Patterico's Pontifications

5/17/2019

USA Today: Georgetown to expel student after he sues over its handling of college admissions probe

Filed under: Crime,Education — DRJ @ 7:00 pm



[Headline from DRJ]

Georgetown to expel student after he sues over its handling of college admissions probe:

A Georgetown University undergraduate student whose dad has already pleaded guilty to paying $400,000 to the ringleader of a nationwide college admissions bribery scheme is now suing the school to try to stop disciplinary action from the university.

He is a junior and says he “had no knowledge” of his father’s payment.

Read more @ USA Today.

–DRJ

20 Responses to “USA Today: Georgetown to expel student after he sues over its handling of college admissions probe”

  1. Interesting theory: “You should have caught me when I first did it, so that I would not have wasted two years worth of time and tuition.”

    nk (dbc370)

  2. And what will Georgetown do with the members of its staff who worked with the facilitators of the admission?

    John B Boddie (66f464)

  3. And what will Georgetown do with the members of its staff who worked with the facilitators of the admission?

    It’s in the article…

    Dave (1bb933)

  4. The guy’s a junior, he knows from what? I say we give blanket amnesty to “Creamers”. Their parents may be criminals, but should they pay?

    Bellman (fc5c41)

  5. If he had no knowledge of what his father did, and he has been academically successful, why should he be punished? Perhaps, there will be an easy way to show his complicity. For example, some in the scandal won athletic scholarships for sports they didn’t play. What? So if he had a scholarship for lacrosse and he doesn’t know it is an indoor sport with 3 to a team, then he should be disqualified. (lacrosse is usually played outside, on a soccer like pitch, and no, there are more than 3 to side.)

    Milwaukee (b53bc2)

  6. Kid’s f***ed school-wise and career-wise no matter what. Hope daddy leaves him a good trust fund.

    nk (dbc370)

  7. I can see him being declared ineligible to re-register, but expelling him for his father’s actions seems harsh, and denying him 3 years of college credits seems indefensible in any case, unless they can show fraud with respect to classes or coursework.

    Kevin M (21ca15)

  8. Kid’s f***ed school-wise and career-wise no matter what.

    In an earlier age this wouldn’t be true, but Google is fracking forever.

    Kevin M (21ca15)

  9. And what will Georgetown do with the members of its staff who worked with the facilitators of the admission?

    Apparently it was a tennis coach who listed him as a potential player, and that may have been enough to get him in over the wire. His grades and SATS were allegedly within range, but then he’s white and from privilege, so there’s that. The tennis coach was caught out in 2017 and fired last year.

    But they let this kid stay another year. That in itself is going to cause the college some problems in the lawsuit.

    Kevin M (21ca15)

  10. Why didn’t the dad do the standard thing, and “donate” that money to the school?

    Kevin M (21ca15)

  11. What I got from the story is: you can get into Georgetown with SAT score of 1980 (aka 1320). It’s the top 10%, but it isn’t exactly stunning.

    Kevin M (21ca15)

  12. Hey he just followed america’s gold rule those with the gold rule. AmeriKKKa’s real pledge of allegiance. “I pledge allegiance to the capitalist flag (green like the dollar) and to the oligarchy for which it stands. One nation under the wealthy. with liberty and justice for the rich and the powerful.”

    lany (dd176d)

  13. I don’t buy “the kid didn’t know”.

    Why didn’t the dad do the standard thing, and “donate” that money to the school?

    Probably because the school isn’t corrupt and doesn’t sell admission.

    Dave (1bb933)

  14. I don’t buy “the kid didn’t know”.

    Hard to prove, and prove they must.

    Kevin M (21ca15)

  15. Hard to prove, and prove they must.

    Not so sure about that on several counts.

    First, it may depend on the fine print. The application may have given Georgetown the right to expel him at their sole discretion in certain cases, including fraud.

    Second, the application was submitted in his name and on his behalf. He was responsible for its accuracy, and if he didn’t know that elements of it were false, he should have.

    Third, I think they already have email evidence implying he was aware of the fraud. Discovery could turn up other incriminating email, text etc records.

    Dave (1bb933)

  16. Dave, how do they justify revoking his credits? Can they show that he didn’t do the work?

    Kevin M (21ca15)

  17. Can they even “revoke” his credits? Wouldn’t it be up to whatever other college he transfers to whether they want to give him credit for his courses at Georgetown? If he asks Georgetown for a transcript of the courses he took and his grades, how could they refuse it, no matter how much they asterisked it for irregularities in his admission?

    nk (dbc370)

  18. I don’t know what Georgetown’s policies are.

    If he obtained entrance by fraud (and clearly he did), then I don’t see why he’s entitled to any benefits that would accrue.

    If you defraud a bank into giving you a loan, invest the money on Wall Street, and make a fortune before they catch up to you, should you be allowed to keep your gains? Put me down as a “no”.

    Dave (1bb933)

  19. Off-topic, but since this is the only (slightly) current education-related thread…

    I’ve never heard of this guy before, but he’s got class:

    Morehouse College grads are surprised by a billionaire’s promise to pay off their student loans

    This guy was receiving an honorary degree and giving a commencement speech, and when he got to the end he announced he was paying off the student loans of all 396 graduates (reportedly about $40m worth).

    “I will never forget that my path was paved by my parents, grandparents and generations of African-Americans whose names I will never know,” Smith said. “Their struggles, their courage, and their progress allowed me to strive and achieve. My story would only be possible in America, and it is incumbent on all of us to pay this inheritance forward.”

    Those are the words of a great American.

    Dave (1bb933)

  20. 10. Kevin M (21ca15) — 5/18/2019 @ 12:19 am

    10.Why didn’t the dad do the standard thing, and “donate” that money to the school?

    It’s not guaranteed, and you can’t be crass about it, like it’s buying an admission; but what he did, Rick Singer told him, was guaranteed.

    The student may or may not have known he was supposed to be a tennis player, but he may not have known what that was all about. You have to be pretty deep into the college admission system to know that the tennis coach had the de facto power to admit someone (who was a reasonable admission) It wouldn’t be something really advertised.

    He can probably get the credits transferred in any case, and can take tests as well. It’s not like a nursing program where the entire course of study is taken as a whole – and not transferred except in units of degrees and even that can be tested for.

    Sammy Finkelman (3fda43)


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