Patterico's Pontifications

6/24/2016

Partial Round-Up of Brexit’s Immediate Aftermath: Revenge of the Establishment

Filed under: General — JVW @ 1:53 pm



[guest post by JVW]

In the wake of last night’s historic referendum on leaving the European Union, the people of Great Britain woke up this morning to find that they are the scourge of of all “responsible thinking” people in the faculty lounges, boardrooms, and grand salons of the cultured world. Here’s a round-up of obnoxious opinion:

The Boston Globe editorial board spewed out a typically pretentious and predictably dull-witted editorial, beginning with a reference to Shakespeare and then discussing the geography of the Calais-to-Dover channel crossing before finally getting around to their main argument for why the EU is so indispensable, because in their minds it has kept the peace: “The entire project was designed to use economics to prevent armed conflict. That worked.” I’m sure the people of Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Croatia would find that to be an interesting assertion. But let’s set that aside for a moment. It is true that since the founding of the European Union that Germany has not invaded France or Belgium, but that might be more aptly attributed to the 60,000 U.S. troops stationed in Europe than all the striped-pants set in Brussels. The heart of the editorial is a boring recitation of the opportunities and challenges facing the EU and was clearly written when the outcome was in doubt. I read it so that you don’t have to, and I would never recommend that anyone waste their time with it.

The Economist also has their callow young writers all hot and bothered over what they characterize as a “senseless, self-inflicted blow.” They forecast nothing but gloom and doom: “As confidence plunges, Britain may well dip into recession. A permanently less vibrant economy means fewer jobs, lower tax receipts and, eventually, extra austerity. The result will also shake a fragile world economy.” Oh my: the cheeky lads and lasses located outside of the major urban centers have managed to steer the ship of state straight into the shoals! The fabulously wealthy Europhiles like author J.K. Rowling are just besides themselves at the insolence. Why, from now on they may have to stand in the non-EU passport control line on the way to their chalets in the Mediterranean.

The Nation tries heroically to reconcile their populist pretentions (close to half of Labour voters may have cast their ballot for Brexit) with proper deference to the opinion of progressive elites, so they attribute the result to a combination of backlash against so-called economic austerity and those twin leftist warhorses racism and nativism. That’s certainly a lot more comforting that having to question the efficacy of trans-national government by a largely unelected and unaccountable elite.

Prime Minister David Cameron has manfully announced his resignation, despite some desire among his supporters for him to stay on. Opposition leader Jeremy Corbin, whose commitment to the Remain cause has been called into question, is resisting calls from restless members of his coalition to resign. President Barack Obama, after raising eyebrows by wading into the debate with a veiled threat demanding Britain to stay in the EU, now insists that he’s totally cool with the decision and that the vote shows how globalization has left some behind. File this in the “No shit, Sherlock” category, where so many of Obama’s pronouncements tend to land these days.

Markets are taking a beating, the pound is falling, and Britain might now be a really good summer travel location. This promises to get more and more interesting as events continue to unfold.

– JVW

159 Responses to “Partial Round-Up of Brexit’s Immediate Aftermath: Revenge of the Establishment”

  1. There’s no small irony that progressives are now terrified that markets are falling and that bonuses at Goldman-Sachs and Deutsche Bank might be far smaller than expected. Of course what they are really worried about is that tax revenues will fall and politicians will have less money to throw away on useless projects like, oh, multinational integration.

    JVW (aa050c)

  2. this brexit, it’s so good i wanna

    i wanna

    i really really really wanna zigazig ah

    happyfeet (a037ad)

  3. Once again, the British have decided that it’s better to live difficult lives as free men than to live pampered lives as the lapdogs of others.

    I am really enjoying all the so-called “elite” wringing their hands and wailing and gnashing their teeth.

    We may be “stronger together,” but only if it’s in a direction we all want to go.

    It seems that half of the U.S wants to live as free men and enjoy the blessings of liberty, and the rest will kiss any butt you ask them to, so long as there’s wifi and free stuff available. Our house is intrinsically and, it seems, irrevocably divided against itself.

    Perhaps we could learn a lesson from the British, but I won’t hold my breath.

    arik (02de93)

  4. By the way, I used the Boston Globe’s editorial as an example of shrill leftwing journalistic reaction because I can no longer access material from the Dog Trainer or the NY Times, but I feel confident that their editorials about this are equally stupid. Feel free to post snippets in the comments if you find a particularly risible contention.

    JVW (aa050c)

  5. It seems that half of the U.S wants to live as free men and enjoy the blessings of liberty, and the rest will kiss any butt you ask them to, so long as there’s wifi and free stuff available.

    The debates in the run-up to the vote were very instructive. The Remain side focused almost entirely on economic arguments: trade agreements will be ended, the pound will fall relative to the dollar and euro, jobs will be lost, etc. The Leave side spoke very extensively (and eloquently) about issues of freedom and liberty: no more meddling from Brussels, protect our culture and values, control immigration, etc. It was so weird to me that the Remain side chose to be so technocratic when the availability of lower-wage programmers from Slovakia doesn’t mean a hell of a lot to a shopkeeper in the Midlands.

    JVW (aa050c)

  6. Donald Trump said it was a victory for xenophobia, and a good thing, too.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/25/us/politics/donald-trump-scotland.html?_r=0

    “People are angry, all over the world people, they’re angry,” he said. “They’re angry over borders, they’re angry over people coming into the country and taking over, nobody even knows who they are. They’re angry about many, many things.”

    Sammy Finkelman (643dcd)

  7. > the availability of lower-wage programmers from Slovakia doesn’t mean a hell of a lot to a shopkeeper in the Midlands.

    No, but you’d expect that higher cost of imports causing people to not be able to afford to buy much from his shop *would* mean a lot to him.

    aphrael (6ce08a)

  8. Not to mention customers with no jobs…

    kishnevi (80558c)

  9. Kishnevi – that one could go either way, right? If you listen to the ‘leave’ folks, customers are already losing their jobs due to immigration and globalization, which will continue absent a Brexit; if you listen to the ‘remain’ folks, leaving will cause massive job losses.

    Which is to say concerns ‘job loss’ doesn’t per se point in one direction or another absent some other ideological bias or concern. However, concern about ‘more expensive imports’ *does* point in one direction or another, as there’s no plausible ‘leave’ scenario which leads to less expensive imports.

    aphrael (6ce08a)

  10. It’s not a phobia if the fear is not irrational.

    Ingot (e5bf64)

  11. No, but you’d expect that higher cost of imports causing people to not be able to afford to buy much from his shop *would* mean a lot to him.

    I think Cameron tried to make the claim that reducing the cost of imports leaves the people with more money to spend on other items. But that sort of free market thinking wasn’t welcome on the British left, which tended to focus their economic pitch on the idea that the EU brought about labor and environmental protections that a British government might not adopt. One of the weirdest aspects of this debate is how leadership of the Tories and the Left (Labour and the Greens) were on the same side, but could not countenance each other’s arguments and present a coherent united case for remaining.

    JVW (aa050c)

  12. . . . there’s no plausible ‘leave’ scenario which leads to less expensive imports.

    What? Britain is now free to cut its own trade deals with the U.S., Canada, India, Australia, etc. How could that not lead to less expensive imports? They no longer have to get clearance from French, Italian, Spanish, and Greek farmers to get cheaper produce, and they don’t have to worry about the Germans blocking them from manufacturing imports.

    JVW (aa050c)

  13. I’m not convinced that Britain leaving the EU will be that bad from an economic standpoint, and apparently neither is Lord Rose, the chair of the lead Remain group. He doesn’t seem to know what it will do.

    DRJ (15874d)

  14. Which is to say concerns ‘job loss’ doesn’t per se point in one direction or another absent some other ideological bias or concern. However, concern about ‘more expensive imports’ *does* point in one direction or another, as there’s no plausible ‘leave’ scenario which leads to less expensive imports.

    aphrael (6ce08a) — 6/24/2016 @ 2:52 pm

    There is one way it could. But restoring a manufacturing base and improving the economy, that would raise the value of the Pound and therefore lower goods on the international markets.

    Plus there are these things called trade agreements. You might want to look into them in your free time.

    NJRob (a07d2e)

  15. DRJ
    At this point no one seems to be sure.
    Here’s a detailed guess on one aspect
    http://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/2016/mar/22/eu-referendum-brexit-change-vat-import-duties

    kishnevi (80558c)

  16. NJRob,

    > Plus there are these things called trade agreements. You might want to look into them in your free time.

    Are you this condescending to people you know in real life, or just online?

    aphrael (6ce08a)

  17. JVW #13 – yeah, watching the establishment right and the establishment left fail to work together in fighting for remaining in the EU has been … stunning.

    JVW @14 – Britain is free to cut its own trade deals, but standing alone has much less *leverage* in negotiation, because of a smaller population and a smaller economy (relative to the EU as a whole).

    Now, the deals are more likely to be targeted to benefit Britain, so it’s an interesting question: will targeted deals produced by less leverage be more beneficial to Britain than larger deals that are less targeted but are achieved with more leverage?

    It’s hard to say.

    In the meantime, though, the pound is going to fall, and the parts of their economic base which depend on close connections to Europe are going to think seriously about picking up and leaving.

    NJRob @16 – restoring a manufacturing base and improving the economy is a long-term play at best, and it’s not at all clear that it will succeed unless either (a) the cost of labor falls really low or (b) the British figure out a way to dramatically improve labor productivity which isn’t then copied by other countries.

    That said, you’ve found a plausible scenario, and I have to acknowledge that, and retract my claim that there is no plausible scenario leading to less expensive imports. So i’ll restate it: there’s no plausible scenario leading to less expensive imports in the short-to-medium term.

    aphrael (6ce08a)

  18. So i’ll restate it: there’s no plausible scenario leading to less expensive imports in the short-to-medium term.

    That’s probably a truism. Responsible Leave backers like Daniel Hannan were honest enough to admit that they could not foresee what would happen in the immediate aftermath, while still expressing confidence that Britain would be better off in the long run. But I’m sure there were plenty of irresponsible Leave backers who promised tea and cakes from the moment they voted “no.”

    JVW (aa050c)

  19. However, concern about ‘more expensive imports’ *does* point in one direction or another, as there’s no plausible ‘leave’ scenario which leads to less expensive imports.

    Sure there is, aphrael, it’s called competition. Now that Britain is once again its own market the sky is the limit. Unless the dumbass limeys limit themselves with their socialist propensities.

    Rev. Hoagie® (734193)

  20. > But I’m sure there were plenty of irresponsible Leave backers who promised tea and cakes from the moment they voted “no.”

    The most infamous example of this is the ads the Leave campaign ran talking about redirecting the money from Britain’s EU contributions to the NHS – something that UKIP leader Nigel Farage *last night* said was a mistake because it couldn’t be done.

    There’s a degree to which this is unexceptional because this sort of thing happens in all political campaigns. And it’s still *really irksome*.

    aphrael (6ce08a)

  21. the brexit – what a game!

    it’s hiding all the cards

    the brexit is in charge of finding

    treasure in the dark

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  22. BRITAIN TO EU, TERRY-THOMAS STYLE: “I SAY, HARD CHEESE, OLD BOY.”

    DCSCA (a343d5)

  23. Over the top with nothing but a swagger stick against the Hun, going it alone against the Nazi Blitz, Nelson at Trafalgar, Wellington at Waterloo… ‘into the valley of death rode the 600 hundred…’ this is their mentality.

    And it hasn’t changed in 1000 years.

    DCSCA (a343d5)

  24. The UK has been supporting a bunch of moocher little European countries, and in the future they won’t have to.
    If Mike Brady of “The Brady Bunch” sees all six of his kids finally move out of the house so that he’s no longer supporting them, that’s going to be a good thing for his checkbook.

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  25. he can buy that salad spinner he been eye-ballin

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  26. Here’s an excerpt from Laura Ingraham writing at Lifezette:

    …We Americans will soon face a similar choice. For years now, Americans have been trying to change policy at the ballot box. But the policies don’t change very much, because so much power is beyond the reach of the voters. The Fed sets monetary policy without concern for what we think. The Supreme Court makes social policy without concern for what we think. The WTO makes trade policy without concern for what we think. And, for most Americans, the result has been a disaster. As in Britain, we have a country where a few people are getting all the benefits, and most of us are stuck with the burden.

    That’s why Republican voters nominated Donald Trump. He was the only candidate who understood the importance of restoring American independence. And most Republicans understand that independence is essential to having real pro-American policies. Britain has chosen freedom and independence. In November, Americans have the opportunity to make the same choice.

    ropelight (596f46)

  27. jesus christ i’m so ready for Mr. Trump

    let’s just do this already

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  28. I remember last summer when Barack and his nasty sycophants blasted Prime Minister Netanyahu for urging Congress to reject the Iran Nuclear Deal. They said that Netanyahu was a jerk for sticking in his nose in America’s politics. Of course, that was silly, because Iran has threatened to wipe Israel off the map with nukes so it was definitely Israel’s business.

    But here was Barack in England a couple months ago, publicly urging UK voters to “remain” in the EU, otherwise, he was going to use his power to punish the UK by sending them to the back queue in trade deals.

    Our President is a real punk.

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  29. Actually an idiot, not a punk.
    Since he will be long gone from 1600 Pennsylvania by the time we start talking trade deals with the (Dis)United Kingdom.

    kishnevi (98ea1b)

  30. The European Union is a complete bureaucrat’s dream, with all the power vested in (indirectly) appointed positions, completely insulated from the voters. The European Parliament is advisory to the councils and commissions that dictate to the nation members. And as one debater pointed out, not only do the people not get to vote for these powerful bureaucrats, but they seem to be filled from the ranks of recently-defeated politicians.

    The EU’s interlocking appointive structure makes the US Electoral College look like radical mob rule.

    Kevin M (25bbee)

  31. a knave, that has been made kristol clear, and he will squawking from his perch in rock creek park,

    narciso (732bc0)

  32. The American colonists fought a war because they didn’t like to be ruled by unaccountable people far away without representation,
    Britain fought two wars so as not to be controlled by Germany.

    What don’t the elites and some here get? Who wants the guests in their living room decided by people in city hall?

    Economic considerations as the primary factor in public policy making is dam*able and just a version of Marxism. Serve mammon if you want, there are higher ideals more fitting for human beings.

    Being fed, cared for, and entertained is the job of the stockyard.

    MD in Philly (f9371b)

  33. Rush reviewed what Jennings said in 1994 about the Republican take over of the House, that the voters were having a temper tantrum and the adults needed to exert control and help all of the emotionally controlled toddlers learn some reason.

    Disgusting.

    MD in Philly (f9371b)

  34. i will be your brexit, baby (put your tiny hand in mine)

    i will be your brexit, baby (i have had enough of crime)

    i will be the one who loves you

    til the end of time

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  35. There is a lot of hand-wringing and intentional scare-mongering. It’s almost as if someone wants to CAUSE the markets to fall now, while there is a scapegoat, rather than have them fall on their own later in the year.

    Kevin M (25bbee)

  36. I remember back in 2008 when every economic malady was the fault of the sitting President.

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  37. It would be nice to have people call out the press and the Dems on their hypocrisy, specific instance by instance and ask the public how they feel about being treated as suckers and idiots.

    MD in Philly (f9371b)

  38. Sell gold, buy blue chips.

    ropelight (596f46)

  39. you should sell furniture you don’t need and buy mint oreos and rumchata

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  40. don’t buy any used furniture though, not if you live in chicago

    this city is crawling with bed bugs it’s so disgusting

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  41. Mr happyfeet, if you need a new mattress, you should wait until the 4th of July weekend when they’ll undoubtedly have a sale. All the mattress stores like to associate buying a new mattress with patriotism. Nothing says “James Madison, father of the Constitution” like a Queen sized mattress with a 3 yr warranty!

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  42. nonono i’m good with mattresses i got a queen for me and a king for guests plus a roll-away and a click-bed

    but i live in a courtyard apartment where your risk of bedbugs is low cause you only have neighbors up and down

    if you move into a place in chicago though where you have neighbors up down right left

    it’s just a matter of time and you really really need to have a lot of traps that you check so you can move fast once they show up

    it’s so gross

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  43. chicago’s the #1 bedbug city in failmerica

    it’s where president food stamp and his hooch started out

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  44. I remember back in 2008 when every economic malady was the fault of the sitting President.

    How droll.

    Kevin M (25bbee)

  45. What’s so hard about “If you can’t beat ‘em, join em”?. It is a behavior that is commonplace wherever there is human interaction. It is no mystery. It has been the norm in politics for as long as I can remember. Nixon’s insight that a successful candidate moves one direction in the primary and the other in the general election was hardly novel at the time and is even less controversial today. Romney’s “etch-a-sketch” strategy is simply a restating of it – and a clever one, I thought. It is simply what politicians do. It is what Hillary did, rather disingenuously – when Bernie started getting traction – by moving to the left. But that’s the point, joining ‘em has always been an exercise in disingenuity.

    For some reason, the GOPe either forgot the lesson or thought they were exempt from the rules that effect the rest of us during this election cycle and they did it twice, digging their hole deeper both times. The first time was when the GOPe candidates refused to budge on immigration. When Governor Walker made noises about immigration reform, he was brought to heel. That the GOPe thought it could oppose an issue that all polling suggested was of critical importance to the base and which was confirmed by the strong support for the two immigration reform-minded candidates, speaks to the extent to which the GOPe had become beholding to K Street. They simply wouldn’t budget and resorted, instead, to hectoring Trump and the one other candidate who also supported immigration reform, Ted Cruz. To watch Jeb! and the lot double down, triple down, and then redouble their efforts once again was surreal. Somehow public humiliation seemed preferable to simply joining Trump on immigration, even disingenuously.

    Their second opportunity came in the person of Ted Cruz. Once it was clear that simply haranguing Shorty was backfiring, they still had the opportunity to join in on immigration reform – and keep the nomination out of Trump’s hands – by shifting their support, en masse, to Cruz. But they wouldn’t do that either because the evil Cruz not only supports immigration reform, but supports reform more generally, threatening all the perks K Street and the GOPe, itself, felt they were owed.

    Today’s comments by George Will, a handmaiden to the GOPe, has informed us all that the Republican Party is no longer his party. All of you know I’m not a big Trump fan, but good riddance to bad rubbish and thank you Mr. Trump. As inverse-barometers go, it is hard to imagine a better one than this. Now that I’ve cast my vote for Bernie, I think it may be time to re-register as a Republican. If it’s not George Will’s party, it is probably mine.

    ThOR (c9324e)

  46. george will’s just a sad little joke-creature anymore

    he’s like charlie sheen with a bow tie and a fat wife

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  47. Mr happyfeet, it sounds like you have more beds than the Brady Bunch. Greg grew his hair out in the final season, so who knows what insects and bugs were nesting in there. Maybe even a squirrel. If you’re looking for some furniture, you could always pretend to be a Scandinavian and go to IKEA. They often have book shelves which only require an MA in Engineering in order to figure out how to put together. And of course, you only need to be Lewis or Clark in order to navigate the store. (LOL)

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  48. let’s move on

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  49. #48
    Okay, I guess a Master’s in Engineering would be an MS, not an MA. (LOL)

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  50. I’m not a statist. I’m a civil libertarian. The EU is committed to “Ever Closer Union.” I cannot imagine a more smothering notion. Apparently the UK voters found it off-putting too. God save the Queen, and may she outlive her twit of a son.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  51. God needs to save a whole pickle-boat of stuff before he saves that nasty old queen and her fetishistic tiara collection

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  52. Seriously, what if a Democratic Party candidate ran on the platform here of “Ever Closer Union.”

    That wouldn’t sell in either the Blue States or the Red States. California doesn’t want a closer union with Texas, and vice versa.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  53. Plus there are these things called trade agreements. You might want to look into them in your free time.

    Are you this condescending to people you know in real life, or just online?

    aphrael (6ce08a) — 6/24/2016 @ 3:11 pm

    I gladly do so in real life when people ignore the obvious to score cheap political points.

    njrob (81e479)

  54. However, concern about ‘more expensive imports’ *does* point in one direction or another, as there’s no plausible ‘leave’ scenario which leads to less expensive imports.

    aphrael (6ce08a) — 6/24/2016 @ 2:52 pm

    The EU as a whole is bought in deep on Al Gore style “global warming” – not the corrected from when we discovered the “scientists” were committing fraud “climate change” but the unreformed vicious and stupid ‘man is a virus’ form of “global warming”.

    IN pursuit of that stupidity, the EU set impossible quotas on how much power needs to come from windmills. Those quota’s don’t fall on the EU member states equally. The UK is paying the lion’s share in treasure, lives of British citizens (freezing to death in the dark) and the countryside defaced for decades to come by obsolete from the drawing board, bird cleavers.

    Now that the Brits infrastructure aren’t being counted toward the EU’s windmill power quota, the rest of the EU’s member states will have to take up windmill building in a quick hurry (expensive) or stop believing on a legal level in Al Gore’s lie.

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  55. NJRob @16 – restoring a manufacturing base and improving the economy is a long-term play at best, and it’s not at all clear that it will succeed unless either (a) the cost of labor falls really low or (b) the British figure out a way to dramatically improve labor productivity which isn’t then copied by other countries.

    That said, you’ve found a plausible scenario, and I have to acknowledge that, and retract my claim that there is no plausible scenario leading to less expensive imports. So i’ll restate it: there’s no plausible scenario leading to less expensive imports in the short-to-medium term.

    aphrael (6ce08a) — 6/24/2016 @ 3:16 pm

    But thank you for acknowledging that I did answer the question even if I did do so rudely.

    I still don’t expect the politicians in Britain to allow it to leave the EU as it isn’t in their political or economic interest.

    They aren’t interested in the same things their constituents are and no longer represent them.

    njrob (81e479)

  56. Of course California wants a closer union with Texas, just so long as Texas has to play by California’s rules. That’s why we’re moving to Austin and Houston and voting in our style of elected officials. Get used to it.

    Isn’t that precisely what Obama wants? Ever closer union with Brother Barry and his phalanx of bureaucratic sycophants calling the shots?

    ThOR (c9324e)

  57. http://media.breitbart.com/media/2016/06/13445884_10209020304361282_1302515232_o.jpg

    Free taco day in Nogales?

    Progressives who hate Wall Street crying wet sloppy tears over Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank year end bonus checks taking a hit.

    Theater or true position?

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  58. ThOR, my Texas/California reference may have been unclear. California’s politics, controlled by the Democratic Party for decades now, skew heavily statist, at every level (precinct, city, county, state, federal). The Dem politicians who control California (I’m not indicting all Californians; there’s an honorable, stalwart, and shrinking pool of non-statist Californians). Being statists, they behave like the Borg, they want to assimilate everyone and everything, and when they cast their eyes at Texas, they would indeed like to force Texans to join their hive mind, and their preferred mechanism of enforcement is the federal government. Ultimately they’ll federalize everything down to the precinct level, and there will be “Closest Possible Union.”

    Texans are okay with the Union that Lincoln saved. We’d prefer to keep it like the Constitution says it’s supposed to be, including our individual rights and our rights collectively to local self-government for the bulk of government functioning, free from federal or Californian meddling.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  59. And yes, Barry Obama is a Californian in spirit and soul, a statist from the moment of conception (if there’s a genetic component to politics, he got his statist genes reinforced from each parent), and the would-be Queen Bee of the Hive Mind.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  60. free from California meddling – let’s drink to that. Oh.

    That’s right. Beldar doesn’t drink with his enemies or perceived inferiors.

    Which is another way of saying, Beldar doesn’t drink.

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  61. I’ll raise my first cup of coffee in a toast to you, papertiger.
    Cheers. It is early as I take my oldest daughter to the airport.

    mg (31009b)

  62. Beldar,

    Even my liberal friends who are long-time Californians talk about how everything seems to be going to hell and our elected officials are idiots. Of course, they still vote the party line.

    ThOR (c9324e)

  63. JVW @14 – Britain is free to cut its own trade deals, but standing alone has much less *leverage* in negotiation, because of a smaller population and a smaller economy (relative to the EU as a whole)…

    aphrael (6ce08a) — 6/24/2016 @ 3:16 pm

    http://www.state.gov/e/eb/tpp/bta/fta/c26474.htm

    Benefits of U.S. Trade Agreements

    Somehow I think if countries such as Bahrain, Jordan, Morocco, Peru, Panama, Chile, etc., have enough leverage, given the size of their economies and populations, to negotiate bilateral FTAs, then so would the UK. Only the US, China, Japan, and Germany have larger economies.

    But it is true that some politicians, elected an unelected, have threatened to “punish” Britain if it voted for BREXIT. Including our vile, narcissistic, thin-skinned, and petty disaster of a President. And frankly a lot of the blame for any negative fallout from BREXIT would have to go to these pols for threatening to manufacture the apocalypse if it turns out that isn’t a natural result. Statements from people such as presidents, prime ministers, and the heads of national banks such as the Federal Reserve have always caused markets to swing wildly. Investors have to worry about what they’ll do.

    Which only goes to show it isn’t the British voters throwing a temper tantrum. It’s pols like Obama.

    Steve57 (ecac13)

  64. Here’s a comment from Free Republic on the It’s Howdy Doody Time! thread:

    About 8 years ago the TEA Party Rebellion started anew, Obama tried to squash it with the aid of some republican leaders.

    The result is we have Donald Trump as our champion, his campaign has brought out most of the phony leftist conservative republicans. Daily we listen to them whine like stuffed pigs saying they will vote for Hillary.

    The leaders of these low lifes are Mittwitts Romney, Ted Cruz, Paul Ryan, all the Bushes and their bots.

    The TEA Party wave has washed back to our shores from the UK with the BREXIT vote. Soon we will take our country back from the fascist New World Order scum and cast off the chains of tyranny.

    7 posted on 6/25/2016, 7:52:24 AM by stockpirate (Make America Mexico Again – MAMA end sarcasm)

    ropelight (596f46)

  65. Got a comment from Stormfront, too?

    nk (dbc370)

  66. his campaign has brought out most of the phony leftist conservative republicans

    yes yes and it’s striking what an ungodly high percentage of these mitt-besotted perverts went to harvard

    not spendy spendy wiscotrash slutboy paul ryan though

    this is why he’s so obnoxiously obsequious

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  67. this is the gang ryan is riding with, like the crips with parker pens,

    http://moneyballforgov.com/category/moneyball-all-stars/federal-all-stars/

    narciso (732bc0)

  68. Ropelight,

    Still trying to win friends and influence people I see.

    Equating Ted Cruz with the establishment is particularly low, but part for the course for you and happyfascist.

    njrob (a07d2e)

  69. Par for the course*

    Why would autocorrect replace par with part?

    njrob (a07d2e)

  70. NJRob – thank you for the meta-response regarding condescension.

    The thing is, I *wasn’t* trying to score a cheap political point; I was trying to draw a distinction between two “Remain” arguments, one of which I thought was meritorious and one of which I thought was unmeritorious – as an outsider, not privy to all of the information available to the British voters, who doesn’t actually have a dog in the fight, I can still look at their arguments and go “this argument makes sense” and “this argument completely ignores the other side’s valid arguments”.

    If there was cheap political point scoring involved, as far as I can tell, you conjured it.

    aphrael (3f0569)

  71. >Somehow I think if countries such as Bahrain, Jordan, Morocco, Peru, Panama, Chile, etc., have enough leverage, given the size of their economies and populations, to negotiate bilateral FTAs, then so would the UK. Only the US, China, Japan, and Germany have larger economies.

    The’ve negotiated bilateral FTAs with the US because (a) the US has a strong belief in the value of trade agreements and (b) they want to have the FTA with the US because of the size of the US economy.

    The situations aren’t symmetrical – Panama (for example) has way less incentive to negotiate with Britain than Panama does with the US, and while *Britain* has a strong belief in the value of trade agreements, Panama does not. So how does Britain get Panama to the table in a way that benefits Britain?

    aphrael (3f0569)

  72. The Cayman Islands is a British Overseas Territory in the western Caribbean Sea. The 264-square-kilometre territory comprises the three islands of Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac and …

    Jamaica is a member of the Commonwealth Realm which recognizes Queen Elizabeth II as their sover um monarch.
    Bermuda, Bahama come on pretty momma. The Beach Boys don’t have a song without the UK in the Caribbean.

    Maybe Panama would like a trade deal.

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  73. Being fed, cared for, and entertained is the job of the stockyard.
    MD in Philly (f9371b) — 6/24/2016 @ 8:02 pm

    well said, MD

    felipe (6bb3ce)

  74. But outside of the Panama Canal there is not much England needs from Panama.
    Not even panama hats, which are really from Ecuador.

    kishnevi (d7d2b1)

  75. 51. So is Prince Harry now sixth on deck behind Chas, Will and the 3 moppets? He’s the King they need.

    urbanleftbehind (3b5fd2)

  76. njrob–

    And Donald Trump is to the Tea Party as Al Sharpton is to the Civil Rights movement.

    Kevin M (25bbee)

  77. The UK was just a backwater banana republic prior to becoming a member of the EU.
    Everyone knows that Portugal, Spain, and Greece are the real breadwinners in the EU.
    If not for their economic contributions to the EU, the UK would be starving. (LOL)

    The “remain” argument is just more left wing mathematics that doesn’t add up.
    A lot of countries are depending upon the UK to wipe their bottoms for them. And now the credit card is being taken away, and so they’re expressing anger.
    Ruh-roh!

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  78. Which is another way of saying, Beldar doesn’t drink – with me.
    papertiger (c2d6da) — 6/24/2016 @ 10:53 pm

    FTFY

    felipe (6bb3ce)

  79. drinking is a thing Mr. Trump he does not do

    but stinkypig can’t get through the day without alcohol cause it helps her ignore the stinkypig odor she inflicts on everyone else

    advantage: Mr. The Donald

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  80. I’ve been graffiti tagged.

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  81. papertiger,

    Those closeted Clinton supporters are always engaging in graffiti. Then they complain we need more government to clean it up. (LOL)

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  82. If there was cheap political point scoring involved, as far as I can tell, you conjured it.
    aphrael (3f0569) — 6/25/2016 @ 9:52 am

    I agree with much of what you write, especially with the above, seeing as you are also guilty. It was njrob who conjured the first cheap shot with the following:

    “Plus there are these things called trade agreements. You might want to look into them in your free time.”
    NJRob (a07d2e) — 6/24/2016 @ 3:05 pm.

    It was that statement that caused you to respond in kind with the second cheap shot:

    Are you this condescending to people you know in real life, or just online?

    aphrael (6ce08a) — 6/24/2016 @ 3:11 pm

    Causing the reply:

    I gladly do so in real life when people ignore the obvious to score cheap political points.
    njrob (81e479) — 6/24/2016 @ 10:18 pm

    However, the two of you exhibited great form, in your comments to each other, afterwards, recognizing each others valid points and affording eaxh other respect. I salute you both.

    Why do I take trouble in noting all of this? It is my aim to use your exchange as a study of how to recover from rancor and ascend into honorable debate. I and others would greatly appreciate it if more exchanges on this site followed your example.

    felipe (6bb3ce)

  83. Beldar (fa637a) — 6/24/2016 @ 9:29 pm

    urbanleftbehind (3b5fd2) — 6/25/2016 @ 10:49 am

    With cheerful semblance and sweet majesty,
    That every wretch, pining and pale before,
    Beholding him, plucks comfort from his looks.
    A largess universal, like the sun,
    His liberal eye doth give to everyone,
    Thawing cold fear, that mean and gentle all
    Behold, as may unworthiness define,
    A little touch of Harry in the night.

    -Will I am Shakespeare, Henry V

    felipe (6bb3ce)

  84. So he tags me. Rubs my nose in it.

    Then steps off with, “You will keep order here. Stop your rough house. Mind your manners peas and cues.”

    Not meaning to highlight the hypocrisy. Just admiring your gall.

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  85. Even my liberal friends who are long-time Californians talk about how everything seems to be going to hell and our elected officials are idiots. Of course, they still vote the party line.

    ThOR (c9324e) — 6/25/2016 @ 12:01 am

    Liberals are immune to evidence. We’ve seen several real examples of this. Such as how every time a Muslim decides to kill in the name of Islam, and calls 911 to tell the dispatcher that is exactly what he’s doing, or pens or video records him giving a manifesto citing chapter and verse about whay he has no choice but to kill in the name of Islam (think Nidal Hassan and Michael Adebolajo, although there have been many others) we get insane statements how their motives are a complete mystery. But what we do know, according to these idiot liberals is that it can’t have anything to do with Islam.

    We have 1400 years of evidence that it does have everything to do with Islam. In fact, one of the leading insane idiots in this regard is of course President Tiger Beat. He has not problem 1) declaring the Islamic State “un-Islamic” while treating the Islamic Republic of Iran as very Islamic. And there is no difference in their ideologies. Perhaps the main difference is the Islamic Republic has more American blood on their hands.

    After the Charlie Hebdo massacre our Nag-in-Chief wagged his finger at us and lectured us about how no religion teaches that it is good to kill people over a cartoon. The issue isn’t cartoons or books, it’s “insulting the prophet and Islam.” Which is why one of the Ayatollahs in Tehran announced a year or so back that the fatwa calling for the murder of Salman Rushdie is “as fresh as ever.”

    There are so many issues where this is true. Immigration, economics, race relations, education, history in general. Liberals consistently don’t know what they are talking about and they flaunt it by doubling down on stupid. Especially these pols who, were are told, are always the smartest people in the world. They aren’t, despite their Ivy League educations. As George Orwell said, some ideas are so stupid only a highly educated person could possibly believe them.

    If you’re conceited, delusional, and therefore immune to evidence, it’s going to be impossible to connect cause to effect.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/06/brexit-eu/488597/

    Is it possible that leaders and elites had it all wrong?

    Possible? It’s not only possible, objectively it’s irrefutable.

    …If they’re to save the open global economy, maybe they need to protect their populations better against globalization’s most unwelcome consequences—of which mass migration is the very least welcome of them all?

    If any one person drove the United Kingdom out of the European Union, it was Angela Merkel, and her impulsive solo decision in the summer of 2015 to throw open Germany—and then all Europe—to 1.1 million Middle Eastern and North African migrants, with uncountable millions more to come. Merkel’s catastrophically negative example is one that perhaps should be avoided by U.S. politicians who seek to avert Trump-style populism in the United States. Instead, the politician who most directly opposes Donald Trump—presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton—is doubling down on Merkelism.

    Hillary Clinton’s first reaction to the Supreme Court decision on executive amnesty looks at the issue exclusively and entirely from the point of view of the migrants themselves: “Today’s heartbreaking #SCOTUS immigration ruling could tear apart 5 million families facing deportation. We must do better.” That U.S. citizens might have different interests—and that it is the interests of citizens that deserve the highest attention of officials elected by those citizens—went unsaid and apparently unconsidered. But somebody is considering it. And those somebodies, in their many millions, are being heard from this year: loud, clear, and angry.

    http://thefederalist.com/2016/06/22/the-persistence-of-washington-delusion/

    …The steady decline of confidence in institutions that began with Watergate and Vietnam is due to real failures of the elite leadership class. These failures undermined confidence not just in capacity to do good but in capability to represent interests. The list is familiar to you by now: Impeachment. 9/11. Iraq. Katrina. Congressional corruption. Financial meltdown. Failed stimulus. Obamacare. Stagnant wages. Diminished hopes. But oh, the party establishment was doing good? These middlemen Rauch puts on a pedestal – they were responding and managing and running things well? No. They were looking out for the interests of people other than those they were elected to serve. They were responding to the donor class and to the party leadership – the very people Rauch views as responsible balances against the populist tendencies of the electorate.

    …Square Rauch’s frame with the Benjy Sarlin report this week on the people who elected Trump, which is also quoted below. You can’t, because the latter offers actual data to show why people supported Trump, and I’ll give you a hint: it’s not because they’re angry about the lack of earmarks. It’s not that people believe their leadership class is corrupt – it’s that they know they’re stupid. It’s not that people are angry because a parking garage didn’t get built, it’s that they’re angry because the FBI can’t keep track of a terrorist’s wife.

    Sarlin’s piece illustrates, in clear data-driven reporting, the real basis for the breakdown of our Cold War era political reality: an utter collapse in the belief that our elites, elected or otherwise, have the capacity to represent…

    Steve57 (ecac13)

  86. “…and our elected officials are idiots. Of course, they still vote the party line.”

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again with an expectation of different results. Liberalism is indeed a mental disorder.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  87. For me, the decline in confidence in Federal institutions began with the Kennedy assassination and was confirmed with the atrocity of the Vietnam War. And, both events can be laid directly at the feet of Lyndon Johnson and his cabal of co-conspirators.

    ropelight (596f46)

  88. George i have no Will just quit the republican party to become a clinton sphincter swab.
    Take Ryan with you.

    mg (31009b)

  89. aphrael @72, I never said the situations were symmetrical. You’re missing the entire point. It isn’t that the UK wants a bilateral FTA with Panama (I have no idea that you got that idea). The point was that in situations that are far more asymmetrical than what exists between the US and the UK, or the UK and Germany or Japan, the country with the smaller economy/population still has *leverage* when it comes to negotiating bilateral FTAs.

    It is of much more benefit to the US to have access to the UK markets than to Panama’s. The point is that despite Obama’s idiotic remarks about how the UK would “go to the back of the queue” if they voted for Brexit, it would be stupid for the US to refuse to negotiate a bilateral FTA with the UK. As the fifth largest economy in the world, they still have plenty of leverage outside of membership in the EU.

    Is the US really supposed to esteem free trade with the UK less than it values trade with Morocco or Peru? That’s cutting off your nose to spite your face. Not that I don’t think Barack Obama would do it, because as the thin-skinned narcissistic little man he is I’m sure he just can’t forgive the British for not doing as he lectured an vote to remain in the EU. But Barack Obama only has seven months left in office and I can’t imagine any possible successor being willing to be so petty. Not even Hillary!; her rich corporate donors are paying for something, after all.

    Steve57 (ecac13)

  90. The best middle finger of all will be when all the elite Clinton republicans continue campaigning for the wide azzed muslim pimp and lose.

    mg (31009b)

  91. Our first priority should be that George Will’s exit from the GOP does not hurt working families.

    nk (dbc370)

  92. aphrael,

    It’s just bizarre the way left wingers are having a freak out about the UK negotiating its own trade deals.
    Portugal, Spain, Greece … those little mosquitoes can fend for themselves — can’t they? Or do they realllly need the former Imperial Crown to hold their hand and wipe their bottom for them?
    C’mon, this is the modern age, where everyone is equal! (LOL)
    Portugal doesn’t need the UK’s credit card! Do they? (LOL)

    (Oh, yesss they do.)

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  93. I don’t know, Cruz Supporter. You seem to need a rich, New York sugar-daddy to change your diapie and protect you from the big, bad boogie-lady.

    No, Spain, Italy, and Portugal do not need that cold little island in the North Atlantic. They managed to get along just fine without it until 1973 when it joined the EEC. Their grafting politicians might. But the people don’t need those, either.

    nk (dbc370)

  94. Not Spain, neither.

    nk (dbc370)

  95. nk,

    That’s cute.
    But I didn’t mention Italy.
    I mentioned Greece.

    Ultimately, it’s just a difference of opinion … you don’t believe Hillary’s all that bad, and you don’t believe the EU’s all that bad for the UK. But the rest of Europe needs the UK’s credit card. It is what it is.

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  96. Yeah, Greece. My mistake. The Greeks voted to get out, but Tsipras double-crossed them.

    nk (dbc370)

  97. You don’t know what I believe about the EU and the UK. I don’t really give a s***. The EU is a mercantile league which, under Merkel, got pretensions of being the Fourth Reich. Where Great Britain used to be can do whatever it wants.

    nk (dbc370)

  98. it is not merely a mercantile league, it has it’s tentacles into every aspect of human endeavour over there, political, legal, economic,

    narciso (732bc0)

  99. nevertrump sniffy-poos are on the wrong side of history

    this is what the brexit is whispering to us

    but it’s not too late to repent and accept Mr. The Donald as your savior

    i did!

    and it’s a fantastic feeling of joy, acceptance and unconditional love

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  100. Its only enforcement mechanisms are economic. Trade, banking, currency and (snicker*) visa-less tourism. If any country tells Merkel to go peddle her strudel. It’s a mercantile league with pretensions. Pretensions.

    *Americans have not needed a visa for most European countries since like forever and we’re not in the EU.

    nk (dbc370)

  101. Anyhow … Germany itself might rebel. Because of immigration.

    Example. My daughter came back from Berlin yesterday. There, you buy a bus and train pass but, but, but nobody checks it! Not a person, not a machine. Germans are a law-abiding people and they mostly self-police. But the non-Germans do not share that ethos, and soon enough Germans will rethink their open borders.

    nk (dbc370)

  102. The Mods just hate it when the Rockers kick their asses.
    More Triumph – Less Vespa!

    askeptic (bfa00e)

  103. i just wanna live in america again

    it’s been so long

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  104. askeptic (bfa00e) — 6/25/2016 @ 3:52 pm

    lol!

    felipe (6bb3ce)

  105. Unconfirmed reports that Ayatollah Khamenei has died

    “According to reports appearing in social media in the Gulf region Saturday evening, Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khameini has died. He was known to be gravely ill with cancer of the ass. Tehran has not so far posted word of his death.”

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  106. i love it how dead he is

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  107. poor valerie

    who’s her daddy now

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  108. “Metastasized into brain cancer due to cranial impaction…”

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  109. papertiger (c2d6da) — 6/25/2016 @ 12:33 pm

    lol, that’s funny, too.

    felipe (6bb3ce)

  110. I get where yer comin’ from Colonel, But I take no pleasure in anybody’s death. The only reason I get invited to parties, is because every party needs a pooper.

    felipe (6bb3ce)

  111. I don’t remember anyone taking him in the Howie Carr Death Pool. Protested against the chumpatolah at Harvard years ago.

    mg (31009b)

  112. I usually feel that way, felipe, but this guy is a special case.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  113. oh c’mon you guys hello

    would a lil virtue signaling kill ya

    génocidaires are people too

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  114. felipe, you’re a much better man than I. I take a great deal of pleasure when any enemy of America dies. Even the domestic ones.

    Rev. Hoagie® (734193)

  115. You are good men as well. I will not begrudge you a little mirth.

    felipe (6bb3ce)

  116. A CESSPIT OF CORRUPTION AND WEAPONS TRAFFICKING? Ex-Calif. State Sen. Leland Yee, gun control champion, heading to prison for weapons trafficking.

    Gimme Back My Bullets State Job by Leeland Yeeland

    Life is so strange when it’s changin’, yes indeed
    Well I’ve seen the good times but the pressure’s now on me
    Cuz now I’m servin’ like the criminal man do
    And I’ve got my bag all packed, my political career’s all thru

    Gimme back my state job
    Put me back where I belong
    Ain’t foolin’ around cuz my cell mate’s no fun
    Ain’t gonna see no, no more dim sum
    Gimme back my state job

    Investigators done shut my sweet scam down
    And I sold enough weapons to move a regiment around
    Now I’m bleedin’ anally, these guys ain’t usin’ lube
    I could use a barrel or three, don’t be sendin’ no damn tube

    Gimme back my state job
    Put me back where I belong
    Ain’t foolin’ around cuz my cell mate’s no fun
    Ain’t gonna see no, no more dim sum
    Gimme back, gimme back my state job
    Oh, put me back where I belong

    Been up and down since I turned twenty three
    I once was on my feet, but now I’m on my knees
    I used to drive big cars, Lexus or Mercedes Benz
    But that judge did tell me that I’d get it in the end
    Gimme back… gimme back my state job

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  117. The reaction is precisely what one must expect when a prisoner escapes cleanly and it becomes known that the method is easily repeatable. The commandant simply must make life as miserable as possible for that first escapee. Otherwise, his walls will cease to have any meaning or purpose.

    It’s the very same thing when any entity in charge is significantly challenged by an individual. Such radicals must be crushed, else others take heart and join the cause. See: IRS and Tea Party.

    Ed from SFV (3400a5)

  118. Maybe the Remain movement should open a new chapter in their fight against the majority of British voters: #NeverExit. There might even be a few commenters here that have some experience in such matters.

    ropelight (596f46)

  119. They haven’t lost a penny. Unless they dumped their stock at the lowered price. Which I doubt they did.

    nk (dbc370)

  120. When a sworn enemy of America dies, that’s a GOOD thing.

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  121. #117 Rev Hoagie,

    There’s a certain percentage of practicing Christians who ascribe to moral equivalency.
    They believe that shooting the aggressive burglar is equivalent to the aggressive burglar shooting an innocent homeowner.
    Is that kooky?
    Of course.

    It’s the same with Obama.
    He believes that Israel having nukes to act as a deterrent against its psychopathic enemies is the same as Iran’s Sicko Mullahs having nukes.

    What can we do?
    We can attempt to gently persuade them that their moral equivalencies are wrong. Some people love the innocent, while some people love the beast.

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  122. in case you were wondering, and you wonder how they got brexit so wrong:

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2016/06/new-reuters-poll-extremely-skewed-reality-trump/

    narciso (732bc0)

  123. everyone i know is voting for pervy harvardtrash mitt romney (write-in)

    at least everyone i know what wears dorky bowties and has a fat wife at home that frightens the crap out of them

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  124. george will by the way is sleazy sleazy princetonfilth

    this used to be a “respectable” failmerican rapeversity before respectability got winnowed down to harvard/yale

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  125. georgw will, who is that’ better check the cables, seriously he and krauthammeer and brooksie and gerson were all taken in by obama, they need a better recommendation,

    narciso (732bc0)

  126. #117 Hoagie,

    Some of the same holier-than-thou people who want to act all holy and forgiving toward Islamists will ironically not show you the same forgiveness if you tweak them in a comments thread at a blog.
    The irony is very biting. (LOL)

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  127. calling the peanut gallery is too charitable,

    https://twitter.com/afneil/status/746415478470483970

    narciso (732bc0)

  128. wtf is a juncker

    is there a vaccine

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  129. oh

    i see

    pouty eurotrash is pouty

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  130. Maybe the Remain movement should open a new chapter in their fight against the majority of British voters: #NeverExit. There might even be a few commenters here that have some experience in such matters.

    ropelight (596f46) — 6/25/2016 @ 6:55 pm

    ropeliar, do you enjoy showing off the fact you’re a man of limited intelligence?

    The Brexit vote was a national referenda. Unlike Brexit which was the choice of a majority of British voters across all party lines, Donald Trump has never been the choice of a majority American voters across all party lines.

    I hate to break the news to you, but you didn’t miss any general election while you were smoking crack. Unlike the Brexit vote, it hasn’t happened yet. It won’t happen until November.

    And Trump never won the majority of Republicans nationwide. I know math is hard for you trumptards, but a

    Steve57 (ecac13)

  131. Mr. ropelight is smart i always ask him about tricky math problems and philosophical conundrums

    you’re just mad cause harvardtrash ted and his sicky sicky sacky were roundly rejected in a fair and democratic brexit-like process

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  132. …a total of 31,081,626 voters cast their ballots in the 2016 GOP primaries. Half of that would be 15,540,813 votes. But Trump didn’t get that despite running virtually unopposed since Cruz suspended his campaign (Kasich was never even laughable opposition).

    He got 13,948,794 votes, which is 44.88% of the vote. Again I know math is hard for you, but 44.88% < 50%.

    So your analogy fails and every single level. But you thought it was clever.

    Steve57 (ecac13)

  133. i love how many votes Mr. Trump got in the primaries

    he got the perfect number of primary votes i think

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  134. The numbers don’t lie. It has nothing to do with being “mad.” It has to do with “math.”

    Math is so hard for you Trumptards you can’t even spell it? You all think it’s a three letter word that ends in “d.”

    http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P16/R

    Steve57 (ecac13)

  135. i’m going to my safe place

    too many stranger danger here

    and they trying to do spellings on me

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  136. Just got off the phone with her campaign. Hillary is amused by the strong en passant support she receives from conservatives.

    If you’re angling for favors though. (YouTube)

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  137. Steve57,

    Speaking of math, wait until Hillary’s IRS, VA, and Justice Department start to play with numbers. Then you’ll wish that Trump’s fans were debating you about the primaries. (LOL)

    Cruz Supporter (102c9a)

  138. the only reason harvardtrash ted and his sicky sicky sacky ran in the first place is cause food stamp opened the door for first-term harvardtrash senate-filth like ted to run

    this is not to say it was a Good Idea

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  139. So, papertiger, doing the math = supporting Hillary! now?

    Why are you a math denier, papertiger? Because if you crunch the numbers even if you browbeat every #NeverTrumper into voting for Trump, that won’t be near enough votes for him to win in a general election.

    Steve57 (ecac13)

  140. i like Mr. Trump

    hillary smells like that time my grandma died of a ruptured colon in an outhouse in new jersey in the middle of august

    terrible tragedy

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  141. i had to be strong for the family

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  142. If Hillary wins you get nothing. In fact worse than nothing. She’ll cost you.

    lets put it in formula.

    0 (zero) > Hillary + victory

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  143. It’s simple math Steve.

    You need a tutor?

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  144. summer bummer

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  145. look on the bright side hf – Grandma always wanted indoor plumbing. Now you have incentive.

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  146. bless you Mr. tiger

    all praise to the 1

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  147. all praise to the 1

    (not harvardtrash ted)

    (not sicky sicky)

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  148. Speaking of math, wait until Hillary’s IRS, VA, and Justice Department start to play with numbers. Then you’ll wish that Trump’s fans were debating you about the primaries. (LOL)

    And, so? Having Trump as a candidate practically guarantees Hillary! will be calling the shots at the IRS, VA, and DoJ. And he is doing that all on his own, without the help of the #NeverTrump wing of the GOP.

    He wasn’t a great candidate in the GOP primary; he couldn’t even get over 50% of Republican votes. Even if the Trumptards yell and scream and get the #NeverTrump crowd to vote for him and the GOP to unite behind him as the “lesser of two evils” that still won’t change the fact he will be a worse candidate in general election.

    He has done absolutely nothing to expand his appeal outside the Trumpkin crowd who supported him in the primary election. He’s had over a month and a half since Cruz dropped out to concentrate entirely on the general election. He should have been working on that; any smart candidate would know that. But he’s not done a damned thing to correct this or other shortcomings built into his campaign.

    Also Hillary! and the Superpacs that support her will spend between $1-2 billion between now and the general election. The Clinton campaign alone entered June with $42M cash on hand.

    And Trump? $1.3M.

    Hillary! isn’t just burying Trump in fund raising. She destroying him in every other category you can measure a campaign by. She has more campaign workers in Ohio than Trump has nationwide. Hillary! has a massive and professional data operation, the kind that helped get Obama elected to a second term despite the firsts term being a disaster. Trump has nothing of the kind. Moreover, and delusionally, he doesn’t recognize he needs one. Trump has had a year an half to put one to together, and he hasn’t.

    This is no longer about convincing me he’s the “lesser of two evils.” I’m not going to try to relitigate all his obvious shortcomings as a man. If Hillary! wasn’t running he’d be the worst person to every run for President. I’m talking about shortcomings which would apply to any candidate whether D or R. Donald Trump will not be able to rely on friendly press coverage with Hillary! as the Democratic nominee. She’ll get the friendly coverage. On top of that she’ll be able to outspend him 10 to 1. With that kind of spending advantage, and with the free help she’ll get from the LHMFM, she’ll be able to paint herself as an angel pure as the driven snow. And Trump could be an angel (he’s not, but for the sake of argument) and she can still make him out to be Lucifer incarnate.

    Then there are all her other organizational advantages. Trump is a lousy candidate in that sense. The sense that any other candidate would be a lousy candidate. Undisciplined, unfocused, and unorganized.

    Steve57 (ecac13)

  149. except that Mr. Trump is so good

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  150. 102. nevertrump sniffy-poos are on the wrong side of history

    this is what the brexit is whispering to us

    but it’s not too late to repent and accept Mr. The Donald as your savior

    i did!

    and it’s a fantastic feeling of joy, acceptance and unconditional love

    happyfeet (28a91b) — 6/25/2016 @ 3:28 pm

    ……

    “Fascism is a religious concept.”

    – Benito Mussolini

    Luke Stywalker (e7ca82)

  151. Having Trump as a candidate practically guarantees Hillary! will be calling the shots at the IRS, VA, and DoJ. And he is doing that all on his own, without the help of the #NeverTrump wing of the GOP.

    Trump > zero chance at presidency. Trump will be helped by these guys. And these guys.

    Hillary can’t guarantee who her husband is sleeping with tonight.

    papertiger (c2d6da)

  152. mg @93 Debka is very unreliable, and has been so for many years. I’m kind of surprised it is still around.

    Sammy Finkelman (7a22e4)

  153. nk (dbc370) — 6/25/2016 @ 3:42 pm

    My daughter came back from Berlin yesterday. There, you buy a bus and train pass but, but, but nobody checks it! Not a person, not a machine.

    I read they stop at red lights, too. Even in the middle of the night, with no traffic.

    Germans are a law-abiding people

    Whatever the law is – although that’s not true. People did try to illegally leave East Germany.

    Sammy Finkelman (c41e9f)


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