Patterico's Pontifications

9/8/2008

Killer of Three Was Indeed Illegal

Filed under: Crime,Deport the Criminals First,General,Immigration — Patterico @ 7:16 pm



Yesterday I reported that we might have another case of an illegal who killed multiple people, after authorities blew multiple chances to deport him. At the time, we didn’t have any official confirmation that authorities believe he was illegal.

Now we do:

U.S. immigration officials believe that the man accused of killing three people in an auto accident last week was born in Guatemala and is in this country illegally.

Francis Hernandez, 23, “may have entered the country in 1991,” said U.S. Immigration Control and Enforcement spokesman Carl Rusnok today.

On Thursday, police say, Hernandez drove a sport-utility vehicle into a pickup truck, sending it careening into a Baskin-Robbins ice-cream shop in Aurora. Two women in the truck were killed, and a 3-year-old boy who was waiting for ice cream inside the shop also died.

Hernandez has a lengthy arrest record and has used 11 aliases, police and court records show. ICE officials only heard about him after he was arrested trying to flee the scene of last week’s accident.

There are three people dead because authorities couldn’t get this man out of the country — even though he was in their clutches time and time and time and time again.

Deport the Criminals First.

22 Responses to “Killer of Three Was Indeed Illegal”

  1. Ideally, he would be convicted of second-degree murder, then “allowed” to serve his 20 year sentence in a Guatemalan prison.

    Kevin Murphy (0b2493)

  2. Deport the Criminals First.

    Perhaps Patterico would like to explain step-by-step exactly how he intends to get us to the point where even that somewhat misguided policy* could be made to happen.

    * If, say, John McCain came up with the same slogan, it would just be a prelude to legalizing all the millions of kind-hearted workers.

    24AheadDotCom (078238)

  3. You order the states to submit the particulars of arrestees. Immediately.

    Yes, it will cost money. But the first – substantial – slice isn’t too difficult. When you start with people who have “a lengthy arrest record”, you aren’t starting with twelve million people. You’ve already done the tricky part – seeing through the eleven aliases and recognizing this is the same guy.

    Demanding that everyone prove citizenship on their second arrest(!!) doesn’t seem overly onerous to the general populace.

    Al (b624ac)

  4. Kind of ironic that McCain was the dude who proposed a path to citizenship for the illegals.

    Pretty tough being a republican these days.

    jharp (ef54fc)

  5. Pretty tough being an American these days.

    I exaggerate but I couldn’t resist. The reality is that it’s great to be an American but it’s certainly difficult for the families of these 3 victims. I’m sure they feel their government let them down.

    DRJ (7568a2)

  6. Barack Obama on “undocumented aliens” and “citizenship”…

    But while security might start at our borders, it doesn’t end there. Millions of undocumented immigrants live and work here without our knowing their identity or their background. We need to strike a workable bargain with them. They have to acknowledge that breaking our immigration laws was wrong. They must pay a penalty, and abide by all of our laws going forward. They must earn the right to stay over a 6-year period, and then they must wait another 5 years as legal permanent residents before they become citizens.

    But in exchange for accepting those penalties, we must allow undocumented immigrants to come out of the shadows and step on a path toward full participation in our society. In fact, I will not support any bill that does not provide this earned path to citizenship for the undocumented population–not just for humanitarian reasons; not just because these people, having broken the law, did so for the best of motives, to try and provide a better life for their children and their grandchildren; but also because this is the only practical way we can get a handle on the population that is within our borders right now.

    Taken directly from Obama’s website from a Senate speech April, 2006 which looks to me like a path to citizenship for the illegals…

    tough to be a democratic these days….

    reff (b68a4f)

  7. Oh, good show, jharp. You are the epitome of grace and class.

    And it isn’t tough to be a small “r” republican at all — since that is the same thing as being an American.

    Icy Truth (a7ead4)

  8. SPQR….er….ah….sorry….I did it again….

    Damn, it is just so easy, I can’t resist….harpoons are so easy to throw….

    reff (b68a4f)

  9. Pretty tough being an American these days.

    Comment by DRJ — 9/8/2008 @ 9:17 pm

    For many if not most yes it is.

    Just how did we get here and who led us here?

    And to listen to the wingnuts we’re winning in Iraq, the economy is fine, and we need to elect 4 more years of George Bush. Go figure.

    jharp (ef54fc)

  10. “Taken directly from Obama’s website from a Senate speech April, 2006 which looks to me like a path to citizenship for the illegals…”

    I don’t think you understand. Mexican hating is a republican talking point. It is what drives the rednecks to vote against their own best interest.

    Most educated folks tend to think of it in a more reasonable and doable resolution.

    The fact that the wingnuts main man proposed a path to citizenship is an albatross around the neck of the GOP.

    jharp (ef54fc)

  11. A number of factors led us here, jharp, but there is a growing effort at local and state levels to fix it.

    DRJ (7568a2)

  12. Don’t confuse the person with facts, DRJ. Why, she or he thinks that laws are created by Presidents instead of Congress.

    Eric Blair (36c1a9)

  13. Oh, and I just saw:

    Most educated folks tend to think of it in a more reasonable and doable resolution.

    Educated folks“? That usually means people who agree with me.

    Scratch a leftie, and there we find a sniffing little elitist, just itching to show the rest of us slobs the more sophisticated and tres chic path.

    And yet it is the Republicans who are supposed to be all elitist and judgmental!

    Thanks for the chuckle.

    Eric Blair (36c1a9)

  14. Most educated folks simply want to see reasonable laws enforced….

    As opposed to proposals to change the reasonable laws changed to meet some diverse or perverse result….

    reff (b68a4f)

  15. Al states: You order the states to submit the particulars of arrestees. Immediately.

    Oddly enough, I’m reminded of things like this in cases like this:

    orangecow.org/pythonet/sketches/toridof.htm

    Neither Al nor Patterico have explained in detail exactly how we could reach a point where, for instance, we could “order the states to submit the particulars of arrestees”.

    Let me just cut to the chase. Any attempt to do things like “just deport the criminals first” is going to be opposed by a lot of people, and they have to be pushed back a bit before anything can happen. That means, for instance, that those who’d oppose things like deporting criminals have to be discredited.

    Let me suggest concentrating on doing that first.

    24AheadDotCom (698f21)

  16. “Most educated folks simply want to see reasonable laws enforced….”

    I’m with you.

    The GOP has been in charge of the Congress for 12 out of the past 14 years.

    And the White house for the past 8.

    Let’s put the blame where it belongs. Not all, but mostly the GOP.

    jharp (ef54fc)

  17. 24AheadDotCom,

    ICE already works with dozens, perhaps hundreds, of local law enforcement agencies to screen arrestees and jail inmates. The point is to get all communities and local law enforcement agencies on board.

    DRJ (7568a2)

  18. jharp,

    Presidents of both parties have been absent on this problem but the Bush Administration finally seems to be on board. The problem now is at the local and state levels.

    DRJ (7568a2)

  19. “Let me suggest concentrating on doing that first.”

    24AheadDotCom – Funny, I would have thought you might have figured out that is one of the purposes of this series of posts.

    daleyrocks (d9ec17)

  20. DRJ writes: ICE already works with dozens, perhaps hundreds, of local law enforcement agencies to screen arrestees and jail inmates. The point is to get all communities and local law enforcement agencies on board.

    I’m going to guess you didn’t see this page:

    orangecow.org/pythonet/sketches/toridof.htm

    As for daleyrocks’ comment, this series of posts has almost zero impact since it’s largely just preaching to the converted.

    24AheadDotCom (62c4c5)

  21. 24AheadDotCom,

    It does appear ICE blew it at Hernandez last arrest. What about the other 15 arrests in the last 5 years? Did local authorities contact ICE all those times, too?

    DRJ (7568a2)

  22. I’m in Seattle. Here, we don’t even give ICE a chance to blow it. The executive, legislative, and judicial positions are all in the position of complete refusal to cooperate with ICE in the slightest way.

    Actually, strike that. They do cooperate with ICE for people the establishment considers troublesome – politically. The case I remember best is a Somalii family that was running a convenience store. An armed and abusive burglar got shot… and the people defending their shop got deported. They weren’t charged – it was self-defense. And they were here legally, but the still got booted. (Status revoked.)

    This is precisely the situation that the entire concept of “Sanctuary Cities” is supposed to resolve. Now even the legal immigrants don’t want to talk to the police, wunderbar.

    Al (b624ac)


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