Patterico's Pontifications

8/21/2017

Solar Eclipse

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 11:52 am

I saw what appeared to be a solar flare at 5 o’clock on the sun. With my naked eye.

Crazy.

UPDATE: My daughter took this picture with an iPhone through my father-in-law’s solar-safe telescope.

These images are from the NASA site.

If you look at the proximity of the moon to the sunspots, the NASA photo was taken perhaps 3 minutes after my daughter’s photo — but from a completely different place in the country, from Wyoming.

77 Responses to “Solar Eclipse”

  1. That was your retina exploding.

    Rev.Hoagie® (630eca)

  2. They’re calling it Black Skies Matter at CNN.

    Rev.Hoagie® (630eca)

  3. this eclipse is fantastic

    happyfeet (a037ad)

  4. someone should take a picture of the eclipse and upload it to facebook

    happyfeet (a037ad)

  5. It’s like my … I’ve lost count. I remember my first one in fourth grade.

    nk (dbc370)

  6. that first one probably wasn’t a metaphor for Megyn Kelly’s career though

    happyfeet (a037ad)

  7. The strigoi follow in strict succession. We are so arrogant to think we are master of this ball of rock and water.

    narciso (e3fbda)

  8. We were hiking. It was…meh. My sister in the path of totality said it was very cool.

    (Funny, Rev. Hoagie!)

    Patricia (5fc097)

  9. Dark of the Sun; Kelp croaks; Big Ben silenced…

    “We’re done for! We’re done for…”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sljSf7KVlQ

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  10. I saw what appeared to be a solar flare at 5 o’clock on the sun. With my naked eye. Crazy.

    Maybe. Maybe not. Check and see — or see if it was just the flash from an eyelash.

    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/news

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  11. 4.this eclipse is fantastic

    It’s the power steering.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  12. I’m sure we’ll read about whatever it was. It was during totality (I’m in the path today). There was a red light at about 5 o’clock on the sun (not at that time but at that location). I’m calling it a solar flare but I actually have no idea what it was.

    Patterico (c0238f)

  13. lindsey saw a solar flare but not at 5 o’clock

    happyfeet (a037ad)

  14. We just looked at a photo taken here and there was another around 2:30 or 3 o’clock position.

    Patterico (c0238f)

  15. this maybe will help

    19:48 UTC would have been 12:48 PST

    happyfeet (a037ad)

  16. russians have landed on the sun

    mg (31009b)

  17. @14/@16. Post the pix if you can, Patrick.

    NASA noted sunspot activity is low in the cycle now but witnessing a corona flare at totality is quite possible– and not uncommon as they’re a regular occurrence– we just can’t see them- but a large solar flare would make news for sure as it would disrupt satellite and telecommunications down here over the next 24-36 hours, trigger an alert for the ISS crew and create a large aurora display as well.

    NASA, NOAA and the ‘spaceweather’ site monitor/track these things.

    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/news

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  18. This cool photo shows a solar flare at 2 o’clock. Amazing.

    DRJ (15874d)

  19. I’m in the path of the partial, but I was fogged in so saw nothing other than the livestreams — and there were some pretty noticeable flares in that coverage.

    aphrael (3f0569)

  20. What would such an awesome event be without an awesomely bad music video? I dare you to turn your eyes around AND from it!!! https://youtu.be/lcOxhH8N3Bo

    Colonel Haiku (66034d)

  21. I saw something earlier today that somebody had made. It’s one of those things going around – somebody mnementioned soimethig like that on the radio later.

    You take a cardboard box, like a cereal box, and take off the top, and cover half of it with a aluminum foil and punch a big hole in it. (I wouldn’t call this a pinhole.)

    You aim it so that the sun is going in in that half and look through the other half. (You can put a white envelope at the bottom of the cereal box. )

    This would let you see the shadow.

    I told this person about using black and white negatives and put two of them one behind the other (so that every spot more or less is blocked) and with that you could look at the sun. Color negatives are not good enough. Only black and white. (That’s a point that could get lost nowadays. People don’t have too many color negatives, let alone black and white)

    The person with the cereal box told me he (still) has them but he was not going to use them – was
    not sure it was safe..

    went outside about 2:45. The only thing I thought was maybe the color balance of the light was slightly different, than at 1:30 but I don’t know if that was so, or just an idea I got.

    NBC had a special too. You had Lester Holt and Al Roker, whi was aboard an aircraft carrier.

    http://www.postandcourier.com/business/tourism/nbc-s-al-roker-to-cover-solar-eclipse-on-patriots/article_f27794ac-844b-11e7-a7e4-6b372920f15f.html

    It didn’t work in 1970, or maybe I didn’t know how to use it. I think there was someone on the roof of the building we lived in at that time. I think my mother was up there on the roof with me too.

    In any case I didn’t have or at leats look for black and white negatives.

    Sammy Finkelman (02a146)

  22. @20. DRJ, that’s the ‘Diamond Ring’ – Bailey’s Beads effect- not actually a ‘solar flare’ – but in fact quite rareto see as it occurs literally only for a few seconds and only durin a total solar eclipse; it is the sunlight funneling through the peaks and valleys of the lunar topography.

    It’s just beautiful.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  23. @21. The man is a total jackass. WHAT is it that EVERYBODY was told NOT TO DO??????

    Are there any gas ovens in the White House? 😉

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  24. 14… in the grand scheme of things, it’s akin to the Sun eating a bad taco.

    Colonel Haiku (66034d)

  25. Patterico:

    I saw what appeared to be a solar flare at 5 o’clock on the sun. With my naked eye.

    4. happyfeet (a037ad) — 8/21/2017 @ 12:11 pm

    his eclipse is fantastic

    There was no tatality in either California or Chicago. Were either or you in a place where you can see it?

    The next total eclipse visible coast to coast in the Unied States will be in 2024 (April 8) This one went northwest to southeast – the other one will go southwest to northeast. Carbondale, Illinois, is a place that will get to see both of them.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/30/science/total-solar-eclipse-2017-carbondale-illinois.html?mcubz=0

    Three years ago, Bob Baer, a staff member at the university’s physics department, learned of Carbondale’s cosmic destiny: The city is near what NASA calls “the point of greatest duration.”

    It will experience “totality” — when the moon completely overshadows the sun — for longer than almost anywhere else: a majestic 2 minutes 38 seconds. That alone would propel any town to nerd stardom, but Carbondale is exceptional. It also lies within the line of totality for America’s next total solar eclipse, on April 8, 2024.

    In this one the band is about 70 miles wide, and totality in any one place lasted no more than 2 minutes and about 45 seconds. The most it can ever reach is just over 7 minutes I think. Sometimes the situaiton is such that the moon doesn’t quite cover the sun even though it is centered.

    Sammy Fnkelman (02a146)

  26. no it was overcast here

    i sat above the street and watched people with their glasses they were adorable

    i wish I’d thought more on it I’d have done some pics, but I took advantage of people being away to tweak their laptops

    happyfeet (a037ad)

  27. @mg: russians have landed on the sun

    Of course the eclipse is the best time to go. But they could have gone at night.

    I live in the 90% area so it got dark, like if you were wearing sunglasses.

    @Sammy Finkelman: I made a pinhole camera to view it with. Next time I would have used a longer box, to get a bigger image. Use foil to make the pinhole, and oil a piece of white paper for the screen.

    Frederick (64d4e1)

  28. @Sammy Finkelman:Sometimes the situaiton is such that the moon doesn’t quite cover the sun even though it is centered.

    Annular eclipse.

    Frederick (64d4e1)

  29. Incidentally, it’s not as though the sun gets superpowered during an eclipse. Looking at the partial eclipse is no more dangerous than looking at the sun usually is.

    I wonder how many hundreds of thousands of people kept their eclipse glasses on and missed totality.

    Frederick (64d4e1)

  30. LOOK
    UP IN THE SKY
    ohhhhh my eyes

    mg (31009b)

  31. You people are something else.

    The ghost of Robert E. Lee shot 63 people in Chicago this weekend, and y’all are going on and on about Mother Nature.

    Where are your priorities?

    Deuce Frehley (7654f5)

  32. how many wounded, Deuce?

    mg (31009b)

  33. Saw the total eclipse today in east/Central Idaho – absolutely amazing and then you see the corona and it’s 50 times more what an experience.

    harkin (9d2d52)

  34. Saw the total eclipse today in east/Central Idaho – absolutely amazing and then you see the corona and it’s 50 times more what an experience delicious and refreshing than teh one you drank 15 minutes ago…

    harkin (9d2d52) — 8/21/2017 @ 3:17 pm

    FIFY

    Colonel Haiku (66034d)

  35. Incidentally, it’s not as though the sun gets superpowered during an eclipse. Looking at the partial eclipse is no more dangerous than looking at the sun usually is.

    Except that your lizard brain won’t let you look at the un-eclipsed sun for more than a split second. (Unless Apaches have staked you out and cut off your eyelids.) With the eclipse, you’ll keep looking until you’ve slow-cooked your retinas because it’s not bight enough to hurt.

    nk (dbc370)

  36. 38 – the only corona was up above.

    The ice chest had Negro Modelo.

    harkin (9d2d52)

  37. Of course bexos is indulging in fake news, sans evidence.

    narciso (d1f714)

  38. @39. Bingo. Not to mention the reducing disc narrows a high intensity light source for fry eye.
    Wonder if Frederick likes to stare int grocery store UPC laser scanners– you know, to see ‘who blinks first.’

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  39. how many wounded, Deuce?

    http://heyjackass.com/

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  40. UPDATE: My daughter took this picture with an iPhone through my father-in-law’s solar-safe telescope.

    These images are from the NASA site.

    If you look at the proximity of the moon to the sunspots, the NASA photo was taken perhaps 3 minutes after my daughter’s photo — but from a completely different place in the country, from Wyoming.

    Patterico (63e824)

  41. Saw the total eclipse today in east/Central Idaho – absolutely amazing and then you see the corona and it’s 50 times more what an experience.

    Yup. We were in Cadiz, Kentucky. Unbelievable.

    Patterico (63e824)

  42. Another cool unexpected feature today were the “shadow snakes” right before and after totality.

    I’d never even heard about them before.

    http://www.ajc.com/news/national/solar-eclipse-2017-watch-for-cool-shadow-snakes-just-before-and-after-eclipse/PNxLaSqws77XMd51ClFNxJ/

    harkin (9d2d52)

  43. @46@47- Patterico, just AWESOME!

    Worth the time and trip. Magnificent imagery. Sunspot activity is low but just ‘wow’ your daughter caught what was there as is w/an IPhone, no less. Tip-of-the-hat on that one!

    That ISS pix is pretty amazing as well.

    You didn’t miss much in Southern California; clear morning skies but percentage of partiality made it appear outside more like a room w/one set of florescent lights out for half an hour.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  44. @46@47 *Very* much obliged.

    Q! (267694)

  45. beautiful photograph by your daughter

    mg (31009b)

  46. Insane photo: International Space Station, w/ crew of 6 aboard, crossing path of the sun during the #SolarEclipse https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/silhouette-of-the-international-space-station-during-a-partial-solar-eclipse

    Insanely out-of-this-world cost, too; that little ISS ‘bug’ w/a crew of six aboard cost $100 billion to engineer and loft, averages $3 billion/yr., to operate and is literally going in circles, no place… fast.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  47. Insanely out-of-this-world cost, too; that little ISS ‘bug’ w/a crew of six aboard cost $100 billion to engineer and loft, averages $3 billion/yr., to operate and is literally going in circles, no place… fast.

    that would mean it’s a hell of a lot cheaper than the US navy with the same capabilities

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  48. LOL!

    nk (dbc370)

  49. @nk: With the eclipse, you’ll keep looking until you’ve slow-cooked your retinas because it’s not bight enough to hurt.

    It would have to be pretty near totality. Where I was, at 90%, it was way too bright to want to stare at it. 10% of the brightness of the sun is pretty bright. But there is nothing that I said that can be construed as a recommendation to stare at a partial eclipse–I simply said that it was “no more dangerous”, which is literally true.

    @DCSCA:Not to mention the reducing disc narrows a high intensity light source for fry eye.

    Only if the moon were a lens… if you block 90% of a light source, you block 90% of the light. 90%/90% = 1, the intensity is unchanged.

    But again, there is nothing that I said that can be construed as a recommendation to stare at a partial eclipse.

    Frederick (30b972)

  50. @20. DRJ, that’s the ‘Diamond Ring’ – Bailey’s Beads effect- not actually a ‘solar flare’ – but in fact quite rareto see as it occurs literally only for a few seconds and only durin a total solar eclipse; it is the sunlight funneling through the peaks and valleys of the lunar topography.

    It’s just beautiful.

    I caught it at the end. At the beginning I was too busy watching the dimming of the light and filming everyone else’s reaction. Plus you don’t want to be staring at the sun at the beginning with the naked eye, but you are doing that at the end — making the diamond effect easier to see at the end.

    It was very brief but beautiful. The whole thing was amazing.

    Patterico (63e824)

  51. It’s safe to look at in totality with the naked eye and we did that. We also saw stars and just the surrounding deep twilight in the middle of the day.

    And the solar flares on the corona.

    And the corona. Which is gorgeous.

    Patterico (63e824)

  52. We probably would not have made the trip except that it was a family reunion.

    Patterico (63e824)

  53. @59- But what a magnificent treat for a reunion.

    We all likely see partial solar eclipses in our lives but getting to experience a total solar eclipse, both in the sky show tself and the effect on the environment around you is simply stellar.

    You’ll never forget it.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  54. 58 – “It’s safe to look at in totality with the naked eye and we did that. We also saw stars and just the surrounding deep twilight in the middle of the day.”

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/healthtrending/do-your-eyes-hurt-after-the-solar-eclipse-here%E2%80%99s-what-you-need-to-know/ar-AAqxD3u?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=ientp

    harkin (536957)

  55. Insanely out-of-this-world cost, too; that little ISS ‘bug’ w/a crew of six aboard cost $100 billion to engineer and loft, averages $3 billion/yr., to operate and is literally going in circles, no place… fast.

    Insane is correct. We should have spent far more, building on from Apollo and never stopping. But we were Proxmired.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  56. BTW, that’s way too big for a space station. Looks more like AWIENS!

    Kevin M (752a26)

  57. I kind of thought it was an imperial TIE fighter.

    urbanleftbehind (5eecdb)

  58. It would be a pretty big one.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  59. It is a photo taken through a telescope.

    Patterico (63e824)

  60. I heard on CNS News yesterday taht there was about 10 seconds of totality visible in Carbondale, Illinois, but NASA said they still got the pictures they wanted and I read in the New York times today that the clouds went away for a it just afetr totality started and a second time right before the end.

    But clouds covered the sun the whole time in Nashville Tennessee.

    The boumdary of toatlity ran through St Louis about 2 miles south of downtown. (that would mean they only got it there for a second or two) And I think a total eclipse boundary ran through New York City in 1925 – the boundary was 96 St.

    https://ny.curbed.com/2017/8/14/16143672/solar-eclipse-new-york-city-history

    A few days before the eclipse, it was predicted that the line of totality would hit somewhere between 72nd and 110th streets. Anything north of 110th Street was guaranteed to see the entire display. (The actual path was right between 95th and 97th streets in Manhattan, and wasn’t perfectly aligned with Manhattan’s east-west streets). Anybody who stayed in this area of uncertainty wouldn’t get the full show, but they would, in the words of one writer, be able to engage in “the excitement of cosmic detective work.”

    So this was seen in Harlem but not in the Upper East Side. Of course that was before Harlem was quite all black.

    Sammy Finkelman (02a146)

  61. 31. Frederick (64d4e1) — 8/21/2017 @ 2:52 pm

    @Sammy Finkelman: I made a pinhole camera to view it with. Next time I would have used a longer box, to get a bigger image. Use foil to make the pinhole, and oil a piece of white paper for the screen.

    I looked at the picture I took of the cereal box. I think the top cover was not completely cut off. The right half was more or less left, with half of it maybe cut open. The left side had aluminmum foil with the square hole.

    Sammy Finkelman (02a146)

  62. In New York City it wss much darker at 7:30 (20 minutes befire sunset) than during the eclipse During the eclipse it wss like 5 pm at 2:30.

    Sammy Finkelman (02a146)

  63. Somebody told me last evening/night that welder’s glasses would be better than the eclipse glasses if they were shade 11 and that I could see that on the Internet. They seem to be saying that Shade 12 is needed. (or that’s what NASA said) NASa said many people might find Shade 12 too bright and Shade 14 too dim, but Shade 13 is hard to find.

    Sammy Finkelman (02a146)

  64. Zero clouds for ours. We had 2 1/2 minutes of unobscured totality.

    Patterico (63e824)

  65. 70 – I delayed too long and missed out on the approved safe viewing lens so borrowed my friend’s arc-welding mask which was shade 10.

    I didn’t stare the whole time at it, never looking longer than maybe 5 seconds at a time. So far I am experiencing none of the symptoms described for doing damage. One thing I read that was surprising is that ophthalmologists can tell sometimes just by examination of the eye if someone has ever viewed an eclipse without proper protection.

    Since I started out looking at the western sky away from the sun just before totality started based on something I read on the internet about the best way to experience the “snake shadow” phenomena, I was greeted not only with that absolutely freaky scene but also the sensation of the sun suddenly being turned off and stars being visible in an instant, which along with the corona were the highlights for me.

    The sensation of the people around me (screams/hoots/whistles) when the corona appeared will also never be forgotten.

    When God made the moon the exact right size at the exact right distance, he must have said OK I’ll add a dick move and make the occurance of total solar eclipse very very very very rare.

    harkin (e725d8)

  66. Sun can’t shine on the same dog’s ass all the time. (Traditional saying.) There’s a sh!tload of solar eclipses; partial, total and in-between, but you gotta be at the right place at the right time.

    nk (dbc370)

  67. Once you’ve had total you never go back.

    harkin (e725d8)

  68. The next one in the US is seven years away. But if you’re willing to travel, the next total eclipse occurs July 2, 2019 in South America, and another in the same general area on December 14, 2020. There will be an annular eclipse in 2023 over the Southwest US and then passing through Latin America. Counting partial and annular eclipses, there are about two a year over the next decade, although you’d have to go to some unlikely places (like Antartica) to see all of them.

    Here’s a list of eclipses, both solar and lunar, for the next ten years.
    https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/list.html

    kishnevi (5a7bdb)

  69. Great list!

    I wonder if the totality path for that one over the South Pacific coming up is over any islands. That would be cool. 🌴

    harkin (e725d8)

  70. The eclipse on April 8, 2024, that will cut across upstate New York, will also be on a Monday.,

    Sammy Finkelman (02a146)


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