rise, and new hospitalizations grew 42% this past week.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  43. That’s how important turbocharging the influx of illegal immigrants is to Biden, Pelosi, Schumer , etc., JF.

    They will do whatever it takes to increase their hold on the reins of government… even if it kills American citizens.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  44. No mask mandates.
    No vaccine mandates.
    No vaccine passports.
    No COVID mandates! pic.twitter.com/QpCNQof9PQ
    — Ted Cruz (@tedcruz) August 10, 2021

    “In a time of crisis, character is revealed.” – Cancun Tedtoo

    Texas Sen. Ted Cruz flies to Cancún amid his home state’s winter weather disaster


    While millions of Texans struggle with a lack of power, heat and water amid deadly winter weather, Sen. Ted Cruz flew to Cancún, Mexico. – yahoonews.com

    IDIOT.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  45. My county is 70% fully vaccinated. The state is 65% fully vaccinated and 75% with at least one shot. The current average daily case rate is 25/100K, up 20-fold from a month ago. Currently hospitalized: 190 out of 2 million.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  46. OT- RE- President Plagiarist blovating on Senate vote for infrastructure bill:

    “The bill passed by a bigger margin than the Interstate highway bill did in 1956.”

    There were only 96 senators in 1956, not 100, Joe; Hawaii and Alaska were not states until 1959, so numerical comparisons are superfluous outgassing. Liars figure and figures lie, eh, Joe!?

    See a doctor, pal.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  47. Ooops. Only up about 8-fold in the last month. Misread something.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  48. Rip,

    The obvious answer is an economic boycott and the refusal to trade with a nation that uses slave labor and artificially manipulates its currency.

    But you don’t care for the answer, do you?

    NJRob (10777c)

  49. George Carlin Skit Germs, Immunity. Contains profanity

    Purple Haze (34bae0)

  50. ‘Contains profanity’

    Antibiotic bug killer— or carcinogen?

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  51. Rip,

    The obvious answer is an economic boycott and the refusal to trade with a nation that uses slave labor and artificially manipulates its currency.

    But you don’t care for the answer, do you?

    NJRob (10777c) — 8/10/2021 @ 12:45 pm

    I think your answer is fine, but in order to be effective it would need to be multilateral, and I don’t see that happening. Other countries have too much at stake not to deal with China.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  52. Rip,

    The obvious answer is an economic boycott and the refusal to trade with a nation that uses slave labor and artificially manipulates its currency……

    NJRob (10777c) — 8/10/2021 @ 12:45 pm

    How long would the boycott be? What results do you want to see-regime change? How would the US deal the Chinese retaliation (dumping US debt)?

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  53. Would you boycott countries that continued to trade with China?

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  54. Go to people. Use the bully pulpit. Explain what China has done and continues to do on the global stage.

    Stop funding people to sit home. Reestablish manufacturing facilities. In the meantime, redirect purchases to Vietnam, the Philippines, etc.

    Most nations would be willing to pretend to go along with the boycott like they did with Iraq and then just trade under the table.

    Regime change is necessary.

    Yes, I’d expect China to lash out militarily which would then lead to a hardening of hearts and hopefully spines.

    NJRob (64d775)

  55. #26 Sammy – I think this is a plausible hypothesis:

    The one in Wuhan was not the most recent common ancestor. There was another variant in China, milder, that is a collateral descendant of the original.

    There were probably two lab leaks – the first one in late August or early September 2019 (but before Sept. 12 when the database of viruses collected was taken off the Internet) from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, and the second one, in mid to late October 2019 from the Wuhan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, located about 300 yards from the seafood market (although it did have some stalls with air breathing animals) that was falsely made the epicenter of the epidemic.

    But one that is not fully testable, without the complete cooperation of “Emperor” Xi and company. (And possibly not even then.)

    Would you agree or disagree with that tentative conclusion?

    Jim Miller (edcec1)

  56. China is literally our largest trading partner, so a boycott is unrealistic and I’d rather not go back into a major recession or depression, especially after the Xi regime helped start the previous one.
    If we want to be smart about it, there are multiple steps we can take over the next several years to lessen their role in our economy, starting with joining TPP and sanctioning the people and companies we know are cheating. Same with those enterprises that exploit Uighers.
    We can incentivize companies to not do business with the regime, and de-incentivize companies that stay there.
    We can create or expand a program that brings Hong Kongers to the US.
    We can stop the flow of Chinese students matriculating at US universities and give those slots to students from other Asian nations, especially those from Taiwan.
    We can hack their asses the way they hacked our OPM.
    We can launch a check-the-tags campaign, to encourage Americans to notice the labels and not buy Made in China.
    Etc.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  57. @56. 1970. Back in London… “Buy British’ craze. Gasps of a dying Empire.

    Confucius say:

    “If you’ve got them by the balls, wang and T-bills, their hearts and minds will follow.”

    Or was that Teddy Roosevelt?! 😉

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  58. Did trump completely break the GOP or was it always like this impotent and self pitying? I used to view them as the least bad choice unless the stars aligned and the Libertarian party accidentally nominated a sane candidate. But seeing this in one of our largest and wealthiest states is just incredibly disheartening. And the ID of the GOP reflexively finds some way to make their team the victim of out side forces instead of taking some responsibility for their own policy decisions. Just sad.

    Time123 (78eca7)

  59. 59… which party is it that is in a race to impose its values (spoiler: which are far-left) on ALL Americans?

    I call BS.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  60. I think that the actual, real world, demographics of the unvaccinated are the same as the demographics of Huntsville prison. Why we hear about the Republican percentage is because they think they can make political hay out of it.

    Because, like, you know, what else they got except “NO! I WON’T! YOU CAN’T MAKE ME! I’M GOING TO RUN AWAY FROM HOME AND JOIN THE CIRCUS, SEE IF I DON’T!”

    nk (1d9030)

  61. I think the demographics of the unvac’d
    are more like the police blotter of the Times of Northwest Indiana, which are about the same as Ralphie’s first dream defending his house against a set of striped shirt burglars in A Christmas Story (i.e. far more accurate than a 2021 ADT commercial), also set in NWI/ da Region.

    urbanleftbehind (058b0e)

  62. The two main group[s of the unvacc’d are loyal Trumpians and original anti-vaxxers. The latter are not always strident or complete about it, if they were “vegetarians” they would range from strict Vegans to people who say they don’t usually eat meat.

    It seems that the weaker end of the latter group is seeking vaccination now, but the press focus on the loyal Trumpians is doing everyone a disservice. There is probably no better way of increasing the obstinacy of an obstinate person that hectoring them.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  63. It is already hard to get someone to admit they are wrong, but “admit you’re stupid” isn’t the winning path.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  64. Off-topic:

    Unexpectedly, inflation remains high at 5.4%, but is predicted to drop real soon now.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  65. A glimpse into the future:

    “Inflation at 6% isn’t all that high, historically. It was much higher in the 1940s and 1970s. If we are to keep people employed at these new green jobs we’ve crreated, we just have to accept this as the New Normal™”

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  66. In person hectoring – Bring it punk.

    mg (8cbc69)

  67. There are still an enormous number of ships sitting in San Francisco Bay waiting to unload. From what I understand, this is also true of the water outside LA/LB.

    A huge chunk of the inflation we’re seeing is driven by supply disruptions caused by the pandemic and by the way states and individuals have responded to the pandemic. The disruptions should *eventually* even out.

    aphrael (4c4719)

  68. https://www.nationalreview.com/the-morning-jolt/the-air-conditioning-covid-19-wave

    …All of the people who are currently unvaccinated were unvaccinated back in May, June, and early July when we weren’t seeing these surges of new patients heading to hospitals. Some of this reflects the spread of the more-contagious Delta variant, but not all of it. By mid June, the Delta strain was 25 percent of all new cases; by July 3, it was 52 percent. In most of these places, cases continued to decline until the second week of July or so.

    What do Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Georgia, South Carolina, Florida, Louisiana, Hawaii, southern California, and Oregon all have in common? They’re all really hot in July and August. (Yup, Oregon’s having intense heat waves this year, too.) Hot temperatures mean that people who aren’t at the beach, lake, or pool are spending more time indoors in air conditioning. More time indoors means more time in close contact with other people. More time in close contact with a COVID-19 variant that is as contagious as chicken pox means you get a faster and more far-reaching spread of the virus.

    There’s a thought I had:

    R0 is not a stable figure. The longer an epidemic goes on, the higher it gets, even without any changes in the virus.

    This should be obvious. As with many other things, “the dose is the poison.”

    That is because the average case gets further along before being beaten back (as most cases are) and tht means the average dosage of viral particles is higher and that means that the infection starts from a later point, and that means cases get worse before being beaten back (or sometimes not – but in a hospital, there may be more limited chances to infect others – the most seriously infected people pass on the disease less than people below that level, provided the hospitals can admit them.

    That;s how you got a very serious epidemic in wuhan, or in northern Italy or in New Delhi.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  69. 69. aphrael (4c4719) — 8/11/2021 @ 10:39 am

    There are still an enormous number of ships sitting in San Francisco Bay waiting to unload. From what I understand, this is also true of the water outside LA/LB.

    And the crews come the United States unvaccinated.

    They are not cruise lines.

    I think there’s some effort to vaccinate the crews.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  70. A huge chunk of the inflation we’re seeing is driven by supply disruptions caused by the pandemic and by the way states and individuals have responded to the pandemic. The disruptions should *eventually* even out.

    As a matter of fact, that is even true when there has only been an increase in demand, as long as there are no permanent limitations on supply.

    Just leave inflation alone, and it will resolve itself. The supply curve will eventually get steeper than the demand curve and inventory control will break down and there will be an excess of supply over demand. That’s what happened in the United States during the late 1940s.

    It was principally inflation that the “do nothing” Congress was doing nothing about. Inflation suddenly vanished in October 1948. Dewey never knew what hit him. Milton Friedman claimed later that the low interest rates were tight money.

    Exception: When people lose faith in the value of the currency. This is measured by the foreign exchange rate.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  71. @67.A glimpse into the future:

    Here’s the deal: President Harris announced that– in what historians will surely call a break with tradition– the body of the late President Biden will be drawn through the streets of Washington to the Capitol Rotunda on a vintage, diesel-fueled, 18-wheeler, flat bed big rig to lay in repose; it will then be transported to a flag-draped commuter car of the 5:15 PM Amtrak local bound for Wilmington, Delaware for cremation. His remains will then be placed in one of his long treasured lunch buckets- a box and Themos combo– for interment at two locations:Scranton, PA and Wilmington, DE.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  72. Texans don’t claim to be the smartest people on the planet. We often learn the hard way. But we don’t like government forcing us to do things because government isn’t that smart either. Giving government more power over our lives could ultimately make our lives worse.

    Most people are smart enough to understand this, even if they don’t agree. Except the Californians.

    DRJ (03cb91)

  73. Texans may not be the brightest bulbs- especially when their power grid freezes up– but they do have the ‘right idea’ when it comes to trying to control the plague crossing at their own border w/Mexico.

    The clear and present danger of President Plagiarist’s policy to allow illegal aliens – literally Covid-ravaged ‘Typhoid Marys’- pour into their state by the thousands, burdening local resources as they spread the bug and themselves into a mask-mandated, vaccine-weary U.S. proper, putting all legal citizens at risk, is the work of a brain-damaged imbecile who is more of a peril to America than PT Barnum ever was.

    He’s a bum.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  74. Texans don’t claim to be the smartest people on the planet. We often learn the hard way. But we don’t like government forcing us to do things because government isn’t that smart either. Giving government more power over our lives could ultimately make our lives worse.

    Most people are smart enough to understand this, even if they don’t agree. Except the Californians.

    Believe it or not, there are plenty of Californians that *are* smart enough to understand this.

    Dana (174549)

  75. Stand proud Texas and don’t let anyone push you around with their womanly fears of virus infection.

    The number of COVID-19 patients in Texas hospitals is accelerating faster than at any other point in the pandemic as the contagious delta variant spreads unchecked, primarily among the unvaccinated.

    https://www.texastribune.org/2021/08/10/texas-hospitals-crisis-covid/

    Time123 (545f4b)

  76. biden’s got a plan, so c’mon texans get with the program

    More than 18 percent of migrant families and 20 percent of unaccompanied minors who recently crossed the U.S. border tested positive for Covid on leaving Border Patrol custody over the past two to three weeks, according to a document prepared this week for a Thursday briefing with President Joe Biden.

    The Biden administration is considering testing all migrants in Border Patrol custody, according to the second document, but CBP, the Border Patrol’s parent agency, does not currently have the testing capability.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/immigration/18-percent-migrant-families-leaving-border-patrol-custody-tested-positive-n1276244

    JF (f71c30)

  77. According to this:
    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1109004/coronavirus-covid19-cases-rate-us-americans-by-state/

    As of August 9th, Texas was in 28th place in case rate with highest rate at #1 North Dakota

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1109011/coronavirus-covid19-death-rates-us-by-state/

    Also as of August 9th
    Texas is #26, tied with Florida in death rate per 100,000 at 185 (which hasn’t changed much) with
    #1 New Jersey checking in at 300 deaths per 100,000, #2 New York at 275

    steveg (ebe7c1)

  78. mission accomplished in texas, now biden’s spreading it around

    https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2021/08/covid-outbreak-at-northwest-ice-detention-center-worsens.html

    An outbreak of COVID-19 cases that started in June at a facility for detained immigrants in Tacoma, Washington, has continued to worsen.

    According to a document submitted to federal court by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Western Washington, the virus surge came as the federal government transferred nearly 1,100 immigrants to the Tacoma detention center in an attempt to relieve overcrowding at holding facilities at the southern border.

    JF (e1156d)

  79. DCSCA (f4c5e5) — 8/11/2021 @ 11:35 am

    President Plagiarist’s policy to allow illegal aliens – literally Covid-ravaged ‘Typhoid Marys’- pour into their state by the thousands,

    He doesn’t have such a policy – which is part of the problem, because he’s not making plans for it. People get released from detention on an “unplanned” basis.

    Now it’s not like he has any choice, because the alternative is the death penalty, direct or indirect. Does anyone think there is a magic wand to wave? Anyone who talks like there is a decision to “allow” has the kind of support of strong government that a Marxist does.

    And there are not so many with Covid, although it is now spiking.

    It’s reached 18% now. While t’s high in Mexico, it could be that the detention period os allowing it to soread.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/immigration/18-percent-migrant-families-leaving-border-patrol-custody-tested-positive-n1276244

    More than 18 percent of migrant families and 20 percent of unaccompanied minors who recently crossed the U.S. border tested positive for Covid on leaving Border Patrol custody over the past two to three weeks, according to a document prepared this week for a Thursday briefing with President Joe Biden.

    Some flights scheduled to deport migrants had more than 25 percent of passengers test positive before departure, leading Immigration and Customs Enforcement to remove those migrants from the flights for quarantine in the U.S., according to the document.

    This is when they leavve BP custody, not when they enter it.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  80. 80.

    An outbreak of COVID-19 cases that started in June at a facility for detained immigrants in Tacoma, Washington, has continued to worsen.

    It doesn’t sound like its a good idea to detain people. And then, after putting people into this petri dish, releasing or transferring them elsewhere because the place had gotten overcrowded. No planing because it is not supposed to happen. (They’re not supposed to be there.)

    They are not using prophylaxis – infusing them with antibodies, because naturally the FDA has not approved this.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  81. @79, you need to look at performance over time.

    Time123 (545f4b)

  82. the caption on the photo below
    Mask mandate OK
    Vaccine mandate OK
    Mandate mentally ill get treatment? HOW DARE YOU!

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E8dj9zYVcAIlvft?format=jpg&name=large

    From Street People of LA

    https://twitter.com/streetpeopleLA/status/1425217724767105026?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet

    steveg (ebe7c1)

  83. I read a piece at PJ Media where someone wonders if forcing a vaccine injection on someone is battery and raises a lot of other questions about forced compliance

    steveg (ebe7c1)

  84. #83

    I believe the words
    “as of August 9th 2021” give a clue and then the charts show data is cumulative.
    You can always click the link for the source materials

    steveg (ebe7c1)

  85. Why is vaccination so far elevated over recovered immunity?
    The data says 25% of the population likely have recovered immunity.
    So why can’t they get an antibody test and be cleared from mask use or vaccine requirements?
    Doesn’t anyone want that data?
    Seems negligent not to have it.
    Vaccination and masking for certain cohorts is unscientific regardless to the masking/vaxxing machine protestations

    steveg (ebe7c1)

  86. Cumulative!=performance over time. My point is that changes over time show that Texas is doing abnormally poorly right now, even if their cumulative performance is close to the US median. Which btw, isn’t good in comparison to other wealthy countries.

    Time123 (545f4b)

  87. The data says 25% of the population likely have recovered immunity.

    The mRNA vaccines, and to a lesser extent the adenovirus vaccines (e.g. J&J), are aimed at proteins common to most (all?) of the strains. Natural immunity is the body’s just-in-time reaction to a single strain. Not only may the antibodies be ineffective against another strain, but Joe and Jim may have developed different antibodies to the same strain, so it’s really hard to say.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  88. By the way, I see all these innumerate “statistics” about hospitalizations, like the one that says that 60% of Israeli hospital admissions for Covid are for vaccinated people, and is used to assert that vaccination is useless.

    These ignore several facts:

    1. The vaccinated patients are all older and were in marginal health beforehand. The unvaccinated patients are generally younger and healtier.

    2. 80% of Israeli adults are vaccianted (and even more among older adults), so, do the math and you find that — ignoring everything else — one is over 2 1/2 times more likely to be hospitalized if you are unvaccinated.

    3. Hospitals may be triaging to accept the vaccinated first.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  89. An interesting point on the testing:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=m53tHJkIQj8

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  90. Trump has refused requests to make vaccine PSAs.

    It’s been more than six months since Donald Trump left office and, despite pleas from multiple friends and advisers, the former president has kept refusing to mount anything resembling a real effort to get his supporters vaccinated.

    As COVID-19 continues to rip through the United States, Trump has done little more than make sporadic gestures toward the vaccine, including when he said he’d “recommend” people get the shot during a Fox News interview, while underscoring at the same time that he respected people’s “freedoms” to not get vaccinated.

    But Trump’s resistance toward truly pushing for people to get the vaccine hasn’t been from lack of trying from some of his allies.

    According to four people who’ve independently spoken to Trump about a potential pro-vaccine campaign, the former president has shown little interest in tying his name to broader efforts to get people inoculated.

    This is having a real impact because, according to this poll, the most vaccine-hesitant are the folks in the counties with highest Trump vote shares.
    Gov. Abbott and other GOP governors aren’t going to push too hard on vaccines when the de facto leader of the GOP won’t do so, and they’re too cowardly to risk his wrath and their election viability by stepping out too far.
    The real question, then, is why he hasn’t done more to get the word out when it’s been demonstrated over and over that the vaccines save lives. Stephen Moore may shrug his shoulders and say “I dunno” but the answer to me is easy: He’d rather sacrifice the lives of his fellow Americans because it’s on Biden’s watch, and he wants to make the current president look bad. It’s not in Trump’s character to make such an unequivocal statement, and is why he’s too immoral and too unpatriotic to ever step in the White House ever again.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  91. Do you have a more recent poll?

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  92. No, BuDuh. This came from a Townhall post yesterday, which linked to a 7/26 news release from UPMC, which linked to the poll results on 7/23.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  93. AUSTIN, Texas — The city of Laredo, Texas, has refused to take in migrants who have been bused in from elsewhere on the border after discovering 40% of them tested positive for the coronavirus, according to two local government officials.

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/texas-city-officials-40-of-migrants-test-positive-for-covid-19

    Trump should send a PSA to the border.

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  94. Unless I am misunderstanding your link at 8:08, the suggestion you are making to Trump is that he needs to offer a PSA to the “highly informed, scientifically literate, and sophisticated in the use of data” group of Americans?

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  95. Yes, you are misunderstanding the link (and didn’t drill down to the actual results). More accurately, you’re going along with Barkoukis’ misleading take. It’s true that PhD’s rival the high-school educated in vaccine hesitancy, but the least hesitant are those with 4-year, professional and masters degrees. She also failed to mention that the most vaccine hesitant (more than PhD’s and the high-school educated) are the folks in counties that had the highest levels of Trump vote shares, more so than the blacks.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  96. So… who does the PSA for the highly educated group that agrees with the high school educated?

    Would the highly educated trust Trump or would they be more skeptical?

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  97. From the study:

    Those with professional degrees (e.g., JD, MBA) and PhDs were the only education groups without a decrease in hesitancy, and by May, those with PhDs had the highest hesitancy. To our knowledge, no other study has evaluated education with this level of granularity, which was possible due to our unusually large sample size (>10,000 participants with PhDs). Further investigation into hesitancy among those with a PhD is warranted.

    January-May, there was a dose-response relationship between relative degree of local Trump support in the 2020 presidential election and hesitancy, that grew slightly over time such that by May those living in counties in the top quartile were 42% more at risk for being hesitant, highlighting the politicization of public health recommendations

    It appears as though the highly educated answered specific questions that allowed the surveyors to have direct data points, however the Trump County Effect is strictly a correlation that doesn’t have the same direct data. Maybe they should have asked the hesitant who received their vote in 2020, rather than treat an entire county as monolithic.

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  98. So… who does the PSA for the highly educated group that agrees with the high school educated?

    Why won’t Trump do a PSA for all the vaccine-hesitant?

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  99. @101 cuz he’s banned from social media?

    JF (e1156d)

  100. Why won’t Trump do a PSA for all the vaccine-hesitant?

    Because for the most part they are his base, and they won’t believe him. Trump is talking out of both sides of his mouth: he endorses vaccination but also endorses the “freedom” not to be vaccinated. Trump supporters view his endorsements as being captured by the “Deep State” and “big pharma.”

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  101. Since they have such a high sample size, what disciplines are most hesitant? Is it biological sciences, or is it sociology or English lit?

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  102. Because for the most part they are his base, and they won’t believe him

    Rip believes that the highly educated are Trump’s base.

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  103. More data from the Washington Post:

    Two-thirds of Americans in highly vaccinated counties now live in coronavirus hot spots, according to an analysis by The Washington Post, as outbreaks of the highly transmissible delta variant — once concentrated in poorly vaccinated pockets — ignite in more populated and immunized areas.

    The Post analysis illustrates how rapidly the state of the pandemic changed in July from a problem for the unvaccinated to a nationwide concern.

    I think almost all of you will find the “Cases in states” graph of interest, where you can see which states are doing especially well, now. And which aren’t.

    My apologies for reposting this, but the “Weekend” post is drawing less attention, and this data is important. I think Dana, for instance, will want to see how Texas is doing, now, compared to other states.

    (Reminder: The Post, to its credit, is making all its stories on the COVID pandemic free.)

    Jim Miller (edcec1)

  104. Since they have such a high sample size, what disciplines are most hesitant? Is it biological sciences, or is it sociology or English lit?

    Does it matter since they are drunk drivers?

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  105. @103 “freedom” in scare quotes, says rip

    either they have the freedom, or they don’t

    which is it?

    do you want to speak out of one side of your mouth, rip?

    JF (e1156d)

  106. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/12/us/coronavirus-migrants-border-covid.html

    when the ny times catches up with the story, you know things are bad in biden’s america

    JF (e1156d)

  107. 109… teh Old, Syphilitic Grey Whoooah may be on her last legs

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  108. 92, Most of the facts are true but the conclusion isn’t.

    And she takes a report that a PCR test can detect a case of Covid somebody recovered from even 70 days ago (which would be rare – it’s an extreme and might even be a sign of a swiftly defeated re-infection) and makes it “several months” She rests her whole argument on that.

    It’s well known that the PCR test does not distinguish between active virus and destroyed virus and is basically too sensitive. But people who test positive stop testing positive after far less than 70 days so this is not the cause of high rates of Covid.

    Yes, someone who got sick and had previously had a mild Covid case might have their flu attributed to Covid if that was the only thing tested for, and if they don;t look at the strength of the positive result.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  109. @101 cuz he’s banned from social media?

    As if that’s the only way an ex-president can communicate.
    Trump has over $100 million in “Stop the Steal” money. Are you seriously telling me he can’t part with a few million and buy some TV ads? He’s the self-professed greatest negotiator ever. Surely he can cut a deal.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  110. Some of this data is stunning. 25% of ALL respondents say they are concerned about an allergic reaction, although these are extremely rare. It’s like saying you are worried to send you child to school because of the (vanishingly small) chance of a mass shooter.

    The statistics for PhD show mostly that people with PhDs are unwilling to listen to other people. Aain, I would like to know what disciplines are represented in this. Education?

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  111. Trump is talking out of both sides of his mouth: he endorses vaccination but also endorses the “freedom” not to be vaccinated.

    I agree, Rip. Trump’s character will not allow him to make an unconditional pro-vaccine statement, and that’s the problem.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  112. Does it matter since they are drunk drivers?

    WOW! What an amazingly non-sensical response. Your resentments do your typing now?

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  113. But people who test positive stop testing positive after far less than 70 days so this is not the cause of high rates of Covid.

    Where do I find the actual timeframe?

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  114. 109. I notie that the New York Times (besides noting that the general upsurge in Covid is not coming from migrants) hasn’t hit upon the flaw in the statistics.

    They are being tested after being in U.S. custody for some time

    It’s the United States government that is giving them Covid.

    It should test them, first thing and then again three days later. And then when you quarantine people, don;t quarantine them together in enclosed spaces.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  115. Everyone who doesn’t get a vaccine is a drunk driver according to you, Kevin.

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  116. So… who does the PSA for the highly educated group that agrees with the high school educated

    You misread that. “≤high school” does not mean they attended high school.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  117. *” ≤ high school”

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  118. Hmmm not all html works here

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  119. Aain, I would like to know what disciplines are represented in this. Education?

    At the bottom of the text portion of the link are multiple references. The link to Delphi seems to go to a whole mess of information that I don’t have time to go through. Maybe it is there?

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  120. Everyone who doesn’t get a vaccine is a drunk driver according to you, Kevin.

    So what? There are statistics among drunk drivers, too. If PhD’s were a large portion of them, it would also be interesting.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  121. It should test them, first thing and then again three days later.

    NO, it should give them a J&J shot immediately, possibly before asking their name.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  122. In interviews, Black men and women said that much of their distrust of the coronavirus vaccine was shaped by their own experiences with discrimination or their identity as Black Americans…

    “They came out with one so fast for Covid, and now they want to pay you to take it,” [one black man] said. “It seems fishy.”…

    “It takes a little bit of hyper-vigilance when you’re a woman of color,” said Jazmine Shavuo-Goodwin, 31, who believes she encountered medical racism when doctors were dismissive of her severe stomach problems. “There’s a lot of homework you have to do, because your doctors may not truly listen to you, to your full complaint, before they’ve already diagnosed you.”…

    Many Black New Yorkers struggled to make sense of why their community suffered so in that first wave. Some of the fears about the vaccine go back centuries, through the nation’s long history of medical experimentation on Black enslaved people and later on Black citizens.

    In interviews, some Black New Yorkers mentioned the government’s decades-long Tuskegee syphilis experiment — in which doctors withheld treatment from Black men with syphilis. Distrust for the vaccine has also been reinforced by contemporary injustices.

    In interviews, a number of Black New Yorkers wondered how vaccines for Covid-19 could have emerged so quickly, but not one for H.I.V., which has disproportionately affected Black Americans….

    One of the three vaccines — the single-shot Johnson & Johnson — had been directed to Black and Latino communities, among other places…. [I]n April, the federal government ordered a brief suspension of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine after it was linked to blood clots in the brains of several women.
    “It reaffirmed my hesitance, it reaffirmed everything,” Ms. Shavuo-Goodwin, the graduate student and clinic manager, said. “It just shows Black lives don’t matter. You can test that on us just like you tested syphilis on us.”

    https://althouse.blogspot.com/2021/08/since-when-does-america-give-anything.html

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  123. Everyone who doesn’t get a vaccine is a drunk driver according to you, Kevin.

    Sober up.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  124. Everyone who doesn’t get a vaccine is a drunk driver according to you, Kevin.

    No, they are just criminally irresponsible LIKE a drunk driver.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  125. Those damn red-staters!

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  126. 96. There;s no way that 40% of a group of migrants would test positive for Covid-19 at the same time unless they were in what amounts to a petri dish.

    And they were.

    They were “dropped off by the Border Patrol”

    And only tested then.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  127. I should also point out this paper is not peer-reviewed.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  128. The Tuskeegee study only had about 120 people enrolled in it and ended 49 years ago. It has more to do with low class than with race, although at that time, Africans Americans in the deep south were all low class.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  129. The J&J vaccine was being directed toward more vaccine hesitant people because to be considered “fully vaccinated” you would only have to give one shot. “One and done” It was also given to Orthodox Jews at Landau’s synagogue in Brooklyn.

    They also wanted to give it to homebound people.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  130. Trump is talking out of both sides of his mouth: he endorses vaccination but also endorses the “freedom” not to be vaccinated.

    Yeah!!! That ‘freedom of choice’ thingy is such double-talk, ain’t it:

    “You can have any color you want, so long as it’s black.” – ‘Model T maker’ Henry Ford, conservative capitalist.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  131. The questionnaire they used is here (PDF). No question about discipline of study was asked. Considering the obstinacy of the PhD group, I think it’s highly relevant.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  132. @132: You only have to find/convince them once. It also stores a lot better.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  133. The whole right wing talk radio eco system is pretending that migrants coming from Mexico had such high rates of Covid positive test results when they first entered the United States. It was probably 2% to 5% but the Border Patrol managed to infect 5 to ten times as many.

    Sammy Finkelman (51cd0c)

  134. NO, it should give them a J&J shot immediately, possibly before asking their name.

    A S&W shot the moment they cross the border and break into the country illegally is much more effective. 😉

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  135. This is where the 70 day figure comes from, Sammy:

    Coronavirus tests are giving people positive results even when they had the virus 70 days ago, an Oxford University academic has warned, amid fears they are too sensitive.

    Prof Carl Heneghan, director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, said eight days after contracting Covid-19, the chances the infected person will pass the virus on “goes down to zero” if they have no symptoms.

    However, he said fragments of the virus can still remain in the body for many weeks afterwards – with some studies showing intermittent shedding up to 70 days later – leading to a positive test and skewing the real picture of how many people are at risk of passing on the virus.

    The warning comes after spikes in cases across the UK have led to local lockdowns, despite no increase in hospital admissions, leading to speculation that people are needlessly being told to quarantine.

    “After about day eight, you can still find the RNA fragments,” Prof Heneghan to BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

    “Some studies have reported up to 70 days that you intermittently shed. You can understand the importance of this, because what you want to do is find those with active infection and not those with RNA fragments.”

    He said it’s “one part of the explanation” why more cases are being identified but hospital admissions are not going up – combined with more young people contracting the virus and not being as badly affected.

    “Asymptomatics could have had the infection six to eight weeks ago and are still shedding virus intermittently, which we can do through faeces and respiratory samples,” he said.

    “It’s incredibly important we get highly accurate data so we can understand whether the infection is going up or down. At the moment what we’re picking up is a lot of noise

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/coronavirus/coronavirus-tests-too-sensitive-oxford-university-academic-warns/ar-BB18K98U

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  136. There;s no way that 40% of a group of migrants would test positive for Covid-19 at the same time unless they were in what amounts to a petri dish.

    Yes, this is because they were bathed, masked, and socially distant on their entire journey until the evil border patrol got their grubby hands on them.

    BuDuh (7bca93)

  137. Because for the most part they are his base, and they won’t believe him

    Rip believes that the highly educated are Trump’s base.

    BuDuh (7bca93) — 8/12/2021 @ 9:27 am

    I do know some otherwise highly educated people who are Trump supporters.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  138. @103 “freedom” in scare quotes, says rip

    either they have the freedom, or they don’t

    which is it?

    do you want to speak out of one side of your mouth, rip?

    JF (e1156d) — 8/12/2021 @ 9:31 am

    They aren’t scare quotes, Trump has frequently spoken about the freedom of choice not to be vaccinated.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  139. “I would recommend it and I would recommend it to a lot of people that don’t want to get it and a lot of those people voted for me, frankly,” Trump said in an unscheduled call-in interview on Fox News. “But again, we have our freedoms and we have to live by that and I agree with that also. But it is a great vaccine. It is a safe vaccine and it is something that works.”

    Source

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  140. “Don’t tell me to open my umbrella! Tell Biden to stop the rain!”

    nk (1d9030)

  141. @142 thanks for reminding us trump is pro-vaccine

    JF (e1156d)

  142. genius

    Republican lawmakers on Thursday introduced the Vaccine Passport and Voter ID Harmonization Act, legislation that would require states mandating vaccine passports to also mandate voter ID requirements.

    https://dailycaller.com/2021/08/12/vaccine-passports-voter-id-kevin-cramer-covid/

    JF (e1156d)

  143. @142 thanks for reminding us trump is pro-vaccine

    JF (e1156d) — 8/12/2021 @ 12:05 pm

    Most people here have never said Trump was anti-vaccine, just that his support is lukewarm.

    His supporters, on the other hand …..

    Americans who voted for former President Trump last year are 10 times more likely than those who cast their ballot for President Biden to say they don’t ever plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19, according to a new Fox News poll out Thursday.

    Thirty-two percent of Trump voters say they have no plans to receive one of the three coronavirus vaccines available in the U.S., compared to only 3 percent of Biden voters, the poll found.

    Eighty-six percent of Biden voters say they’ve already been vaccinated, while 54 percent of Trump voters said the same.
    ……..

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  144. “Don’t tell me to open my umbrella! Tell Biden to stop the rain!”

    Sweet Baby Jesus… lawyers and umbrellas… I wonder how many liability lawsuits resulting from faulty mechanisms or too pointy points have yet to be filed.

    Now snakes, on the other hand…

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)


Powered by WordPress.

Page loaded in: 0.3372 secs.