Patterico's Pontifications

12/28/2020

Trump Allows Unemployment Benefits to Expire for No Particular Reason

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 8:29 am



The Succeeding New York Times:

President Trump on Sunday abruptly signed a measure providing $900 billion in pandemic aid and funding the government through September, ending last-minute turmoil he himself had created over legislation that will offer an economic lifeline to millions of Americans and avert a government shutdown.

The legislative package will provide billions of dollars for the distribution of vaccines, funds for schools, small businesses, hospitals and American families, and money needed to keep the government open for the remainder of the fiscal year. The enactment came less than 48 hours before the government would have shut down and just days before an eviction moratorium and other critical pandemic relief provisions were set to expire.

But it also came after two critical unemployment programs lapsed, guaranteeing a delay in benefits for millions of unemployed Americans.

The crisis was one of Mr. Trump’s own making, after he blindsided lawmakers and White House officials with a videotaped implicit threat on Tuesday to veto the package, which his top deputies had helped negotiate and which had cleared both chambers of Congress with overwhelming bipartisan support nearly a week ago. The 5,593-page legislation was flown to Florida, where the president is spending the winter holidays, on Thursday and had been waiting for Mr. Trump’s signature since.

The lapse will result in real hardship for real people, who are in most cases suffering through no fault of their own — and there appears to have been absolutely no reason to wait until just after the lapse in benefits to sign. Just the typical erratic behavior from this lout.

It’s the exact same bill he had just finished refusing to sign, calling it a “disgrace.” His opposition has been comically stupid, with the stupidity reaching its grandest heights when Trump made a long speech decrying foreign aid allotments that were in every case almost to the penny what he himself had requested in his own budget proposal. Now Trump has indicated he will send a redlined version of the bill back to Congress with a list of specific items to which he objects and wants deleted. I’m sure they’ll get right on that.

Counting the days until he is gone.

130 Responses to “Trump Allows Unemployment Benefits to Expire for No Particular Reason”

  1. They are suffering because of the decisions of politicians to make them suffer for the benefit of “the community.”

    The more people connect their hardship to the government, the better.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  2. Trump put out the fire of his own making, unfortunately millions of Americans got burned in the process.

    Rip Murdock (80e6b4)

  3. POLITICO Playbook: Trump got nothing
    THAT’S IT? President DONALD TRUMP made all this noise about the Covid relief and government funding bill only to sign it and get nothing in return?

    TRUMP got taken to the cleaners.

    WHAT A BIZARRE, embarrassing episode for the president. He opposed a bill his administration negotiated. He had no discernible strategy and no hand to play — and it showed. He folded, and got nothing besides a few days of attention and chaos. People waiting for aid got a few days of frightening uncertainty.

    ZIP. ZERO. ZILCH. If he was going to give up this easy, he should’ve just kept quiet and signed the bill. It would’ve been less embarrassing.
    ……
    ……In his Sunday evening statement, Senate Majority Leader MITCH MCCONNELL didn’t even mention anything that TRUMP got in return for signing this bill.

    THIS IS PROBABLY THE MOST FITTING coda to TRUMP’S presidency, and a neat encapsulation of his relationship with Congress. He never cared to understand the place and was disengaged from its work.
    …….
    My emphasis. Attention and chaos is what Trump wanted, not caring about the consequences of his actions (as he never has).

    Rip Murdock (80e6b4)

  4. Gitmo the mother-figure!

    nk (1d9030)

  5. On the bright side, that’s $1,400 less of our children’s money that his faithful will have to send to him.

    nk (1d9030)

  6. If in the end Trump gets anything out of this, it might only be erosion of support among his base. Sure, there are some who would stand by him if he shot someone on Fifth Avenue, but there must be some among them who have been negatively affected by this latest drama. I like to think that some, too, have caught on by now to the fact that most of his fund raising for “legal defense” has simply fed a growing slush fund with few strings attached.

    Roger (782680)

  7. Where humans are involved, it can always be worse. No, I’m not bitter; more like jaded/sorely tested. 2020 was a looong year.

    felipe (630e0b)

  8. @6 – I wouldn’t count on it. What passes for the intelligentsia of the #MAGA set will criticize him, and then as soon as they start losing market share to the more slavish devotees they’ll change the subject to how democrats want to force your children to carry illegal immigrants to voting centers and Trump alone can stop it.

    (Not That) Bill O'Reilly (6bb12a)

  9. I am constantly surprised that he still has capable people working for him. They must love their country dearly to put up with this man.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  10. WHAT A BIZARRE, embarrassing episode for the president.

    Compared to what?

    Have you ever been in a relationship that you hoped would get better, but always got worse?

    You have now.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  11. They must love their country dearly to put up with this man.

    Comedy gold! The only thing they love is themselves (and turning a buck).

    Rip Murdock (80e6b4)

  12. The really sad thing about this administration is that there were many people who had been marginalized and many things that needed correction in government. In four years, Trump has fixed none of these problems. At best he’s smashed a few things that needed smashing, along with several that didn’t, but he’s been unable to build anything on the rubble.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  13. HAT’S IT? President DONALD TRUMP made all this noise about the Covid relief and government funding bill only to sign it and get nothing in return?

    So, I’d like to see how much money his PAC (established days after the election) raked in as a result of his latest theatrics. Clearly, he acted as if he truly had hard-working Americans first and foremost in his mind. Did his base believe that – yet again – he was the only one championing them, and the only one willing to stop the government, if necessary, to fight for them? It seems that whenever he plays that particular card, the money starts rolling in. Why would this be any different?

    Dana (cc9481)

  14. Comedy gold! The only thing they love is themselves (and turning a buck).

    There is a line of good men who tried to work with Trump — someone had to steer the boat while the captain was looking for his strawberries. Some have stayed, some were fired, most have left. That gonifs have risen to the top only reinforces the idea that better men should have stayed.

    It’s easy to walk away and wash your hands of it, it’s much harder to stay and block the crazy.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  15. The (NY) Post says: Give it up, Mr. President — for your sake and the nation’s

    Front page headline: “Mr. President…..Stop the Insanity”

    Rip Murdock (80e6b4)

  16. If Trump does nothing he loses.
    He’s not embarrassed by trying stupid things.
    So he’s doing random, stupid things to try and create opportunities

    Time123 (130539)

  17. So he’s doing random, stupid things to try and create opportunities

    This goes with my point at 13: I think it’s safe to say that any opportunities he is trying to carve out consistently start and stop with an eye on how he might most benefit. First, financially. Secondly, building the Trump Brand. By *appearing* as if he is fighting for his base provides them with a great reason to send him their money. It’s just more of the same old grift. Although I agreed with his video where he expresses his disgust with the bill, I never thought his motivation was anything but it always is, and always has been. I think people make a big mistake if they don’t recognize his base motivations always remain the same. I also think it’s a big mistake if people don’t recognize that his loyal supporters are now willingly wired to react accordingly. It’s not about political strategery, or clever maneuvering to benefit the party. It’s just about Trump sticking it to the GOP and cleaning out the swamp while appearing to be the last fighter for his base.

    Dana (cc9481)

  18. Counting the days indeed. More like counting the weeks. This is all about the runoffs in Georgia, where Trump is planning on holding a rally. To what point? He’s not on the ticket, and he has no coattails.

    Trump is not even pretending to be president anymore. The Republicans want to maintain control of the Senate, so they can reign in Biden. That’s what this is all about, ruining the Biden presidency, making the transfer of power more and more difficult.

    Twenty years ago if you had told me that Biden would win a primary, I would have laughed in your face. If you told me I would vote for him, I would have backslapped you in the face.

    But he did win the primaries, and I did vote for him. First time in my life I ever voted for a Democrat. I’m no fan of Biden, but getting Trump out of office is all important.

    Where are the Republicans? I mean seriously, who is willing to stand up against this fraud president?

    They’re all cowards, and they’re all cowering to the base, the Trump base. As long as they continue to assign their name to that brand, they will continue to lose.

    Trump cannot handle losing, neither can his cult base. But it’s over. The election is over, and Trump lost. The Republicans actually gained seats, but that doesn’t matter. It’s all about the 2022 midterm elections.

    If the Republicans follow Trump, the will lose. Because Trump always loses. He’s a failed businessman, and a failed president.

    Gawain's Ghost (b25cd1)

  19. I imagine that most of Trump’s actions can be explained by Jared Kushner’s stock market trades the day before.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  20. If the Republicans follow Trump, they will lose

    If the follow Trump the Man, you are certainly correct. If someone who knows what they are doing addresses the issues that Trump left unsolved, I think they will do well. They’ll do better if Trump will STFU.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  21. If someone who knows what they are doing addresses the issues that Trump left unsolved, I think they will do well.

    But the catch is that Trump’s issues are unsolvable, as framed by Trump. Better, cheaper healthcare that leaves doctors’ livelihoods untouched is literally impossible. A dynamic, innovative economy is unachievable without relatively open borders and trade.

    Other politicians have downplayed or otherwise danced around the tradeoffs associated with their policy goals; Trump is among the first to confidently assert tradeoffs literally do not exist. Anyone who knows what they are doing won’t be able to follow in his footsteps with a straight face.

    (Not That) Bill O'Reilly (6bb12a)

  22. Totally blame Nancy and Mitch. Nobody told them to wait to the last minute to stuff a thousand pounds of sh-t in a ten pound lazy-azzed omnibus bag. Nor did anybody tell them to dick around for half a year and quill legislation w/program expiration dates at the rush-rush-get-it-done holidays. And it is one of he reasons Trump was elected in the first place. The Executive proposes and the Congress disposes. And the corporatist delegates to his/her team; no top exec can possibly know the hourly detail of how or what is ground into the pork sausage– nor would we want a Carteresque micromanager doing so [recall Jimma’s detailed schedule work for play times on the WH tennis courts?!?!]

    No way. This bag-o-crap is wholly on the swamp creatures.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  23. 8. 11. They must love their country dearly to put up with this man. A lot of them, at higher levels, could get other jobs. And it is hard work to work around him.

    Now one woman wrote an Op-ed in the New York Times that she was sorry. It would have been better for Trump to fail in court.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/20/opinion/trump-justice-department-lawyer.html

    …My job was to tailor the administration’s executive actions to make them lawful — in narrowing them, I could also make them less destructive. I remained committed to trying to uphold my oath even as the president refused to uphold his.

    But there was a trade-off: We attorneys diminished the immediate harmful impacts of President Trump’s executive orders — but we also made them more palatable to the courts…

    …After the Supreme Court’s June 2018 decision upholding the third Muslim ban, I reviewed my own portfolio — which included matters targeting noncitizens, dismantling the Civil Service and camouflaging the president’s corruption — overcome with fear that I was doing more harm than good. By Thanksgiving of that year, I had left my job.

    Still, I felt I was abandoning the ship. I continued to believe that a critical mass of responsible attorneys staying in government might provide a last line of defense against the administration’s worst instincts. Even after I left, I advised others that they could do good by staying. News reports about meaningful pushback by Justice Department attorneys seemed to confirm this thinking.

    I was wrong.

    Watching the Trump campaign’s attacks on the election results, I now see what might have happened if, rather than nip and tuck the Trump agenda, responsible Justice Department attorneys had collectively — ethically, lawfully — refused to participate in President Trump’s systematic attacks on our democracy from the beginning. The attacks would have failed.

    I;m not sure what she’s talking about. What does she mean?

    She seems to be attributing Trump’s failures in election litigation to having second rate lawyers.

    Sammy Finkelman (081278)

  24. The weirdest thing about this political episode is how many people believe that the most self-centered, petty, sniveling president in history is really the most valiant, self-sacrificing patriot the nation has ever seen — like Churchill and Christ rolled into one.

    I peak into Trumper Twitter and comment boards sometimes, and the faith in Trump is absolutely religious. Trump is the unquestioned measure of goodness and truth. Anyone and anything that doesn’t serve Trump is consigned to the camp of evil. Like all cult followers, Trumpers don’t recognize they’re part of a cult, but believe that they alone see the truth clearly while everyone else is deceived by “the media.” There is no way of persuading them otherwise.

    Radegunda (b6cc34)

  25. This kind of trouble from Trump is over maybe. They probably won’t need Trump’s signature on anything, or at least anything important any more, at least not on a bill..

    After the current Congress adjourns sine die the new Congress will meet on January 6 to count the Electoral votes, and then not meet again (as a body – committees will be holding hearings) until January 20.

    With regard to the missed payments, they probably should be eligible to get back pay.

    Sammy Finkelman (081278)

  26. “Swamp creatures” = anyone who doesn’t worship at the altar of Trump. It’s pretty funny to see such a self-serving cheat and chronic liar being portrayed as the only truly honest person in D.C.

    Radegunda (b6cc34)

  27. 15. On 770 AM WABC radio’s Curtis Sliwa with someone else show they said Donald Trump’s reads the printed paper – you can get the New York Post in Florida – so this was aimed at Donald Trump’s eyes.

    The New York Post said Trump should be paying attention to the Georgia elections – January 5 – rather than January 6.

    It’s not too likely to help because it is not aimed at his heart.

    Sammy Finkelman (081278)

  28. 18. Gawain’s Ghost (b25cd1) — 12/28/2020 @ 11:28 am

    Where are the Republicans? I mean seriously, who is willing to stand up against this fraud president?

    They’re all cowards, and they’re all cowering to the base, the Trump base.

    But Trump, if he gets at least one Repuublican Senator, may leave them no choice but to stand up to him.

    One day AFTER the Georgia runoffs.

    Jon Ossoff consistently polls one percentage point ahead of Raphael Warnock.

    Sammy Finkelman (081278)

  29. @24. The weirdest thing is how cheaply Americans can be bought; sex, gadgets—on in this case, $600.

    That likely wouldn’t by you an hour of ‘playtime’ w/Stormy.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  30. ^buy

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  31. DCSCA:

    If Mitch was continuing with the fiction that the election is yet undecided, you know that Trump would have accepted the $600 with nary a tweet.

    The payback is transparent. Trump could have weighed in on many occasions to make sure everyone got $2,000, if that is what he really wanted.

    Appalled (1a17de)

  32. Can anybody show me where in Article 1 Section 8 of the enumerated federal powers of the constitution that any of the stimulus is allowed? For that matter most of this 5,600 page omnibus bill?

    It’s compassionate to want to give people who are hurting because of the governments own actions financial relief. However, this is like the government breaking your legs then giving you crutches so you can walk. They are now saying because of the government you can walk, but they were the people who broke your legs in the first place.

    It is only an overly expensive view of some clauses in the enumerated powers that allow some of this. It’s just not there. I’m sorry it doesn’t seem compassionate, but if you want to give the federal government that kind of power create an amendment. That’s the way it supposed to be done.

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  33. Totally blame Nancy and Mitch.

    It’s as if Trump’s negotiator and voice in the room, SecTreas Mnuchin, was not involved in the development of this bill. Trump gets his share of blame, too.

    Paul Montagu (77c694)

  34. Now that Trump has folded on the Covid relief bill, my guess is that he’ll pardon Assange, Snowden and himself on the day Congress overrides his veto on the Defense Act, and there will be nothing left for him to do after that. He might as well retreat to Mar-A-Lago and rage-tweet.

    Paul Montagu (77c694)

  35. The lapse will result in real hardship for real people, …

    Maybe this wasn’t an oversight or a lapse. Maybe this is exactly what Trump wants: To make sure there will be suffering after he is no longer President. Most Americans will remember Trump wanted to give them $2000 but had to settle for less because the Deep State said No. They won’t know or care about the timing of how this happened. They will only remember Trump wanted to give more.

    DRJ (aede82)

  36. They will only remember Trump wanted to give more.

    Trump cares far more about getting credit than about getting the job done.

    Radegunda (b6cc34)

  37. Trump knows the Senate won’t back him up so this could also be about making the GOP Senate the scapegoat when it refuses to go along with the Democratic House if it passes a bill for more pandemic relief. Trump wants to punish everyone but especially GOP politicians who don’t crown him King.

    DRJ (aede82)

  38. Trump will no longer be in office. He needs to stay relevant, both in case he wants to run again and in order to make money off his views/influence. The only way he will be relevant is if people think only he can help them. This is about convincing people Trump is the only one who will stand up to Republicans and Democrats.

    DRJ (aede82)

  39. It doesn’t matter that he is ineffective. This is another example of where “He fights” is all that matters.

    DRJ (aede82)

  40. But the catch is that Trump’s issues are unsolvable, as framed by Trump. Better, cheaper healthcare that leaves doctors’ livelihoods untouched is literally impossible.

    Like, “getting Mexico to pay for the wall” you are picking and choosing what you wish to ridicule.

    Go talk to the millions of American men and women who are not suited for college degrees and have to compete for jobs with third world immigrants with low expectations. Tradesmen, as a group, have been badly treated by both parties, as have the former manufacturing workers. SUre, they can retrain, but most of the jobs they retrain to are very low wage.

    Not everyone can code (and imho most who do are very bad at it).

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  41. It is only an overly expensive view of some clauses in the enumerated powers that allow some of this

    Well, “Regulate interstate commerce” and “necessary and proper” come to mind. That last is pretty elastic.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  42. > At best he’s smashed a few things that needed smashing, along with several that didn’t, but he’s been unable to build anything on the rubble.

    i mean, this pretty much sums up his life, too.

    aphrael (4c4719)

  43. > To make sure there will be suffering after he is no longer President.

    this isn’t a word i use much, but if that *is* the motive — if his *goal* is to make people suffer so that they blame the suffering on someone else and he looks good by comparison — then he is simply *evil* and should be driven from public life posthaste.

    aphrael (4c4719)

  44. Like all cult followers, Trumpers don’t recognize they’re part of a cult, but believe that they alone see the truth clearly while everyone else is deceived by “the media.” There is no way of persuading them otherwise.

    The power of the invisible conspiracy is that it’s unfalsifiable.

    lurker (d8c5bc)


  45. Not everyone can code (and imho most who do are very bad at it).

    Kevin M (ab1c11) — 12/28/2020 @ 2:59 pm

    Kevin,

    You’re right. I was a programmer for 35 years and interviewed many with a master’s in computer science who were horrible programmers. One of the best programmers I ever hired was the mail clerk at the company for which I worked. While I have also worked with many great programmers who have computer science degrees I don’t think it is the be-all end-all to be a good computer programmer. I believe customer service lessons learned at a fast food restaurant are more important. If you don’t listen to the customer you can’t give them a program that meets their needs.

    Seems like some of you commenting are mind readers. Just how do you know what a person is thinking or their intentions?

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  46. I believe Trump is the result of a glitch in the subliminal messaging from the Florida Citrus Growers Association sent directly into people’s heads through 5G towers. We were supposed to like orange juice. Orange juice!

    nk (1d9030)

  47. Can anybody show me where in Article 1 Section 8 of the enumerated federal powers of the constitution that any of the stimulus is allowed? For that matter most of this 5,600 page omnibus bill?

    Is anyone going to attempt to answer my question?

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  48. Ok nk, you made me laugh.

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  49. Looks like the House called Trump’s bluff. Onto the Senate, where the GOP will knock it down.
    This will give Trump some measure of revenge against McConnell (for disloyally calling it for Biden), but it will likely repel more voters away from Loeffler-Perdue and hurt the GOP. Strategy backfire for Trump, because his petulance and general cruelty will only blow up in his face.

    Paul Montagu (77c694)

  50. Paul, if Trump could just think two moves ahead, he would have realized that this is a massive gift to Biden. If Biden has a more friendly D senate it completely changes how powerful he is, how effective he is, how easily he can deal with committees or get things done.

    Combined with Lin Wood’s little operation for republicans to get the GOP vote total negative in Georgia, to ‘prove to SCOTUS’ Trump won, and it’s really as though the democrats have taken over the GOP and are ramming it into a wall over and over.

    Dustin (4237e0)

  51. State policies are what are causing the unemployment (lockdowns, etc.).
    Why should the federal government be spending any money on easing the pain that the individual states are inflicting on themselves?

    kaf (8a543d)

  52. Can anybody show me where in Article 1 Section 8 of the enumerated federal powers of the constitution that any of the stimulus is allowed? For that matter most of this 5,600 page omnibus bill?

    Is anyone going to attempt to answer my question?

    Regulation of interstate commerce, combined with the 16th Amendment and the tax and spend powers of Article I, Section 8, Clause 1, of the U.S. Constitution:

    “The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States.”

    The spending power has been held to be plenary if tied to another enumerated power such as interstate commerce. But it could as easily be tied to the war power (and it has been) or the protection of civil rights, interstate travel, and patents and copyrights.

    nk (1d9030)

  53. Is anyone going to attempt to answer my question?

    Article II, Section 8, which begins with “The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States” and ends with the following: “To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.”

    Also Section 9, “No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of Appropriations made by Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time to time.”

    And Article VI, “This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.”

    See also Amendments XIV, XV, XIX, XXIII,XXIV, and XXVI, all of which include the authority to Congress “to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions” of each amendment.

    Rip Murdock (80e6b4)

  54. Trump is a Republican In Name Only. He esteems the Republican Party only as his spear carrier and cupbearer. He could not possibly care less how it fares without him. Which is to his credit, actually.

    nk (1d9030)

  55. Is anyone going to attempt to answer my question?
    Tanny O’Haley (8a06bc) — 12/28/2020 @ 3:31 pm

    I second NK’s post – the general welfare clause of the Constitution.

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but sound as if you are not a big fan of that clause. As a strict Constitutionalist (as you seem), you know how to remedy that…

    Hoi Polloi (139bf6)

  56. Tanny, I answered you back in #42. There’s more but I think those two are enough.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  57. I think Rip’s answer is a kitchen sink approach. He was done after the first paragraph. Not sure how an amendment to require equality before the law justifies a $600 check, especially as some do not get one.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  58. the general welfare clause of the Constitution.

    The preamble is just throat-clearing. No powers are derived from that (or at least shouldn’t be). It no more means that “welfare” payments are OK than it means General George Welfare must be promoted.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  59. Article I, Section 8, Clause 1, of the U.S. Constitution:

    “The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States.”

    contains words from the Preamble but it is not throat clearing.

    nk (1d9030)

  60. I think Rip’s answer is a kitchen sink approach. He was done after the first paragraph. Not sure how an amendment to require equality before the law justifies a $600 check, especially as some do not get one.

    You’re right-I wanted to cover all the bases of Congressional authority. Tanny also asked about the entire omnibus bill, and I’m sure you can find in my “kitchen sink” that whatever is in the 5,000+ pages, authority can be found in one of the Articles or amendments.

    Rip Murdock (80e6b4)

  61. The Necessary and Proper Clause, Article I, Section 8, Clause 18,

    To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof

    first requires an enumerated power that Tanny was asking about.

    nk (1d9030)

  62. [I]n United States v. Butler, (297 U.S. 1, 1936) the Court gave its unqualified endorsement to Hamilton’s views on the taxing power. Justice Roberts wrote for the Court:

    “Since the foundation of the Nation sharp differences of opinion have persisted as to the true interpretation of the phrase. Madison asserted it amounted to no more than a reference to the other powers enumerated in the subsequent clauses of the same section; that, as the United States is a government of limited and enumerated powers, the grant of power to tax and spend for the general national welfare must be confined to the enumerated legislative fields committed to the Congress. In this view the phrase is mere tautology, for taxation and appropriation are or may be necessary incidents of the exercise of any of the enumerated legislative powers. Hamilton, on the other hand, maintained the clause confers a power separate and distinct from those later enumerated, is not restricted in meaning by the grant of them, and Congress consequently has a substantive power to tax and to appropriate, limited only by the requirement that it shall be exercised to provide for the general welfare of the United States. Each contention has had the support of those whose views are entitled to weight. This court has noticed the question, but has never found it necessary to decide which is the true construction. Mr. Justice Story, in his Commentaries, espouses the Hamiltonian position. We shall not review the writings of public men and commentators or discuss the legislative practice. Study of all these leads us to conclude that the reading advocated by Mr. Justice Story is the correct one. While, therefore, the power to tax is not unlimited, its confines are set in the clause which confers it, and not in those of § 8 which bestow and define the legislative powers of the Congress. It results that the power of Congress to authorize expenditure of public moneys for public purposes is not limited by the direct grants of legislative power found in the Constitution.”

    By and large, it is for Congress to determine what constitutes the “general welfare.” The Court accords great deference to Congress’s decision that a spending program advances the general welfare, and has even questioned whether the restriction is judicially enforceable. Dispute, such as it is, turns on the conditioning of funds.

    Source. My emphasis, and footnotes omitted.

    Rip Murdock (80e6b4)

  63. The relief funds are not fundamentally different from FEMA providing emergency food, shelter, evacuation, etc, to people in an area hit by hurricane, earthquake, or any other natural disaster.

    In this case the natural disaster is a pandemic.

    Dave (1bb933)

  64. ob·scu·rant·ism
    /əbˈskyo͝orənˌtizəm,äbˈskyo͝orənˌtizəm,ˌäbskyəˈranˌtizəm/
    noun
    the practice of deliberately preventing the facts or full details of something from becoming known.

    “The essential element in the black art of obscurantism is not that it wants to darken individual understanding, but that it wants to blacken our picture of the world, and darken our idea of existence.” — Friedrich Nietzsche

    nk (1d9030)

  65. 47, hard to believe the long-time though long-ago patrons of Anita Bryant would entrust their marketing to a Roy Cohn minion.

    urbanleftbehind (036b24)

  66. 5G is a collaborative endeavor of the vast left-wing, globalist, collectivist, vegan, Section 230 tech giants, urbanleftbehind. They entrusted nothing to Trump, he was just a coding error.

    nk (1d9030)

  67. There’s a theory being circulated that the AT&T building in Nashville was hit by a missile instead of being damaged by a bomb. (!!!???)

    Apparently after hitting TWA Flight 800, the missile was captured by a time warp and emerged 24 years five months 7 days and 9 hours later in Nashville, Tennessee.

    No, they are not saying that but this isn’t that far away from that. Somebody truly wants to make some people be ridiculous.

    Sammy Finkelman (081278)

  68. Obscurantism. When people were illiterate, isolated, and living hand to mouth, they could simply be kept ignorant. With universal literacy, wide-spread means of communication, and an above-subsistence standard of life, it is necessary to keep them functionally ignorant by bombarding them with propaganda and disinformation so that they do not know what to believe.

    nk (1d9030)

  69. I believe we should go back to the plain reading of the US Constitution. Before FDR the commerce clause was tightly controlled and did not allow the federal government to do anything they feel like doing. Because of the Supreme Court during the FDR administration we have the tragedy of the Wickard v. Filburn decision. I believe David Barton has a good take on the commerce clause.

    It’s to be able to regulate or make regular between states. Texas has a lot of vineyards and so does California. If Texas outlawed California wine the federal government could step in and say no Texas under the commerce clause you cannot do that.

    Regulate does not mean micromanage.

    https://wallbuilderslive.com/federal-government-pt3/

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  70. 59. Kevin M (ab1c11) — 12/28/2020 @ 4:40 pm

    The preamble is just throat-clearing. No powers are derived from that (or at least shouldn’t be).

    Powers are not derived from that but it is not just throat clearing. It is there for a very important reason:

    It has to deal with the fact that the entire constitution is unconstitutional!

    It violates the terms for amending the Articles of Confederation.

    So they step outside of it, and say “We the People…so ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

    In part to make sure that this doesn’t happen again, in Article VI they make every state and federal take an oath or affirmation to support the constitution.

    Amendment 14, Section 3, makes a reference to this oath.

    Articele VII, at the end, then says when and if it will go into effect

    Sammy Finkelman (081278)

  71. @31. The turtle gots hizelf another six years in the swamp.

    Where turtles are right at home. 😉

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  72. It starts with the schools. That’s where we start paying for our “education” with our mental health.

    How many of you have nightmares about school? I’m 44 years out of high school and I had a nightmare about high school less than a week ago and it was by no means the first one. I did not participate in this study

    They Dream of School, and None of the Dreams Are Good


    In this survey, 128 adults described their recurring dreams of being in school.but any or all of the participants could be me.

    nk (1d9030)

  73. Tanny O’Haley (8a06bc) — 12/28/2020 @ 6:15 pm

    If Texas outlawed California wine the federal government could step in and say no Texas under the commerce clause you cannot do that.

    But under the 21st amendment, Section 2, they can, although maybe that only means the same kind of wine that is illegal in California.

    Sammy Finkelman (081278)

  74. Re: Rip Murdock (80e6b4) — 12/28/2020 @ 4:00 pm

    What about the necessary and proper clause of the Constitution?

    Article 1, section 8:

    “To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.”

    Look closer and will see “for carrying into Execution the foregoing powers”. The important part here is “foregoing powers” not any new powers. What is necessary and proper to execute the enumerated federal powers of the government. Necessary and proper is not a standalone clause apart from the enumerated federal powers of the government.

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  75. Tanny is right. There was a recent Supreme Court case which ruled that the 21st Amendment does not supersede the Commerce Clause.

    nk (1d9030)

  76. Not a cult.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  77. I second NK’s post – the general welfare clause of the Constitution.

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but sound as if you are not a big fan of that clause. As a strict Constitutionalist (as you seem), you know how to remedy that…

    Hoi Polloi (139bf6) — 12/28/2020 @ 4:36 pm

    Some people state “provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States”.

    “General welfare“! That means anything doesn’t it? No it doesn’t. How about we ask what some people call the father of the constitution James Madison? Letter from James Madison to Andrew Stevenson regarding the general welfare clause.

    https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/99-02-02-2220

    In the US Constitution “common defence and general welfare” is to be used to pay down debt incurred by the states for the revolution. Not as some think to create any law under the sun.

    I’m not a big fan of stare decisis. The supreme court has gotten it wrong a number of times (see Dred Scott, Korematsu, Wickard v. Filburn, …) and if a previous ruling violates the plain reading of the US Constitution I believe that ruling should be overturned.

    The supreme court didn’t take an oath to stare decisis, but to the constitution. I believe we should always go first to the US Constitution and use stare decisis as guidance, but not the final word.

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  78. Tanny, I answered you back in #42. There’s more but I think those two are enough.

    Kevin M (ab1c11) — 12/28/2020 @ 4:36 pm

    Yes you did. I apologize. I addressed the commerce clause in 70 and the necessary and proper clause (not a standalone clause) in 75.

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  79. I think Rip’s answer is a kitchen sink approach. He was done after the first paragraph. Not sure how an amendment to require equality before the law justifies a $600 check, especially as some do not get one.

    You’re right-I wanted to cover all the bases of Congressional authority. Tanny also asked about the entire omnibus bill, and I’m sure you can find in my “kitchen sink” that whatever is in the 5,000+ pages, authority can be found in one of the Articles or amendments.

    Rip Murdock (80e6b4) — 12/28/2020 @ 4:52 pm

    Ah, but I’m stating that the only powers that give authority to the federal government is in the enumerated federal powers of Article 1 Section 8 and the 16th amendment. No other amendments give additional authority to the federal government.

    The 14th, 15th, 19th, 23rd, 24th, and 26th (XIV, XV, XIX, XXIII, XXIV, and XXVI) Amendments are about citizen’s rights And don’t give the federal government authority to make laws on any additional items that are not listed and the enumerated powers of the federal government and the 16th amendment.

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  80. “to give authority to the federal government to make law is in …“

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  81. How many of you have nightmares about school?

    I’ve had nightmares that I have to teach a class and haven’t begun preparing.

    More often, it’s that I’m traveling somewhere and haven’t begun to pack (though in fact I’ve made a practice of starting well ahead of time).

    Radegunda (b6cc34)

  82. @77 — Maybe not, but this is definitely a cult.

    Radegunda (b6cc34)

  83. Heh! From Radgunda’s link:

    Mike Sington
    @MikeSington
    The Trump Hotel in Washington DC has conceded the election. They’ve unblocked all the rooms they had reserved for Inauguration Week, and have made them available to anyone, at a 25% discount.

    nk (1d9030)

  84. I find it odd that for around 150 years after the US Constitution was ratified that the commerce clause was extremely limited in its power. Then during the FDR administration the Supreme Court started to expand the powers of the commerce clause to mean almost anything. Just like the 16th amendment which gives the federal government the power to tax income doesn’t give Congress the power to make up anything that they can spend that taxable money on. It’s limited to what is already outlined in the enumerated powers the federal government in Article 1 Section 8 of the US Constitution.

    I had an aid in Representative Tony Cardenas’ office tell me that Congress could do anything they wanted because of the power of the purse. That because of the power of the purse they had unlimited power to make any law they wanted to make.

    But they are our superiors and know what’s best for us. Despite the oath Representatives recite before taking office it doesn’t seem that they know the US Constitution hardly at all.

    “I, AB, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

    https://history.house.gov/Institution/Origins-Development/Oath-of-Office/

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  85. *Radegunda’s*

    nk (1d9030)

  86. It’s limited to what is already outlined in the enumerated powers the federal government in Article 1 Section 8 of the US Constitution.

    In your opinion, but the current state of the law is outlined in Butler (see #63).

    Rip Murdock (e7189f)

  87. 2020 Was the Year Reaganism Died

    …….
    ……. In times of crisis, government aid to people in distress is a good thing, not just for those getting help, but for the nation as a whole. Or to put it a bit differently, 2020 was the year Reaganism died.

    What I mean by Reaganism goes beyond voodoo economics, the claim that tax cuts have magical power and can solve all problems. After all, nobody believes in that claim aside from a handful of charlatans and cranks, plus the entire Republican Party.

    No, I mean something broader — the belief that aid to those in need always backfires, that the only way to improve ordinary people’s lives is to make the rich richer and wait for the benefits to trickle down. This belief was encapsulated in Ronald Reagan’s famous dictum that the most terrifying words in English are “I’m from the government, and I’m here to help.”

    Well, in 2020 the government was there to help — and help it did.
    …….
    So the government was there to help, and it really did. The only problem was that it cut off help too soon. Extraordinary aid should have continued as long as the coronavirus was still rampant — a fact implicitly acknowledged by bipartisan willingness to enact a second rescue package, and Trump’s grudging eventual willingness to sign that legislation.
    ……..
    DCSCA should be happy (I think).

    Rip Murdock (e7189f)

  88. In your opinion, but the current state of the law is outlined in Butler (see #63).

    Rip Murdock (e7189f) — 12/28/2020 @ 8:16 pm

    1936 during the FDR administration. I don’t understand how it applies to Article 1 Section 8 Enumerated Federal Powers.

    In an opinion written by Justice Roberts, the majority declared the Act unconstitutional because it attempted to regulate and control agricultural production, an arena reserved to the states. Congress’ Spending Power (Article I, Section 8) is restricted to situations in which it is being used for the general welfare of the people. Agricultural production historically lies beyond the authority of the federal government to regulate. Although Congress does have the power to tax and appropriate funds, in this case those activities were “but means to an unconstitutional end.” That is, Congress was using the spending power as an enforcement mechanism to control activity that was completely within the authority of the states. Thus, the Act violated the Constitution.

    General Welfare is defined in the Article 1 Section 8 Enumerated Federal Powers which limits the powers of the federal government. It’s pretty specific as to what the federal government may do. Butler appears to be a slap in the face of those who expanded the commerce clause. It affirms the limits on what the federal government is authorized to do and affirms that those powers not specifically given to the federal government are under the power of the states. I don’t see it expanding the power of the federal government to do anything they please, but severely limiting the federal government‘s power and authority.

    https://www.oyez.org/cases/1900-1940/297us1

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  89. Rip Murdock (e7189f) — 12/28/2020 @ 8:27 pm

    An article by Paul Krugman? He’s been wrong on everything!

    Tanny O'Haley (8a06bc)

  90. “the belief that aid to those in need always backfires”

    Yes, like all government aid was heartlessly shut down during the evil 1980’s…..and the records of this were cleverly hidden to protect Reagan and his legacy. It’s good to remember that no one’s taxes have gone up to pay for all of the aid currently going out. It’s all being put on the government “credit card”….with interest on the debt continuing to grow and subsume the budget. Though, I…and I would dare to say most conservatives…. don’t oppose the relief….because this is a national disaster….with government edicts causing the economic stress….but let’s not confuse that one case of subsidy being necessary and helpful does not somehow prove the appropriateness of every other government subsidy….I think there’s some rule of logic involved in there. It would be interesting if the op ed writer might… in good faith of course….analyze more cases of government subsidies and speculate about when government debt might actually become a problem…..but in this season of Santa Claus, why ruin the story…..

    AJ_Liberty (a4ff25)

  91. Oh wait…it was Krugman….good faith…never mind

    AJ_Liberty (a4ff25)

  92. Other politicians have downplayed or otherwise danced around the tradeoffs associated with their policy goals; Trump is among the first to confidently assert tradeoffs literally do not exist. Anyone who knows what they are doing won’t be able to follow in his footsteps with a straight face.

    (Not That) Bill O’Reilly (6bb12a) — 12/28/2020 @ 11:53 am

    You’ve forgotten Obama already? It was only 1 presidency ago. “If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor.” ” You will save $2,500 a year under my plan.” And on and on.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  93. Can anybody show me where in Article 1 Section 8 of the enumerated federal powers of the constitution that any of the stimulus is allowed? For that matter most of this 5,600 page omnibus bill?

    It’s compassionate to want to give people who are hurting because of the governments own actions financial relief. However, this is like the government breaking your legs then giving you crutches so you can walk. They are now saying because of the government you can walk, but they were the people who broke your legs in the first place.

    It is only an overly expensive view of some clauses in the enumerated powers that allow some of this. It’s just not there. I’m sorry it doesn’t seem compassionate, but if you want to give the federal government that kind of power create an amendment. That’s the way it supposed to be done.

    Tanny O’Haley (8a06bc) — 12/28/2020 @ 2:02 pm

    No they cannot. But it’s in the Soviet one.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  94. contains words from the Preamble but it is not throat clearing.

    I stand corrected.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  95. first requires an enumerated power that Tanny was asking about.

    Interstate Commerce clause. Me being broke affects interstate commerce, at least as far as me growing wheat or pot does.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  96. 2020 Was the Year Reaganism Died

    No, it was the year that abject incompetence didn’t get re-elected. Comparing ANY aspect of the Trump administration to Reagan’s is libelous, and anyone who makes that claim is a hack.

    And look, it’s Paul Krugman, known hack.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  97. It’s compassionate to want to give people who are hurting because of the governments own actions financial relief. However, this is like the government breaking your legs then giving you crutches so you can walk. They are now saying because of the government you can walk, but they were the people who broke your legs in the first place.

    The constitution and the government it established exist to serve us, not the other way around.

    The founders confronted this question almost immediately, in regard to creation of the First Bank of the United States. Jefferson and Madison objected that the constitution conferred no such power to charter a bank; Hamilton eloquently demolished their arguments, and Washington signed the bank into law.

    Another enumerated power absent in the constitution is the power to purchase or annex territory. Jefferson – the oracle of limited government – briefly worried that purchasing Louisiana would go beyond the federal government’s enumerated powers, before common sense won the day.

    Dave (1bb933)

  98. “Another enumerated power absent in the constitution is the power to purchase or annex territory.”

    But the Constitution explicitly gives the President the power to “make treaties” subject to the “advice and consent” of the Senate. And one type of treaty was to acquire land, with a notable example being the Treaty of Paris of 1783 which secured land from Britain. That was the whole pretext that started the Louisiana Purchase, Jefferson wanted to purchase New Orleans for easy navigation of the Mississippi. So if you can acquire a city via treaty, what constitutionally would limit the President from negotiating for a larger land area? So though Jefferson can be commended for being careful about his use of power, this one seems pretty well supported by text and precedent.

    Now the First Bank introduces a more subtle issue of what is “necessary and proper” to bring laws into execution. So, could government require everyone to purchase health insurance in order for it to properly regulate the interstate market of health insurance? NFIB said “no”. McCulloch certainly expanded “necessary” to go beyond “absolutely essential to” and closer to “convenient to” but something must limit the reach of the N&P clause or why even have enumerated powers if you can apply House-that-Jack-built analysis to whatever government…and Dave…. wants to do?

    AJ_Liberty (a4ff25)

  99. Tany, if you can spend to create the social security system or medicare system, the die has been cast. Both systems address a “general” problem…and survived scrutiny under Butler, Helvering, and Steward Machine. No federal spending initiative has been deemed unconstitutional since, except under certain situations when the money is conditioned on something else (Dole). Now I understand your frustration with stare decisis, but it does provide predictability and introduces efficiency into the system…or else some issues would be argued ad infinitum and the stability of the law would be lost. My preference would be that major shifts in government power be authorized by constitutional amendment….I’m old fashioned that way…..but our forefathers dropped the ball on that in the 30’s and 40’s….and no court now wants to unwind the spending and regulatory powers….and the huge disruption this would have to courts, rights, and contracts…. because of selective readings of Madison over Hamilton. If you want to change the reach of government, you must try to amend the Constitution. If you cannot get a supermajority to agree with you, then your argument isn’t that compelling. That’s where we are at.

    AJ_Liberty (a4ff25)

  100. But the Constitution explicitly gives the President the power to “make treaties” subject to the “advice and consent” of the Senate. And one type of treaty was to acquire land, with a notable example being the Treaty of Paris of 1783 which secured land from Britain.

    At issue was not the president’s power to make treaties with consent of the senate, but for congress to appropriate money for the purpose of acquiring territory (which also requires passing legislation in the House).

    Putting COVID relief or a health insurance mandate (for instance) into a treaty would not create a constitutional basis for them, if it did not already exist.

    Dave (1bb933)

  101. As 2020, annus horibilus, comes to a close, and the Trump administration, or what’s left of it after so many departures, turnovers and acting subordinate secretaries and deputies, it ends as it began, with lies, fraud and hypocrisy.

    Trump accomplished nothing, other than increasing federal spending to a level it took Obama two terms to achieve, in half the time. There has been no substantive reform. There is no wall, certainly not paid for by Mexico. The only things he accomplished was signing a tax bill, which benefitted the wealthy and large corporations but not the poor or the middle class, and nominate some justices recommended by the Federalist Society. And sign bill after bill he threatened to veto.

    That’s not draining the swamp. It’s filling it.

    https://reason.com/2020/12/28/surrendering-on-covid-spending-is-fitting-end-for-trumps-tenure/

    The Republicans need to take a serious look at their party structure and leadership, because if their only strategy moving forward is to make things difficult for the Biden administration, the status quo isn’t going to change much. Biden cannot possibly be a worse president than Trump.

    Gawain's Ghost (b25cd1)

  102. Kevin @40-

    Go talk to the millions of American men and women who are not suited for college degrees and have to compete for jobs with third world immigrants with low expectations. Tradesmen, as a group, have been badly treated by both parties, as have the former manufacturing workers. SUre, they can retrain, but most of the jobs they retrain to are very low wage.

    Not everyone can code (and imho most who do are very bad at it).

    They can work at Amazon.

    ……
    ……Amazon added 427,300 employees between January and October, pushing its work force to more than 1.2 million people globally, up more than 50 percent from a year ago. Its number of workers now approaches the entire population of Dallas.

    The spree has accelerated since the onset of the pandemic, which has turbocharged Amazon’s business and made it a winner of the crisis. Starting in July, the company brought on about 350,000 employees, or 2,800 a day. Most have been warehouse workers, but Amazon has also hired software engineers and hardware specialists to power enterprises such as cloud computing, streaming entertainment and devices, which have boomed in the pandemic.

    The scale of hiring is even larger than it may seem because the numbers do not account for employee churn, nor do they include the 100,000 temporary workers who have been recruited for the holiday shopping season. They also do not include what internal documents show as roughly 500,000 delivery drivers, who are contractors and not direct Amazon employees.
    …..
    Amazon’s rapid employee growth is unrivaled in the history of corporate America. It far outstrips the 230,000 employees that Walmart, the largest private employer with more than 2.2 million workers, added in a single year two decades ago. The closest comparisons are the hiring that entire industries carried out in wartime, such as shipbuilding during the early years of World War II or home building after soldiers returned, economists and corporate historians said.
    ……
    ……Of its 810,000 workers who are in the United States, about 85 percent are frontline employees in warehouses and operations who earn a minimum of $15 an hour. That is higher than traditional retail work, where an average sales worker makes $13.19 an hour, but lower than typical warehousing jobs. ……

    ……
    So yeah, let’s break up an American success story! That’ll teach them to be successful!

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  103. @88. Glorious.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  104. Tanny and NJRob:

    Under your interpretation of the Constitution, would you agree the civilian space program and the national park system are unconstitutional?

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  105. about 85 percent are frontline employees in warehouses and operations who earn a minimum of $15 an hour.

    Yeah, people who used to earn 3 times that will be happy to know you’ve got a job for them.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  106. annus horibilus

    Having lived through 1968, I had thought I’d never see such a year again. I’m not convinced that 2020 is worse, but it’s certainly a contender.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  107. The Republicans need to take a serious look at their party structure and leadership

    Nikki Haley, who has tried very hard to weave a path between Trump and not-Trump, is clearly running for president already. But whatever the GOP does, it needs to take a lesson from the Democrats this year, as they avoided their own crazy by quickly settling on an alternative. Trump and his ilk cannot be allowed to define the party any further.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  108. It’s actually worse than Congress being unfettered in its power; they at least are elected and can be held to account. We now have regulatory agencies like the EPA that can do things unintended by Congress with only the threat of a new Law being passed and signed to undo their actions.

    When the Nixon-era agencies were crated, Congress reserved the right to block regulations, but that check was stripped from the law by the courts (INS v Chadha). If you want to return to the Constitution, perhaps we should start there.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  109. 72% of Republicans See Trump As Model for Party’s Future

    I had not realized alcoholism was so widespread.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  110. More like mental illness.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  111. More to the point, though, Rip, I doubt they see incompetence, deceit and confusion as the model; they see the need to address the same issues (particularly immigration, trade and jobs) that Trump championed in speech but failed to deal with in practice.

    In short, a competent, informed and effective leader co-opting the same coalition. Had Trump been that person, he would have been easily re-elected (assuming he did not get votes for being incompetent, ineffective and embarrassing). As it was he came far too close.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  112. There’s also what I call the Trump Lesson: half the population has an IQ of 100 or below. Trump never tried to appeal to our intelligence; rather to our emotions and prejudices. His speeches are written at the 5th grade level for a reason.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  113. To your points above….
    The Life in The Simpsons Is No Longer Attainable

    The most famous dysfunctional family of 1990s television enjoyed, by today’s standards, an almost dreamily secure existence that now seems out of reach for all too many Americans. I refer, of course, to the Simpsons. Homer, a high-school graduate whose union job at the nuclear-power plant required little technical skill, supported a family of five. A home, a car, food, regular doctor’s appointments, and enough left over for plenty of beer at the local bar were all attainable on a single working-class salary. Bart might have had to find $1,000 for the family to go to England, but he didn’t have to worry that his parents would lose their home.
    ……
    ……[T]he world for someone like Homer Simpson is far less secure. Union membership, which protects wages and benefits for millions of workers in positions like Homer’s, dropped from 14.5 percent in 1996 to 10.3 percent today. With that decline came the loss of income security and many guaranteed benefits, including health insurance and pension plans. In 1993’s episode “Last Exit to Springfield,” Lisa needs braces at the same time that Homer’s dental plan evaporates. Unable to afford Lisa’s orthodontia without that insurance, Homer leads a strike. Mr. Burns, the boss, eventually capitulates to the union’s demand for dental coverage, resulting in shiny new braces for Lisa and one fewer financial headache for her parents. What would Homer have done today without the support of his union?

    The purchasing power of Homer’s paycheck, moreover, has shrunk dramatically. The median house costs 2.4 times what it did in the mid-’90s. Health-care expenses for one person are three times what they were 25 years ago. The median tuition for a four-year college is 1.8 times what it was then. In today’s world, Marge would have to get a job too. But even then, they would struggle. Inflation and stagnant wages have led to a rise in two-income households, but to an erosion of economic stability for the people who occupy them.
    …….

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  114. The purchasing power of Homer’s paycheck, moreover, has shrunk dramatically. The median house costs 2.4 times what it did in the mid-’90s. Health-care expenses for one person are three times what they were 25 years ago. The median tuition for a four-year college is 1.8 times what it was then. In today’s world, Marge would have to get a job too. But even then, they would struggle. Inflation and stagnant wages have led to a rise in two-income households, but to an erosion of economic stability for the people who occupy them.

    Yes, all of this. Some see this from atop Olympus, but the ones who have to live it are angry. The decline in living standards in the US, at least as far as non-college grabs is concerned, is both meaningful and stark. People who were making $25/hour (1980 dollars) are now getting $15/hour (2020 dollars). It’s unsurprising that there are many more single men than before.

    Trump promised to turn this trend around, and small successes. All of which was undone by Covid and his feckless response. That Trump is an incompetent, ignorant and foolish man does not change the facts on the ground.

    Someone will come along to address these again.

    The Democrat version would suggest vastly more state aid, evolving to a Guaranteed Annual Income at some point. What SF writers have come to call “Basic.”

    The old GOP line was to become an Information Society, with a highly educated populace and global free trade enriching all.

    The Trump line argues that such a thing might be wonderful for many, but won’t work for all (particularly more (and more expensive) education), and in any event is a long-term strategy when people eat in the short term.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  115. The median house costs 2.4 times what it did in the mid-’90s. Health-care expenses for one person are three times what they were 25 years ago. The median tuition for a four-year college is 1.8 times what it was then.

    all these three things are not paid for out of current income.

    Sammy Finkelman (7e803d)

  116. all these three things are not paid for out of current income.

    Just because it is paid over time does not mean it is not paid. And it wasn’t paid out of current income back then, either.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  117. Bernie Sanders is stopping the Senate vote to override the National Defense Authorization Act of 2020 because he wants the Senate to take up the $2,000 per Social Security account stimulus payment that the House passed yesterday. They have the rest of this week, and Sunday morning, to do it.

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, I think I heard, is thinking of packaging together (in hopes it loses?) three of Trump’s priorities in a single bill: The $2,000 checks, the repeal of Section 230, and something about election integrity. If that did pass it would have to pass the House too to become law.

    Sammy Finkelman (7e803d)

  118. Better: The Trump new GOP line argues that such a thing might be wonderful for many, but won’t work for all (particularly more (and more expensive) education), and in any event is a long-term strategy when people eat in the short term.

    The “Trump line” uses more short words.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  119. 118. Kevin M (ab1c11) — 12/29/2020 @ 12:48 pm

    Just because it is paid over time does not mean it is not paid. And it wasn’t paid out of current income back then, either.

    Having it not paid out of current income allows inflation.

    Housing is paid for by borrowing, which is paid back by working it out to be a fixed payment per month, and the effective cost can be lower if interest rates are lower. If houses do not drp in value in general a person can recover the value of the house.

    Medical care is paid for, in large part, by insurance, and the rise in costs has been felt.

    College tuition is paid for more and more by borrowing which is increasingly not paid back but which is eligible for bankruptcy and it creates enormous trouble for some people with these loans. It is made very easy to borrow.

    Sammy Finkelman (7e803d)

  120. The $2,000 checks, the repeal of Section 230, and something about election integrity

    Repeal of Section 230 would end the Internet as we know it. Twitter, Facebook, Whatsapp, and every comment section on every blog or publication would end. Even product reviews on shopping sites would disappear.

    Requiring site owners to be responsible for the the comments made by others would require massive censorship, constant vigilance, and quite a bit of fact-checking by the site owners.

    Why is Trump doing this? Because some jackass on TV told him that Section 230 allows censorship. Which it does in the sense that it doesn’t ban it, but it reduces the need almost completely. Twitter and Facebook don’t censor because of Section 230, but in spite of it.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  121. Sammy,

    In 1990 or 2020 all those things were paid over time. That means that if it costs 3x what it did then (in inflation-adjusted dollars) the monthly payment is ALSO 3 times as large.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  122. Why is Trump doing this? Because some jackass on TV told him that Section 230 allows censorship. Which it does in the sense that it doesn’t ban it, but it reduces the need almost completely. Twitter and Facebook don’t censor because of Section 230, but in spite of it.

    Today to do even basic “censorship” (light moderation), you get things like this. If there were the liability that Trump seems to think he wants, a) Trump would not be allowed anywhere near the internet, he would force twitter et al, to be liable for hundreds of trillions of billions of millions of dollars of liability. And b) neither would anyone else.

    It’s almost like Trump doesn’t know WTF he is talking about IRT this. Which makes it so much different than…

    Oh yeah, he’s a complete moron, full stop.

    Colonel Klink (Ret) (1367c0)

  123. Or he wants to silence other websites so he can fill the void they leave once he starts Trump Media, where he won’t let any voice but his (and his family/surrogates) be heard.

    DRJ (aede82)

  124. Or he wants to silence other websites so he can fill the void they leave once he starts Trump Media, where he won’t let any voice but his (and his family/surrogates) be heard.

    But then he’d be his own liability for libel. I guess that he’d be the publisher and be shielded from that, normally, but then he’d be Trumpeting (because it’s Trumpet Media in this case, so to Trump is a verb) Trumpisms which may not be good for him, a la Newsmax/Fox/Dominion/Smartmatic brewhaha. Of course, when he gets sued into oblivion, he could always file for bankruptcy and…

    Colonel Klink (Ret) (1367c0)

  125. where he won’t let any voice but his (and his family/surrogates) be heard.

    We used to have a UHF station in L.A. like that. The gospel according to Gene Scott. IIRC, he had a worldwide network of stations at one point, with his sermons running 24/7.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  126. Klink,

    I’m not arguing that moderation is wrong or unnecessary, although it is very hard to avoid bias when the moderators are human (and young and inexperienced humans at that).

    What I’m arguing is that Section 230 is the only thing that allows unmoderated discussions to be possible. Remove 230 and open discussion is impossible. Everything offends someone, and someone can always sue.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  127. My understanding is that Section 230 protects hosts who moderate discussions from liability for what their commenters say. Trump won’t moderate discussion if he has websites or allows commenters, so he won’t need protection there. His liability will be for traditional defamation and he has navigated that for decades by speaking in vague innuendo, coupled with aggressive use of legal threats and lawsuits. In other words, business as usual for him but it will crush online websites as we know them now.

    DRJ (aede82)

  128. I heard yesterday from someone who called up his bank. The $600 might be deposited on Monday.

    Sammy Finkelman (b78e49)


Powered by WordPress.

Page loaded in: 0.2551 secs.