Patterico's Pontifications

4/29/2014

The Horrible Pain of a Botched Execution

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 8:27 pm

Clayton Lockett was not a very nice man:

Stephanie Neiman was proud of her shiny new Chevy truck with the Tasmanian Devil sticker on it and a matching “Tazz” license plate.

Her parents had taught the teenager to stand up for “what was her right and for what she believed in.”

Neiman was dropping off a friend at a Perry residence on June 3, 1999, the same evening Clayton Lockett and two accomplices decided to pull a home invasion robbery there. Neiman fought Lockett when he tried to take the keys to her truck.

The men beat her and used duct tape to bind her hands and cover her mouth. Even after being kidnapped and driven to a dusty country road, Neiman didn’t back down when Lockett asked if she planned to contact police.

The men had also beaten and kidnapped Neiman’s friend along with Bobby Bornt, who lived in the residence, and Bornt’s 9-month-old baby.

In fact, you might say he was downright evil.

Neiman was forced to watch as Lockett’s accomplice, Shawn Mathis, spent 20 minutes digging a shallow grave in a ditch beside the road. Her friends saw Neiman standing in the ditch and heard a single shot.

Lockett returned to the truck because the gun had jammed. He later said he could hear Neiman pleading, “Oh God, please, please” as he fixed the shotgun.

The men could be heard “laughing about how tough Stephanie was” before Lockett shot Neiman a second time.

Why, it sounds kind of like a “botched execution,” doesn’t it?

“He ordered Mathis to bury her, despite the fact that Mathis informed him Stephanie was still alive.”

Bornt and Neiman’s friend “were threatened that if they told anybody about these events, they too would be murdered,” court records state.

“Every day we are left with horrific images of what the last hours of Stephanie’s life was like,” her parents’ impact statement says.

. . . .

Bornt wrote a letter Feb. 7 stating: “Clayton being put to death by lethal injection is almost too easy of a way to die after what he did to us. … He will just be strapped to the table and will go to sleep and his heart will stop beating.”

Well . . . turns out, not quite.

Oklahoma called off a high-profile double execution with an experimental drug combination Tuesday evening after the first execution was apparently botched and the inmate died of a heart attack about 40 minutes after the drugs were administered, according to local news reports.

Clayton Lockett was slated to be the first to die after a legal battle over Oklahoma’s lethal-injection methods, which have come under fire from death penalty opponents for the secrecy surrounding the process.

But his vein apparently burst while officials were trying to administer the drugs beginning at 6:23 p.m. He began to convulse and officials tried to resuscitate him, according to an Associated Press reporter at the scene.

According to the AP, Lockett had received a new lethal-injection formula that included the sedative midazolam as the first in a three-drug combination. He died of a heart attack at 7:06 p.m. The second execution was called off.

Most stories you read today will be about the horrible, awful suffering Lockett supposedly went through today during the “botched” execution. Not this post.

I say he still had it way too easy. I bet Bobby Bornt agrees. I bet Stephanie Neiman’s parents do too.

Somehow, I don’t think our Founding Fathers, who authored and ratified the Eighth Amendment, would have been too disturbed by the manner of Clayton Lockett’s death either. But why speculate? Let’s ask Emmy-Award Winning Founding Father James Madison!

Screen Shot 2014-04-29 at 8.26.07 PM

So shed no tears for Clayton Lockett. And let’s set a new execution date for Charles Warner, pronto.

So says me. And James Madison.

88 Responses to “The Horrible Pain of a Botched Execution”

  1. Ding.

    Patterico (9c670f)

  2. my understanding is that litigious american lawyertrash have driven a lot of the suppliers of lethal injection drugs out of the market, so states are having to try to find new approaches

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  3. Yes, they can’t get rid of the death penalty, through schemes like the baldus study, so they try other roadblocks,

    narciso (3fec35)

  4. here’s how National Soros Radio is reporting it

    they have to beat the English language like a dog what ate the Christmas turkey to do it though

    According to reporters tweeting from inside the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Oklahoma, the execution of Clayton D. Lockett has failed. Lockett died of a heart attack after the execution was aborted.

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  5. According to reporters tweeting from inside the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Oklahoma, the execution of Clayton D. Lockett has failed. Lockett died of a heart attack after the execution was aborted.

    I wish every failure of mine could meet with equal success.

    Patterico (9c670f)

  6. amen

    I bet the obamacare people wish they had failed as spectacularly

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  7. Maybe they should make the death penalty method dependent on the weapon of choice of the murder. Murder by firearm gets a firing squad. Murder by strangulation gets hanging. Murder by means such as being beaten gets a choice of the other “approved” methods, nobody should have to be as barbaric as beating someone to death as the form of execution.

    MD in Philly (f9371b)

  8. Why on Earth is this kind of thing so complicated? An execution is inherently violent. When Cruel and Unusual was ratified, there was a pretty common sense understanding of what that meant (like drawing and quartering or crucifixion).

    Executing a murderer is a grisly task, and I do thing was should do so soberly and respectfully, but this current scheme is like one of those Monty Python skits where things have been taken beyond absurd.

    They knock people out for medical procedures every day. Just knock him out and do the rest of deed in the simplest way.

    But let’s not ignore the elephant in the room. Tedious and endless objections surrounding an execution are actually protests of having a death penalty. They are attempts to delay the will of jury and legislature. Instead of having the argument about a death penalty (though they certainly are willing to do that) we see silliness. God knows how expensive these current procedures are, including the appeals that have nothing to do with whether the accused had a fair trial.

    Dustin (1436c2)

  9. i like the idea of those weirdo time dilation drugs drudge was going on about a few weeks ago

    http://yro-beta.slashdot.org/story/14/03/20/1218259/time-dilation-drug-could-let-heinous-criminals-serve-1000-year-sentences

    here’s that Stephen King story I think people were talking about at the time the drug story came out

    http://www.en8848.com.cn/fiction/Fiction/Scific/2005-11-15/1712.html

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  10. what’s this got to do with a certain billionare and his potty mouyh?

    and his potty mouth

    pdbuttons (944767)

  11. nobody should have to be as barbaric as beating someone to death as the form of execution.

    Comment by MD in Philly (f9371b) — 4/29/2014

    That’s a good point. But what’s the real cruelty to a death penalty? I doubt it’s the moment it occurs. I think it’s the anticipation. Imagine locking someone in a cage, while putting them in mortal suspense. Granted, in California the dude in the cage is going to die of natural causes, but that’s not the case everywhere.

    The real push for more humane death penalties should be to drastically reduce the length of time before the execution. Doing this would probably require an independent court system that handles only these cases.

    A different sort of rocket docket, though if it ever happened it would be in Texas again.

    When the time comes, just knock him out remove his organs for donation, assuming they are viable.

    Dustin (1436c2)

  12. So you’re different from him how?

    Rick Horowitz (bde947)

  13. We should be careful to not allow their brutality to infect us, and render us equally brutal.

    That said, it means only that we should find as painless means as possible to put a mad dog to death.

    If the mad dogs are sentient and happen to suffer as we search for such means, I’m less concerned with that.

    Smock Puppet, "Si tacuisses, philosophus mansisses." (225d0d)

  14. Dustin,
    Plus 30 years on death row for a murder today is hardly a deterrent, as it used to be.

    Gazzer (6aa14d)

  15. i do not understand what it is Mr. Horowitz is wanting to signify with his words

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  16. Plus 30 years on death row for a murder today is hardly a deterrent, as it used to be.

    Comment by Gazzer (6aa14d) — 4/29/2014

    Yeah. I believe a prompt appellate process and no hassle execution would be a much more effective deterrent. When you hear that Joe Blow was executed for a murder he committed in 1976, it doesn’t really have that same impact.

    Dustin (1436c2)

  17. Wasn’t so long ago that the judge would don his black cap at the conclusion of a trial and the murderer was sent straight out to be hanged.

    Gazzer (6aa14d)

  18. “He began to convulse and officials tried to resuscitate him,…”

    If I had been one of those “officials” at the scene I’d probably have blurted out, “Why are you doing that? This is an execution, after all.”

    Blacque Jacques Shellacque (85adb3)

  19. If (When) capital punishment is permanently outlawed, the anti-death penalty advocates will start railing that life without parole is “cruel and unusual punishment.” They will say the same when the “maximum” penalty is 20 years and on and on.

    DN (fe3f16)

  20. “Why are you doing that? This is an execution, after all.”

    That had to be a surreal moment. And of course this process would also increase whatever pain the guy was experiencing.

    There are ways to cause instant death. While that’s a grisly chore, these people are executioners. I don’t get why they pump the guy full of poison when he probably had a perfectly good kidney or something. They could probably remove part of his brain and ship him to a good trauma center for transplants.

    heck, for certain crimes, they should allow the convict to opt-in to doing this in exchange for a scholarship for their kids or something. Let’s put those death panels to a better use! (joke)

    Dustin (1436c2)

  21. i still think a fast IVP of at least 60 cc’s of room air would be just fine as an execution method, and you’d not have to worry about a supply problem.

    of course, a 22 short to the back of their skull as they walk down a hallway would w*rk just as well.

    redc1c4 (abd49e)

  22. if I got to choose how you executered me I’d pick getting thrown off a very very very tall building like some of those ones in food stamp’s hometown of Chicago or better yet a famous mountain like the Zugspitze, which I do not know how to pronounce

    lethal injection is like how we kill dogs

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  23. Bullets: instantaneous, effective & not unusual

    Icy (14327b)

  24. …and cheap.

    Gazzer (17bc25)

  25. try harder

    there’s got to be a way we can work in a hang glider and unremovable google glasses what say

    “prisoner number 866247 has been VERY VERY naughty. Consequences are imminent.”

    while acquitted child molester R Kelly’s “I believe I can fly” plays in the likewise unremovable headphones

    and also sharks

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  26. get back to me with your proposals if you need graph paper it’s by the donuts

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  27. And again I say it: use a bolt gun.

    Bolt guns are judged humane for slaughtering animals. It’s sudden, final, and not particularly messy. It should be humane for human animals.

    Kevin M (b11279)

  28. Plus 30 years on death row for a murder today is hardly a deterrent, as it used to be.

    It seems to depend on the circuit. 4th Circuit, not nearly that long. Ninth circuit, 40 years is closer to the average. There must be some way to discourage foot-dragging. Perhaps some targeted impeachments are in order.

    Kevin M (b11279)

  29. The recitation of facts left out the repeated rapes and sodomies these creatures inflicted on one of the victims they kidnapped. I don’t call them animals. Animals do not commit such horrid acts.
    His IV line blew during the administration of the drugs. He’s dead. Who cares how?

    Been There (f3e964)

  30. Botched execution……… Couldn’t happen to a more deserving guy.

    Hangtown Bob (288e15)

  31. This makes for a disturbing read, not just because of the horrible nature of the crimes described but also because of your worrying ‘eye for an eye’ attitude. Retribution is not the name of the game. The American legal system terrifies me because it speaks volumes about people like you who cannot see past the emotional-fuelled rage and desire for retribution to see the death penalty for the barbaric and embarrassing affair it is. Further, you don’t seem to understand that people aren’t just good or bad and that labellin people as mister is unhelpful. You seem completely unfamiliar with the psychology of crime. No doubt you will accurate me of condoning the terrible acts committed: I do not. I just wish people would consider the morals more philosophically.

    Lizzie (b63de8)

  32. *labelling
    *monster
    Apologies for the typos, I write this from my phone.

    Lizzie (b63de8)

  33. I don’t support having capital punishment in the first place, but it’s obvious that, since hanging was the common form of execution when the Eighth Amendment was passed, and the Framers didn’t make any efforts to ban hanging, they understood it to not be covered by the Eighth Amendment. Why go through all of the silliness of trying to find the right drugs, when a $7 piece of rope is constitutional, simple, and effective?

    The historian Dana (3e4784)

  34. I’ve noticed that these anti-death-penalty “humanitarians” have infinite compassion for monsters like Mumia Abu Jamal, but do not care in the slightest for their victims.

    pst314 (ae6bd1)

  35. of course, a 22 short to the back of their skull as they walk down a hallway would w*rk just as well.

    Have you tried to find .22 ammo lately?

    PPs43 (6fdef4)

  36. So you’re different from him how?

    Rick Horowitz:

    I asked you this question on Twitter, and I hope you’ll take the time to answer it here rather than simply being a drive-by. Let’s say that someone (call him Ariel) locks up people in a small room for several years straight.

    The police have now caught Ariel. What should his punishment be?

    Please don’t say jail. That’s locking him up in a small room for years — and therefore is sinking to his level.

    Right?

    That’s where your “don’t sink to their level” logic leads you.

    How am I better than Clayton Lockett, Rick Horowitz? Let me count the ways! Ooh, here’s one: If Clayton Lockett disagreed with your argument, he might shoot and kill you in order to express his disagreement. I am instead debating with you. That’s one way. There are undoubtedly others, if you really put your brain to work thinking about it.

    Patterico (9c670f)

  37. this ain’t Motel 6
    no country for old killers
    we won’t leave light on

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  38. I’m reminded of a scene from one of my favorite movies:

    Hal: Okay, boys, okay. Now, what in the hell happened?
    Paul: An execution. A successful one.
    Hal: How in the name of Christ can you call that a success?
    Paul: Eduard Delacroix is dead.

    Burnside (8fa39f)

  39. If (When) capital punishment is permanently outlawed, the anti-death penalty advocates will start railing that life without parole is “cruel and unusual punishment.” They will say the same when the “maximum” penalty is 20 years and on and on.

    Is there proof?

    Michael Ejercito (becea5)

  40. Retribution is not the name of the game.

    Is therer any authority for that?

    The American legal system terrifies me because it speaks volumes about people like you who cannot see past the emotional-fuelled rage and desire for retribution to see the death penalty for the barbaric and embarrassing affair it is.

    Why should it be embarassing?

    And you write as if barbaric is somehow a bad thing.

    I just wish people would consider the morals more philosophically.

    The fundamental theorem of morality is that God’s might makes right.

    Michael Ejercito (becea5)

  41. Lizzie, it is not an eye for an eye. It is only an eye for an eye. At least let’s understand our Biblical references. And we don’t even do that anymore — it’s now money for an eye.

    Further, the law is not a philosophical exercise. It is a practical thing intended for the orderly function of society. Now you may not think that society should be so outraged over a young girl being kidnapped, raped, shot twice, and buried alive to suffocate to death with a lungful of dirt, so as to put her killer to death, but society disagrees with you. We don’t want this guy around. His crime was so horrible that, in our minds, giving him less than proportional punishment would amount to tacit approval.

    Since you like the Bible so much, pray for his soul and for the age of Isaiah where there will be no suffering and the whole world will be a serene and happy place, and Almond Joy wrappers will not be deceptively large in order to fool people that there is more candy than there really is.

    nk (dbc370)

  42. Is there proof?

    Comment by Michael Ejercito (becea5) — 4/30/2014 @ 7:12 am

    Yes. The European Parliament passed a rule that outlaws life sentences or sentences over 25 years.

    nk (dbc370)

  43. Yes. The European Parliament passed a rule that outlaws life sentences or sentences over 25 years.

    It mnakes you wonder what their motivation is.

    Michael Ejercito (becea5)

  44. It mnakes you wonder what their motivation is.

    nothing noble, that’s for certain.

    redc1c4 (abd49e)

  45. An extension of paternalistic socialism. They want the state to be an indulgent daddy not a stern one.

    nk (dbc370)

  46. This is one reason why I ultimately came out against the death penalty. The Northwestern project was the main reason.

    It seems inconsistent to me that an authority that can’t manage their tortoise habitat effectively is trusted to kill people.

    carlitos (e7c734)

  47. Just to add to the above, I live in a state where half the governors go to prison. I’m more than a little suspect about the process that would lead to an execution.

    carlitos (e7c734)

  48. Can’t the prison-bound governor quickly pardon himself, carlitos?

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  49. I share carlitos’ thoughts exactly, and I’m glad he made those points. It’s not the suffering that is most bothersome (though the reactions to the suffering are bothersome in their own way); it’s the incompetence of the executioners, and the fact that this was an execution driven by politics, and not process.

    And the Oklahoma governor looks (and I hope she feels) like a f*cking cowardly idiot right now.

    Leviticus (f9a067)

  50. I’m more than a little suspect about the process that would lead to an execution.

    Didn’t one of those crooks commute all the existing sentences on his way out of office? So, why do you trust the commutations?

    Kevin M (b357ee)

  51. The hypocrites wailing over Lockett are not bothered in the least by what was done to Stephanie Neiman.

    DN (fe3f16)

  52. What’s to trust about a commutation? Sentences were commuted.

    carlitos (e7c734)

  53. Leviticus said “… and the fact that this was an execution driven by politics, and not process.”

    Would you care to explain? If the death penalty is not applicable to this type of crime, exactly where would you draw that line?

    I don’t trust politicans, or the Courts, much anymore. As such, any irreversible decisions should be given incredible scrutiny.

    JD (3273b9)

  54. Comment by nk (dbc370) — 4/30/2014 @ 7:21 am

    Lizzie, it is not an eye for an eye. It is only an eye for an eye. At least let’s understand our Biblical references. And we don’t even do that anymore — it’s now money for an eye.

    They never did it. It had already been redeemable by money under Babylonian law, which was the law in the background in the time of Moses, and the Mosaic code has to be understood in that context (just like in the U.S. constitution the power of impeachment is understood to exist without being explicitly granted).

    Exodus 21 is filled with examples of what to do in cases where an eye for an eye is difficult to apply. For instance, if someone causes a miscarriage. You can’t carry it out, so you have the court assign a value.

    The default, I think, was for a sentence of an eye for an eye to be pronounced, but then for the victim and perpetrator to settle on a amount. I guess till it was settled he stayed in prison. Whatever it was the procedure later deteriorated into a first version payment of money the Second temple period without the “sentence” of an eye or a tooth..

    A slave, who can’t own anything, goes free whether for something as small as a tooth or as important as an eye. But there is no redemption for murder.

    There is a provision that in the case of an ox that had gored 3 times (and was known to be dangerous) if it kills someone after that, the owner dies – except that he can be redeemed. This is the most egregious case of criminally negligent homicide. Real murders cannot be redeemed, and beating someone so severely that he dies counts, unless he recovers sufficiently to walk outside.

    Another exception is a slave who was killed by the owner, where there is a lower standard for determining that he didn’t intend to kill him.

    The Bible is quite explicit there can be no money redemption for murder. Moslems don’t follow that. This has helped the U.S. military in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan because payments of money have been accepted as acknowledgments of guilt, although the U.S. is careful to say that’s not the case.

    The provision of sharia law also leads to honor killings, for what do you think happens when the person entitled to receive the money is also the murderer, or consents??

    Sammy Finkelman (d22d64)

  55. “Just to add to the above, I live in a state where half the governors go to prison. I’m more than a little suspect about the process that would lead to an execution.”

    carlitos – Dude, get a grip. It’s not the governors who convict and sentence criminals to death.

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  56. My heart still bleeds for Tookie Williams and his childrens’ books. Not.

    MUMIA!

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  57. Isn’t this the guy who took two shots with a shotgun to kill his victim in a roadside grave?
    He can now contemplate what his victim felt between the first and second shot.

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  58. Comment by MD in Philly (f9371b) — 4/29/2014 @ 8:46 pm

    You need “blunt force trauma”?
    There’s always a tall building when you need one.

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  59. “51.The hypocrites wailing over Lockett are not bothered in the least by what was done to Stephanie Neiman.”

    - DN

    Dumbass: of course we’re bothered by it.

    Even if this was justice, it was terrible justice, and the reaction to both events should have been the realization that we live in a terrible, terrible world.

    Leviticus (a1a52f)

  60. Comment by Blacque Jacques Shellacque (85adb3) — 4/29/2014 @ 10:22 pm

    “You can’t do that in here, this is an Execution Chamber!”

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  61. …and cheap.
    Comment by Gazzer (17bc25) — 4/29/2014 @ 11:53 pm

    They were, before Obama.

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  62. Is there proof?
    Comment by Michael Ejercito (becea5) — 4/30/2014 @ 7:12 am

    Mexico!

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  63. …it’s the incompetence of the executioners…

    It’s hard to find today, in almost any occupation/profession, people who take real pride in doing a good job.

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  64. “Would you care to explain? If the death penalty is not applicable to this type of crime, exactly where would you draw that line?

    I don’t trust politicians, or the Courts, much anymore. As such, any irreversible decisions should be given incredible scrutiny.”

    - JD

    The courts had stayed the execution pending an investigation into the source and effect of the drugs. The governor – up for re-election, to the surprise of no one – decided to huff and puff about how she was going to execute these guys anyway. A bunch of legislators threatened to impeach members of the state Supreme Court who upheld the stay. The judges caved to the pressure and the stay was dissolved.

    I share your distrust of politicians. To a lesser degree, I share your distrust of courts, but I trust the courts far more than I trust politicians. And I agree that irreversible decisions should be given incredible scrutiny. The stay was designed to allow that scrutiny, and the stay was dissolved because a bunch of politicians thought – knew – that they could get reelected by hootin’ and hollerin’ about how scrutiny is for pansies and this guy needed to die ASAP.

    Leviticus (a1a52f)

  65. we live in a terrible, terrible world

    They don’t call it The Law of The Jungle for nothing.
    Mother Nature is a cruel mistress.
    And when you revert back to your most base of instincts, you will suffer her lash.

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  66. but I trust the courts far more than I trust politicians

    Why would you, they are populated by …
    politicians?

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  67. No, the stay had nothing to do with the penalty, but the manner in which the penalty would be carried out.
    If the law stated that the accused would be shot in the back of the head with a particular caliber of pistol, would the judges then grant a stay while the various cartridges on the market were studied for velocity, penetration, and tissue destruction – cartridges that have existed for decades?
    This argument over the drug cocktail is worse than disingenuous, it is destructive to the respect for the law that society must have.
    In Utah, which has death-by-hanging, are they going to debate the properties of hemp rope, or whether or not to use 3-strand or multi-braid?

    Perhaps we need to start hanging a few lawyers.

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  68. This is why I support dropping a large granite block on people to execute them. Just have it be the ceiling of their cell…then drop 100 tons on them when the appeals run out.

    NO lack of drugs.
    No Medical personnel needed.

    Just a hose to clean out the room afterwards.

    DejectedHead (a094a6)

  69. I think you are conflating the issues, Leviticus. I haven’t seen anything that suggests the horrible death by injection combo caused his vein to burst. I have seen a lot of assuming cause and effect. That the injection combo gets strict scrutiny is hardly a concern of mine. The process was followed, up to the point of disagreement over the chemicals involved. Maybe I don’t understand the medicine.

    JD (3273b9)

  70. Execution without civilization…

    I don’t think they got the benefit of any pain-killing drugs.

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  71. Teh killer died like a rich celebrity… of a heart attack. What’s the issue?

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  72. I like that they tried to resuscitate him.

    Officials:
    “Whew, that was close! You almost died!”

    Clayton:
    “Did I receive a pardon!? That was close.”

    Officials:
    “No, we’re gonna hook you back up here in a sec and try again.”

    DejectedHead (a094a6)

  73. The should have flayed him, wet him down with lemon juice, staked him down face up, covered with honey over a red ant hill and strapped a 5-sided cage with a starving rat inside to his crotch. Go Comanche on his sorry ass.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  74. Col., I think you just stepped over the 8th-A line -
    though I admire your style.

    askeptic (8ecc78)

  75. This is another case that illustrates the self-loathing that passes for compassion today. Liberals get no satisfaction from dedicating their lives to God or to their country, so they make up all these extreme reasons to apologize and feel bad about themselves.

    What could satisfy one’s moral vanity more than feeling sorry for this sadistic creep? Of course, they in their elite communities, protected by men with guns, are in no danger from the likes of him.

    Patricia (be0117)

  76. “I haven’t seen anything that suggests the horrible death by injection combo caused his vein to burst. I have seen a lot of assuming cause and effect.”

    JD – Maybe the dude had an undiagnosed cholesterol problem that had led to some blockages. Not uncommon.

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  77. To Leviticus,

    A “dumbass” is someone who draws an equivalence between what was done to Stephanie Neiman and the execution of her murderer.

    Furthermore, how many of the national and international news organizations moaning about the “botched execution” bothered to report on Stephanie Neiman’s murder or the ensuing trial?

    DN (fe3f16)

  78. Two liberals were walking down the road, when they stumbled upon an unconscious man, laying bloody and bruised in a roadside ditch.
    Liberal #1 says to liberal #2 Leviticus, “We have to find out who did this so we can help them with their defense !”

    Elephant Stone (6a6f37)

  79. Decapitation is pretty quick and not terribly error prone with the right technology (Madame Guillotine’s bad name didn’t come from inefficiency!)

    Dan S (00fc90)

  80. Could care less for the evil Clayton Lockett. He got his just deserves kinda sorta and should have been shown NO mercy. Period.

    ljcarolyne (9a92e4)

  81. the American justice system doesn’t appear to serve a particularly useful function aside from providing fodder for Nancy Grace

    which, God love her

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  82. #79 Indeed! We could call it…the Republican Window!

    Strabo (27afc4)

  83. These comments are like a straw man bowling league. No one is “feeling sorry” for this creep, or drawing “equivalence” with his acts and his execution. Personally, I have a problem with the state killing people. That’s it. Given the general distrust of government around here, I would think that this would be axiomatic. I hear anti-court stuff, anti-state stuff, and anti-federal stuff here all the time, but we should trust them to fairly adjudicate death penalty cases?

    The Chicago police have tortured people with car batteries, and they are currently cooking the books on crime stats. Our city, county and state government are thoroughly corrupt. 165 people wrongly-convicted of murder have been exonerated in Illinois alone by Northwestern’s Center on Wrongful Convictions. 165!

    carlitos (e7c734)

  84. This story bothers me as much as rat meat in Mickie D sandwiches.

    I generally eat fish.

    gary gulrud (e2cef3)

  85. Right out of college I was a super in a rubber molding outfit.

    Presses large enough to accommodate a man of no weight or size limit are run by hydraulics.

    Not a big deal.

    gary gulrud (e2cef3)

  86. Yes, Chicago police are an untrustworthy lot, see the untouchables, of course this is why they have been the monopoly of legal force in that metropolis.

    narciso (3fec35)

  87. I hear anti-court stuff, anti-state stuff, and anti-federal stuff here all the time, but we should trust them to fairly adjudicate death penalty cases?

    Because vigilante death squads are even less trustworthy.

    Michael Ejercito (becea5)

  88. It would have been nice to see some outcry and review over practices after the botched execution of Sarah Brown. Two failed attempts at lethal injection left her blind, mentally disabled, mute, and unable to walk. It took her five years to die.

    She had no trial, no appeal, no representation, no due process. Her crime was simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Her executioner was “hero” abortionist George Tiller.

    http://realchoice.blogspot.kr/2014/04/two-botched-executions.html

    Christina Dunigan (0effee)


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