Patterico's Pontifications

3/1/2021

Trump Is Making an Enemies List and Checking It Twice

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 8:29 am



I guess enemies lists are good now.

In an address on Sunday at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, his first public appearance since he left the White House, Mr. Trump read a sort of hit list of every congressional Republican who voted to impeach him, all but vowing revenge.

“The RINOs that we’re surrounded with will destroy the Republican Party and the American worker and will destroy our country itself,” he said, a reference to the phrase “Republicans In Name Only,” adding that he would be “actively working to elect strong, tough and smart Republican leaders.”

Mr. Trump took special care to single out Representative Liz Cheney, the third-ranking House Republican, and Senator Mitch McConnell, the minority leader. He called Ms. Cheney “a warmonger” and said her “poll numbers have dropped faster than any human being I’ve ever seen.” Then he falsely claimed he had helped revive Mr. McConnell’s campaign last year in Kentucky.

Watch as CPAC boos the names of the most courageous politicians in Washington.

We are living in the Upside Down.

84 Responses to “Trump Is Making an Enemies List and Checking It Twice”

  1. I used to worry about Lex Luthor becoming president. I should have been worried about Bizzarro.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  2. “The RINOs that we’re surrounded with will destroy the Republican Party and the American worker and will destroy our country itself,” he said, a reference to the phrase “Republicans In Name Only,” adding that he would be “actively working to elect strong, tough and smart Republican leaders.”

    And, to be fair, I have always claimed that a Republican is one who supported the Republcian Party, not those who opposed an insurgency. The wheel has fin ally come around to where they are using the term correctly.

    I am now a RINO.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  3. Dear Senator McConnell and the other cowards who tried to have their cake and eat it too:

    Trump has no loyalty for past actions towards any who transgress even once. The Emperor requires you remain abased. Lift your head up, even once, and snicker-snack goes the vorpal blade.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  4. Also:

    Trump has no loyalty even if you don’t lift your head up. If you are what stands between him and an applause line, too bad for you.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  5. I confess to being one who, given Trump’s 2016 surprise, was looking for the pony for 4 long years, eventually despairing. All of Trump’s mistakes, transgressions and poor judgement could be forgiven if only there was a pony hidden in the muck. His first debate “performance” where he simply acted out on TV (“fought” in Trumpist parlance) was the last straw for me, as I accepted that there was no redeeming value.

    By the time we got to Jan 6th, which I suspect shocked even his long-time detractors, I had thoroughly parted company, but was sure the GOP would not acquiesce to a treasonous Trump.

    Sadly, they have. No ponies left there, either.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  6. It’s been obvious for sme time that the major roadblock between Mr. Trump and his dreams of glory is Mr. Trump himself. All the available evidence points to the fact that he is a purebred RINO and has been since he declared himself to be a republican. Is he writing his list on a Mobius strip?

    John B Boddie (d795fd)

  7. Cocaine Mitch’s office is festooned with the skulls of political opponents who tried to topple him, and at home he wears a necklace consisting of each one of their left index fingers.

    JVW (ee64e4)

  8. According to a NRA tweet, the second amendment protects the first amendment. I hope Google, Facebook, and Twitter’s campus’s are more secure than the Capitol building was.

    https://twitter.com/NRA/status/1365109967519436801

    Purple Haze (34bae0)

  9. If Trump’s influence is persistent he will wreck the careers of those how opposed him.
    If his influence fades they’ll likely have more prominence then the sycophants and cowards.

    But neither group will lead the GOP. The GOP will be lead by the next person to tape into the fears and rage the republican base feels at their loss of cultural power and relevance.

    Time123 (ca85c9)

  10. Cocaine Mitch’s office is festooned with the skulls of political opponents who tried to topple him, and at home he wears a necklace consisting of each one of their left index fingers.

    JVW (ee64e4) — 3/1/2021 @ 10:04 am

    I think it was McCardle who said

    “Susan Collins sits on the throne made from the skulls of people who have tried to take her senate seat. It’s on the porch of a cute little cape code overlooking the bay.”

    Time123 (ca85c9)

  11. According to a NRA tweet, the second amendment protects the first amendment. I hope Google, Facebook, and Twitter’s campus’s are more secure than the Capitol building was.

    https://twitter.com/NRA/status/1365109967519436801

    Purple Haze (34bae0) — 3/1/2021 @ 10:04 am

    These private companies better watch what they do with their property or righteous conservatives wearing don’t tread on me t-shirts will storm their offices and kill them. If the police try to stop them they’ll beat the officers with blue lives matter flags.

    Time123 (ca85c9)

  12. Well punishing your enemies is a kind of ethos. So it’s not like he has no principles.

    Victor (4959fb)

  13. Heh! Trump is playing for big stakes, comrades. 74 million marks with each mark potentially getting a $1,600 check shortly. That’s one hundred eighteen billion, four hundred million dollars ($118,000,000,000) Discount the numbers any way you want — we’re still talking a lotta moolah up for grabs by the right reelection campaign and the right leadership PAC.

    nk (1d9030)


  14. According to a NRA tweet, the second amendment protects the first amendment. I hope Google, Facebook, and Twitter’s campus’s are more secure than the Capitol building was.

    Damn few guns were in evidence Jan 6, and most of those were in the hands of authorities. So this is just a non-sequitur.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  15. The Jan 6th attack seems to have been a success.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  16. > but was sure the GOP would not acquiesce to a treasonous Trump

    they are now his party, in heart and in soul and in body. Given the opportunity, they will support him becoming a dictator, because they are incapable of opposing him on *anything*.

    trump, and his adherents, are the biggest threat to the republic since the civil war, and there is a *very* good chance the republic doesn’t survive this.

    aphrael (4c4719)

  17. Well punishing your enemies is a kind of ethos.

    Republicans had the vapors when Obama said: “we’re going to punish our enemies and we’re going to reward our friends who stand with us on issues that are important to us.” He later tempered his remark; “I probably should have used the word ‘opponents’ instead of enemies.” He understood that his divisive language was not appropriate coming from the president of all the people.

    Also, Obama had drawn the dividing line on “issues that are important to us.”

    Trump tries to do that, but he can’t help coming back to what’s really important to him: Are people praising him or criticizing him? At CPAC, he once again made it abundantly clear that his central guiding principle is ego. Anyone who injures Donald Trump’s ego must be punished.

    Now we have a political party that has essentially adopted that rule as its guiding principle.

    Radegunda (f4d5c0)

  18. 3. Kevin M (ab1c11) — 3/1/2021 @ 9:36 am

    Trump has no loyalty for past actions towards any who transgress even once. The Emperor requires you remain abased. Lift your head up, even once, and snicker-snack goes the vorpal blade.

    With the exception of Lindsey Graham.

    https://www.huffpost.com/entry/lindsey-graham-hypocrisy-new-attack-ad_n_5ec7ceb8c5b68c7e2a8634e1

    AND

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/transcript-sen-lindsey-graham-on-face-the-nation-february-7-2021

    MARGARET BRENNAN: You’ve known the Biden family for years. Have you spoken to the president since inauguration?

    SEN. GRAHAM: No, I haven’t. Congratulations to- to him. He’s the legitimate president…

    BUT

    https://nypost.com/2021/02/23/heres-what-lindsey-graham-trump-discussed-over-the-weekend

    The two “just talked about the 2022 cycle,” Graham explained, adding that, “He’s very involved in helping the team win.”

    Trump “made a bunch of phone calls,” specifically with GOP senators, and is “trying to get the best team on the field.”

    When asked by a CNN reporter which senators he spoke to, Graham declined to say, only noting that Trump’s message was, “You’ve been there for me and I’ll be there for you.”

    He’s like Talleyrand.

    Sammy Finkelman (57e37d)

  19. I think it was McCardle who said. . .

    I like it, though I don’t recall having heard it before. If I am cribbing from Megan McCardle, then at least I’m cribbing from a writer whose work I admire.

    JVW (ee64e4)

  20. Ooooo… let’s call it an Enemies List…. Ooooo…. scary

    JF (202b93)

  21. Ooooo… let’s call it an Enemies List…. Ooooo…. scary

    When a major political party tethers itself to someone who believes that the greatest of evils is to hurt his ego and who has no moral qualms about using public resources and power for his own benefit, and when that party then sets out punish his critics for criticizing him, it is, in fact, concerning.

    Radegunda (f4d5c0)

  22. Trump lost the Presidency…and under his leadership, he lost the House and Senate. It’s unclear what the positive direction he has for the party. Trump seems dedicated to making the GOP smaller and smaller….and keeping it primarily about bending the knee to him and excusing his transgressions. Demand better.

    AJ_Liberty (ec7f74)

  23. “CONSERVATIVE Political Action Committee,” huh? I struggle to see what is remotely conservative about this group, and especially about the orange Messiah it idolizes (and has even made a graven image of). You could not point to any conservative policy ideas, mainly because this rabble appears not to be at all interested in matters of policy. It’s sad to see a major part hijacked by this lunacy, but to me it’s beyond sad to see the word “conservative” besmirched by people who can attach no constructive meaning to it.

    Roger (e34354)

  24. Mr. President-Reject Donald saw fit to explain what Trumpism means last night, comrades!

    “It means no riots in the streets. It means law enforcement.”

    Dave (1bb933)

  25. Yesterday:

    “Republicans should be the party of honest elections that can give everyone confidence in the future of our country.”

    January:

    “So look. All I want to do is this. I just want to find 11,780 votes, which is one more than we have because we won the state.”

    Dave (1bb933)

  26. Trump is supporting the new populist republican party giving it a future with minorities. As I said in earlier post 74,000,000 may not all love trump :but most ( I said all error on my part ) hate milton friedman and ergonomics. Trump opposed free trade policy, selling out to china and supported social security and medicare which are socialist programs. The republican voters demonstrated the old republican party was a hollow shell run by the donor class of wealthy economic libertarian supports of milton friedman. The majority of republican are former white trash democrats brought into the party by nixon’s southern strategy. They are populists not milton friedman economic libertarians supporting his capitalisms creative destruction applied viciously by mitt romney and the rest of the vulture capitalists. At least the neo-con war mongers like liz cheney are being marginalized if not right driven out. Their open border policy now being supported by joe biden has discredited the corporatist donor class as the disaster it always was.

    asset (a737e1)

  27. Dave —

    Here’s some hope from the Peach State

    https://apnews.com/article/donald-trump-biden-cabinet-georgia-general-elections-elections-391e7bbb49678d6304110e9644d3b7c6

    Georgia prosecutor investigating Trump call urges patience

    Appalled (1a17de)

  28. I understand some in the media are finding Nazi symbols hidden in the CPAC stage? WTF?

    Hoi Polloi (7cefeb)

  29. I understand some in the media are finding Nazi symbols hidden in the CPAC stage? WTF?

    Nonsense.

    It wasn’t hidden at all.

    Dave (1bb933)

  30. Can someone who disagrees with me explain how ashli babbet or the guy with the painted face and buffalo horns is not a white trash democrat populist :but a william f. buckley milton friedman acolyte? I am a NON-ignorant southern white trash democrat myself and I know these people. I grew up around them.

    asset (a737e1)

  31. It’s been a long, long time since democrats and those guys were the same group. The GOP is the party that wants a Muslim ban or wants to call a virus “CHINESE FLU” to make sure it has a nationality.

    But yeah, 75 years ago these folks are democrats with white sheets.

    We have to accept that there is no neat binary choice. Abortion, spending, race, guns, environmentalism, war, federalism, health care, speech, they simply do not neatly line up in two groups. One can support a couple of these on the ‘left’ and a couple on the ‘right’ and be totally reasonable and consistent. Lots of people want the freedom from government so you can do what you want in your bedroom, with whatever guns you want in your closet. Lots of people think otherwise.

    The political parties are a trick where they highlight the right parts as the more dire emergency, while the other party highlights their right parts as their more dire emergency.

    This is why my city council (Austin suburb) were talking about “drag queens” and gun control last week while the water wasn’t drinkable. It’s why AOC is talking about student loan relief instead of enforcing immigration laws to protect jobs (or why Greg Abbott would talk about the opposite).

    It’s a shame we can’t just have American Idol elections every week where we can phone in our vote on each little issue, with a dramatic episode discussing each point of view. Just straight up direct democracy glued to the boob tube.

    Dustin (4237e0)

  32. @31 It was 1980 that reagan went down to philadelphia mississippi to give a speech to the klansmen welcoming them in to the republican party. I use the term ignorant southern white trash democrats as simple way to delineate these people. They are now growing up ignorant white rash republicans. Party is the only difference they are still populists.

    asset (791eae)

  33. Can someone who disagrees with me explain how ashli babbet or the guy with the painted face and buffalo horns is not a white trash democrat populist :but a william f. buckley milton friedman acolyte? I am a NON-ignorant southern white trash democrat myself and I know these people. I grew up around them.

    asset (a737e1) — 3/1/2021 @ 2:09 pm

    You’re trying to fit a square peg into a round hole. The parties don’t split on populist / free trade lines.

    Time123 (b87ded)

  34. Meatloaf impacted in the lower colon
    Diet Coke gurgles in the upper
    A toothless dog snarls at gerbils
    Losers

    nk (1d9030)

  35. @33 Only because the wealthy donor class in both partys are for free trade and their voters are not.

    asset (791eae)

  36. @31 It was 1980 that reagan went down to philadelphia mississippi to give a speech to the klansmen welcoming them in to the republican party. I use the term ignorant southern white trash democrats as simple way to delineate these people. They are now growing up ignorant white rash republicans. Party is the only difference they are still populists.

    asset (791eae) — 3/1/2021 @ 3:54 pm

    Oh I get ya. Time123 is right and in line with my point, but I guess it doesn’t matter now. There is basically one viable political party now.

    Dustin (4237e0)

  37. Only because the wealthy donor class in both partys are for free trade and their voters are not.

    What a load of rubbish. Free trade raises the standard of living for the whole country by making our money buy more of the things we want. It made the United States the wealthiest and most powerful nation in history.

    Protectionism, on the other hand, impoverishes us. Protectionism is the government imposing its choices on your spending, making you pay more so their favored corporate allies can profit without competing or innovating. It’s socialism for the wealthy: stealing purchasing power from the working class and transferring it to the well-connected.

    Dave (1bb933)

  38. @28. I understand some in the media are finding Nazi symbols hidden in the CPAC stage? WTF?

    ‘Right’ under foot; like the SS graves Ronnie graced at Bitburg:

    Frank Zappa – Reagan at Bitburg Lyrics

    genius.com/Frank-zappa-reagan-at-bitburg-lyrics

    ‘This song is about President Ronald Reagan’s visit to a Nazi cemetery in Bitburg, Germany in 1985, where he said that the Nazi dead were just as much victims as the Jews murdered in the Holocaust…’

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  39. Nonsense.

    It wasn’t hidden at all.
    Dave (1bb933) — 3/1/2021 @ 1:47 pm

    Can you point to it then? Coworker talking to another coworker about it within earshot. I looked and couldn’t find it.

    Did Q point this out or something?

    Hoi Polloi (b28058)

  40. “Can you point to it then?”

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/cpac-stage-nazi-symbol/

    Davethulhu (6ba00b)

  41. Prinz Eugen SS operated only in occupied Yugoslavia and it was a hodgepodge of German-Germans and Balkans, the bulk of the later being ethnic Germans living in Yugoslavia … like the Knausses … as in Melania. So who knows? Coincidence?

    nk (1d9030)

  42. Snopes says a “a number of Nazi divisions during the early 20th century”, but only identifies Prinz Eugen. Snopes will be Snopes.

    nk (1d9030)

  43. Speaking on the possible #1 of this list, echoes of Harry Reid?

    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/mitt-romney-injured-knocked-unconscious-022434556.html

    urbanleftbehind (fcc3f4)

  44. The fringe extremists that form the core of Trump’s cult are not populists, because Trump is not a populist. None of the policies he pursued can be described as populists. His tax bill, for example, heavily favored the wealthy and corporations, and disfavored the middle and lower classes, and that is the opposite of the kind of tax plan a populist would enact.

    More accurately, the people are white nationalists and isolationists. Scaramucci said as much to Anderson Cooper tonight. He correctly noted that most Republicans try to expand their base by appealing to Independents and center-right Democrats, which is what Adam Kinzinger is trying to do with countryfirst.com site, but not Trump. Scaramucci said Trump only intends to deepen and strengthen his white nationalist base, which will result in further marginalizing the party. That’s why Liz Cheney said Trump has no place leading the Republican party or the country.

    As to the stage design at TPAC “resembling” the Odal Rune worn by the Waffen SS and other Nazi military units, the reason why reporters are hesitant to say it IS the Odal Rune is because they don’t want to appear to be accusing the Republicans of being Neo-Nazis. Thus, they question whether the design was deliberate or not.

    I think it was. Maybe Trump didn’t come up with the idea, but it wouldn’t surprise me, because the design fits in with his plan to deepen and strengthen his support among white nationalists, white supremacists, and Neo-Nazis. It’s a form of code, like the hand signal used by several extremist groups. The Ku Klux Klan has their own symbol, so I doubt the Odal Rune was intended for them, but Trump certainly welcomes their support in his white nationalist cult.

    During WW II, the SS and other Nazi units wore the Odal Rune on their collars in place of the Swastika. After the war, when the Swastika was banned throughout Europe, it became the preferred symbol for white nationalist and white supremacist groups. It is also used by white nationalist and white supremacist groups in the United States, however Neo-Nazis still use the Swastika because it has not been banned here. First amendment concerns and all that.

    Trump is a demagogue, a malignant narcissist with a persecution complex, so of course he has an enemies list of Representatives who voted to impeach and Senators who voted to convict him. He has tens of millions in his PACS and the joint Super PAC with the RNC, which he intends to use for travel expenses, to hold rallies, and to contribute to the campaigns of his loyalists and the campaigns of opponents of those he feels are disloyal to him in the primaries. He could be a disruptive force within the party for at least two years. That’s why the Republicans cower before him and make excuses for him.

    However, I think his influence will wane before he does too much damage. His act is getting tired and his lies are getting old, and only appeal to the hard core of his shrinking base. Besides, the American people overwhelmingly rejected him in the last election. When the state prosecutions and civil lawsuits begin to fill the news cycles in six months or a year or so, his brand will become increasingly tarnished. And I’m still wondering where he’s going to get the hundreds of millions he owes to foreign banks and lenders, in a balloon note that comes due within two years. His hotels, properties, resorts and golf courses are losing money; no bank is going to give him a loan, not when he’s under prosecution; and he’s on the verge of bankruptcy, for the fifth time.

    All of this will come to a fore in the months preceding the primaries. So while his cultists, loyalists and sycophants are caught up in the fury over the election now, that too will fade before too long. Not to mention that the unforgivable insurrection he incited and the violent siege on the Capitol on Jan. 6, the darkest day in American history, has changed the dynamics of the elections in 2022 and 2024. The anger real Americans and true patriots feel about that ugliest of events has not been fully realized yet, but it has not been forgotten. It’s simmering and will be unleashed in every election Trump tries to influence for the foreseeable future.

    In short, it’s over. It may not seem like it now, but the Trump era is over. It’s so over, it’s extinct.

    Gawain's Ghost (b25cd1)

  45. The CPAC symbol is a generic design that’s been used countless times, but any way to attach Nazi to a conservative group will be done, no matter how obscure. It’s to hide from the Nazi and Maoist desires of the left to eliminate all competition to their perfect world.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  46. @46, if it’s been used countless times as you assert can you provide a couple examples?

    Time123 (9f42ee)

  47. No I can’t because it’s never been an issue. Have you even heard of the symbol before the lunatic left dug it up for this event? Look at the pattern. It’s generic. You know that. But it’s fun to tar people in this day and age and pretend to be virtuous when you’re really just being evil.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  48. GG:

    Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. Until you can show it was Trump who designed the stage and CPAC who insisted on the design, you don’t have enough for speculation.

    The thing all of us have to be careful about is being led down a path because it just fits in with hat we strongly believe. The Lincoln Project just made a ton of money off people like us by doing that very thing.

    Appalled (1a17de)

  49. No I can’t because it’s never been an issue. Have you even heard of the symbol before the lunatic left dug it up for this event? Look at the pattern. It’s generic. You know that. But it’s fun to tar people in this day and age and pretend to be virtuous when you’re really just being evil.

    NJRob (eb56c3) — 3/2/2021 @ 6:41 am

    So you were just making it up that it’s been used many times before. I was open to that argument, and I’m open to the argument that it’s generic. It’s not a commonly used nazi symbol. But, because of how beloved Trump is by the neo-nazi/white nationalists/alt right and how hard it’s been for him to distance himself from that filth it’s hard to dismiss this sort of thing out of hand.

    Time123 (b0628d)

  50. No, I’m saying look at the pattern. It’s generic. It’s a stage. No one went down the rabbit hole that before that you’re flying down at warp speed. It’s the same lunacy that’s causing people to ban books left and right like just happened to Dr Seuss. Dr freaking Seuss. It’s out of control. Step on the break man.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  51. brake*

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  52. No, I’m saying look at the pattern. It’s generic. It’s a stage. No one went down the rabbit hole that before that you’re flying down at warp speed. It’s the same lunacy that’s causing people to ban books left and right like just happened to Dr Seuss. Dr freaking Seuss. It’s out of control. Step on the break man.

    NJRob (eb56c3) — 3/2/2021 @ 7:58 am

    Pre-Trump this sort of thing seemed silly. Now, tat the head of the GOP was strongly supported, and has had a terribly hard time pushing back on, the scum bags that like this sort of thing it’s a lot less silly. I like to make conclusions based on data. Your initial claim that this symbol had been used many times before would have been a good data point that it was silly. But you don’t have that, just that it’s generic.

    I’m not really trying to change your mind. Just explaining why I was asking. Absent more evidence like what you originally suggested this will just be another example of an innocent coincidence.

    btw, I have no idea what you’re talking about with Dr. Seuss. Have his publishers decided to duplicate the potatoe head marketing plan?

    Time123 (b0628d)

  53. asset (791eae) — 3/1/2021 @ 3:54 pm

    Actually, it was Carter who gave his opening speech in a MS town where the KKK was headquartered. Reagan gave his speech at the Neshoba County Fair, seven miles from Philly, MS. Glenn and Dukakis also spoke there when they were candidates.

    Paul Montagu (77c694)

  54. https://www.campusreform.org/article?id=16849

    The madness is all consuming.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  55. https://www.campusreform.org/article?id=16849

    The madness is all consuming.

    NJRob (eb56c3) — 3/2/2021 @ 8:56 am

    This strikes you as all consuming madness?

    Cornell University trustees approved a request from faculty to change the “Department of English” to the “Department of Literatures in English” in the interest of fighting racism. Professor Kate McCullough said that the rebranding would help to avoid the “conflation of English as a language and English as a nationality.”

    It strikes me as people having too much time on their hands and making tiny change no one will care about.

    Time123 (ae9d89)

  56. ” if it’s been used countless times as you assert can you provide a couple examples?”

    There’s been enough time since the story broke for counter examples to have been revealed, and so far I haven’t seen any.

    The stage design is absolutely deliberate, probably by one of the same smirking chuds that you see posing for pictures making the “ok” sign.

    Davethulhu (6ba00b)

  57. “It’s the same lunacy that’s causing people to ban books left and right like just happened to Dr Seuss”

    Who banned Dr. Seuss, NJRob? Name names.

    Davethulhu (6ba00b)

  58. Time123,

    it’s a sign of a deep, deep delusion.

    I don’t see how you could’ve read the article and missed this:

    After faculty overwhelmingly affirmed the measure, they awaited permission from administrators to implement the name change. The Board of Trustees approved the name change in January, and the department’s site currently reflects the new name.

    Cornell University spokeswoman Abby Butler directed Campus Reform toward a statement saying that the name change is part of “decolonization efforts” inspired by universities around the world.

    According to the statement, Professor Caroline Levine — who supported the measure — said that the “British Empire invented English as an academic discipline as part of a dedicated effort to persuade Indian subjects to view England as a culture superior to their own and so to acquiesce to English rule.”

    “The connection between literary studies and political power is nothing new, and as our society has grown more plural, so has our literature,” she wrote in the department’s newsletter. “Today, as our own historical moment is prompting us to reflect seriously on long histories of racism in culture and institutions, it seems important to recognize the many writers of color around the world who are producing literatures in English.”

    Levine told Campus Reform that she was referencing Gauri Viswanathan’s Masks of Conquest, which “argues forcefully that the curricular study of English can no longer be understood innocently of or inattentively to the imperial contexts in which the discipline first articulated its mission,” according to Columbia University Press.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  59. Go for it Thulu. It’s right there on the internet. Hounding the publisher and getting them to cancel their own books. Good job with the mob. The Taliban is envious of their success.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  60. Looks like Patterico has an opinion on the mob going after Dr Seuss. He’s posted on it.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  61. Time123,

    it’s a sign of a deep, deep delusion.

    I don’t see how you could’ve read the article and missed this:

    After faculty overwhelmingly affirmed the measure, they awaited permission from administrators to implement the name change. The Board of Trustees approved the name change in January, and the department’s site currently reflects the new name.

    Cornell University spokeswoman Abby Butler directed Campus Reform toward a statement saying that the name change is part of “decolonization efforts” inspired by universities around the world.

    According to the statement, Professor Caroline Levine — who supported the measure — said that the “British Empire invented English as an academic discipline as part of a dedicated effort to persuade Indian subjects to view England as a culture superior to their own and so to acquiesce to English rule.”

    “The connection between literary studies and political power is nothing new, and as our society has grown more plural, so has our literature,” she wrote in the department’s newsletter. “Today, as our own historical moment is prompting us to reflect seriously on long histories of racism in culture and institutions, it seems important to recognize the many writers of color around the world who are producing literatures in English.”

    Levine told Campus Reform that she was referencing Gauri Viswanathan’s Masks of Conquest, which “argues forcefully that the curricular study of English can no longer be understood innocently of or inattentively to the imperial contexts in which the discipline first articulated its mission,” according to Columbia University Press.

    NJRob (eb56c3) — 3/2/2021 @ 9:14 am

    1. This all resulted in a trivial change of name for the department.
    2. What in the quoted text do you feel is objectionable? I’m honestly not seeing it.

    Time123 (b0628d)

  62. I don’t have a problem with Cornell changing the name to the Department of Literatures in English, except to say that it’s inane.

    The scholars who wrote The Story of English, McCrum, Cran and MacNeil, don’t even call it “English” anymore. Rather, they call it Globish in their new book, because it is the preferred language spoken all around the globe.

    The thing is that the history of the English language mirrors the history of England. As a small group of islands off the coast of Europe, it has been subject to invasion after invasion for thousands of years. First the Celts, then the Britons, the Scandinavians, the Angles, the Saxons, the Normans, and so on and so on.

    What we call Old English, the language of Beowulf, is actually Danish Old German, which became Anglo-Saxon. What happened is after the ascension of Constantine and the rise of the Holy Roman Empire, Latin became the language of the Church. Then after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror, French became the language of the Court. But the common people spoke Anglo-Saxon. Hence, the language adapted.

    It changed from an inflected language, in which word-endings determine grammatical function in a sentence, to a word-ordered language–subject, verb, object. Thus, English became a language of languages, because any word from any language could be added to the vocabulary simply by placing it in the appropriate position in a sentence. This was especially true after the invention of the Guttenberg press, which allowed the printing of ancient texts and books in other languages.

    As the British Empire grew to encompass the globe, the English language kept adopting more and more words from every language. Today, the English language has over 1.2 million vocabulary words and adds about 20,000 new words a year. The second largest language in terms of vocabulary is German, with around 250,000 words. That’s why English is now called Globish.

    What these professors at Cornell are doing by changing the department name is ignoring reality. They’re more responding to the white nationalist movement, because the see English as the language of white nationalists and therefore as discriminatory, rather than promoting the study of literature and seeing Globish as an all-inclusive language. It’s inane, but not unexpected.

    Gawain's Ghost (b25cd1)

  63. I don’t have a problem with Cornell changing the name to the Department of Literatures in English, except to say that it’s inane.

    This feels right and the rest of your comment is a good read.

    I would like to better understand what Rob is objecting to because I’d honestly like to understand it better.

    Time123 (c9382b)

  64. The department name change sounds like a response to a conversation that’s been going on for at least 30 years and probably much longer(I remember it from when I was in college in the 90s and it was an oldish conversation then) about the “purity” of the English curriculum. The discussion was basically regarding the traditional English curriculum of almost entirely British, mostly male, mostly white (because, you know, British) writers vs opening it up to include a greater variety of voices of people writing in English so that you end up with more Irish writers, or American writers or Caribbean writers or Indian writers. This looks like Cornell going, yeah, we’re done with that conversation, here’s our conclusion,

    And part of the creation of the original “traditional” curriculum and then the resistance to adding more voices probably was partially British jingoism. They have a history of thinking they are better than everyone else.

    Nic (896fdf)

  65. The department name change sounds like a response to a conversation that’s been going on for at least 30 years and probably much longer(I remember it from when I was in college in the 90s and it was an oldish conversation then) about the “purity” of the English curriculum. The discussion was basically regarding the traditional English curriculum of almost entirely British, mostly male, mostly white (because, you know, British) writers vs opening it up to include a greater variety of voices of people writing in English so that you end up with more Irish writers, or American writers or Caribbean writers or Indian writers. This looks like Cornell going, yeah, we’re done with that conversation, here’s our conclusion,

    And part of the creation of the original “traditional” curriculum and then the resistance to adding more voices probably was partially British jingoism. They have a history of thinking they are better than everyone else.

    Nic (896fdf) — 3/2/2021 @ 12:43 pm

    When it came to making people into colonies they had a decent argument to make that they were.

    Time123 (c9382b)

  66. @67 Depending on time period and which colonies, probably sometimes, and probably sometimes not, and probably depending on which people are focused on and very often maybe better in regards to their own people and definitely not better in regards to how they treated the people in those colonies. My Irish ancestors, frex, would very much say NOT.

    Nic (896fdf)

  67. Time123,

    I really can’t tell if you’re being obtuse or just disingenuous. Their stated reasons for the change are the problem. They claim Western Civilization is the issue and desire “decolonizing” society and that English is there to subjugate others. The pollicization of the course is the problem. It’s the same reason these ignoramuses are cancelling Shakespeare.

    We should rejoice in the successes of the British and American cultures. Without them where would we be?

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  68. NJRob, that’s not exactly what they said, but I understand how you see it now. I wasn’t trying to troll you/be disingenuous, thank you for taking the time to reply.

    Time123 (daab2f)

  69. The Forward has done additional reporting on the symbolism of the stage.

    It’s not very deep, and is mostly just a summary of what Hyatt, CPAC and Design Foundry are saying. But it’s additional information.

    This has to be bad for the design company. When you hire professionals you’re expecting them to avoid mistakes that embarrass you. If there are a lot of options this might slow new customer growth.

    Time123 (653992)

  70. https://www.yahoo.com/news/trumps-cash-plea-could-complicate-050738092.html

    In his first speech since leaving office, the former president encouraged loyalists to give directly to him, essentially bypassing the traditional groups that raise money for GOP candidates.

    “There’s only one way to contribute to our efforts to elect ‘America First’ Republican conservatives and, in turn, to make America great again,” Trump said Sunday at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida. “And that’s through Save America PAC and donaldjtrump.com.”

    The comment was particularly notable because Trump is generally loath to ask for money in person. It amounts to the latest salvo in the battle to shape the future of the GOP, with Trump making clear that he holds no allegiance to the party’s traditional fundraising operation as he tries to consolidate power.

    It looks like he’s not going away. The norm that a former president retire somewhat from public life denies the incumbent the ability effectively contrast themselves with an unpopular predecessor. Looks like Trump is willing to give up that advantage. This will make it a lot easier for Biden and his supporters to point to Trump when establishing a baseline for behaviors and results.

    Time123 (653992)

  71. The should also talk to whoever picked the same initials as the Communist Party Annual Congress’s for their group’s initials.

    nk (1d9030)

  72. @50

    No I can’t because it’s never been an issue. Have you even heard of the symbol before the lunatic left dug it up for this event? Look at the pattern. It’s generic. You know that. But it’s fun to tar people in this day and age and pretend to be virtuous when you’re really just being evil.

    NJRob (eb56c3) — 3/2/2021 @ 6:41 am

    So you were just making it up that it’s been used many times before. I was open to that argument, and I’m open to the argument that it’s generic. It’s not a commonly used nazi symbol. But, because of how beloved Trump is by the neo-nazi/white nationalists/alt right and how hard it’s been for him to distance himself from that filth it’s hard to dismiss this sort of thing out of hand.

    Time123 (b0628d) — 3/2/2021 @ 7:13 am

    I actually think it’s easy to dismiss this out of hand.

    The fact is, it took someone looking for something, ANYTHING, to tar a political group and landed on a seemingly innocuous stage design by arguing it’s a dog whistle for a “wink-wink” for neo-nazi.

    I mean, if you’re going to argue that this is a “dog whistle” and it’s the worst thing ever, maybe take a step back and at least entertain the idea that there are just some people in this world who will always try to take the worst interpretation possible in order to tar their ideological opponent.

    What’s more likely?

    whembly (446c04)

  73. Whembly, first, I never claimed this was the worst thing ever and don’t think any of my comments were particularly passionate. I was being sincere when I asked for examples of similar designs being used previously.

    Second, this The fact is, it took someone looking for something, ANYTHING, to tar a political group and landed on a seemingly innocuous stage design by arguing it’s a dog whistle for a “wink-wink” for neo-nazi. isn’t an accurate statement of what happened. It should be The fact is, it took someone looking for something, ANYTHING, to tar a political group and landed on a seemingly innocuous stage design that was identical to a Nazi insignia by arguing it’s a dog whistle for a “wink-wink” for neo-nazi who support former president Trump.

    Trump has embraced some of the weirdest political allies. It’s not unreasonable that one of them would do this on purpose. You can’t reject it out of hand in the way you could with McCain, Bush, or Romney.

    Time123 (daab2f)

  74. Time123 —

    It’s easy to dismiss out of hand. To get to the secret dogwhistle, you have to assume:

    1. There is a Nazi at CPAC intimately involved in stage design;
    2. That said Nazi figures that people will see the stage and get what’s happening from the tv
    3. That this will be seen as some kind of triumph as all the nation’s Nazis nod their head up and down and
    4. The Nazis won’t talk about it on social media, meaning the cat will be out of the bag in notime.

    This is not persuasive. It is Q for the anti-Trump set.

    Appalled (1a17de)

  75. @75 Again, the issue here is that someone wanted to tar an ideological opponent in the worst possible way without considering that it was possibly innocuous.

    That’s the issue.

    That is the crux if why our politics is so hyper-partisan.

    Because, once the “nazi” label sticks, then all manner of responses (up to physical violence) is on the table.

    whembly (fd0490)

  76. @75 Again, the issue here is that someone wanted to tar an ideological opponent in the worst possible way without considering that it was possibly innocuous.

    That’s the issue.

    That is the crux if why our politics is so hyper-partisan.

    Because, once the “nazi” label sticks, then all manner of responses (up to physical violence) is on the table.

    whembly (fd0490) — 3/3/2021 @ 7:59 am

    What do you mean once it sticks? Trump has repeatedly cozzied up with white nationalists. They love him. They’re open about it. They’ve let the cat out of the bag numerous times that they feel his denunciations of them are forced and insincere posturing for the normies.

    Time123 (daab2f)

  77. @78 Trump is a craven politician who has also repeatedly denounced them. But, politicians can’t stop these folk’s endorsement even if said politician denounced them again and again.

    Hell, Richard Spencer endorsed Joe Biden, even after the campaign denounced him.

    What do you mean once it sticks?

    If Democrats are successful in proclaiming GOP as the “Nazi” or party of white supremacism, then the party’s destruction is on the table.

    whembly (fd0490)

  78. @79 Time123, I’m not saying the neo-nazi don’t exist or isn’t a problem. No one can control whether or not these groups give their endorsements.

    Again, it’s about a tactic used by ideological opponents to find the worst attribute of their opponent and tar the entire group.

    I lived in MO my whole life, in rural and ‘burbs, and never seen anything coming close to neo-nazis or white supremacist groups, even hanging around rednecks and bikers and gun shows. Every Republican I have ever met would consider being associated with Nazism an insult.

    whembly (fd0490)

  79. @78 Trump is a craven politician who has also repeatedly denounced them. But, politicians can’t stop these folk’s endorsement even if said politician denounced them again and again.

    Hell, Richard Spencer endorsed Joe Biden, even after the campaign denounced him.

    As I said, they were clear that they viewed Trump’s rejections as insincere. That’s not my evaluation. That was theirs.

    Time123 (daab2f)

  80. @79 Time123, I’m not saying the neo-nazi don’t exist or isn’t a problem. No one can control whether or not these groups give their endorsements.

    Again, it’s about a tactic used by ideological opponents to find the worst attribute of their opponent and tar the entire group.

    I lived in MO my whole life, in rural and ‘burbs, and never seen anything coming close to neo-nazis or white supremacist groups, even hanging around rednecks and bikers and gun shows. Every Republican I have ever met would consider being associated with Nazism an insult.

    whembly (fd0490) — 3/3/2021 @ 9:02 am

    You’re better then the people around this guy from Jan 6, or this one from a different time. I mean that, you seem like a good person and it doesn’t surprise me that you don’t know any people like this.

    Trump is cozy enough with racists that the initial assertion seemed plausible. I think the evidence has shown that it was a coincidence. But it wasn’t silly in the way an accusation that he was pro diversity imagery in his set design would be.

    Time123 (daab2f)

  81. If Democrats are successful in proclaiming GOP as the “Nazi” or party of white supremacism, then the party’s destruction is on the table.

    whembly (fd0490) — 3/3/2021 @ 8:57 am

    It was Trump that did this, not democrats.

    Time123 (daab2f)

  82. “If Democrats are successful in proclaiming GOP as the “Nazi” or party of white supremacism, then the party’s destruction is on the table.”

    The Democrats are the party of baby murder.

    Davethulhu (6ba00b)


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