Patterico's Pontifications

1/29/2024

A Thought

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 8:07 pm



Political correctness, at its heart, is the impulse to impose ruinous consequences on people for saying things that are reasonable, but unpopular with the denizens of rage-filled fringe political communities.

Sounds a lot like what Trump cult members do to anyone who questions the Glorious Wisdom of Dear Leader Donald Trump.

Therefore, Trump cult members are purveyors of political correctness.

Discuss.

25 Responses to “A Thought”

  1. They have become that which they claim to hate.

    Patterico (b0145e)

  2. Yeah, many MAGA folks thinks Trump walks on water.

    He’s not unique in that regards… as one could argue that Obama supporters did the same things.

    Just call them out on their worship.

    whembly (c88dc4)

  3. Matt tabbi was just on mark levine show discussing what the democrat party has in store for trump and Rfk.jr. Also no label and green party. We have seen what they did to the democratic party primary and those running against Biden. The DNC plans to fight the 2024 election with lawyers instead of voters. If trump gets thru they plan to sabotage his presidency with lawsuits and general strikes. First they will go after voting to help democrat voters and go after republican voters. Read What Matt Taibbi says the DNC has in store for us. “Is the electoral fix already in!

    asset (81362a)

  4. From wikipedia: “The phrase politically correct first appeared in the 1930s, when it was used to describe dogmatic adherence to ideology in authoritarian regimes, such as Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia.”

    Well, there’s slavish devotion, not exactly to an ideology but to an almost cartoonish personality. I’ve always viewed political correctness as being about controlling language. You have to speak about things in a specific way as to not offend certain favored groups.

    Trumpism is almost the opposite: speaking in ways to intentionally offend alleged favored groups. You make fun of Carly Fiorina’s face or Nikki Haley’s name. Offensiveness is almost the point. Trump is admired because he has no filter and no shame. Rather than being viewed as childish, mean, and undisciplined, he’s viewed as authentic, amusing, and aggressive. With the emergence of reality tv and youtube, we as a people enjoy watching people behave badly. We’re beyond shock and need even more outrageous behavior to entertain us. Trump tapped into our worst selves.

    Political correctness dogmatically controls speech; Trumpism dogmatically prefers uncontrolled speech. They’re quite the pair…

    AJ_Liberty (cba8d1)

  5. Patterico, The current populist right (as well as the established lefty identity politics groups) are motivated in large part by grievance and will use any slight (perceived or real) to fuel their persecution complex. In some cases this is purely an effort to wield power / count coup, in other cases they genuinely believe the nonsense they espouse.

    AJ, I think you’re failing to separate how they speak about outgroups vs. how they react when others speak about them. I think the heart of the PC movement is to discuss issues in ways that aren’t offensive to the people you’re talking about. (Lower income minority children from multi-family homes vs. poor black kids raised by their grandmas). One of the flaws of this is that as soon as everyone understands the code it stops working as well.

    Also, as the National Review said Trump is the only middle finger available.

    Time123 (e84039)

  6. Asset: Dean Phillips and Marianne Williamson couldn’t be bothered to show basic competency and get onto state ballots via signature gathering. If they can’t do that, then they aren’t competent to be president either.

    Remember, Buttigieg – a no-name mayor in 2020 – was on all 50 states ballots. Williamson has name recognition, and both she and Phillips have enough money to have done so. That they chose not to speaks volumes.

    SamG (4e6c22)

  7. Perhaps “political incorrectness”?

    Kevin M (ed969f)

  8. Trumpism is almost the opposite: speaking in ways to intentionally offend alleged favored groups. You make fun of Carly Fiorina’s face or Nikki Haley’s name.

    Trump seems to be the lightning rod for the disaffected. The undereducated, the involuntarily celibate, the drunks, the “unfairly” unemployed, and those otherwise cast out from polite society.

    Biden seems to be the lightning rod for the smug, who have their own issues.

    Kevin M (ed969f)

  9. I agree with the consensus here. Personally, I find more than a measure of grace in woke speech codes even when they’re misapplied. There is no grace in Trumpism.

    But as another commenter might write, you have to no your odeons. Jerry Lee Lewis’s rock and roll career tanked when it was revealed that he had married a thirteen-year-old girl. So he switched to country music, where he enjoyed substantial success all the way to the Country Music Hall of Fame.

    Trump knows his audience.

    nk (733b1f)

  10. To some degree, speech codes are simple politeness.

    Politeness, as we all know, sometimes involves holding our tongue when not doing so would hurt others. We listen to Drunk Uncle Fred go on about whatever it is he goes on about at Thanksgiving, holding our response (and looking for an opportunity to disengage). We don’t say “Fred, you’re an idiot and you drink too much” even though that might be “what he really needs to hear.”

    So, finding myself in a social situation with some guy in a dress who prefers she/her, I attempt to avoid any pronouns but if pushed I choose the polite option. Even though I want to say something else.

    I too have issues with enforced politeness, but society tends to enforce that anyway without formal rules. Whatever.

    Trumpism, to me, often seems like screaming “f….t” in a gay bar.

    Kevin M (ed969f)

  11. Because we live in a very strange world, I teach first year college students once a year, I try to introduce ideas I learned from my father. He put things in a more earthy way than I do, but he was seldom wrong when it came to how to treat others.

    My late father’s first language was profanity. I mean, he was a truck driver, then an oil field worker, then a firefighter. As a boy, I pointed out that he did not curse in front of an elderly neighbor. Wasn’t that dishonest?, I asked him.

    “Kid, you don’t fart in church.”

    I put it a different way to my students, and it is SO relevant to our current crisis:

    “Honesty is not the same as tactlessness.”

    And Patterico #1: that is a curse worthy of Greek mythology. I hope that nk agrees.

    Simon Jester (c8876d)

  12. Trump asserts two things to defend against all criticism, according to Allahnick:

    1. The last election was stolen and the next election might be. This makes “electability” arguments ineffective.

    2. The Deep State and partisan prosecutors are filing false charges to weaken our great President. Anyone who brings up these lies is America’s enemy.

    My question is this: What portion of Trump supporters believe these things, and is everyone else “persuadable”?

    Kevin M (ed969f)

  13. This is a deep-seated human practice. Reinforcing tribal bona fides by mimetic screaming at outsiders transcends political definitions.

    Er . . . or maybe it *is* politics?

    Uh oh . . .

    Marc (586943)

  14. #11 — If you remember your Shakespeare, Iago (the most imfamous Shakespearean villain) did his horrible things by posing as an honest and blunt soldier. Many people think crude talk is honest talk, probably because there seems to be no artifice involved. (Clever people use complete sentences and big words).

    Appalled (f5bd29)

  15. Or, another thought, because there’s almost a religious quality to Trumpism, particularly that he values loyalty and devotion to him above all else, if you dispute or counter the Word of Trump, you’ll get excommunicated, like Nikki’s donors.

    Paul Montagu (d52d7d)

  16. Not only are Trumpers purveyors of political correctness. Trump himself is a RINO.

    No God-fearing, America-loving Republican would ever suggest “the termination of all rules, regulations, and articles, even those found in the Constitution”.

    norcal (a4966a)

  17. Speaking of Trumpism, did anyone see the recent season of “Fargo”

    Kevin M (ed969f)

  18. Kevin M (ed969f) — 1/30/2024 @ 9:48 am

    My question is this: What portion of Trump supporters believe these things, and is everyone else “persuadable” My question is this: What portion of Trump supporters believe these things, and is everyone else “persuadable” I don;t think these things determine votes.

    1. The last election was stolen and the next election might be. This makes “electability” arguments ineffective.

    A lot of his supporters believe such things but not strongly – they think it is possible. But it’s not why they favor Trump. To be against him they’d have to be convinced that Trump knows he that is wrong. They’d anyway consider other Republicans but to them it’s that Trump is the candidate already or the strongest one.

    2. The Deep State and partisan prosecutors are filing false charges to weaken our great President. Anyone who brings up these lies is America’s enemy.

    I think it is fairly obvious that many of these cases are unfair stretches, but I don’t think they think that anyone who brings up these cases is America’s enemy — but they may think they are echoing propaganda.

    Sammy Finkelman (1d215a)

  19. Speaking of Trumpism, did anyone see the recent season of “Fargo”

    Kevin M (ed969f) — 1/30/2024 @ 4:10 pm

    I’m one episode in. Episode one was fantastic. Movie quality, even. I’m glad to see the show returning to its roots. Season 4 was the first season of Fargo that didn’t grab me. (I didn’t even make it through Season 4.)

    norcal (1b378e)

  20. Political correctness has a special meaning limited to one point of view.

    Saying someone was “enslaved” rather than a slave, even though the person was not captured and turned into a slave is political correctness and a slave master should not be called an enslaver.

    No one but an absolute idiot would think that the term slave means slavery is legitimate and that you have to say enslaved.

    Sammy Finkelman (1d215a)

  21. > Trumpism, to me, often seems like screaming “f….t” in a gay bar.

    There’s an aspect of Trumpism which seems to be based in the premise that nobody should ever be polite in order to spare someone else’s feelings — or, rather, people who are part of the Trumpist in-group shouldn’t have to be polite to spare the feelings of anyone else, but those people should have to be polite to spare the feeligns of Trumpists.

    There’s a whole mindset of “f— your feelings” which is widely shared on the Trumpist side.

    aphrael (71d87c)

  22. > A lot of his supporters believe such things but not strongly – they think it is possible. But it’s not why they favor Trump. To be against him they’d have to be convinced that Trump knows he that is wrong. They’d anyway consider other Republicans but to them it’s that Trump is the candidate already or the strongest one.

    This is one of the things I don’t get.

    From my perspective, causing people to believe that the election was stolen is a massive attack on the legitimacy of the system and is inherently destabilizing and therefore dangerous to the Republic. For it to be ok to do, there must be *hard proof*; doing it without hard proof is an attack on the system and should be treated as such.

    I am baffled as to why so few people see it that way.

    aphrael (71d87c)

  23. @22 You guessed it its an attack on the system.

    asset (07282f)

  24. 22. A lot of people don’t consider that they know enough to evaluate whether the claims of fraud are true, but they tend to assume there must be a basis fort because they hear so many people saying it. Like: “Didn’t I hear something about 1 million ballots?”

    But there is no big election fraud except in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

    If people had knowledge, they’d know the difference between real cases and fake cases of election fraud.

    And the evidence never gets evaluated because Democrats never use the truth in their arguments. They prefer something stronger, and simpler. It polls better.

    Sammy Finkelman (1d215a)

  25. (when they test it out)

    Sammy Finkelman (1d215a)

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