Patterico's Pontifications

6/28/2024

Weekend Open Thread

Filed under: General — Dana @ 8:18 am



[guest post by Dana]

Let’s go!

First news item

These rich old white guys want to become your next president:

“I’m in very good health. I just won two club championships, not even senior two regular club championships,” said Trump. “To do that, you have to be quite smart and you have to be able to hit the ball a long way. And I do it. He doesn’t do it. He can’t hit a ball 50 yards. He challenged me to a golf match. He can’t hit a ball 50 yards. I think I’m in very good shape.”

BIDEN: I’d be happy to have a driving contest with him. I got my handicap when I was vice president down to a six. By the way, I told you before, I’m happy to play golf. If you carry on bag, think you can do it?

TRUMP: That’s the biggest lie that he’s a six handicap of all

BIDEN: I was eight handicap….

TRUMP: I’ve seen you swing I know you swing…Let’s not act like children.

BIDEN: You are a child!

Second news item

Despite numerous calls for him to step down, including from liberal columnists at the New York Times (see: Thomas L. Friedman and Nicholas Kristof), President Biden told reporters at a Waffle House last night that “we did well at the debate”.

Third news item

While CNN fact-checked the debate and found that President Biden made nine false or misleading claims during the debate, Donald Trump took the gold prize by making 30 false or misleading claims:

Trump made more than 30 false claims at the Thursday debate. They included numerous claims that CNN and others have already debunked during the current presidential campaign or prior.

Trump’s repeat falsehoods included his assertions that some Democratic-led states allow babies to be executed after birth, that every legal scholar and everybody in general wanted Roe v. Wade overturned, that there were no terror attacks during his presidency, that Iran didn’t fund terror groups during his presidency, that the US has provided more aid to Ukraine than Europe has, that Biden for years referred to Black people as “super predators,” that Biden is planning to quadruple people’s taxes, that then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi turned down 10,000 National Guard troops for the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, that Americans don’t pay the cost of his tariffs on China and other countries, that Europe accepts no American cars, that he is the president who got the Veterans Choice program through Congress, and that fraud marred the results of the 2020 election.

Trump also added some new false claims, such as his assertions that the US currently has its biggest budget deficit and its biggest trade deficit with China. Both records actually occurred under Trump.

(Go to link above to check out all of the links provided by Daniel Dale to support his claims.)

Fourth news item

Of course they are:

House Republicans are ramping up their efforts to enforce a subpoena against Attorney General Merrick Garland, with multiple avenues in play after the Justice Department said it would not bring charges against Garland following a House vote to hold him in contempt of Congress.

“We’re going to be as aggressive as we can and use every tool in our arsenal,” House Speaker Mike Johnson said of the effort to enforce the subpoena at a news conference on Wednesday.

GOP lawmakers are seeking audio recordings of President Biden’s interview with special counsel Robert Hur concerning the president’s handling of classified documents, which came as part of an investigation that wrapped earlier this year. The House Judiciary and Oversight committees demanded that the Justice Department provide the tapes as part of their impeachment inquiry into the president. But the president asserted executive privilege over the recordings in May.

Fifth news item

A vexing problem:

The Supreme Court ruled Friday that cities can ticket homeless people for camping in public even when there is no alternative shelter available, a decision that could drastically alter the lives of hundreds of thousands of Americans without a permanent place to live.

The justices sided 6-3 with the Oregon city of Grants Pass, which had asked the high court to review a lower court’s decision blocking the enforcement of a public camping ordinance after determining that banning camping where shelter beds were limited amounts to cruel and unusual punishment.

Sixth news item

Good:

Schools in New York City are planning to ban the use of mobile phones amid concerns over children’s mental health.

America’s largest schools system announced the move on Wednesday following a detailed consultation with medical professionals.

“Our kids are fully addicted to these phones, we’ve got to do something about it,” said David Banks, New York City schools chancellor, in an interview with broadcaster NY1.

Seventh news item

Chevron overruled:

A divided US Supreme Court threw out a decades-old legal doctrine that empowered federal regulators to interpret unclear laws, issuing a blockbuster ruling that will constrain environmental, consumer and financial-watchdog agencies.

The 6-3 decision, which came in a fight over a fishing-industry regulation, is a long-sought triumph for opponents of big government. The court overturned Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council, a 1984 ruling that Democratic administrations had used as a legal building block for new regulations.

The latest ruling raises new questions about longstanding rules as well as the power of agencies going forward, particularly in emerging fields including cryptocurrency and artificial intelligence. It puts more onus on Congress to directly tackle policy issues and gives lower-court judges a mandate to rein in regulators when they exceed their authority.

The Supreme Court majority said the Chevron decision improperly transferred the power to interpret the law from the judiciary to federal agencies. Under Chevron, judges were required to defer to agencies that offered a reasonable interpretation of an unclear statute.

“Chevron was a judicial invention that required judges to disregard their statutory duties,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court.

Eighth news item

Infuriating:

U.S. journalist Evan Gershkovich will stand trial for espionage in Russia on Wednesday in a court whose proceedings are classified as a state secret.
No reporters, friends, family members or U.S. embassy staff will be allowed into the courtroom in the city of Yekaterinburg where Gershkovich, 32, faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted.

Have a great weekend.

—Dana

327 Responses to “Weekend Open Thread”

  1. Hello.

    Dana (917e26)

  2. I’ll move this here:

    Kristoff, Krugman, Friedman and Bruni all say Biden must drop out.

    Have they mentioned The 25th Amendment?

    There seems to be a growing consensus, amongst those who arrived on planet earth moments before the debate started, that Biden is unfit for a second term. That consensus is based on him being unfit this term. Are they going to do something about it?

    This is like catching a thief in your staff, but deciding to fire him months later.

    BuDuh (8df1cf) — 6/28/2024 @ 8:25 am

    BuDuh (8df1cf)

  3. Good morning, Dana.

    BuDuh (8df1cf)

  4. Biden allies say president is ‘sharp,’ special counsel criticism is ‘B.S.’

    President Joe Biden’s allies on Sunday defended the commander in chief and blasted a special counsel report that questioned the president’s age and mental fitness as containing “gratuitous, unnecessary and inaccurate personal remarks.”

    Mitch Landrieu, a former senior adviser to Biden who is now a national co-chair of his re-election campaign, told NBC News’ “Meet the Press” that “this kind of sense that he’s not ready for this job is just a bucket of B.S. It’s so deep [that] your boots will get stuck under.”

    Landrieu added that as a longtime adviser to Biden, he can testify to his mental acuity.

    “I’ve been knowing him for 30 years. I have met with him personally. I’ve met with him with two people, five people, 10 people. I have been on trips with him, crisscrossing the country, rebuilding America based on this incredible infrastructure bill that was passed. And I’m telling you, this guy is tough. He’s smart. He’s on his game,” Landrieu said.

    Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas offered a similar defense, calling Biden “sharp.”

    “The most difficult part about a meeting with President Biden is preparing for it because he is sharp, intensely probing and detail-oriented and focused,” Mayorkas told “Meet the Press.”

    Definitely not lying about conditions at the border…

    BuDuh (8df1cf)

  5. (from other thread)

    RCP Betting odds (President):

    55% Trump
    19% Biden
    10% Newsom
    5% Harris

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  6. Fact-checkers are biased towards trusting Democrats. Never interesting. It’s not that Trump doesn’t lie a lot — he’s a clumsy liar, too — but that Biden does too and is better at it.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  7. The Supreme Court ruled Friday that cities can ticket homeless people for camping in public even when there is no alternative shelter available, a decision that could drastically alter the lives of hundreds of thousands of Americans without a permanent place to live.

    Good. One of the reasons I left Los Angeles (there were many) was that the city was allowing camping in all my nearby parks, and the streets were lined with decrepit RVs and their refuse pitches. The only place in my council district that had police removing campers was in a few blocks around my city councilman’s home (posted as no RV parking, too).

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  8. There is no constitutional right to live by the beach. Really there isn’t. There are plenty of places to move to if “sleeping” is your basic need. But that is not is what is going on, and I’m sorry for people’s delusions.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  9. What I would like to know is who has been the acting president? In 1919 it was Mrs Wilson. Who has been deciding things for Joe?

    Kevin M (a9545f) — 6/28/2024 @ 8:31 am

    Please ignore the source (she is a vomit inducing psycho), and watch the short video that doesn’t include her:

    Acting President?

    BuDuh (8df1cf)

  10. Trump’s repeat falsehoods included his assertions that some Democratic-led states allow babies to be executed after birth

    Yes, Trump’s TalkRadio hyperbole is off-putting. But Democrats HAVE opposed laws that protected live births from failed abortions. Obama voted against one in Illinois.

    Also, Biden asserted that Democrats do not support late-term abortions, but the state I live in passed a law — the moment a Democrat became governor — to allow abortions for any reason at any time. There was a private clinic in Albuquerque that advertised elective abortions up through 32 weeks until they caused the death of a late-term patient. Now they advertise 25 weeks.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  11. > There are plenty of places to move to if “sleeping” is your basic need.

    Because of course you can afford to travel to those places, and of course you can get a job there if you give up the job you have now.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  12. From Wayback machine link above:

    Abortions through 32 weeks
    Abortions After 32 Weeks on a Case by Case Basis

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  13. Because of course you can afford to travel to those places, and of course you can get a job there if you give up the job you have now.

    The people sleeping rough in West LA moved there because the weather is nice and the city is a codependent.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  14. I find it troubling that liberals are so cannibalistic of their own programs that they will allow the LA Metro transit system to become homeless housing, parks to become homeless housing, nature reserves to become homeless housing. Then they wonder why no one cares about these things any more.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  15. I find it troubling that conservatives think it’s appropriate to throw people in jail for not being able to afford housing, and that they don’t understand that the *very act of doing that* makes it harder for the person to ever obtain housing again.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  16. aphrael, how many homeless camps are there near you? For most people it colors their view.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  17. aphrael, do you think that most unhoused people are there through economics, high rents and/or bad luck?

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  18. No reporters, friends, family members or U.S. embassy staff will be allowed into the courtroom in the city of Yekaterinburg where Gershkovich, 32, faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted.

    Yekaterinburg is where the Tsar Nicholas and his family were sent into exile after the Reds took St. Petersburg. And it was there that the Romanov family was murdered.

    JVW (b02843)

  19. Interesting tweet from Byron York, explaining how the Biden Administration outfoxed themselves and ended up subjecting the President to his humiliation last night. If we can believe Donald Trump — which of course deserves a lot of caveats — then he really did have good instincts regarding the potential for a Biden disaster on the debate stage. Here is what former President Trump told Byron York:

    A lot of Republicans were baffled in May after Trump quickly agreed when Biden challenged him to two debates, the first with CNN and the second with ABC News. Some in the GOP were skeptical, suspecting the debates would be structured and conducted in a way to disadvantage Trump. When asked about how the deal came about and how it came about so quickly, Trump said it was the result of what he believes was failed gamesmanship on the part of the Biden campaign.

    “What they did, I’m pretty sure, is that they approached me with a debate that I couldn’t take,” Trump explained. “Dana Bash, Jake Tapper” — Trump referred to the CNN anchor as “Fake Tapper” throughout — “no audience, sitting down, originally sitting down, a dead debate, turn off the mics when you’re not speaking so I can’t interrupt him. … They knew I wouldn’t accept that because it was CNN, Dana Bash, Jake Tapper, and I like an audience and probably he doesn’t, who knows? So they thought they would present it, I would say no, and they would say we can’t debate because Trump said no. So I said yes before they even gave me the terms. So he got roped into it.”

    Democrats would interpret things differently. After all, Biden took the lead in the debate maneuver and Trump had to react. But there also appears to be little doubt that Biden, who trailed Trump in both national and key state polls, felt a need to shake up the race, and to do it sooner rather than later. Thus, the June 27 debate will be the earliest general election faceoff ever.

    In a way, though, both men were locked into a deal of some sort. Trump asked if I was surprised that Biden is debating. I said no, I wasn’t. “I don’t think either one of you could have said no when the other one said yes.”

    “No, I couldn’t have said no,” Trump agreed.

    JVW (b02843)

  20. Chadha *1983) removed a 50 year-old check on agencies (the single-house veto) from Congress, giving the Executive unfettered power to write regulations that Congress had deferred to them with that check in place.

    Chevron removed long-standing judicial review from those same agencies “interpretation” of their deferred powers.

    The combination of the two was a massive abdication to federal regulators and a serious undermining of democracy and the Rule of Law. Suddenly, in some loosely defined areas, unelected bureaucrats had the power to alter wide areas of the economy and individual people’s lives.

    This is just the pendulum swinging back.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  21. That should have been Chevron (1984)

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  22. @18: The Star Chamber

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  23. Kevin M (a9545f) — 6/28/2024 @ 9:05 am

    I find it troubling that liberals are so cannibalistic of their own programs that they will allow the LA Metro transit system to become homeless housing, parks to become homeless housing, nature reserves to become homeless housing.

    The problem is that they can’t deliberately set aside some places for homeless encampments because they don’t meet standards, and they can’t build housing because it’s too expensive and there’s no end to it.

    But if they are not responsible for setting it up, then it’s OK with them.

    They could find some unused space in the LA transit system that could be satisfactory to some homeless, or some unused park space or nature reserve. But that would be authorizing it – and would insurance allow?

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  24. Trump is of course wrong that China would pay the tariffs. They are a sin tax on Americans who want to buy Chinese products.

    But … China’s way to compete is to lower their prices to compensate for the tariff, or provide products good enough to justify the higher cost. If so, they are in a way paying the tariff.

    The problem of course is that it’s likely that domestic suppliers of the competing products will increase their prices, given the tariff cover, resulting instead in inflation and no net discouragement to those wanting the Chinese product.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  25. But if they are not responsible for setting it up, then it’s OK with them.

    Shorter: You never need a permit to do nothing.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  26. Of course Donald Trump told a bunch of quarter-truths, half-truths, and untruths during the debate. It is who he is. But Charlie Cooke points out that the biggest lie in politics which was pushed heavily over the past four years, is that Joe Biden has the mental acuity to serve as President:

    Last night, over the course of about five minutes, the mainstream press and the Democratic Party’s establishment shifted positions on Joe Biden’s fitness for office. And when I say “shifted positions,” I mean shifted hemispheres. One moment we were in Italy, the next we were being whizzed across the Equator to Micronesia. It was as if the Political Gods had changed the channel. Poof!

    I have been writing for more than a year that Joe Biden is too old to be president right now — let alone until 2029. I’ve written about it here and here and here and here, and in many other places besides. I’ve talked about it on The Editors. I’ve discussed it on the radio. I’ve mentioned it on Twitter. And when I’ve done so, I haven’t hinted at the notion, I’ve conveyed it as bluntly as I know how. Simultaneously, I’ve submitted that Biden’s apologists are lying to us about this, that they know they’re lying to us about this, that we know that they are lying to us about this, and that they know that we know they are lying to us about this, but that they’re lying to us about this anyway, because they don’t think it’s their job to tell the truth.

    This morning, many of those people have stopped lying to us about this — perhaps because the lie has now become too obvious to deny. But that does not in any way change the fact that they have been lying to us about this. When they complained about “right-wing media,” they were lying to us. When they insisted that worries about Biden’s age were just cynical cover for Donald Trump, they were lying to us. When they suggested that Biden was impressive and sharp behind closed doors, they were lying to us. When they talked about “cheapfakes” and “deceptive editing,” they were lying to us. When they pulled out the “misinformation experts say . . .” garbage, they were lying to us. When they proposed that Robert Hur’s report was “partisan” or “unfair,” they were lying to us. They’re liars, and that they have ceased lying for a moment does not change the fact that they are liars who will lie to you for any political advantage they can gain.

    If Donald Trump is elected President in November, the Democrat establishement — which includes the mainstream media — needs to cogitate long and hard over how their own mendacity contributed mightily to his victory.

    JVW (b02843)

  27. They could find some unused space in the LA transit system

    If you’ve ever been to Tokyo, they do this and patrol the F out of it. There are wide underground connectors in major subway stations (e.g. Shinjuku) where the homeless are allowed a small space along the walls. Which they are expected to keep orderly and clean and not interfere with foot traffic. The station facilities can (MUST!) be used for sanitary needs. I actually saw two cops hustling some homeless guy away who was trying to pull his pants back up. It appeared he had been trying to crap in the open.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  28. But in LA they are living in the trains, which decreases paying ridership.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  29. . . . and they can’t build housing because it’s too expensive and there’s no end to it.

    And the dirty little secret is that very few (if any) urban progressives want homeless shelters built in their neighborhoods. It’s really easy to be in favor of housing the homeless in principle, but to not want it to be anywhere you like to frequent.

    Let me just say too that I do have compassion for those who are struggling through tough economic times and don’t have a support group, and I do favor efforts to find shelter for families with children. But where I live, virtually all of the street vagrants have issues with alcohol and drugs. My parish provides meals to the homeless twice a week, and when I have been there and have interacted with some of the people we are trying to help I have on several occasions heard a variation on “well, I would go to the Salvation Army Center [or some other local private shelter] but they won’t let me use cannabis, which I need for my [insert alleged malady here].” It’s just absolute bullstuff, but we’ve gotten to the point where the needy believe that they can dictate the terms of the charity they deign to receive.

    JVW (b02843)

  30. Kevin, at 20, it’s hilarious to me to watch conservatives embrace the idea that yes, really, they DO want judges to be philosopher-kings.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  31. > But if they are not responsible for setting it up, then it’s OK with them.

    Not so, unfortunately; anyone attempting to build a shelter gets shut down by local NIMBY activists who don’t want it in their neighborhood because it will bring their property values down and make them feel unsafe. Even in cities like San Francisco which allegedly believe in supportive housing, nobody is willing to have it next to them.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  32. > “well, I would go to the Salvation Army Center [or some other local private shelter] but they won’t let me use cannabis, which I need for my [insert alleged malady here].” It’s just absolute bullstuff,

    the thing is, that particular drug *is* useful for a number of different maladies, and it’s a bad policy decision to insist that people with such maladies give it up in order to obtain housing.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  33. @KurtSchlichter

    “Wow. This has to be the worst 24 hours for the Democrats since Appomattox”

    BuDuh (8df1cf)

  34. > resulting instead in inflation

    oh, yeah. the trade war Trump is going to start will result in runaway inflation that makes the Biden-era inflation look like nothing. and we can combine it with massive cuts to government social programs, too, justified by the need to balance the budget after we cut taxes again.

    it’s a grim future, and it’s basically locked in now.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  35. Over at The Spectator, Yascha Mounk also blames the Democrats for brazenly lying about Joe Biden’s mental acuity:

    A presidential incumbent whose mental and physical state is visibly deteriorating before the eyes of the world would, even at the best of times, put the Democratic party in a tough position. But the current emergency looks even more hopeless for two reasons. First, Kamala Harris, Biden’s vice president and his presumptive replacement as the Democratic party’s nominee if he should bow out, is just as unpopular as her boss. This is no coincidence. Harris has no political core, having swung without rhyme or reason between the persona of a tough centrist prosecutor and that of a leftist agitator raring to take on the white supremacist power structure. [. . .]

    Second, it may now be too late to avert the impending car crash. If Biden had bowed out six months ago, there would still have been just about enough time for a new generation of Democratic hopefuls to make their pitch to the nation. But with the primaries concluded, it would likely take a very messy coup at the Democratic National Convention to stop Harris from succeeding Biden. [. . .]

    All of which raises a simple question: how could Democrats have gotten themselves — and, by extension, all of us — into such a terrible mess? The answer, I’m afraid, suggests that America’s institutions are badly broken. For at every juncture, people whose obligations should have been towards truth and political responsibility bowed to the perceived imperatives of polite groupthink. And while the costs of these decisions seemed to be moderate at each juncture, they slowly accumulated, ultimately producing the omnishambles in which America now finds itself.

    And he has an interesting rejoinder to the idea of “yeah, but Trump is an existential threat to the nation”:

    When I was promoting my latest book, The Identity Trap, last fall, the question I was asked most often was about why we should criticize the flaws of the left when the threat from the right is so much greater. The answer I gave was threefold. The flaws of wokeness matter because they are leading us away from, not towards, the kind of society in which we should wish to live. They matter because they claim innocent victims who are deserving of our compassion. And they matter because they create the deep disdain for establishment institutions that helps right-wing demagogues be competitive in national elections in the first place.

    Reflecting on the mess the Democrats have created for themselves, I would now add a fourth point. The problem with so much of American life — from the identitarian slogans that were unthinkingly embraced by mainstream institutions over the last years to the softer forms of deference to conventional wisdom that made pundits desist from asking awkward questions about Biden’s age — is that it is undermining the basic foundations of our society. You cannot have an accurate grasp of reality when journalists are more concerned with “reading the room” than with telling the truth. And you cannot have high-performing institutions when demographic considerations trump merit.

    At least in the short-run, things will often work out just fine. But if you systematically weaken a society’s foundations, you’ll never be sure when the cracks start showing.

    JVW (b02843)

  36. Having seen how better Seattle is without the tents and encampments, I support the USSC decision on Grants Pass, OR.
    BTW, Mrs. Montagu and I have slept in Grants Pass, but at an AirBnB in the country. Beautiful area, definitely Trump country.

    Regarding the USSC decision on the issue that Dana didn’t talk about (the J6 rioters), Ryan Goodman that the obstruction charges only affected 6% of the defendants.
    https://x.com/rgoodlaw/status/1806717273287360630?s=46&t=Enscg8JjQytl9HJp0OtcWA

    Paul Montagu (977b50)

  37. He also lays out a four-point program to potentially “save” the Democrats, though it is nearly impossible to imagine much if any of this to come to fruition:

    1. Party leaders and family members need to tell Joe Biden the tragic truth. Whether or not he is able to admit this to himself, he clearly is in no condition to soldier on for another four years

    2 Democrats must avoid the temptation of coronating Harris as Biden’s successor. From her poor showing during the 2020 primaries to her evident unpopularity today, there simply is no democratic legitimacy for forcing her upon American voters as the only realistic alternative to Donald Trump

    3. Democrats need to think outside the box about how to give Americans a voice in picking Biden’s substitute If party rules make it impossible to run a formal primary contest at this late stage, the party should surely be capable of staging a one-day consultative vote in all fifty states. This would serve as a crucial testing ground for the national appeal of would-be candidates and provide the winner with some modicum of democratic legitimacy

    4. The candidate who eventually replaces Biden needs to make a real offer to American voters. In the UK, an uninspiring Labour Party leader is about to win a big victory in part because he has aligned his party’s program much more closely with the moderate preferences of swing voters; if Democrats are to win a resounding victory against Trump, they finally need to take a page out of the same playbook

    Number one remains something of a possibility, but I would instead imagine that we’ll be regaled with tales of how severe the “cold” that President Biden is suffering through truly is (even though this highlights the fact that a run-of-the-mill illness takes on much more significance in an elderly man like Joe Biden), and we will be assured that he has made a full recovery and that people who meet regularly with him are reporting back how engaged and focused he really is. And I will also bet that come September if the race is still relatively close, the Biden campaign will find a reason to cancel the second debate.

    JVW (b02843)

  38. > how many homeless camps are there near you? For most people it colors their view.

    How do you define near? I live in the bay area, there are homeless camps everywhere.

    But that doesn’t mean I want the people in them in jail, or subject to fines that they’ll never be able to pay. I want us to use tools that improve the situation rather than tools that make it harder for people to get out of the situation … and fines and jail make it harder, not easier, for the economically displaced and mentally ill to get into stable housing.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  39. aphrael (1797ab) — 6/28/2024 @ 10:01 am

    anyone attempting to build a shelter gets shut down by local NIMBY activists who don’t want it in their neighborhood

    That’s still official, because it requires permits and people can move to stop it.

    When I said not responsible, I meant no OK from government.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  40. If there’s no OK they can’t be moved from place to another where they will disturb fewer people.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  41. the thing is, that particular drug *is* useful for a number of different maladies, and it’s a bad policy decision to insist that people with such maladies give it up in order to obtain housing.

    We ought to be well past the point when we delude ourselves into believing that every pothead is just trying to treat his glaucoma or anxiety or arthritis. Nobody would believe a dude who claimed that he had to have a shot of vodka every 30 minutes in order to calm his nerves, so let’s stop pretending that the street guy who self-medicates with cannabis isn’t also very likely to abuse alcohol and be attracted to other opioids too.

    Do you really think the Salvation Army wants a shelter full of people who are hitting their vape pens every 20 minutes? Would you feel comfortable letting them out during the day to roam around town on their own, then assume they will be just fine when they come back in the evening?

    JVW (b02843)

  42. > Do you really think the Salvation Army wants a shelter full of people who are hitting their vape pens every 20 minutes

    Does the salvation army want it? No. Do I think they’re dumb for caring? Yes.

    > anxiety

    I know multiple people who use THC to help control their anxiety, and i’ve been around these people enough to be able to see the *positive* difference in them when they are using compared with when they aer not.

    > let’s stop pretending that the street guy who self-medicates with cannabis isn’t also very likely to abuse alcohol and be attracted to other opioids too.

    Since the overwhelming majority of the people I know who self-medicate with cannabis abuse neither alcohol nor opioids, why would I assume that homeless people who are self-medicating with cannabis *would*?

    And since the overwhelming majority of the people I know who self-medicate with cannabis *are actually experiencing positive mental health benefits from doing so*, why would I think it is appropriate to insist that homeless people would be better off without that self-medication?

    aphrael (1797ab)

  43. Don’t worry, Dems, an MSNBC host who advised Joe Biden back in 2020 insists that he was just a bit off last night and will have better days.

    When it comes to debates, performance is just as important as substance. On that count, Thursday’s debate was not a good night for President Joe Biden.

    As an adviser to then-candidate Biden ahead of the 2020 debates, I did not see him at his best, especially at the beginning. The fire we saw at Biden’s triumphant State of the Union this year wasn’t there, although he did get progressively better as the evening went on.

    Thursday’s debate was not a shouting match, and for that we can all be grateful. It was also a rare moment when voters have the benefit of seeing how the two candidates would fare in the White House. [Here she lapses into a rote recitation of “Biden good, Trump bad” which is just as banal as you might expect.]

    Those differences should matter, and the 90-minute debate could have illuminated them. It was an opportunity for Biden to speak to the American people about those differences and to talk more about the future than the past. On both fronts, the president fell short.

    The President “fell short” because at this point he is quite simply incapable of stringing together a cogent thought and then communicating it to the public. The “fire” we saw at his “triumphant” SOTU address back in February merely tells us is that Joe Biden is at his best when he’s being a grouchy old bastard reading large print from a teleprompter in a dark room where he does not have to answer questions or engage in any sort of back-and-forth with an interlocutor or an antagonist. What his desultory performance last night confirmed is that he is not up for any sort of event in which he has to think on his feet or explain what it is he actually believes.

    This is exactly the sort of attitude which leads me to conclude that Democrats absolutely deserve to lose in November, even though the thought of four years more of Donald Trump fills me with dread. But four more years of the progressive establishment continuing to lie their way into desperately clutching on to power is even worse.

    JVW (b02843)

  44. Kevin M (a9545f) — 6/28/2024 @ 9:43 am

    Trump is of course wrong that China would pay the tariffs.

    That one is a permissible error rather than a lie, and shouldn’t be lumped with other lies, as a lot of people can honestly fall into that mistake.

    This sort of thing is known among economists as the “incidence of taxation.”

    https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/05775132.1979.11470501 (can’t cut and paste with this browser)

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/23398836

    THE INCIDENCE OF TAXATION
    By A. C. Pleydell

    Secretary New York Tax Reform Association, New York City

    If the people understood who really pays each of the various taxes, there would be great changes in our present tax systems.

    But there will not be complete reform until it is understood also who ought to pay the taxes. No discussion of the incidence of taxation can be profitable unless in addition to pointing out just who bears the burden of the tax we consider
    also who should bear the burden.

    To show how taxes can be shifted, may result in popular attempts merely to unload burdens, unless it be shown also that unjust taxes injure every one, and not only those who actually pay them.

    Technically the “incidence of taxation” refers to the final resting place of the tax, and “shifting” indicates the method by which the tax is passed on from the one who first pays it
    to the one who finally pays it. But the terms
    “incidence” and “shifting” are so often used interchangeably that for practical purposes we can speak entirely of “shifting” the tax.

    A shifted tax means that the person who pays it to the government gets it back, through an increased charge, from some one to whom he sells or hires property or services. When the positive statement is made that a certain tax is shifted, it must be assumed that the law is enforced.

    Of course there’s room for disagreement on how much of a tax is shifted and we can also just ignore it and assume that any tax is eventually laid on GDP so we just go by something like 20% of GDP.

    By the way, for corporations to pay taxes at least has the virtue of simplifying things for most people.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  45. . The “fire” we saw at his “triumphant” SOTU address back in February merely tells us is that Joe Biden is at his best when he’s being a grouchy old bastard reading large print from a teleprompter in a dark room where he does not have to answer questions or engage in any sort of back-and-forth with an interlocutor or an antagonist.

    it means that, at a minimum, he can understand what he’s reading .

    Well most of the time.

    When he expects applause, and doesn’t get it, he’ll reach for something, like trying to read the word: “Pause”

    Sammy Finkelman (e0dccb)

  46. JVW, we are all “binned” into in and out groups. Inside of a group, people clap each other on the back constantly…and the ideas get more extreme. The opponents more evil.

    In Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels,” there was a wonderful place where the enlightened leaders were great. But the “flappers” held a fan over the leaders’ eyes, ears, or mouth. Only when the flappers thought it was best, did the leaders see, hear, or speak. So who really are the leaders?

    That’s what we have now. It’s not new; Swift was writing about bureaucrats.

    And here we are.

    Honestly, I wish that both RNC and DNC had a brokered convention.

    #NoneOfTheAbove

    Simon Jester (c8876d)

  47. Since the overwhelming majority of the people I know who self-medicate with cannabis abuse neither alcohol nor opioids, why would I assume that homeless people who are self-medicating with cannabis *would*?

    I guess what I’m getting at, aphrael, is that they aren’t truly using cannabis under the instruction and supervision of a physician or a psychiatrist; they are merely using it as an excuse to feed their opioid addiction, and then claiming that it is for medicinal purposes. That’s why I compared it to the rummy who insists that he uses alcohol only “to calm my nerves.”

    It would be interesting if the legalized weed lobby stepped up and opened up their own private homeless shelters. Naturally, they would allow residents to use the products which have helped make their fortunes. I would love to see just how well that worked out for them; if they could trust their residents to self-medicate responsibly or if it devolved into a s***show similar to the tent cities in your town and in mine.

    JVW (b02843)

  48. > as an excuse to feed their opioid addiction

    what opioid addiction? THC isn’t an opioid and its mechanism of action is nothing like that of opioids.

    I *think* what you’re trying to say is that these people are addicted to THC and are making up excuses to justify their addiction.

    Maybe that’s true. I’m skeptical, though, because i’ve known enough people for whom THC has significant positive mental health impact that, for me to believe what you believe, would require me to either (a) doubt the evidence in front of me of the positive benefits to people I know, or (b) assume that homeless users are for some reason less likely to experience the positive benefits and must therefore be lying when they claim to be experiencing them.

    I see no good reason to do either.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  49. Take the money that would be spent jailing people and build more housing.

    Sam G (87ab56)

  50. > This is exactly the sort of attitude which leads me to conclude that Democrats absolutely deserve to lose in November, even though the thought of four years more of Donald Trump fills me with dread. But four more years of the progressive establishment continuing to lie their way into desperately clutching on to power is even worse.

    On the one hand, I agree with you that the Democrats deserve to lose (even though I will vote for anyone who stands a chance of defeating Trump, including people I think deserve to lose).

    On the other hand … dude, it’s not the progressives that are the problem here. The progressives didn’t want Biden in 2020 and would by and large prefer someone else right now.

    It’s the *mainstream democratic establishment*, the people that have basically run the show in the party since the Clinton years, who are responsible for this disaster. The progressives barely have a seat at the table.

    This conflation of the center-left establishment people and the progressives is no more realistic a representation of reality than the way people on the left conflate Mitt Romney and Lauren Boebert into the same nightmare fantasy of the far right.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  51. > Take the money that would be spent jailing people and build more housing.

    That would be fantastic. But in California that means sweeping away the ways people can obstruct building more housing. Almost nobody wants to allow more housing anywhere near them.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  52. Kevin, at 20, it’s hilarious to me to watch conservatives embrace the idea that yes, really, they DO want judges to be philosopher-kings.

    Then you misread Chadha and seem to confuse judicial review with legislating from the bench.

    Chevron said that courts could not interpret law if an agency had interpreted it already, in a way that was a *possible* meaning of the statute, even if it was not a likely or traditional one. Clawing back the power to interpret law through judicial review is not legislating themselves, but reinforcing the words that Congress passed.

    One of the terrible things about the ability of agencies to read powers into laws that aren’t there is that it is difficult to fix an interpretation so that the agency cannot willfully find the same powers again. Judges, at least, have rules to go by when reading statutes.

    Chadha said that the “single house veto” — a power that Congress had reserved when delegating to FDR — was unconstitutional. The theory behind the veto was that regulations were laws made on Congress’ behalf and a law that either House disapproved of would fail. But the Court accepted the argument that disapproving a regulation required a “no you can’t do that” law to be passed and signed by the President, neatly locking all the previously delegated power to the Executive branch for all time. It was a terrible decision and gutted Congress’ power to control what was law.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  53. Trump made more than 30 false claims at the Thursday debate.

    Including some he repeated a number of times.

    One was that Joe Biden was allowing “millions” of people to come in here from “prisons, jails, and mental institutions” to come into the United States and destroy our country.

    He repeated the idea a number of times, so Joe Biden finally remembered a (weak) refutation that there was no data to support that.

    How many people who accepted that claim are going to believe that, even though it is undoubtedly true?

    Biden said:

    I’m not saying no terrorist ever got through. But the idea they’re emptying their prisons, we’re welcoming these people, that’s simply not true. There’s no data to support what he said. Once again, he’s exaggerating. He’s lying.

    He should have said:

    This is not the Mariel boatlift! And even there many people were genuine political refugees. There were people who had been in relationships with children of members of the government where, if they were boys, they were charged with rape, and if the unwanted partner was a girl, she was charged with prostitution. They were later told they would be released in they agreed to leave Cuba.

    And there were people who had stolen trivial amounts of things from the government. There were genuine criminals, who usually had tattoos like gang members do in Latin America, and specific tattoos, but the immigration people who encountered them often relied on self reporting and ignored what other passengers were telling them. The Cuban government forced the people who came to take their relatives over to take these people too. And nobody paid any fare.

    Fidel Castro was not interested in harming the United States – just in sending people who, the United States would reject, which is not the same thing.

    One category was homosexuals, who were then prohibited from immigrating. Now it is 180 degrees reversed – they get preference because they get entitled to asylum. Not that it did many of them any good. This was in 1980 and many came down with AIDS in the United States and died while in Cuba, while they might have been locked up they might not have gotten AIDS.

    Another thing that had Trump been asked would hsve revealed that he knew that this business of people being released from prisons and mental institutions was a lie.

    The migrant smuggling is being done by cartels, don’t you agree? (because U.S. policy and Mexican officials have made it almost impossible for someone to come over the border without paying)

    Do you think anyone just released from a prison has money to pay?

    And how many people do you think are in mental institutions and what kind? You’re scaring people about the mentally disabled.

    Bu Biden mostly fixed on something Trump had said about veterans, because migrants were allegedly being favored over veterans and he defended his record on veterans and Trump followed him over into that digression.

    nd luxury hotels? Luxury prices maybe but no more luxury hotels.

    And how were they damaging Social Security? You might have an argument about Medicaid (Medicare is contribution program) but how could any of them affect Social Security except possibly to be taxed?

    Sammy Finkelman (e0dccb)

  54. I *think* what you’re trying to say is that these people are addicted to THC and are making up excuses to justify their addiction.

    What I mean is that your average homeless street vagrant THC user also uses plenty of other opioids, pretty much any that he or she can get his or her hands on. But because cannabis (like alcohol) is legal, they try to frame themselves as just being medical marijuana users.

    JVW (b02843)

  55. @51 I’m in the East Bay, and lived in the Bay Area my whole life. That’s exactly right, our local politics is the problem when it comes to housing. Prop 13 does us no favors.

    Sam G (87ab56)

  56. The reason why California has more homeless – besides being the most populous state, with decent weather – isn’t due to drug issues but housing policy. Drug abuse is rampant in areas like West Virginia, and yet they have lower homelessness – because they have cheap housing.

    Sam G (87ab56)

  57. Kevin M (a9545f) — 6/28/2024 @ 11:30 am

    But the Court accepted the argument that disapproving a regulation required a “no you can’t do that” law to be passed and signed by the President, neatly locking all the previously delegated power to the Executive branch for all time. It was a terrible decision and gutted Congress’ power to control what was law.

    Bit there’s a way, and it can take effect when the presidency changes hands and Congress is in the control of the opposite party.

    Allow a law to be passed negating a regulation. This law is an exception to the filibuster rule in the Senate. he only thing is it has to be done within six months of when the regulation became effective’

    https://regulatorystudies.columbian.gwu.edu/congressional-review-act

    Another possibility would require new regulations to be passed into law by Congress to become effective or effective for more than a short time.

    Sammy Finkelman (e0dccb)

  58. On the one hand, I agree with you that the Democrats deserve to lose (even though I will vote for anyone who stands a chance of defeating Trump, including people I think deserve to lose).

    On the other hand … dude, it’s not the progressives that are the problem here. The progressives didn’t want Biden in 2020 and would by and large prefer someone else right now.

    It’s the *mainstream democratic establishment*, the people that have basically run the show in the party since the Clinton years, who are responsible for this disaster. The progressives barely have a seat at the table.

    Yeah, I guess you’re right that I am unfairly conflating the Establishment with progressives. But that said, the Democrat establishment has bent over backwards to try to pander to the progressive left by adopting their style if not exactly their substance. That’s how we get nonsense like Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, and other Dem leaders donning kente cloth and kneeling in supplication for the martyrdom of St. George Floyd of Fentanyl. It’s why the party, including ultra-Establishmentarian Joe Biden, went hog wild for transgenderism over the past four years. And it’s the locus of the party tying itself in knots over the Palestinian question, and trying to tell Israel how to manage a war to avenge the worst mass killing of Jews since the Holocaust.

    So while the progressives perhaps aren’t the majority of the party, they have certainly had a very powerful influence on Democrat policies for the past four years.

    JVW (b02843)

  59. Not so, unfortunately; anyone attempting to build a shelter gets shut down by local NIMBY activists

    There are places to build shelters that don’t do this, and particularly transitional housing for people who actually ARE bad-luck cases. Converting a warehouse in a light-industrial area, for example, especially if it is close to buses or trains, would be good for those seeking work and needing low-cost ways to get around.

    But THIS is opposed by the do-gooders, who argue that these are not good living environments, far from groceries, etc. The YIYBY crowd, to coin a phrase.

    But why do you object to those who don’t want sketchy people hanging out near their kid’s schools?

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  60. Drug abuse is rampant in areas like West Virginia, and yet they have lower homelessness – because they have cheap housing.

    That is a part of it for sure, but you seem to be entirely overlooking the fact that states like California tolerate, support, and even subsidize homelessness. Other places that are far less tolerant of camping out in public, openly selling and using drugs, prostitution, and public drunkenness, urination, and defecation don’t end up having the level of homelessness of the places that turn a blind eye to it.

    JVW (b02843)

  61. Trump is of course wrong that China would pay the tariffs.

    One could as easily point out that Biden is wrong on who pays “the employer’s half” of the FICA tax. From the employer’s point of view, it’s part of the employee’s wage. The employee may get a benefit from not paying income tax on it, but it’s all the same to the employer.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  62. ESPN is a joke:

    Also at the ESPYs: Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex, will receive the Pat Tillman Award for Service, an award given to a person with a strong connection to sports who has served others in a way that echoes the legacy of the former NFL player and U.S. Army Ranger, Pat Tillman. https://t.co/3Tn2daJ9CR— Adam Schefter (@AdamSchefter) June 27, 2024

    JVW (b02843)

  63. Since the overwhelming majority of the people I know who self-medicate with cannabis abuse neither alcohol nor opioids, why would I assume that homeless people who are self-medicating with cannabis *would*?

    Because people who are homeless are more likely to be engaging in self-destructive acts than people who are not. The “homeless” thing being the best indicator of that.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  64. Harry has been such a prince in his service to others. Usally between champagne brunch and teatime.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  65. Drug abuse is rampant in areas like West Virginia, and yet they have lower homelessness – because they have cheap housing.

    I live in Albuquerque, home of Breaking Bad, and this is true here. There is some homelessness still, even though housing is about 5 times cheaper than Los Angeles. The homeless we have are the hard-core homeless; either unable to cope with self-care, or hopelessly addicted to destructive substances and/or behavior. But anyone with any kind of career job can buy a house without a struggle. I have cops and teachers on my block. Wasn’t that way in Los Angeles. Young people have hope here.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  66. This is clearly shutting the barn doors after the horses are scampered off.

    https://www.cnn.com/2024/06/28/politics/video/joe-biden-age-concerns-debate-donald-trump-digvid

    Still, it is eloquent. Pity we didn’t see this last night. There’s a part of me that figures this is a poignant political goodbye rather than a ringing argument for four more years.

    Appalled (b73db7)

  67. I’m in the East Bay, and lived in the Bay Area my whole life. That’s exactly right, our local politics is the problem when it comes to housing. Prop 13 does us no favors.

    How is Prop 13 to blame? Is it because if only the state had more revenue from property taxes they would almost certainly be building a great deal more housing, never mind the fact that we have lavishly funded the Homeless Industrial Complex to the tune of billions of dollars over the past decade? Or is it because young families and senior citizens would be driven out of the state to escape ridiculously high property tax bills, and that would allow the government to seize abandoned buildings via eminent domain and then convert them into homeless shelters?

    JVW (b02843)

  68. It helps to have laws that encourage new housing, although we are starting to get NIMBYs of the “pull the ladder up after me” variety.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  69. JVW (b02843) — 6/28/2024 @ 11:41 am

    And it’s the locus of the party tying itself in knots over the Palestinian question, and trying to tell Israel how to manage a war to avenge the worst mass killing of Jews since the Holocaust.

    They didn’t discuss the war much in the debats, but Biden indicated his strategy:

    https://www.cnn.com/2024/06/27/politics/read-biden-trump-debate-rush-transcript/index.html

    …The first stage is to treat [sic – probably the word here should be “trade”] the hostages for a ceasefire. Second phase is a ceasefire with additional conditions. The third phase is know the end of the war. The only one who wants the war to continue is Hamas, number one. They’re the only ones [not agreeing to?] standing down (ph)…

    …Hamas cannot be allowed to be continued. We continue to send our experts and our intelligence people to how they can get Hamas like we did Bin Laden. You don’t have to do it. [I think meaning the U.S. government doesn’t need to do it itself -SF] And by the way, they’ve been greatly weakened, Hamas, greatly weakened, and they should be. They should be eliminated. But, you got to be careful for what you use these certain weapons among population centers.

    And Trump said:

    ..You got to ask him, as far as Israel and Hamas, Israel is the one that wants to go. He said the only one who wants to keep going is Hamas. Actually, Israel is the one, and you should them go and let them finish the job. He doesn’t want [them?] to do it. He has become like a Palestinian. But, they don’t like him because he is a very bad Palestinian. He is a weak one.

    I don’t know what that is supposed to mean, except that maybe Biden is satisfying neither Israel nor the enemies of Israel.

    Anyway, Trump took issue with Biden’s claim that Israel wants to end the war. And Biden thinks that as soon as they kill Sinwar and his top people, Hamas, or perhaps its desire to wage war and stay in power, will go poof. I think that’s what some Arab country is telling them.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  70. The most expensive, and worst, housing is that constructed by government. The next worst and expensive housing is that constructed under heavy government mandates.

    Only government can find a way to spend $700K on studio apartments.

    In ABQ they build new 1500-1800 sf houses and sell them for under $400K. Larger homes are in the 4s.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  71. Some people think that Biden was deliberately sabotaged (not given vitamins etc.) in order to try to get him to quit.

    I suppose you could call these people LGTBQ [Let’s Get Biden To Quit] (a weeks or months old joke)

    In reality, the people who prepped him for the debate could be the same sort of geniuses who persuaded French President Emmanuel Macron to call snap elections for Parliament.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  72. 66. Appalled (b73db7) — 6/28/2024 @ 12:00 pm

    Pity we didn’t see this last night.

    What was the temperature in the studio and outdoors, or what did he eat or drink?

    Sammy Finkelman (e0dccb)

  73. @60 those are symptoms of the underlying issue

    Sam G (87ab56)

  74. Sent a bit early: the underlying issue being our housing policy, and the subsidization homelessness and the non-profits that claim to serve them (which are often fraud rackets) because that is preferred over just allowing dense housing in our cities.

    Sam G (87ab56)

  75. House Judiciary advances contempt resolution against Biden’s ghostwriter

    The House Judiciary Committee voted Thursday to advance a resolution that would hold President Biden’s ghostwriter in contempt of Congress for failing to provide transcripts and recordings of his conversations with the commander-in-chief.

    The possible contempt charges against Mark Zwonitzer, which can now be considered by the full House of Representatives, come after federal investigators revealed the author had classified material disclosed to him by Biden, 81.

    Zwonitzer, 61, would be referred to the Department of Justice for prosecution if the full House were to pass the resolution.

    Zwonitzer deleted the recordings sometime after Hur was appointed by Attorney General Merrick Garland in January 2023 to investigate whether the president had mishandled the classified material.

    The author was not charged by Hur despite the special counsel acknowledging in his report that the recordings had “significant evidentiary value.”

    Deleting evidence. Defying a congressional subpoena. The Rule of Law folks must be having a fit.

    lloyd (241e96)

  76. #72

    Judging by Biden’s cough during the clip I posted, I believe the story that he has a cold. This is the one and only time I will think that someone would have been better off with COVID.

    Appalled (b73db7)

  77. Prop 13 is a problem because it disincentivizes selling your property. If we had proper land/property taxation, we’d see more development or at least turn over in terms of which houses people live in. An example: an elderly couple still living in their family home instead of downsizing.

    It’s somewhat similar to rent control, if you think about it – both policies lead to less development and growth.

    Sam G (87ab56)

  78. Still, it is eloquent. Pity we didn’t see this last night. There’s a part of me that figures this is a poignant political goodbye rather than a ringing argument for four more years.

    You just can’t compare speaking in front of an adoring crowd of campaign supporters and either reading from a prepared text or giving off-the-cuff casual remarks with having to face down an antagonist and answering difficult questions on policy and international events. Donald Trump can be funny and disarming when he is

    I doubt very much that President Biden can hold his own in tense negotiations with Xi or Putin or even more friendly figures like Claudia Pardo, Benjamin Netanyahu, and Prince Mohammad. Trump might be no prize there, but I would imagine he is enough of an asshole that he wouldn’t do anything too stupid. If nothing else, Trump could just sit there and spout his usual nonsense while Biden would likely have his mind wander off into some far-away place and would not be able to complete his thoughts.

    JVW (b02843)

  79. Prop 13 is a problem because it disincentivizes selling your property.

    I’m not sure I follow. I can see why it would be a disincentive to add on to your home, at least to the degree that the addition triggers a tax reassessment, but other than desiring to pass along your home to a child or grandchild via a family trust I don’t see why anyone wouldn’t sell it when the time is right. Even in my town, where we beat Gavin Newsom in court over state attempts to undermine single-unit housing, there is no shortage of single-home lots which are being turned into two or more townhomes.

    JVW (b02843)

  80. @74 The underlying issues are blue states that enable drug abuse (see Oregon measure 110) and the thinking that the mentally ill can function in society. If housing were free, they would still be doing hard drugs and the mentally ill would still be mentally ill. Mass transit, downtowns, public parks have become no-go zones for anyone doing a basic risk-reward calculation. This is simply insane.

    lloyd (241e96)

  81. JVW —

    Given the cadence, those remarks were from a prepared text.

    I understand your point, but believe that Trump is a Putin/Kim Jong Un fanboy, and would not represent US interests in tense negotiations with Xi or Putin, because he want them to like him and he wants to be like them. That puts me close to nk on the neverTrump spectrum, but I think you knew that.

    I doubt the Democrats are going to find a replacement. That’s the result of a very bad VP decision in 2020 that is now unfixable.

    Appalled (b73db7)

  82. Appalled (b73db7) — 6/28/2024 @ 12:32 pm

    This is the one and only time I will think that someone would have been better off with COVID.

    Biden’s people said he took a Covid test and it was negative.

    I bet that they didn’t take any kind of a test to see what it was We might be a little bit better off if that was done more often. DRJ had tests done so it is possible.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  83. Here’s a good rundown of the golf part of the debate. I lament where our great country is going.

    Paul Montagu (d4d407)

  84. From SCOTUS blog:

    The court ruled on Thursday that the Securities and Exchange Commission’s routine practice of imposing fines in its administrative proceedings, used to penalize securities fraud, violates the Seventh Amendment “right of trial by jury” in all “suits at common law.” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for a 6-3 majority in Securities and Exchange Commission v. Jarkesy that the SEC cannot continue to handle this cases in house without a jury. The decision will have a far-reaching impact on dozens of federal administrative agencies that use similar processes.

    Justice Sonia Sotomayor, joined by Justices Elena Kagan and Ketanji Brown Jackson, dissented. Reading from the bench on Thursday, Sotomayor called the majority’s decision Justice Sonia Sotomayor, joined by Justices Elena Kagan and Ketanji Brown Jackson “a devastating blow to the manner in which our government functions.”
    Bold emphasis is mine

    Dear Justices Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan and Ketanji Brown Jackson. Exactly. Our government was functioning outside the Constitution, which means it was behaving badly and needed a blow delivered in the form of a 6-3 spanking

    steveg (71265a)

  85. Several SCOTUS 6-3 spankings, thanks to Trump’s appointments.

    lloyd (241e96)

  86. > I’m not sure I follow. I can see why it would be a disincentive to add on to your home, at least to the degree that the addition triggers a tax reassessment, but other than desiring to pass along your home to a child or grandchild via a family trust I don’t see why anyone wouldn’t sell it when the time is right. Even

    Unless you are subject to the specific exemption for senior citizens, it’s very likely that if you sell and move without moving out of the region, your taxes will go up.

    aphrael (1797ab)

  87. There are actually only two weeks till Joe Biden is officially nominated because it is necessary to name him that early in order to be on the ballot in Ohio. legal complications start not on August 19 but with the Zoom nomination, although there will be an unofficial (and dramatic sounding) roll call of the states in August.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  88. Correction: Actually the deadline is actually August 7.

    Sammy Finkelman (e0dccb)

  89. That part of the debate was surreal, Paul Montagu. I actually had to do some investigating to truly ascertain how good of a golfer each man is. There are plenty of results when you search on “Biden golf handicap” and “Trump golf handicap.”

    Trump carries a handicap of 2 to 3, which was legitimately calculated through tournament play, but it’s from around eight years ago so there is no telling if he still plays up to that now. Golf Digest also points out that Trump’s best scores were all obtained during good weather months.

    Biden reports a handicap of roughly 7. Golf Digest seems to accept him at his word, though they do note that videos from his play suggest that he would be closer to a 10 or 12. Former President Bill Clinton was notorious for taking mulligans and improving his lie (what an appropriate phrase) while on the course, and then reporting a score for the round based upon his various shortcuts. It would not be at all surprising if Joe Biden does the same. Biden apparently didn’t start playing golf until 2001, by which time he was already 57, so a handicap that low would be pretty decent in light of his late start. But like Trump, Biden’s lack of a reported score since 2018 suggests he’s probably no longer playing at his previous level. Last year, Golf Digest had Biden at a 10 handicap.

    JVW (b02843)

  90. The reason why California has more homeless – besides being the most populous state, with decent weather – isn’t due to drug issues but housing policy. Drug abuse is rampant in areas like West Virginia, and yet they have lower homelessness – because they have cheap housing.

    What prevents the “homeless” from going to West Virginia?

    BuDuh (8df1cf)

  91. I have a comment that gets thrown straight out without going to moderation. I will try chopping it to bits to figure out what word is possibly doing this.

    BuDuh (4214e4)

  92. Judging by Biden’s cough during the clip I posted, I believe the story that he has a cold. This is the one and only time I will think that someone would have been better off with COVID.

    Appalled (b73db7) — 6/28/2024 @ 12:32 pm

    Or:

    What is Add erall tongue?
    Ad der all tongue is the name given to a cluster of symptoms that affect some people who take Add er all regularly. It may also be called Add er all Cotton mouth or Add er all dry mouth.

    Hmmmm… What to believe?

    [This is the earlier comment from you which went into the Spam folder rather than the Moderated comments folder. I suppose that the link included in the comment goes to a site that WordPress believes is a spamming site. – JVW]

    BuDuh (4214e4)

  93. The always ridiculous Elie Mystal kicks off the biannual “listen to the simple wisdom espoused by my young child which cuts through the fog of political chicanery and spin” season with a real howler:

    My kid just said: “It’s sad to watch a pack of lies beat a good person just because the good person can’t speak.”I literally just gave him a hug and said that “debates don’t matter.”— Elie Mystal (@ElieNYC) June 28, 2024

    Enjoy reading the various responses which clown on his reliance on this tired, tired trope.

    JVW (b02843)

  94. Hey, are there any names that Nick Kristof is leaving out as he mulls over potential replacements for Joe Biden? Maybe he really was serious about his whole “liberals have wrecked the West Coast” column after all.

    I wish Biden would reflect on this debate performance and then announce his decision to withdraw from the race, throwing the choice of Democratic nominee to the convention. Someone like @gretchenwhitmer or @SherrodBrown or @SecRaimondo could still jump in and beat Trump.— Nicholas Kristof (@NickKristof) June 28, 2024

    JVW (b02843)

  95. The left got together and decided this is the frame and the spin.

    Barack Obama – “Bad debate nights happen. Trust me, I know. But this election is still a choice between someone who has fought for ordinary folks his entire life and someone who only cares about himself. Between someone who tells the truth; who knows right from wrong and will give it to the American people straight — and someone who lies through his teeth for his own benefit.”

    1. “This election is still a choice between someone who has fought for ordinary folks his entire life and someone who only cares about himself” No it is not. I would agree that Trump cares about himself first- who doesn’t. There are very very few truly selfless people in Washington DC and Biden most certainly is not one of them. Arguably the most grossly self centered, self serving, disgusting lie during the debate was Bidens lie that whitewashed the deaths of 13 Americans in Afghanistan

    2. Between someone who tells the truth; who knows right from wrong and will give it to the American people straight — and someone who lies through his teeth for his own benefit.”
    Obama must have been one of those people who watched with the sound off. During the debate, Biden lied about what he did and didn’t do, lied about what Trump did and didn’t do.
    Biden didn’t appear to know right from wrong and didn’t give it to the people straight even when talking about the ultimate sacrifice, which he lied through his teeth about.
    Biden ran for President in 1988 and it fell apart due to plagiarism (a form of a lie where one falsely claims work of another as their own), and lies about his accomplishments that Biden dismissed as an “exaggerated shadow” of past mistakes. That odor of mendacity had not worn off by 2008 but now he’s “Honest Joe? Please

    This election is a choice between two people who care primarily about themselves, who lie about themselves and others. Trumps flaws are on full display as always, Bidens are under full cover up as always – it is just that one of the big lies and cover ups was exposed last night

    Here is Mayorkas covering up and lying about an old fraud
    https://x.com/i/status/1756759133678940627

    steveg (33c23c)

  96. The NYT editorial board is saying Biden should release his delegates. That’s how big a train wreck it was last night.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2024/06/28/opinion/biden-election-debate-trump.html?smid=nytcore-ios-share&referringSource=articleShare

    Paul Montagu (977b50)

  97. If I had the ear of the DNC leadership, I’d be pushing for Claire McCaskill to come off the bench, but I kind of like the idea of a guy from Ohio like Brown. For VP, Harris is a problem. There’s no confidence in her within the establishment part of the party, and less the further toward the center you go.

    If Biden had chosen Mayor Pete (can’t be bothered to look up how to spell his last name), then it wouldn’t be as ugly a conversation as today. Brown was on the list for VP but just didn’t want to do it.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  98. Thanks, JVW. All I changed was the spelling of the drug by adding spaces and then it posted. I didn’t alter the link.

    Bizarre.

    BuDuh (4214e4)

  99. steveg has it right @95.

    Biden knows where he’s going, and he knows it will be soon just not exactly when, and does not give a hoot what he leaves behind. He will not drop out of the race and he will not drop Harris; and the party will not even try to drag them out, it will just keep on saying rich Corinthian leather.

    We proles (speaking for myself) can only hope that NJRob’s optimism is right, that the election is meaningless, and that the nation will continue to function under the governance of the bureaucrats.

    nk (2836cd)

  100. Paul Montagu (977b50) — 6/28/2024 @ 4:53 pm

    When a Democrat President has even lost the New York Times, it’s time to step aside.

    The people who benefit from propping up Biden as President (yeah, Jill, I’m looking at you, and the Cabinet, advisors and other White House staff) should be ashamed of themselves.

    My elderly mother said back in 2020 that Biden looked like he was in a trance. If that was a trance, last night was a coma.

    Pull the plug on this clown show now, and put up somebody who has a better chance of beating the con man.

    norcal (32d83c)

  101. Prop 13 is a problem because it disincentivizes selling your property.

    A recent change allowing transfer of the assessment after sale (modified for buying higher-valued property) fixed that. The only disincentive was that your next property would be taxed MUCH higher. Now it won’t.

    Now, is this fair to new residents? Yes and no. Long-time residents have paid over the years for schools and other infrastructure that newcomers are getting “for free.” Sure that’s only part of the picture, but it IS part of the picture.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  102. The biggest strength of Prop 13 is it doesn’t tax people on “paper profits” in value of their homes. The old system used to force retired people to sell to pay the increased taxes when they really had no interest in the supposed gains.

    The biggest failure of Prop 13 is that it ignores people who actually realize the increased value of their property through home equity loans. One way to fix that would be to treat any loan taken against the property, above the Prop 13 assessment, as an assessment event just like a sale.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  103. What prevents the “homeless” from going to West Virginia?

    Santa Monica is much nicer that Wheeling.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  104. If I had the ear of the DNC leadership, I’d be pushing for Claire McCaskill to come off the bench, but I kind of like the idea of a guy from Ohio like Brown.

    Please, no senators. And particularly no wonky senators. Going after Trump with a wonk is just asking to lose. Governors make the bets presidents, which is why so very few (Harding, Kennedy and Obama) sitting senators become president.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  105. Whitmer has success in a purple state. Beshear has success in a (very) red state. Newsom is a governor, all right, but he’s never won a competitive state-wide election (and besides, he’s the poster boy for everything wrong).

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  106. This election is a choice between two people who care primarily about themselves

    I think it’s a bit unfair to say that Trump only cares about himself. There are 1000 other billionaires in the country who don’t offer to serve. Trump has taken up the banner of a lot of people who were ignored by the two parties for decades. Now, maybe that’s simply a hustle, but they kinda still like him.

    Will he produce if elected? He might. Obama disappointed a lot of black folks who put out for him.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  107. Beshear is our Governor, he’s fine, but he’s really no better than that. He gets credit for actually being bipartisan in a state that isn’t, supermajorities in both houses for the GOP, but he’s fine. Young, and a 2 time gov, would make him pretty decent as a veep.

    Being in NKY, or the OH-IN-KY tri-state, a very red part of the country Brown gets quite a bit of positive vibes from the local GOP because he brings the $$’s back to Ohio. He and DeWine get along well too, and still wins in a +8 Trump state, so he’d be OK.

    I don’t get the wonk issues. I want a wonk this time, we’ve had way too much “personality” over the 30 years.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  108. Remember Dukakis?

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  109. I guess asset is off trying to figure out how AOC can replace Biden.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  110. 36 is less than 30.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  111. ?

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  112. Sotomayor wise Latinx “Sleep is a biological necessity, not a crime. For some people, sleeping outside is their only option”
    Pooping is a biological necessity and your porch seemed like my best and only option.
    Seriously though, what about when sleeping outside is the only option chosen.
    Move it along laws create a motivational imperative to find and choose options to sleeping outside

    From SCOTUS Blog: Justice Sonia Sotomayor dissented, in an opinion joined by Justices Elena Kagan and Ketanji Brown Jackson. She argued that the majority’s ruling “focuses almost exclusively on the needs of local government and leaves the most vulnerable in our society with an impossible choice: Either stay awake or be arrested.”

    Impossible.
    The only choice.
    The only choice is impossible.
    I’m confident there are possible choices. If there are not in Grants Pass, hop that freight and head for greener pastures

    Grants Pass is one of those small hub cities in the west that draw wanderers and drifters.
    There is the I-5, US-199, State 99, and a railroad yard. All near a safe piece of river. I’ve ridden freights through there, don’t think I’ve ever stopped there, but those are hobo amenities.
    When I was roaming around there were vagrancy laws, loitering laws and those kept a person from squatting on public or private land.
    Recently in LA youth soccer teams had scheduled games on the soccer fields at a city park. The kids showed up to play and the homeless squatters refused to move off the field so the kids league eventually cancelled the season

    steveg (33c23c)

  113. OK, more recently.

    Biden is all about programs, budgets and is always talking about how much money “he” has spent. He’s not wonkish of late because, well, he gets confused. But I don’t see him as Mr Personality.

    Or Gore, but he lost. Or Obama, who was dialed into the details of things. Paul Ryan wasn’t exactly glib with the numbers.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  114. Steve, This was my neighborhood park when I left L.A.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  115. Clinton, Bush, Obama, Trump, Obama-lite…Joe from Scranton. Those are the presidents over the last 30 years. Every one is a personality not a wonk. Biden might have been a wonk 30 years ago, but in 2020 he was pure personality and not Trump.

    Trump is still going to lose to Biden and other, but might be president. Competence matters, give me the nerd.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  116. Echo Park was kind of terrible until 2010 or so, then it got the urban gentrification treatment that almost all of close in LA got. Then Covid.

    Same thing happened in Vegas and Phoenix, just a big problem in the summer. Salt Lake got slammed, especially since they didn’t have the cycle of deterioration to the same degree, sameysame in Austin and Nashville, supposed examples of the anti-LAX/SFO.

    Seattle and Portland had it much worse, and Vancouver, good lord, Victoria too.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  117. R.I.P. Martin Mull

    Icy (5a5e0b)

  118. Obama was a personality? I guess to some. Biden is incessantly talking about programs and money. Sure, he’s folksy, but he’s also (um, was also) very involved in programs. He’s the kind of guy who would know (would have known) the answer to how much was being spent on child-care and with which programs.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  119. Judge Merchan seems to be even more tone deaf if this is true

    “Five mental health professionals, some of whom already accused Donald Trump of being “dangerous,” prepared a risk assessment for New York state Judge Juan Merchan to consider in his July 11 sentencing decision on Trump, according to forensic psychiatrist Dr. Bandy X. Lee, a longtime critic of the former president.
    Their risk assessment could be a factor in the severity of Merchan’s sentence for Trump in Manhattan Criminal Court, which could be up to 20 years in prison for all 34 felony counts on which he was convicted last month.”

    “Lee edited the book “The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 37 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President,” first released in 2017. In May, she published a new book titled “The Psychology of Trump Contagion: An Existential Threat to American Democracy and All Humankind.”

    So what are the odds that:
    1. Video and/or audio will be found of Lee armchair “diagnosing” Biden as being totally fit to serve.
    Oh wait. Here we go.
    “The reason why so many people see problems with Joe Biden is that Donald Trump is projecting his mental symptoms on to Joe Biden so he can deny his own symptoms”

    2. Lee finds Trump -again from the armchair- to be an existential threat to all humankind
    Uh oh
    “In May, she published a new book titled “The Psychology of Trump Contagion: An Existential Threat to American Democracy and All Humankind.”

    Her first book on Trump?
    “The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 37 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President” [from their armchairs]

    The kangaroos seem to be taking themselves very seriously in their twitter bios
    “Psychiatrist expert on violence who compiled Kelly’s “owner’s manual” on Trump and may have prevented nuclear war”

    “Kelly” is said to be former WH Chief of Staff John Kelly who was reported to have “secretly consulted the book as a guide for dealing with Trump”.

    Democrats and a few Republicans (hmmmm, total mystery who those R’s were) wanted to form a panel of experts to evaluate Trump. A panel with this woman on it.

    steveg (33c23c)

  120. Merchand putting Trump in prison before any appeal would set off a serious constitutional crisis.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  121. Merchand putting Trump in prison before any appeal would set off a serious constitutional crisis.

    That’s not how criminal courts work.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  122. Which isn’t how they work?

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  123. So, we’ve been talking about what would be the best replacement team for Team D, but what are THEY thinking? There’s a whole host of far-left “progressives” who would like nothing better than to elect someone who’ll outlaw cars and raise taxes to 97%.

    So, how about Newsom-AOC?

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  124. No one is advocating outlawing cars and doubling taxes. That’s simply a lie.

    You can disagree with some policies, it’s like Trump saying your taxes are going up 400%. Lies.

    There’s plenty of issues that the progs are way off base on, but nothing like these strawmen, they’re fake arguments.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  125. See, when leftist policies mandate rules that don’t exist, like abaurd mileage efficiency numbers thar would effectively ban all gas powered cars, that’s not the same thing as banning cars. They just need to create the magical car powered on leftist dreams

    Klink’s conservative case for defending leftists strikes again.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  126. If Henry Ford could have profitably sold gasoline-electric hybrid Model Ts for $290 in 1920 — the technology was there — we all would have grown up with gasoline-electric hybrids. As it was, we had to be satisfied with diesel-electric locomotives and oil-burning steamships.

    The keyword is profitably. The powerband of the internal combustion engine vs. the powerband of the electric motor is no match for the profit and loss curve. Consumers will get what manufacturers make money selling them.

    nk (2836cd)

  127. nk (2836cd) — 6/29/2024 @ 5:17 am

    Well said nk. I’m so glad G*D made you.

    felipe (44e42a)

  128. Merchand putting Trump in prison before any appeal would set off a serious constitutional crisis.

    Trump can’t appeal until he is sentenced, but the odds of a prison sentence (let alone actual incarceration) are probably close to nil. My guess is that he would receive a large fine and possibly community service, perhaps working in an immigrant shelter. 😉 At worst, he could receive a suspended jail term.

    Trump’s age, security concerns, the nonviolent nature of his offenses, and yes, the fact he is a major presidential candidate would preclude prison.

    Even if Trump was sentenced to prison, he would remain free pending appeal, which could take years.

    Rip Murdock (c27dcc)

  129. The whole (unsourced) idea that outside psychiatrists will influence sentencing is pretty ridiculous. It certainly would factor in any appeal; and is blatantly unethical for any doctor to render an opinion without examining the patient.

    Rip Murdock (c27dcc)

  130. Unsurprising:

    The Supreme Court on Friday rejected a last-ditch effort by former Trump White House aide Steve Bannon to avoid reporting to jail next week while he appeals his conviction for defying a subpoena from a House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol riot.

    Bannon, 70, is due to begin serving a four-month jail sentence for contempt of Congress on Monday.

    The Supreme Court in its unsigned, one-sentence order Friday said Bannon’s “application for release pending appeal presented to The Chief Justice [John Roberts] and by him referred to the Court is denied.”
    ……………….

    Bannon’s fellow Trump White House advisor Peter Navarro is scheduled to be released from prison in mid-July.

    Rip Murdock (c27dcc)

  131. No one is advocating outlawing cars and doubling taxes. That’s simply a lie.

    You are correct that the first sentence is a lie. Also an unwise lie, since *some* are suggesting those things or similar. Remember, there ARE fringes.

    Have you see the New Green Deal, which clearly favors public transportation over private? Have you seen the laws in several states ending ICE sales after a date certain?

    Even Joe Biden wants to raise taxes by $7 trillion over the next 10 years and folks like asset call him a corporate stooge. Imagine what the hard left of the Democrat Party wants to do.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  132. So, I’ve been thinking about my reaction to the debate, which was “pretty much as I expected” and the reaction from Democrats, both in the press and in private conversations.

    I could sum up this response as “Who knew?!”

    But I knew. Many of us were unsurprised that Biden was diminished. Hur pointed it out, Twitter posters have been all over it with videos from his campaign stops. But the Biden party line has been that it’s all false, that Biden is doing just fine. That party line continues, btw.

    The real scandal is that, outside of Fox et al, the press has been covering for Biden. Now that they can’t do that any more, they are acting all surprised.

    BUT THEY KNEW.

    The GOP (not just Trump) ought to be making their lives living Hell for lying to the public to support their guy. Yes, we need a free press, but we also need a truthful press. The more I think about this, the more outraged I become.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  133. Have they mentioned The 25th Amendment?

    That would require the Vice President and Cabinet to initiate the process under Section 4; a highly unlikely scenario. And if President Biden disagrees with the decision of the Cabinet, he can send a written declaration to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the House Speaker that no disability exists. And if the VP and a majority of the Cabinet still thinks the President is unable to carry out his duties, they send another message to Congress. It would then be up to Congress to decide by a two-thirds vote of who should be President.

    It’s all very unlikely.

    Rip Murdock (c27dcc)

  134. As for how reasonable the Green Left is, this 1 minute lampoon is 14 years old now, but still works.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  135. It’s all very unlikely.

    And even trying it would doom his chances of re-election, so his cabinet is not going to go their. The only effect it would have is getting Harris dropped from the ticket. So, not all bad.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  136. *there

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  137. The GOP (not just Trump) ought to be making their lives living Hell for lying to the public to support their guy.

    You could say the same thing about Republicans supporting Trump. I’ve heard nothing about the debate that would make me vote for either candidate. A pox on both.

    Rip Murdock (442183)

  138. The PRESS did nothing to cover for Trump. It’s not that the Democrats hid his infirmities, it’s that the PRESS hid them.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  139. Good news: The Supreme Court’s decision to support our civil rights laws is having some effect on our colleges and universities. And beyond.

    A year later, many of the nation’s most selective universities have snapped into compliance with the court’s vision of a colorblind America, reconsidering all the ways they use race as a factor. But that vision has reverberated far beyond academia: Programs meant to diversify companies, public boards and government contractors face a legal onslaught unleashed by the landmark ruling, pushing American society at large toward a new race-neutral era.

    The article uses “race-neutral” to describe compliance with civil rights laws. Which are popular with with voters even in states such as California and Washington. Both states banned racial preferences in voter intiatives, twice.

    Jim Miller (9ace55)

  140. I’ve been working with our legal counsel on how the ruling may effect our product strategy gathering race and gender data for AI training. One of the inputs into training today is that the LLM’s actually show a pretty dramatic difference between age cohorts, race, and gender; so where we want to personalize our alpha of AGI for Financial Service does the ruling make it more or less problematic. It doesn’t effect the core business logic, but it actually changes how we lay out the user experience.

    Part of it is also who’s user, each age cohort seems to want dramatically different experiences. When there’s a collision between expectations and such an underlying legal requirement, it’s a giant pain in behind. We’ll probably just create a document the user checks, because that’s kind of why you create TOSs, but I hate complex TOS so that’s another collision.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  141. polling company asked 800 people to give 1-2 word responses about the debate and created these

    Biden: https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2024/06/28/16/86700347-0-image-a-17_1719587697275.jpg

    Trump: https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2024/06/28/16/86700339-13580793-image-a-18_1719588632562.jpg

    Interestingly many people saw Trump as scary and liar, which seem to be assessments they brought with them to the debate

    steveg (33c23c)

  142. I should not have said “many” people saw Trump as liar.
    It is very interesting to see the thoughts people brought with them

    steveg (33c23c)

  143. Are those of Americans, or of Brits? Because that the groups find “scary” differs.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  144. *what

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  145. @140:

    What most people miss is that the decision just said that you couldn’t just work off a “race” checkbox. You could work off an individual’s race as it combined with his other individual experiences. In short, you had to treat a black inner-city kid differently than the offspring of two black Harvard-educated lawyers.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  146. Sad!

    The liquor licenses for Donald Trump’s three New Jersey golf courses are in his eldest son’s name, not his own, according to records obtained by Business Insider.

    But hiding behind Donald Trump, Jr. isn’t enough to protect the elder Trump.

    On Friday, state officials said Trump’s new felony record bars him from profiting from the licenses.

    They announced they will not renew the licenses for Trump National Bedminster and Trump National Golf Club in Colts Neck due to last month’s felony hush-money conviction.

    The two clubs can continue to serve alcohol pending a July 19 hearing on the two licenses, which expire Sunday.
    ………….
    The New Jersey’s AG’s office regulates liquor licenses through its Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Attorney General Matthew J. Platkin announced two weeks ago that all three licenses were under review by his office.

    Trump, at that time, brushed off the importance of that review, noting through a spokesman that he is “not the holder of any liquor license in New Jersey, and he is not an officer or director of any entity that holds a liquor license in New Jersey — or anywhere in the United States for that matter.”

    But on Friday, New Jersey officials found otherwise.

    “A review by ABC indicates that Mr. Trump maintains a direct beneficial interest in the three liquor licenses through the receipt of revenues and profits from them, as the sole beneficiary of the Donald J. Trump Revocable Trust,” the AG’s spokesperson said.
    ……………
    Under state liquor law, a license may be pulled if anyone who either owns — or financially benefits from — the license is convicted of a crime of “moral turpitude.”
    …………
    “Felony convictions are universally considered crimes of moral turpitude,” said Peter M. Rhodes, partner at the Haddonfield, New Jersey-based firm Cahill, Wilinski, Rhodes & Joyce.

    Given his felony conviction, “If the license is owned by a trust whose sole beneficiary is Donald Trump, then that, in my opinion, violates the ABC laws,” said Rhodes, whose firm has served for 50 years as counsel to the New Jersey Licensed Beverage Association.
    …………..

    Rip Murdock (c28559)

  147. Rip Murdock (c28559) — 6/29/2024 @ 1:27 pm

    NJ kicking Trump where it hurts.

    Rip Murdock (c28559)

  148. “The GOP (not just Trump) ought to be making their lives living Hell for lying to the public to support their guy.”

    There were outlets that ran regular stories over the past couple of years about Biden’s cognitive decline. (These outlets have also run stories about Trump’s cognitive decline.) The same outlets were focusing on Covid lab origins while the Glenn Kessler’s were calling it a debunked conspiracy theory. They were also investigating Hunter’s laptop when others dismissed it as Russian misinformation and banned any mention of it. They also highlighted the border mess long before Democrat mayors and governors suddenly discovered it. The lie is that there is serious objective media as opposed to silly misinformation media, which is a lie that’s been going on for many decades. Radical leftist Susan Sontag, of all people, called it out more than forty years ago. Updating to present day:

    ”Imagine, if you will, someone who read only The Daily Mail between 2020 and 2024, and someone in the same period who read only WashPost or the NYT. Which reader would have been better informed? The answer, I think, should give us pause. Can it be that our enemies were right?”

    There’s nothing new. It’s been going on and will continue to go on.

    lloyd (f51ee4)

  149. #145 KevinM

    “JL Partners polled 805 independent voters immediately after the debate”

    I assumed they meant Americans

    steveg (33c23c)

  150. Indeed, but you only linked to the images which said nothing about who they polled. Your link in the other thread is clearer.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  151. There’s nothing new. It’s been going on and will continue to go on.

    Yes, but rarely is it so blatant and obvious. It is hard for the MSM to say that they didn’t KNOW. How could they not?

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  152. This is a man who has SERIOUSLY declined in the few months since the SotU. RBG-level chutzpah.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  153. #130 Rip

    The whole (unsourced) idea that outside psychiatrists will influence sentencing is pretty ridiculous. It certainly would factor in any appeal; and is blatantly unethical for any doctor to render an opinion without examining the patient.

    The source is Bandy X. Lee’s Substack, but sorry for not providing it earlier. https://bandyxlee.substack.com/p/dangerousness-risk-assessment-of
    I have to say that I misunderstood Lee as implying Merchan asked for this assessment from Bandy X. Lee and/or the 5 who contributed to this assessment. They might have sent it unsolicited and if so, it should be binned.

    “The most eminent living psychiatrists in existence have assembled in a panel to give their recommendations to the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, for Donald Trump’s sentencing on July 11, 2024.”

    “Generally, the purpose of a pre-sentencing report or evaluation is to provide information that can help the court to determine the degree to which a person convicted of breaking a law or laws, especially if they are crimes that rise to the level of felonies, presents a risk of repeating the same or similar crimes—and, worse, of committing even more serious felony crimes.
    A forensic psychiatrist or psychologist may first begin by evaluating how serious the crimes were that a particular convicted criminal committed.”

    From the assessment (I bolded the end, because it has a few semi-reasonable ideas)

    … the only way to protect our democracy, and the legal and electoral structure without which it will cease to exist, from the defendant’s attempt to destroy it—the crime of which he has just been convicted—is to restrain him by any means that the laws of sentencing permit: up to and including incarceration, for as long as those laws permit. Anything less than that would be insufficient to protect our nation, and indeed the entire world, from criminal behavior on a scale that we have never seen before in our history, committed by a man who is totally unrepentant and uninhibited about doing so.

    Standardized, evidence-based violence risk assessment tools agree with our assessment. The defendant scored 8 (from a score range of -26 to +38) on the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide–Revised (VRAG-R) and 35 (prorated at 36, from a maximum score of 40) on the Psychopathy Checklist–Revised (PCL-R). These scores indicate a significant need for specific deterrence (even without consideration of general deterrence, which the VRAG-R does not measure) and a full diagnosis of psychopathy, which is highly predictive of violence. A diagnosis of mass murderers and serial rapists, psychopathy means that he is capable of mass atrocities, without limit. Early containment of this tendency will help curb escalations of future violence. Also important factors are his denial of guilt, his lack of remorse, his contempt of court by threatening and inciting violence against judge, jury, and prosecutors, and his use of this criminal conviction to attack the justice system and the rule of law in general.

    In the words of Michel Foucault, a philosopher who wrote Discipline and Punish (originally published in French in 1975): “How can one link absolutely in the minds of men the idea of crime and the idea of punishment, if the reality of the punishment does not follow, in all cases, the reality of the offense?… One must punish enough to prevent repetition.” It should not be overlooked that he still has pending cases of election fraud, conspiracy against the government, and theft of classified documents that has endangered national security. It is also notable that he has been adjudicated to be guilty of sexual assault, likely rape.

    And of the two types of deterrence for felonies – specific and general – general deterrence is of great significance, because of Donald Trump’s conduct and how vigorously his more than 74 million followers echo his message. Therefore, the sentence should not only be sufficient for specific deterrence but also for general deterrence.

    The United States requires all high-ranking military officers to submit to an annual fitness-for duty evaluation including full medical and psychiatric examinations. Unfortunately, this rule does not apply specifically to the Commander in Chief. In determining an appropriate sentence for the former president, the Court has a unique opportunity to protect public safety and national security by requiring him to undergo a comprehensive evaluation of his mental status and dangerousness by an impartial panel of experts. A comprehensive evaluation of his mental status should be mandatory, as will a complete physical examination including brain imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We understand that he may be hospitalized for this purpose, in a designated facility for up to thirty days. Once complete, the results are to be provided to an impartial panel of experts, who will monitor his progress and evaluate his dangerousness.

    steveg (33c23c)

  154. I don’t want Trump within a 1,000 miles of the White House, but if he wins I want his DOJ to indict Leticia James, Arthur Engoron, Alvin Bragg, and Juan Merchan under the Ku Klux Klan Acts for violation of his civil rights under color of law.

    It will not be retribution. It will be Darth Vader bringing balance to the Force by wiping out the Hutts.

    nk (a63fc9)

  155. 155
    There are no “outside” psychological experts. The DoC only uses psychiatrists that have been contracted and certified to provide the service. All convicts are required to have an exam, and the DoC doesn’t employ full-time experts in this area, hence contractors.

    Even the mental health folks in prisons are generally contracted out to 3rd parties. Maximus, Accenture, Deloitte, etc, all provide contractors to do this, many cover quite a few regions, so NJ/NY/CT/PA might share a resource.

    So this is just a red herring.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  156. 157. And if Trump had strangled Stormy Daniels in that hotel room, it might call for such flexing of the psychiatric muscle.

    A chicken droppings misdemeanor inflated to 34 felonies by casuistic legal contortions, and “proven” by the testimony of a gossip peddler, a convicted shyster, and a faux sex performer, does not.

    What would they recommend for jaywalking?

    nk (a63fc9)

  157. forgot the /s.

    But Trump’s going to get between 2 weeks per served consecutively to 6 months per served concurrently. He’s going to be free til the final appeal, then house arrest. Whether that’s at the Tower of Babel or the White House, we’ll see. If it’s the latter than it will be ignored and NY will do what exactly?

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  158. New Report Suggests Reason Biden Appeared Sluggish At Debate

    Biden is typically at his sharpest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., according to Axios, which cited discussions with eight current and former Biden aides.

    Thursday night’s debate was five hours after that window. Quite simply, it might have been too late in the day for him to present his best self.

    Axios reported that the staffers have seen “flashes of an absent-minded Biden” akin to the version who took long pauses and delivered meandering sentences in a low, hoarse voice onstage this week. But they reportedly dismiss these moments because he is alert and engaged at other times.

    International travel is also particularly tiring for the president, the outlet said.

    This is disqualifying, so can we flush one of these turds? Then we’d be halfway to flushing both. House arrest for 6-12 months for the other one that starts in Jan, would be a good reason.

    Sanity can still be restored.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  159. My dog has it, so does my 85 year old mother, and the president I assume.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  160. House arrest for 6-12 months for the other one that starts in Jan, would be a good reason.

    The man has an army.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  161. What would they recommend for jaywalking?

    Well, it would be jaywalking to avoid being charged for spitting on the sidewalk, hence a felony. It might be a separate felony for each step of the jaywalk.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  162. My dog has it, so does my 85 year old mother, and the president I assume.

    At least Biden avoided saying the same thing every 7 minutes. Or I think he did.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  163. I have to say that I misunderstood Lee as implying Merchan asked for this assessment from Bandy X. Lee and/or the 5 who contributed to this assessment. They might have sent it unsolicited and if so, it should be binned.

    Usually courts avoid asking people with proven biases to decide things. It’s called “reversible error.”

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  164. Usually courts avoid asking people with proven biases to decide things. It’s called “reversible error.”

    Says the stale, old, probably white male, while placing his antiquated, racist, microaggressions onto my body and our democracy.

    If some on the left get their way with the courts this won’t be considered an error, much less reversible

    steveg (58963e)

  165. I am not stale.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  166. I consider myself musty thank you

    steveg (58963e)

  167. From the hosts Twitter:

    “The case why it’s OK to vote for Joe Biden even if he has declined significantly is that Donald Trump is a corrupt criminal who would sell out our allies and threaten democracy.”
    Fair enough case, but Joe Biden is a vacuum that the unelected administrative state has to fill without oversight from the Executive. There will be unknown consequences, increasing consequences as that unsupervised, unaccountable power vacuum within the executive goes on and the d**** of consequences rarely arrives lubed.

    I’m prepared, so to speak, for the arrival of the consequences of either after four years of each and hope not to be shocked by the magnitude.

    A positive about our country, not Trump is that his two worst things were arguably Ukraine call impeachment, Jan6 and we bounced off those as a nation pretty well

    steveg (58963e)

  168. How does impeachment of the executive work if the executive is known to be mentally incompetent?
    Robert Hur answered part of the question, but what about actions taken by the President’s personnel and executive privilege?
    The magnitude of the privilege, the discretion of action requirements of mentally incompetent executive from the executive “deep state” is unfathomable.
    At least with Trump I know who to hold accountable. (WOW. We really are at a low bar) I guess it doesn’t matter if history notes that Trump screwed the US pooch or if they find it to be the licenses taken by the mentally incompetent Biden’s Administration. We get to pick up the pieces and fix it best we can

    steveg (58963e)

  169. NBC
    President Joe Biden is expected to discuss the future of his re-election campaign with family at Camp David on Sunday, following a nationally televised debate Thursday that left many fellow Democrats worried about his ability to beat former President Donald Trump in November, according to five people familiar with the matter.

    steveg (58963e)

  170. Fox

    https://www.foxnews.com/politics/heritage-working-election-legal-challenges-case-biden-pulled-from-dnc-nomination

    “We are monitoring the calls from across the country for President Biden to step aside, either now or before the election, and have concluded that the process for substitution and withdrawal is very complicated,” Executive Director of The Heritage Foundation’s Oversight Project Mike Howell said in a statement. “We will remain vigilant that appropriate election integrity procedures are followed.”

    steveg (58963e)

  171. “The case why it’s OK to vote for Joe Biden even if he has declined significantly is that Donald Trump is a corrupt criminal who would sell out our allies and threaten democracy.”

    Just saying it louder doesn’t make it any more convincing. Hectoring people with the same claims over and over is how Joe Biden was already losing this.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  172. No, Democracy is *Not* on the Ballot; Biden and Trump are.

    Among his points:

    1. To begin with, preserving/defending/whatever democracy persistently trails the economy/inflation as the issue voters think is most important, even when the democracy issue is specifically mentioned as part of a list.

    2. And when respondents’ most important issue is solicited in an open-ended format, where respondents give an unprompted, top-of-mind answer, democracy simply does not rate very high. In the most recent Gallup poll, only 4 percent fall into a bucket they term “elections/election reform/democracy.” This vastly trails key economic problems, immigration, etc.

    3. Even more recently, the new New York Times/Siena poll finds just 5 percent of voters (3 percent of working-class voters) saying “the state of democracy/corruption” will be the most important issue in deciding on their November vote, again substantially trailing the same set of issues. In an interesting followup, the poll asked voters who they thought could do a better job of handling whatever issue they designated as most important. By 14 points (24 points among the working class), voters thought Trump could do a better job than Biden of handling that issue.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  173. It should be pointed out that of the 4% who say that “elections/election reform/democracy” are their top concern, many of them mean “to stop the steal.”

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  174. we bounced off those as a nation pretty well

    J6 didn’t even have a dead-cat bounce. It hit like a lead balloon and people were far more disgusted than anything. As in “These people are bat-sh1t crazy”, not “where do I sign up.”

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  175. As for Biden, it’s time for a delegation of Democrats to visit the man and explain things like Goldwater did with Nixon.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  176. @26

    If Donald Trump is elected President in November, the Democrat establishement — which includes the mainstream media — needs to cogitate long and hard over how their own mendacity contributed mightily to his victory.

    JVW (b02843) — 6/28/2024 @ 9:45 am

    They won’t.

    The only thing that matters is Democrats get/remain in power.

    They will ALWAYS justify the means to met that end.

    I just wish the Republicans and their voters recognize that… as, it explains so much about Democrats.

    whembly (279d5e)

  177. @30

    Kevin, at 20, it’s hilarious to me to watch conservatives embrace the idea that yes, really, they DO want judges to be philosopher-kings.

    aphrael (1797ab) — 6/28/2024 @ 9:59 am

    It’s really funny to me that folks like you just keeps missing the point as to what exact Loper is about (the one that overturned Chevron).

    whembly (279d5e)

  178. @98

    If I had the ear of the DNC leadership, I’d be pushing for Claire McCaskill to come off the bench, but I kind of like the idea of a guy from Ohio like Brown. For VP, Harris is a problem. There’s no confidence in her within the establishment part of the party, and less the further toward the center you go.

    If Biden had chosen Mayor Pete (can’t be bothered to look up how to spell his last name), then it wouldn’t be as ugly a conversation as today. Brown was on the list for VP but just didn’t want to do it.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a) — 6/28/2024 @ 5:11 pm

    *waves*
    Missourian here…

    Yeah, you don’t want McCaskill either. She’s almost as incompetent as Harris.

    whembly (279d5e)

  179. @136

    The PRESS did nothing to cover for Trump. It’s not that the Democrats hid his infirmities, it’s that the PRESS hid them.

    Kevin M (a9545f) — 6/29/2024 @ 10:13 am

    That’s scandal #1.

    Scandal #2 is that it’s obvious that we have a “figurehead” president, and the executive branch is really being decided/ran by unelected officials in the Whitehouse.

    Scandal #3, is how people will still vote for Biden knowing the state he’s currently in.

    whembly (279d5e)

  180. @156

    I don’t want Trump within a 1,000 miles of the White House, but if he wins I want his DOJ to indict Leticia James, Arthur Engoron, Alvin Bragg, and Juan Merchan under the Ku Klux Klan Acts for violation of his civil rights under color of law.

    It will not be retribution. It will be Darth Vader bringing balance to the Force by wiping out the Hutts.

    nk (a63fc9) — 6/29/2024 @ 3:27 pm

    “under the Ku Klux Klan Acts for violation of his civil rights under color of law.”

    Can you elaborate plz?

    whembly (279d5e)

  181. TITLE 18, U.S.C., SECTION 242

    Whoever, under color of any law, statute, ordinance, regulation, or custom, willfully subjects any person in any State, Territory, Commonwealth, Possession, or District to the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States, … shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both; and if bodily injury results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both; and if death results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death.

    nk (f77af1)

  182. The truth is finally dribbling out.

    Between the lines: Biden’s miscues and limitations are more familiar inside the White House.
    • The time of day is important as to which of the two Bidens will appear.
    • From 10am to 4pm, Biden is dependably engaged — and many of his public events in front of cameras are held within those hours.
    • Outside of that time range or while traveling abroad, Biden is more likely to have verbal miscues and become fatigued, aides told Axios.

    Paul Montagu (eeff72)

  183. The time of day is important as to which of the two Bidens will appear.

    They should have had him sleep to 4 in the afternoon then.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  184. “The truth is finally dribbling out.”

    Oh yeah, finally. Finally! For those in their bubble, I suppose.

    The family of 20-year-old Marine Rylee McCollum has expressed the most anger toward the president, with his mother, Kathy, calling Biden “a dementia-ridden piece of crap who doesn’t even know he’s in the White House” in a radio interview.

    That’s from 2021.

    lloyd (b1b536)

  185. #187. Every president gets blasted by grieving Gold Star families. Trump is the only one who blasts them back.

    lurker (c23034)

  186. RIP satirical singer, songwriter, and novelist Kinky Friedman (79):

    …………..
    ………….. An interest in music led him to form King Arthur & the Carrots followed by Kinky Friedman and the Texas Jewboys, which he described as a “country band with a social conscience, a demented love child of Lenny Bruce and Bob Wills.” The group stirred controversy with songs like “They Ain’t Makin’ Jews Like Jesus Anymore” and “Ride ‘Em Jewboy.”

    When his music career waned in the 1980s, Friedman shifted to being a novelist and writer at large, publishing 1994’s “Elvis, Jesus and Coca-Cola: A Novel” and 2004’s “Kinky Friedman’s Guide to Texas Etiquette: Or How to Get to Heaven or Hell Without Going Through Dallas-Fort Worth.”
    …………….

    Rip Murdock (c28559)

  187. @188 The point was about echo chambers, but you made it about Gold Star families. The quote could be from any of the many stories outside air quote serious media over the years that pointed to Biden’s cognitive decline.

    lloyd (b1b536)

  188. @184

    TITLE 18, U.S.C., SECTION 242

    Whoever, under color of any law, statute, ordinance, regulation, or custom, willfully subjects any person in any State, Territory, Commonwealth, Possession, or District to the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States, … shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both; and if bodily injury results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both; and if death results from the acts committed in violation of this section or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death.

    nk (f77af1) — 6/30/2024 @ 5:32 am

    Yes, yes… I understood the law you were pointing to…

    But, was asking what, specifically the “…the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States” were done by Trump’s opponents?

    whembly (279d5e)

  189. @185

    The truth is finally dribbling out.

    Between the lines: Biden’s miscues and limitations are more familiar inside the White House.
    • The time of day is important as to which of the two Bidens will appear.
    • From 10am to 4pm, Biden is dependably engaged — and many of his public events in front of cameras are held within those hours.
    • Outside of that time range or while traveling abroad, Biden is more likely to have verbal miscues and become fatigued, aides told Axios.

    Paul Montagu (eeff72) — 6/30/2024 @ 8:04 am

    So we have a part-time POTUS.

    Lovely.

    Hope the world stops for POTUS during 10am to 4pm eastern time.

    /s

    whembly (279d5e)

  190. lloyd (b1b536) — 6/30/2024 @ 8:42 am

    The difference is that sources in the White House are saying it.

    Paul Montagu (e167e7)

  191. But, was asking what, specifically the “…the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States” were done by Trump’s opponents?

    “Mandating his presence in a courtroom for long periods while being tried on wholly trumped up charges” would be my guess. His freedom of movement and speech were curtailed, both of which are constitutional rights.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  192. The truth is finally dribbling out.

    Paul Montagu (eeff72) — 6/30/2024 @ 8:04 am

    ************

    The difference is that sources in the White House are saying it.

    Paul Montagu (e167e7) — 6/30/2024 @ 9:51 am

    [emphasis mine]

    How long have you been suspicious, Paul. By your use of “finally” and your satisfaction that it is now confirmed by reliable sources, my guess is that you have felt that Biden has been unfit for some time.

    BuDuh (d6a398)

  193. @194

    But, was asking what, specifically the “…the deprivation of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States” were done by Trump’s opponents?

    “Mandating his presence in a courtroom for long periods while being tried on wholly trumped up charges” would be my guess. His freedom of movement and speech were curtailed, both of which are constitutional rights.

    Kevin M (a9545f) — 6/30/2024 @ 9:54 am

    ??

    Aren’t you required to attend, in person, federal criminal cases?

    The gag on speech might have legs, but I struggle to see how much support he’d get.

    whembly (4887ac)

  194. Malicious prosecution, unlawful detention, jeopardy to liberty and property, subornation of perjury, making false entries in the public record (the court docket) with the intent to unlawfully influence the election ….

    nk (ded266)

  195. Aren’t you required to attend, in person, federal criminal cases?

    The point is that, *IF* the charges were bogus, then the mandate that he attend the trial was a deprivation of rights.

    Now, I think it’s a stretch that the charges can be proven to be fraudulent, and that the required attendance is therefore a deprivation of rights, but you asked “what can there possibly be?” and I answered that.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  196. making false entries in the public record (the court docket) with the intent to unlawfully influence the election ….

    Nice one.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  197. Sotomayor’s comment has got to be one of the most intellectually dishonest things I’ve ever read. Yes, sleep is indeed a biological necessity and it even is not a crime. That doesn’t mean you can sleep wherever you please.

    WHS (76600f)

  198. More Trump Administration prosecution fantasies:

    Lindsey Graham: If Trump Wins Mayorkas, Biden Likely Will Be Prosecuted
    ………….
    Graham said (on CNN’s State of the Union) , “The Democrats keep calling President Trump a felon. Well, be careful what you wish for. I expect they will be investigations of Biden’s criminality at the border. If I am Mayorkas I should be worried that somebody’s going to come after you because you’ve abused the parole statute. The Hunter Biden laptop, all 51 of the people who signed a letter saying the laptop was fake and Russian disinformation, I hope somebody looks at you because that’s election interference. So this country will have a resetting here and using the bind standard of glorifying political prosecutions Pandora’s Box has been opened. What are the steps down or not accountabilities coming to him.”
    …………

    What section of the US Code covers “election interference?” For example, for the signatories of the Hunter Biden laptop letter, what USC section did they violate? What section of the criminal code did President Biden and DHS Secretary Mayorkas violate regarding the border?

    It’s about as likely as the judges and prosecutors in New York being charged with a crime. Is there any case law that suggests that governmental officials in enforcing state civil or criminal law against an individual is a “deprivation of rights” under 18 USC 242? If that is true, then any defendant can claim their rights have been violated.

    And 18 USC 242 is not the Ku Klux Klan Act, that is codified under 42 USC sections 1983, 1985, and 1986.

    Rip Murdock (c28559)

  199. Based on this analysis, I don’t see how 18 USC 242 would apply to Leticia James, Arthur Engoron, Alvin Bragg, or Juan Merchan. The idea seems to be a stretch.

    Rip Murdock (c28559)

  200. Le Pen’s far right set for big win in first round of French election

    France on Sunday took a step closer to delivering what was once seen as an unthinkable nightmare: a far-right government taking power in Paris for the first time.

    Marine Le Pen’s National Rally made big gains in the first round of a snap election that could upend political orthodoxy across Europe and beyond, with implications for markets and global security that will be hard to predict.

    According to early estimates by pollsters Ipsos, the far-right National Rally is on course to win 34 percent of Sunday’s vote while French President Emmanuel Macron’s centrist alliance suffered staggering losses, coming third with 20.3 percent of vote. The left-wing alliance made a strong showing with 28.1 percent of the vote.

    lloyd (1e6d2c)

  201. WHS (76600f) — 6/30/2024 @ 11:06 am

    Sotomayor’s comment has got to be one of the most intellectually dishonest things I’ve ever read. Yes, sleep is indeed a biological necessity and it even is not a crime. That doesn’t mean you can sleep wherever you please.

    They all say things that are wrong.

    She could have made a better point by saying that this was a law that some people found impossible or unreasonable to obey, and that you can’t have such a law (why?).

    Yes they could go outside the jurisdiction, but what’s stopping all nearby jurisdictions from passing such a law?

    And do they mean to enforce such a law in the event of an earthquake?
    Even if it did not destroy all houses, it is recommended that people stay outside and in the open when aftershocks are expected,

    Sammy Finkelman (c2c77e)

  202. BuDuh (d6a398) — 6/30/2024 @ 9:59 am

    Like I said to Lloyd, BuDuh. This isn’t hard, and I didn’t use big words.
    Anyone with eyes to see and eyes to hear can observe Joe’s physical and mental diminution.

    Paul Montagu (7b8b7c)

  203. Good news for LePen is bad news for Ukraine.
    https://x.com/kremlintrolls/status/1513445358373941251?s=46&t=Enscg8JjQytl9HJp0OtcWA

    Paul Montagu (c9abf8)

  204. Just because I will vote for a potato over a convicted felon, doesn’t mean a potato should run for President.

    https://x.com/rooseveltted/status/1807409784276033816?s=46&t=Enscg8JjQytl9HJp0OtcWA

    For me, I’m still NeverTrump and NeverPotato.

    Paul Montagu (c9abf8)

  205. Obama’s defense of Biden, wherein Obama stated that he himself knows what it’s like to have a bad debate, was a red herring.

    It’s not that Biden had a bad debate. Rather, it was that Biden’s senescence was painfully obvious for all to see. I don’t necessarily need a President who is a good debater. I just want one who has his marbles more than six hours a day.

    norcal (226e65)

  206. Welcome to the Free World:

    SEOUL — Hardly anyone has escaped from North Korea these past four years, since leader Kim Jong Un shuttered his country’s border with China in the earliest days of the pandemic.

    But Kang Gyu-rin and her mother, aunt and a family friend are among the few. To do so, they used a perilous route that has become almost the only option for escape: by sea.

    They had a tough journey in their rickety boat, including an encounter with a North Korean patrol boat that could have stopped them — but didn’t.

    (As the article notes, the names used are aliases. The Kim dynasty is not big on mercy.)

    Jim Miller (354efc)

  207. Anyone with eyes to see and eyes to hear can observe Joe’s physical and mental diminution.

    Yes… but when did it dawn on you was the question.

    BuDuh (4214e4)

  208. Here’s what I want to know. Were those times when Biden shook hands with the air during the golden six hours or afterwards?

    norcal (226e65)

  209. Yes… but when did it dawn on you was the question.

    Years ago. He was camped out in his basement in the 2020 campaign for more than just Covid reasons, IMO.

    Ironic that a person who’s been NeverTrump and NeverBiden from the get-go is in a “bubble”. Pretty silly.

    Paul Montagu (78d8f9)

  210. So…absolute immunity for official acts, but none for unofficial acts. I presume an attempted coup falls under the latter.

    ”Under our constitutional structure of separated powers, the nature of Presidential power entitles a former President to absolute immunity
    from criminal prosecution for actions within his conclusive and preclusive constitutional authority. And he is entitled to at least presumptive immunity from prosecution for all his official acts. There is no
    immunity for unofficial acts.“

    Paul Montagu (7b8b7c)

  211. @213 Nope… reading the ruling Paul.

    It specifically calls out Trump “pressuring” Pence and is communication to the acting AG as covered with immunity.

    In the current indictment, I think the only thing left as possible legal exposure is his rotunda campaign speech on J6?

    Still, the case is not going to be completed before the election, due to the defense’s ability to appeal any immunity claim rejections at the district court.

    whembly (86df54)

  212. I don’t see how pressuring Pence to cancel certified state votes, thereby violating the 12th Amendment, is an official act.

    Paul Montagu (7b8b7c)

  213. From what I am reading, this is almost more rewarding to Obama and his actions in 2016.

    BuDuh (a6b63d)

  214. @215

    I don’t see how pressuring Pence to cancel certified state votes, thereby violating the 12th Amendment, is an official act.

    Paul Montagu (7b8b7c) — 7/1/2024 @ 8:14 am

    The government is going to have to overcome the presumed immunity for acts a POTUS to “twist the arms” of his VP to do “x”. Even though desired act by the VP wasn’t ultimately done.

    That’s going to be a high bar for Smith to overcome, and even if he gets a favorable ruling that Trump is not immune, Trump’s defense can appeal again.

    Thus, no matter how this shakes out, it’s unlikely that the DC Smith case would even start before the Nov election.

    whembly (86df54)

  215. @216

    From what I am reading, this is almost more rewarding to Obama and his actions in 2016.

    BuDuh (a6b63d) — 7/1/2024 @ 8:17 am

    Every past President for that matter.

    There are still folks out there who wants Dubya to be criminally charged.

    whembly (86df54)

  216. Indeed.

    BuDuh (a6b63d)

  217. As for the NetChoice decision, regarding the Facebook et al objection to limits on content moderation, the Court observes that 1) facial challenges to laws are hard to win, 2) neither party seems to have addressed many of the salient points, and 3) the Circuit courts failed to address the cases as facial challenges. Accordingly, they are sent back with instructions to do better.

    Also, although they don’t have the information they want, it’s pretty clear that the Texas law will fail when they do have it and that they don’t think much of the Fifth Circuit’s First Amendment jurisprudence.

    Parts of the Florida law may survive.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  218. Via the immunity syllabus:

    Held: Under our constitutional structure of separated powers, the nature
    of Presidential power entitles a former President to absolute immunity
    from criminal prosecution for actions within his conclusive and preclusive constitutional authority. And he is entitled to at least presumptive immunity from prosecution for all his official acts. There is no
    immunity for unofficial acts
    . Pp. 5–43.
    (a) This case is the first criminal prosecution in our Nation’s history
    of a former President for actions taken during his Presidency. Determining whether and under what circumstances such a prosecution
    may proceed requires careful assessment of the scope of Presidential
    power under the Constitution. The nature of that power requires that
    a former President have some immunity from criminal prosecution for
    official acts during his tenure in office. At least with respect to the President’s exercise of his core constitutional powers, this immunity
    must be absolute.
    As for his remaining official actions, he is entitled
    to at least presumptive immunity.

    whembly (86df54)

  219. Some tid bits from the ruling:

    In dividing official from unofficial conduct, courts may not inquire
    into the President’s motives. Such a “highly intrusive” inquiry would
    risk exposing even the most obvious instances of official conduct to judicial examination on the mere allegation of improper purpose. Fitzgerald, 457 U. S., at 756. Nor may courts deem an action unofficial
    merely because it allegedly violates a generally applicable law. Otherwise, Presidents would be subject to trial on “every allegation that
    an action was unlawful,” depriving immunity of its intended effect.

    whembly (86df54)

  220. Trump’s immunity:

    (i) The indictment alleges that as part of their conspiracy to
    overturn the legitimate results of the 2020 presidential election,
    Trump and his co-conspirators attempted to leverage the Justice Department’s power and authority to convince certain States to replace
    their legitimate electors with Trump’s fraudulent slates of electors.
    According to the indictment, Trump met with the Acting Attorney
    General and other senior Justice Department and White House officials to discuss investigating purported election fraud and sending a
    letter from the Department to those States regarding such fraud. The
    indictment further alleges that after the Acting Attorney General resisted Trump’s requests, Trump repeatedly threatened to replace him.
    The Government does not dispute that the indictment’s allegations
    regarding the Justice Department involve Trump’s use of official
    power. The allegations in fact plainly implicate Trump’s “conclusive
    and preclusive” authority. The Executive Branch has “exclusive authority and absolute discretion” to decide which crimes to investigate
    and prosecute, including with respect to allegations of election crime.
    Nixon, 418 U. S., at 693. And the President’s “management of the Executive Branch” requires him to have “unrestricted power to remove
    the most important of his subordinates”—such as the Attorney General—“in their most important duties.” Fitzgerald, 457 U. S., at 750.
    The indictment’s allegations that the requested investigations were
    shams or proposed for an improper purpose do not divest the President
    of exclusive authority over the investigative and prosecutorial functions of the Justice Department and its officials. Because the President cannot be prosecuted for conduct within his exclusive constitutional authority, Trump is absolutely immune from prosecution for the
    alleged conduct involving his discussions with Justice Department officials.
    Pp. 19–21.

    whembly (86df54)

  221. @Paul… here’s the VP certification part… Trump is at least presumptively immune:

    (ii) The indictment next alleges that Trump and his co-conspirators “attempted to enlist the Vice President to use his ceremonial role
    at the January 6 certification proceeding to fraudulently alter the election results.” App. 187, Indictment ¶10(d). In particular, the indictment alleges several conversations in which Trump pressured the Vice
    President to reject States’ legitimate electoral votes or send them back
    to state legislatures for review.
    Whenever the President and Vice President discuss their official responsibilities, they engage in official conduct. Presiding over the January 6 certification proceeding at which Members of Congress count
    the electoral votes is a constitutional and statutory duty of the Vice
    President. Art. II, §1, cl. 3; Amdt. 12; 3 U. S. C. §15. The indictment’s
    allegations that Trump attempted to pressure the Vice President to
    take particular acts in connection with his role at the certification proceeding thus involve official conduct, and Trump is at least presumptively immune from prosecution for such conduct.
    The question then becomes whether that presumption of immunity
    is rebutted under the circumstances. It is the Government’s burden to
    rebut the presumption of immunity. The Court therefore remands to
    the District Court to assess in the first instance whether a prosecution
    involving Trump’s alleged attempts to influence the Vice President’s
    oversight of the certification proceeding would pose any dangers of intrusion on the authority and functions of the Executive Branch
    . Pp.
    21–24.

    whembly (86df54)

  222. Probably the Jack Smith’s strongest charge, is remanded back to district court to apply the “official v. unofficial” test:

    (iii) The indictment’s remaining allegations involve Trump’s interactions with persons outside the Executive Branch: state officials,
    private parties, and the general public. In particular, the indictment
    alleges that Trump and his co-conspirators attempted to convince certain state officials that election fraud had tainted the popular vote
    count in their States, and thus electoral votes for Trump’s opponent
    needed to be changed to electoral votes for Trump. After Trump failed
    to convince those officials to alter their state processes, he and his coconspirators allegedly developed and effectuated a plan to submit
    fraudulent slates of Presidential electors to obstruct the certification
    proceeding. On Trump’s view, the alleged conduct qualifies as official
    because it was undertaken to ensure the integrity and proper administration of the federal election. As the Government sees it, however,
    Trump can point to no plausible source of authority enabling the President to take such actions. Determining whose characterization may
    be correct, and with respect to which conduct, requires a fact-specific
    analysis of the indictment’s extensive and interrelated allegations.

    The Court accordingly remands to the District Court to determine in
    the first instance whether Trump’s conduct in this area qualifies as
    official or unofficial.
    Pp. 24–28.

    whembly (86df54)

  223. As to his J6 speech, “are likely to fall comfortably within the outer perimeter of his official responsibilities”, but is remanded for more fact finding if government wants to pierce this immunity:

    (iv) The indictment also contains various allegations regarding
    Trump’s conduct in connection with the events of January 6 itself. The
    alleged conduct largely consists of Trump’s communications in the
    form of Tweets and a public address. The President possesses “extraordinary power to speak to his fellow citizens and on their behalf.”
    Trump v. Hawaii, 585 U. S. 667, 701. So most of a President’s public communications are likely to fall comfortably within the outer perimeter of his official responsibilities. There may, however, be contexts in
    which the President speaks in an unofficial capacity—perhaps as a
    candidate for office or party leader. To the extent that may be the case,
    objective analysis of “content, form, and context” will necessarily inform the inquiry. Snyder v. Phelps, 562 U. S. 443, 453. Whether the
    communications alleged in the indictment involve official conduct may
    depend on the content and context of each. This necessarily factbound
    analysis is best performed initially by the District Court. The Court
    therefore remands to the District Court to determine in the first instance whether this alleged conduct is official or unofficial.
    Pp. 28–30.

    whembly (86df54)

  224. This will go back to the DC Circuit, where they will conclude that none of the acts for which Trump was indicted were official, and the USSC should have the good sense to deny cert after Trump, but the clock is effectively run out.

    If Biden really wants to test this ruling, all he has to do is is send out his SEAL team to not only take out Trump but also three or four of the conservative USSC justices and have the Democrat-led Senate replace them with liberals. Biden could then say he did it for national security reasons, for the good of the country. The newly constituted court would affirm his acts, because there’s presumptive you know. Sure, Biden may get impeached, but won’t get convicted. This is the fascist path that was started by Trump and his attempted coup, and given cover by his enablers.

    Paul Montagu (7b8b7c)

  225. This is pretty clear in defense of “Presidential communication immunities”:

    (3) Presidents cannot be indicted based on conduct for which they
    are immune from prosecution. On remand, the District Court must
    carefully analyze the indictment’s remaining allegations to determine
    whether they too involve conduct for which a President must be immune from prosecution. And the parties and the District Court must
    ensure that sufficient allegations support the indictment’s charges
    without such conduct. Testimony or private records of the President
    or his advisers probing such conduct may not be admitted as evidence
    at trial.
    Pp. 30–32.

    whembly (86df54)

  226. @227

    This will go back to the DC Circuit, where they will conclude that none of the acts for which Trump was indicted were official, and the USSC should have the good sense to deny cert after Trump, but the clock is effectively run out.

    If Biden really wants to test this ruling, all he has to do is is send out his SEAL team to not only take out Trump but also three or four of the conservative USSC justices and have the Democrat-led Senate replace them with liberals. Biden could then say he did it for national security reasons, for the good of the country. The newly constituted court would affirm his acts, because there’s presumptive you know. Sure, Biden may get impeached, but won’t get convicted. This is the fascist path that was started by Trump and his attempted coup, and given cover by his enablers.

    Paul Montagu (7b8b7c) — 7/1/2024 @ 8:47 am

    Tell me you didn’t read the ruling, without telling me you didn’t read it.

    Oh wait, you just did.

    “If Biden really wants to test this ruling, all he has to do is is send out his SEAL team to not only take out Trump but also three or four of the conservative USSC justices”
    That is absolutely not an official presidential core acts.

    whembly (86df54)

  227. SCOTUS emphatically states that impeachment is meant for sitting president, not including formers:

    (c) Trump asserts a far broader immunity than the limited one the
    Court recognizes, contending that the indictment must be dismissed
    because the Impeachment Judgment Clause requires that impeachment and Senate conviction precede a President’s criminal prosecution. But the text of the Clause does not address whether and on what
    conduct a President may be prosecuted if he was never impeached and
    convicted. See Art. I, §3, cl. 7. Historical evidence likewise lends little
    support to Trump’s position. The Federalist Papers on which Trump
    relies concerned the checks available against a sitting President; they
    did not endorse or even consider whether the Impeachment Judgment
    Clause immunizes a former President from prosecution. Transforming
    the political process of impeachment into a necessary step in the enforcement of criminal law finds little support in the text of the Constitution or the structure of the Nation’s Government. Pp. 32–34.

    whembly (86df54)

  228. Final syllabus section:
    (e) This case poses a question of lasting significance: When may a
    former President be prosecuted for official acts taken during his Presidency? In answering that question, unlike the political branches and
    the public at large, the Court cannot afford to fixate exclusively, or
    even primarily, on present exigencies. Enduring separation of powers
    principles guide our decision in this case. The President enjoys no immunity for his unofficial acts, and not everything the President does is
    official. The President is not above the law. But under our system of
    separated powers, the President may not be prosecuted for exercising
    his core constitutional powers, and he is entitled to at least presumptive immunity from prosecution for his official acts. That immunity
    applies equally to all occupants of the Oval Office.

    This seems like a teacher (SCOTUS) admonishing the lower courts that there is no “O r a n g e M a n B a d” exception.

    whembly (86df54)

  229. Ultimately this case is delayed by sloppy indictments presented to a non-curious judge who passed it off to an irresponsible court of appeals.

    Sad!

    BuDuh (a6b63d)

  230. If Biden really wants to test this ruling, all he has to do is is send out his SEAL team

    Why is this stupid hypothetical, that was created by Judge Flo Pan, ever used as a potentially persuasive argument?

    BuDuh (a6b63d)

  231. @227 “If Biden really wants to test this ruling, all he has to do is is send out his SEAL team to not only take out Trump but also three or four of the conservative USSC justices and have the Democrat-led Senate replace them with liberals.”

    That’s a lot of trouble to go through when you can just put Trump in prison. Too bad the timing just didn’t work out as intended, but Merchan still has a card to play. Keep your hopes up.

    lloyd (7935a8)

  232. From what I am reading, this is almost more rewarding to Obama and his actions in 2016.

    BuDuh (a6b63d) — 7/1/2024 @ 8:17 am

    LOL! If Obama was subject to prosecution for killing an American Al-Qaeda terrorist, then why didn’t the Trump Administration charge him? I’ve never found any legal commentary supporting such a prosecution.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  233. Derp.

    It would be Obama’s sicking the DOJ on Trump. But you knew that..

    What is your purpose, Rip? It is far from enlightenment of a dim comment section. It seems more like tooting a horn by blowing hard. Feels good?

    BuDuh (a6b63d)

  234. At least Putin puts his opponents in prison first before whacking them. As a country, we should strive to do better.

    lloyd (7935a8)

  235. The Executive Branch has “exclusive authority and absolute discretion” to decide which crimes to investigate and prosecute, including with respect to allegations of election crime.

    There goes the argument that the failure to enforce immigration laws is a criminal offense.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  236. Rip is always rooting for a particular side.

    BuDuh (a6b63d)

  237. @238

    The Executive Branch has “exclusive authority and absolute discretion” to decide which crimes to investigate and prosecute, including with respect to allegations of election crime.

    There goes the argument that the failure to enforce immigration laws is a criminal offense.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8) — 7/1/2024 @ 9:16 am

    Yup… pretty much.

    Now… is it impeachable?

    Probably…

    whembly (86df54)

  238. @238 “There goes the argument that the failure to enforce immigration laws is a criminal offense.”

    There goes the argument no one was making.

    It can still be a high crime and misdemeanor, as judged by Congress, which is how the Founders intended.

    lloyd (7935a8)

  239. I’m pretty sure even Rip’s claims of being “pro-life” is just what he considers a parody of a real pro-life Christian.

    NJRob (e8ac00)

  240. For Rip:

    The dissents overlook the more likely prospect of an Executive
    Branch that cannibalizes itself, with each successive President free to prosecute his predecessors, yet unable to boldly
    and fearlessly carry out his duties for fear that he may be
    next. For instance, Section 371—which has been charged
    in this case—is a broadly worded criminal statute that can
    cover “‘any conspiracy for the purpose of impairing, obstructing or defeating the lawful function of any department of Government.’” United States v. Johnson, 383 U. S.
    169, 172 (1966) (quoting Haas v. Henkel, 216 U. S. 462, 479
    (1910)). Virtually every President is criticized for insufficiently enforcing some aspect of federal law (such as drug,
    gun, immigration, or environmental laws). An enterprising
    prosecutor in a new administration may assert that a previous President violated that broad statute. Without immunity, such types of prosecutions of ex-Presidents could quickly become routine. The enfeebling of the Presidency
    and our Government that would result from such a cycle of
    factional strife is exactly what the Framers intended to
    avoid.
    Ignoring those risks, the dissents are instead content to leave the preservation of our system of separated
    powers up to the good faith of prosecutors.

    SCOTUS does a good job in forming prospective prosecutors from politically “stretching” the law to meet their partisan agendas.

    whembly (86df54)

  241. This is the fascist path that was started by Trump and his attempted coup, and given cover by his enablers.

    So, it’s OK then because we fantasize* that Trump would have done it.

    ————————-

    * building on an extreme hypothetical mentioned in argument only for illustration

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  242. Whooooo… the majority is deftly smacking down the dissents here:

    Our dissenting colleagues exude an impressive infallibility. While their confidence may be inspiring, the Court adheres to time-tested practices instead—deciding what is required to dispose of this case and remanding after “revers[ing] on a threshold question,” Zivotofsky, 566 U. S., at 201, to obtain “guidance from the litigants [and] the court below,” Vidal v. Elster, 602 U. S. 286,
    328 (2024) (SOTOMAYOR, J., concurring in judgment).

    whembly (86df54)

  243. To say that “no one is above the law” neglects Congresspeople who libel while speaking on the floor, or who evade misdemeanor arrest because Congress is in session. Or people at all levels of government with “qualified immunity.”

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  244. libel slander

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  245. I don’t see how pressuring Pence to cancel certified state votes, thereby violating the 12th Amendment, is an official act.

    I don’t either, but I can see that it’s not a slam dunk and it depends greatly on the degree to which Pence (and VPs in general) are independent actors not subject to the will of the Executive.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  246. What is your purpose, Rip? It is far from enlightenment of a dim comment section. It seems more like tooting a horn by blowing hard. Feels good?

    BuDuh (a6b63d) — 7/1/2024 @ 9:15 am

    You have implied (several times) that the killing of Anwar al-Awlaki makes Obama criminally liable, but you’ve never made an argument with supporting facts. The killing was well within the authority of the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force.

    The U.S. placed Awlaki on its target list because he was linked to several terrorist plots against the U.S. First, Awlaki communicated with Nidal Malik Hasan, who killed 13 people in a shooting spree at Fort Hood Army base in Texas in November 2009. Second, Awlaki directed Abdulmutallab, who attempted to blow up a passenger airline en route to Detroit on Christmas Day one month later. Third, Awlaki supervised a failed plot to detonate explosives hidden in ink cartridges in cargo planes over Chicago. Finally, Awlaki communicated with British Airways employee Rajib Karim who tried to get a bomb aboard a U.S.-bound plane at Heathrow Airport.
    ………..
    According to the (Department of Justice’s Office of Legal Counsel) memo, Awlaki was covered by the authorization to use military force against al Qaeda, which Congress had authorized immediately after September 11, 2001. The memo reasoned that the U.S. could legally kill Awlaki in a targeted strike, if it was not feasible to capture him, because intelligence agencies said he was taking part in the war between the U.S. and al Qaeda and posed a significant threat to Americans, and because the Yemeni authorities were unable or unwilling to stop him. The memo did not independently analyze the evidence against Awlaki.

    The memo authorized Awlaki’s killing despite several U.S. and international laws. First, an executive order banning assassinations did not apply because this would be a lawful killing in an armed conflict, not an unlawful killing of a political leader outside of war. Second, a federal law prohibiting Americans from murdering other Americans abroad would not apply because killing a wartime enemy within the laws of war was not “murder.” Third, the killing would not violate due process because the Supreme Court had upheld the use of force against an American citizen to curtail an “imminent” threat, which Awlaki was. Finally, it would not violate international law because the U.N. Charter’s law of self defense provides for the use of force against an imminent threat.

    Source. Footnotes omitted.

    I just knew you would bring up this today. 😉

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  247. @238 “There goes the argument that the failure to enforce immigration laws is a criminal offense.”

    There goes the argument no one was making.

    It can still be a high crime and misdemeanor, as judged by Congress, which is how the Founders intended.

    lloyd (7935a8) — 7/1/2024 @ 9:26 am

    Lindsey Graham: If Trump Wins Mayorkas, Biden Likely Will Be Prosecuted

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  248. You have implied (several times) that the killing of Anwar al-Awlaki makes Obama criminally liable

    Are you a student of the Klunk school of putting words in people’s mouths?

    Go find where I have ever said anything remotely close to that. It isn’t in my memory bank.

    BuDuh (a6b63d)

  249. I’m pretty sure even Rip’s claims of being “pro-life” is just what he considers a parody of a real pro-life Christian.

    NJRob (e8ac00) — 7/1/2024 @ 9:26 am

    Actually my views on abortion are based on the fact that two of my sisters have aborted their children because they were “inconvenient” at the time.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  250. That is absolutely not an official presidential core acts.

    Ironic, you telling me I didn’t read it. The presumptive immunity applies to non-core “official acts”, those outside core constitutional duties. Of course Trump and any other president going forward will declare everything they do is or was “official”, thus creating the presumption, thus requiring a factual case be made to overcome it.

    Paul Montagu (383f45)

  251. So, it’s OK then because we fantasize* that Trump would have done it.

    Please show me where I said any of that is OK. I threw out an extreme scenario to communicate “not OK”.

    Paul Montagu (383f45)

  252. 253. The Democratic Party is said to have given up, in the sense of not building big campaign, on Georgia [16] , Arizona [11] and Nevada [6] and trying to replace them with North Carolina [16]

    North Carolina = Georgia but Arizona and Nevada assume a loss of 17 Electoral votes. Michigan is 15 this election (down from 16 in 2020) and Pennsylvania 19 (down from 20) Wisconsin 10 Biden won 306-232 in 2020 and can afford to lose only 36 to avoid a tie and there are some Electoral votes lost to reapportionment.

    270 to win [https://www.270towin.com] has the state of the election now 235 at least leaning Republican, 226 leaning Democratic and 77 tossup, the tossups being Georgia, Arizona, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin. 16+11+6+19+15+10 = 77 Electoral votes With North Carolina in the Republican column and Virginia [13] in the Democratic column. (Biden won Virginia in 2020 with 54.15% of the vote)

    Trump is within sight of carrying New Jersey [14] according to Republicans, and he hopes even to carry New York, like Ronald Reagan did in 1980, but this may be because he is originally from New York.

    Nikki Haley says that she said months ago and still hold to it that Biden will not be the Democratic nominee.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  253. Please show me where I said any of that is OK. I threw out an extreme scenario to communicate “not OK”.

    You went pretty far down that path for the Democrats, then justified it by saying that Trump started it.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  254. Which he didn’t, any more than Palin said she could could see Russia from her house.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  255. 215. Paul Montagu (7b8b7c) — 7/1/2024 @ 8:14 am

    I don’t see how pressuring Pence to cancel certified state votes, thereby violating the 12th Amendment, is an official act.

    Had Pence attempted that it would have been an official act (not a private one) but unconstitutional.

    There was lobbying and arguing with Pence, not pressure or threats.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  256. Nikki Haley says that she said months ago and still hold to it that Biden will not be the Democratic nominee.

    The commercials they are running don’t depend on Biden being the nominee.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  257. “Russia has bombed itself at least 119 times over the last 4 months.
    9 bombs, including a FAB-3000kg bomb, and an R-77 air-to-air missile fell on the Belgorod region in the last 4 days, destroying 5 houses”

    steveg (40d13a)

  258. Kevin M (a9545f) — 7/1/2024 @ 11:20 am

    any more than Palin said she could could see Russia from her house.

    Tina Fey said that on Saturday Night Live.

    And yet today this error lives on given a little help from Sarah Palin (who did say you could see Russia from Alaska, in an attempt to boost her foreign policy credentials)

    New York Governor Kathy Hochul can see Canada from her home.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  259. Kevin M (a9545f) — 7/1/2024 @ 11:22 am

    The commercials they are running don’t depend on Biden being the nominee.

    Has this changed any in the last few days?

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  260. SCOTUS emphatically states that impeachment is meant for sitting president, not including formers:

    It does no such thing. All it says is that it need not be a prerequisite for prosecuting former presidents and even if failure to remove leaves prosecution postponed, it does not immunize. Impeachment is a political act, not a judicial one.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  261. Had Pence attempted that it would have been an official act (not a private one) but unconstitutional.

    I’m not so sure Sammy, per the Syllabus…

    The immunity the Court has recognized therefore extends to the “outer perimeter” of the President’s official responsibilities, covering actions so long as they are “not manifestly or palpably beyond [his] authority.”

    I take that to mean that crapping on the 12th Amendment could be “manifestly and palpably beyond” Trump’s authority, whether Pence went along with it or not.

    Paul Montagu (383f45)

  262. You have implied (several times) that the killing of Anwar al-Awlaki makes Obama criminally liable

    Are you a student of the Klunk school of putting words in people’s mouths?

    Go find where I have ever said anything remotely close to that. It isn’t in my memory bank.

    BuDuh (a6b63d) — 7/1/2024 @ 9:59 am

    My apologies. I was thinking of someone else here.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  263. Now just over 30 years ago:

    https://patterico.com/2014/06/13/20-years-ago-today/

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  264. Happy Canada Day to our friends up north.

    When the 9/11 attack happened, Canada responded with Operation Yellow Ribbon, for which we should be grateful. I especially admire the spontaneous response of the people of Gander, Newfoundland.

    Jim Miller (0db57a)

  265. There’s some kind of a virus going around – not Covid, and probably not bird flu, light estin, folic cid, oranges, pineapple tidbits probably helps. And water,

    Sammy Finkelman (c2c77e)

  266. R.I.P. Ismail Kadare.

    A magnificent writer. I read his The Drums of Rain, also published as The Castle and as The Siege, in Greek more than 30 years ago and it made a great impression on me, awakening an interest in things Greek and Albanian of which I had only vague knowledge until then.

    nk (a71d91)

  267. Straight talking honest Joe, Executive of the Executive branch of the USA- Not A Liar TM sends out WH Press Secretary and she goes totally rogue every day and claims Joe is just fine mentally, grocery prices and gas prices are down. Straight Talking Joe TM never corrects the record

    Every President does it. And we accept it. Weird.

    steveg (8dac75)

  268. Every President does it. And we accept it. Weird.

    steveg (8dac75) — 7/2/2024 @ 3:42 pm

    Americans just aren’t that astute. I’m amazed the country works as well as it does, to be honest.

    norcal (df08ac)

  269. Correction: Actually the deadline is actually August 7.

    Actually, Ohio changed that law in June (finally!) reducing the time the candidate had to be known from 90 days to 65 days (thus September 1) but the DNC is going ahead with their zoom nomination in July anyway.

    I think Karl Rove (on WABC radio Cats & Cosby 5-6pm show today) is wrong that the delegates are normal Democrats This was probably heavily tilted toward “progressives” (after all they were bound to vote for Biden anyway) They could reward people with being delegates.

    So if there is to be a replacement, the people in charge of the DNC would probably rather have it be the national committee rather than the convention delegates.

    Sammy FInkelman (e4ef09)

  270. She said today that Joe Biden did not take any medicine for the old. Probably true, as they wouldn’t want to slow down his mind.

    Sammy FInkelman (e4ef09)

  271. Macron evidently thought his party would come in second and win most runoffs. but the left wing united.

    Another possible thought was that he wanted Marine Le Pen’s party to win now if she was going to win so she would lose in 2027.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  272. for the cold!

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  273. So here’s something curious. My brother, who has heretofore been a resident of MAGA world, recently told me he’s thinking about not casting a vote for President this year.

    The reason? He’s afraid Trump will sell out Ukraine, which will encourage Russia (and China, vis-a-vis Taiwan) to seek more territory, which will result in the U.S. getting involved in war(s), which will result in a draft, which will result in his young daughter getting drafted due to potential legislation expanding the draft to women.

    This strikes me as rather tortured reasoning, but any anti-Trump vote (or non-vote) is welcome.

    norcal (df08ac)

  274. Even though I think Biden should step aside due to his senescence, I would still vote for him over Trump, because I don’t see the people running his administration being as dangerous to democracy and global stability as Trump 2.0.

    Like Bill Maher, I would vote for Biden’s head in a jar of blue liquid before I’d vote for Trump.

    norcal (df08ac)

  275. Clarence Thomas is 76. Samuel Alito is 74. At 69, John Roberts might be in the running too for retirement too.

    These gerbils do not want a Democrat President to appoint their replacement. If Biden/Harris win, they better win resoundingly. Otherwise, it will be a reprise not of 2020 but of 2000. And they will find a way to give the election to Trump.

    nk (b24d23)

  276. So if there is to be a replacement, the people in charge of the DNC would probably rather have it be the national committee rather than the convention delegates.

    AOC! AOC!! AOC!!!

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  277. And they will find a way to give the election to Trump.

    That’s a libel with no foundation.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  278. The DNC has no ability to replace the candidate.

    Good, if profanity-filled, read on the history of the Democratic Party’s candidate selection processes at https://lbjvantagepoint.com/the-white-house-tapes/f/a-brief-history-of-the-democratic-partys-nomination-system

    SamG (4e6c22)

  279. Their wives will make them.

    nk (a40d3e)

  280. We dodged a bullet in 2020 with a 4-4 Court and Anthony Kennedy as the fourth Republican, but it’s now 6-3 and three are Trump appointees.

    Vote for the pickled head! It’s important.

    nk (a40d3e)

  281. “All they know is electric. They want electric army tanks. They want electric planes. What happens if the sun isn’t shining while you’re up in the air?”

    Guess who.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a)

  282. “All they know is electric. They want electric army tanks. They want electric planes. What happens if the sun isn’t shining while you’re up in the air?”

    Guess who.

    Colonel Klink (ret) (96f56a) — 7/2/2024 @ 7:50 pm

    Uncle John Trump from MIT?

    Trump knows the intellectual caliber of his supporters. Unfortunately, it turns out, he also knows the integrity and intellectual honesty of the judiciary, but we refused to believe him because he only criticized the ones who were against him.

    nk (615b2c)

  283. That’s a libel with no foundation.

    Kevin M (a9545f) — 7/2/2024 @ 7:01 pm

    It’s an opinion. That makes it constitutionally incapable of being libel. Calling it a libel with no foundation is a falsehood with no foundation.

    lurker (c23034)

  284. Like Bill Maher, I would vote for Biden’s head in a jar of blue liquid before I’d vote for Trump.

    norcal (df08ac) — 7/2/2024 @ 5:09 pm

    Me too. I’d take any Biden variant over Trump. To be fair, I’d also take Biden’s head in a jar over Biden.

    lurker (c23034)

  285. This 1956 Heinlein novel gives me some reason for encouragement about Joe Biden as president. Let me repeat, some

    In the US — and, I would guess — in most other large democratic nations, prominenet politicians are best understood as teams that can function reasonably well, even when the top person is having problems.

    (I do worry about the current Defense Secretary.)

    Jim Miller (7b1f74)

  286. So many former conservatives showing their true colors. Vote for the leftist plutocracy. It’s important.

    NJRob (998b3c)

  287. This 1956 Heinlein novel

    Is an actor going to replace him?

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  288. Biden is thinking about it.


    Biden Told Ally That He Is Weighing Whether to Continue in the Race

    President Biden has told a key ally that he knows he may not be able to salvage his candidacy if he cannot convince the public in the coming days that he is up for the job after a disastrous debate performance last week.

    The president, who the ally emphasized is still deeply in the fight for re-election, understands that his next few appearances heading into the holiday weekend — including an interview scheduled for Friday with George Stephanopoulos of ABC News and campaign stops in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin — must go well.

    “He knows if he has two more events like that, we’re in a different place” by the end of the weekend, said the ally, referring to Mr. Biden’s halting and unfocused performance in the debate. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a sensitive situation.

    How do I know this is true?

    After the article published, Andrew Bates, a White House spokesman, said it was “absolutely false.”

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  289. The Snuffleopoulos interview will not be live and will be edited (actually, chopped into parts) for broadcast in several segments. So, if he has trouble with pointed questions like “What did you have for breakfast?” the viewer probably won’t see them.

    A bar so low he can shuffle over it.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  290. Prediction: Biden is going to free his delegates. The question remains whether Trump will do that, too.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  291. The DNC has no ability to replace the candidate.

    So, if the nominee dies in September, they just run a dead candidate? Or try to reconvene the convention?

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  292. Trump knows the intellectual caliber of his supporters.

    If he gets the vote of everyone with a 2-digit IQ, he wins.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  293. @296 the candidate’s name remains on the ballots, because ballots are state responsibilities. Example from earlier this year: a Democratic candidate died in April and won in June.

    Sam G (80a2a9)

  294. To add to 298: early voting starts in September. Ballots will have already been set.

    Sam G (80a2a9)

  295. #292 In the novel, the Bonforte team is able to carry on, after he had been kidnaped — and before the actor was hired.

    Similarly, if Antony Blinken is doing his job, I worry a little less about our diplomacy than I would otherwise.

    And, so on.

    Jim Miller (f98654)

  296. 296. Kevin M (a9545f) — 7/3/2024 @ 8:13 am

    So, if the nominee dies in September, they just run a dead candidate? Or try to reconvene the convention?

    depending on the state, they replace him or just runa dead candidate.

    A situation like this occurred in 1872. Although in that case, Horace Greeley died between the November election and the casting of the Electoral votes.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1872_United_States_presidential_election

    Grant won an easy re-election over Greeley, with a popular vote margin of 11.8% and 763,000 votes.

    Grant also won the electoral college with 286 electoral votes; while Greeley won 66 electoral votes, he died on November 29, 1872, twenty-four days after the election and before any of his pledged electors (from Texas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Maryland) could cast their votes. Subsequently, 63 of Greeley’s electors cast their votes for other Democrats: 42 voted for non-candidate Indiana Governor-Elect Thomas A. Hendricks, 18 of them cast their presidential votes for Greeley’s running mate, Benjamin Gratz Brown, 2 cast their votes for non-candidate and former Georgia Governor Charles J. Jenkins, and 1 cast his vote for non-candidate U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Davis….

    …During the joint session of Congress for the counting of the electoral vote on February 12, 1873, five states had objections that were raised regarding their results. However, unlike the objections which would be made in 1877, these did not affect the outcome of the election.

    3 (of the 11) electoral votes were cast for Greeley in Georgia and rejected, but 8 cast for him in Texas were accepted. The challenge in Texas was based on different ground (irregularities) OOr do I understand that Wikipedia article wrong?

    Sammy Finkelman (c2c77e)

  297. Prediction: Biden is going to free his delegates. The question remains whether Trump will do that, too.

    Kevin M (a9545f) — 7/3/2024 @ 8:11 am

    Odds Biden will free his delegates: slightly greater than zero.

    Odds Trump will free his delegates: far less than zero.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  298. Prediction: Biden is going to free his delegates. The question remains whether Trump will do that, too.

    Kevin M (a9545f) — 7/3/2024 @ 8:11 am

    Why would Trump free his delegates? What possible motivation would he have to do so?

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  299. Michael Weiss has an update from his Estonian source wrt Putin’s War Against Ukraine.

    In short, Putin’s assault on Kharkiv failed (losing 1,000 troops a day), new weapons to Ukraine are “achieving parity” against Russian aggression, Russian missile and drone attacks are relatively low (presumably due to production issues), Ukrainian energy infrastructure took a hit, F-16s still aren’t in operation there, and Ukrainians are hamstrung by Biden’s limits on strikes in Russian territory. There haven’t been any notable gains or losses in territory since Ukraine reclaimed Kherson, and there probably won’t be any changes in 2024.

    A note on populations…
    North Vietnam (1970): 18.5 million
    USA (1970): 203 million

    Afghanistan (1980): 12.5 million
    USSR (1980): 262 million

    Ukraine (2024): 38 million
    Russia (2024): 144 million

    Paul Montagu (e7d63b)

  300. 296. Kevin M (a9545f) — 7/3/2024 @ 8:13 am

    So, if the nominee dies in September, they just run a dead candidate? Or try to reconvene the convention?

    depending on the state, they replace him or just runa dead candidate.

    Sammy Finkelman (c2c77e) — 7/3/2024 @ 11:28 am

    Incorrect. Under Democratic Party rules:

    Filling a Vacancy on the National Ticket: In the event of death, resignation or disability of a nominee of the Party for President or Vice President after the adjournment of the National Convention, the National Chairperson of the Democratic National Committee shall confer with the Democratic leadership of the United States Congress and the Democratic Governors Association and shall report to the Democratic National Committee, which is authorized to fill the vacancy or vacancies.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  301. Yes, they can fill a vacancy on the national ticket, but this has no effect on state election laws, and you have a problem with ballots mailed out early, especially to military voters stationed overseas.

    Whether the state party can change the a name on the ballot has nothing to do with what the national party does.

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  302. Three people keeping mostly quiet:

    1. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer

    2. House Majority Leader Hakeem Jeffries

    3. Kingmaker (in 2020) Representative James E. Clyburn (D-S.C.)

    Schumer is reported to have dissuaded Senator
    Joe Manchin from going on a Sunday interview show last Sunday and saying that Biden should quit (even though Manchin is officially no longer a Democrat. But then neither is Senator Angus King)

    Sammy Finkelman (e4ef09)

  303. Question:

    Assume that Biden will release his delegates and not pick a successor. Does he also resign, giving Harris her moment in the sun, for better or worse? Then, if the convention chooses someone else, they can truthfully say that she had her best shot.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  304. Yes, they can fill a vacancy on the national ticket, but this has no effect on state election laws,

    And they end up running countless ads like “A vote for Biden-Harris is a vote for Whitmer-Beshear” or whatever. And still people get to the polls wondering why Biden is on the ballot.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  305. One of the co-authors of “Seven Days in May” wrote a novel about a fill-in candidate after the GOP nominee dies 6 weeks before the election, trailing by 10 points with no money left. Nobody wants the sure loss, so the RNC picks an unknown. They give him a script and write him off, but he has other plans.


    Dark Hose by Fletcher Knebel
    (1973)

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  306. Peggy Noonan on the Biden problem

    Biden Can’t Spin His Way Out of This

    We are living big history. We do that so often we don’t always notice. But a proud president is hunkered down in the White House, and his party is frantically trying to decide whether to press him to step aside from his bid for re-election after a catastrophic 90 minutes revealing that he is neurologically not up to the demands of a campaign or a second term. (And revealing, too, that his true condition, the depth of his decline, had been kept, quite deliberately and systematically, from the American people. Oh, the histories that will be written, and the villains that will be named.)

    To me it feels like August 1974. The president’s position isn’t going to get better, it is going to get worse. The longer he waits to step aside the crueler his departure will be.

    The post-debate polls show he is losing support both overall and in the battlegrounds. A cratering like that doesn’t happen because you had a bad night, or a cold, or were tired. It happens when an event starkly and unavoidably shows people what they already suspected. It happens when the event gives them proof.

    Before the debate a majority of those polled said they no longer thought he had it in him physically or mentally to do the job of president anymore. After the debate that number reached 72%. You can’t un-ring that bell.

    But read the whole thing

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  307. *Dark HORSE

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  308. Doom and gloom tomorrow for the Conservative Party across the Atlantic:

    ……….
    YouGov’s MRP poll (more on that below) predicts Keir Starmer’s Labour will win 431 seats, up 229 from 2019, with the Tories on 102, down 263 seats from the last election. These numbers would give Labour a majority of 212, the largest the party has ever enjoyed. Ed Davey’s Liberal Democrats were on 72 seats, up 61.

    Nigel Farage’s insurgent right-wing Reform UK, meanwhile, was predicted to win three seats.
    ……….
    A poll by More in Common released Wednesday predicted a 210-seat majority for Labour, showing the party on 430 seats, up 228 from the last election, while the Tories were down 239 seats on 126. The Lib Dems returned as the third party with 52 seats, up 41, while the Scottish National Party held 16 seats, a loss of 32. Reform UK won two seats.
    ………
    A Focaldata poll also published Wednesday suggested an even higher majority for Labour of 238, allocating the party 444 seats to the Tories’ 108 seats. The Lib Dems would also return as the third party with 57 seats, while the SNP held just 15 of Scotland’s 57 seats. Reform would again win two seats.
    ………
    YouGov, a long-standing pollster, correctly predicted a hung parliament in the 2017 general election in an MRP poll when other polling suggested a strong majority for the Tories.

    MRP (multi-level regression and post-stratification) polls use a far larger sample size and involve looking at each person’s voting intention and their demographic characteristics, including their age, income, occupation and level of education, as well as their past voting behavior.
    ………..

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  309. The Tories are being punished for incompetence, ideological rigidity, inflation and high intere3st rates. Good thing that cannot happen here.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  310. The New York Times story that goes back and firth about the problems in connection with switching candidates that has some unknown people close to Biden among its sources still has this Ohio ballot problem as a consideration even though it was fixed a month ago. The fact it ws fixed has mostly slipped by people, (this is one of those things where if you read it once, you know it is true) and political insiders have to be lying to the reporters, putting lies into their explanations of their supposed calculations

    https://www.nytimes.com/2024/07/03/us/politics/president-biden-donald-trump-campaign-2024-democrats.html

    A new nominee could face other complicating factors. An Ohio election law requires parties to have their candidates set by Aug. 7, nearly two weeks before the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The party had been planning to formalize Mr. Biden’s nomination before then, through a virtual online roll call vote. Barring a change to the law, which may still happen, the party will be hard pressed to settle on its new ticket by that August deadline — or give up being on the ballot in Ohio.

    But this is an outright lie.

    https://www.wvxu.org/2024-06-03/dewine-signs-biden-ohio-ballot-fix-and-foreign-money-ban-he-asked-for-in-special-session

    DeWine signs Biden Ohio ballot fix and foreign money ban he asked for in special session

    On Sunday, Gov. Mike DeWine signed the two bills that resulted from the special session that he called for. One bill will change the state’s 90-day candidate certification deadline so President Biden will be on Ohio’s fall ballot and the other will ban foreign nationals from contributing to ballot issue campaigns.

    Some Republicans broke with the supermajority in voting against House Bill 1.

    Republicans wanted the ban on contributions from foreign nationals in ballot issue campaigns following the passage of November’s abortion access amendment. Among the groups that contributed to that effort was the Sixteen Thirty Fund, a progressive dark money group which has received donations from a Swiss billionaire. The Sixteen Thirty Fund has contributed $550,000 toward Citizens Not Politicians, the group working to put an overhaul of redistricting on this fall’s ballot.

    But HB 1 was amended in the House to include permanent lawful US residents, also known as green card holders, in the ban on contributions from foreign nationals. Rep. Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), the sponsor of HB 1, had objected, saying green card holders have not been defined as foreign nationals in federal law and that “we are inviting the undoing of all of the otherwise good work that we are doing.” ….

    This Ohio deadline claim was also in another New York Times story, which was corrected online:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2024/07/03/us/politics/biden-drop-out-2024-
    election.html

    Editors Note: An earlier version of this article misstated Ohio’s deadline for a candidate to be certified. Ohio legislators passed a bill extending the deadline, and it is no longer before the Democratic convention

    The upshot of this is that New York Times cannot trust its inside the WHite House sources even about known facts,

    Sammy Finkelman (c2c77e)

  311. The Tories are being punished for incompetence, ideological rigidity, inflation and high intere3st rates. Good thing that cannot happen here.

    Kevin M (a9545f) — 7/3/2024 @ 6:34 pm

    And the fact that they’ve been in power for the past 14 years. They’ve grown stale.

    Rip Murdock (bf8ea8)

  312. Trump gained about 3 percentage points after the debate, and especially gained with young males with less education.

    Biden actually gained a bit with women and independents.

    Sammy Finkelman (c2c77e)

  313. And the fact that they’ve been in power for the past 14 years. They’ve grown stale.

    Twelve of the last 16 here.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  314. The way out for the Democrats. They have until Labor Day, when campaigns traditionally start.

    1. Sotomayor resigns.
    2. Harris appointed to Court.
    3. Gretchen Whitmer appointed VP.
    4. Biden resigns.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  315. Will Biden’s collapse allow Trump to pick a more MAGA VP?

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  316. Dark Hose by Fletcher Knebel (1973)

    Kevin M (a9545f) — 7/3/2024 @ 5:05 pm

    Thank you for the tip. I’ve already read the first couple of chapters. NJRob would really like it.

    nk (9a8070)

  317. The Economist

    The presidential debate was awful for Joe Biden, but the cover-up has been worse. It was agony to watch a befuddled old man struggling to recall words and facts. His inability to land an argument against a weak opponent was dispiriting. But the operation by his campaign to deny what tens of millions of Americans saw with their own eyes is more toxic than either, because its dishonesty provokes contempt.

    The effect has been to put the White House within Donald Trump’s grasp. Fresh polls have found that voters in the states Mr Biden must win have moved against him. His lead may be in danger even in once-safe states such as Virginia, Minnesota and New Mexico.

    Mr Biden deserves to be remembered for his accomplishments and his decency rather than his decline. So it is right that the first senior Democrats have begun to call openly for him to step aside. However, their public expressions are nothing compared with the building wave of private dismay. More of them urgently need to face up to the fact that if they do not speak out now, Mr Trump will win. In order to bring about the political renewal that America now so clearly needs, they must call for change. It is not too late.

    Democrats argue, rightly, that Mr Trump is unfit to be president. But the debate and its aftermath have proved Mr Biden unfit, too. First, because of his mental decline. Mr Biden can still appear dynamic during short, scripted appearances. But you cannot run a superpower by autocue. And you cannot put an international crisis on hold because the president is having a bad night. Should someone who cannot finish a sentence about Medicare be trusted with the nuclear codes?

    Mr Biden is blameless for his failing powers, but not for a second disqualification, which is his insistence, abetted by his family, senior staff and Democratic elites, that he is still up to the world’s toughest job. Mr Biden’s claim that this election is between right and wrong is ruined by the fact that the existence of his campaign now depends on a lie.

    Democrats sneer at the Republican Party for its craven behaviour towards Mr Trump. Again, they are right. Too many Republicans have parroted his falsehoods and lacked the moral courage to speak out against his abuses. Convinced they could outlast him, or that someone else would pay the price for ejecting him, senators and congressmen have put their ambition before their country.

    The Democratic Party should look in the mirror, starting with Mr Biden himself. He avers that he failed in the debate because he was tired from jetting around the world, as if his debility were evidence of his vitality. His supporters argue that those awful 90 minutes should not overshadow the past three and a half years. But what matters is whether they foreshadow the next four. Senior Democrats repeating these desperate talking points or waiting in silence for someone else to speak up first may think they are being loyal. Is that loyal to their country or their careers?

    Democrats might say that their tactics are just politics. Their ugly means are justified by their honourable ends of saving American democracy from the predations of Mr Trump. That defence does America no favours. The tactic of covering up your own flaws by demonising your opponent has long marred American politics, but using the threat of Mr Trump as a “dictator” to offset Mr Biden’s evident infirmity is a form of blackmail. As the head of state, America’s president embodies the virtues of the republic. The more he is seen as a stubborn old man who leaves the real work to his courtiers, the more he will undermine Americans’ faith in their system of government. Representing America abroad, Mr Biden will project decrepitude—to the delight of China and Russia and the dismay of America’s allies.

    There is another option. Mr Biden should withdraw from the campaign. That way, the election might refresh the body politic. The virtue of democracy is that voters can choose their rulers, but Mr Biden and Mr Trump offer a choice between the incapable and the unspeakable. Americans deserve better.

    The Dems’ willingness to play Weekend at Bernie’s with Joe tells me the Donkey Party is more like the GOP than they’re willing to admit.

    Paul Montagu (3a796b)

  318. Where does the media’s willingness come into play, Paul?

    Do people believe they have clean hands in all of this? Does The Economist?

    BuDuh (951507)

  319. Where does the media’s willingness come into play, Paul?
    Do people believe they have clean hands in all of this? Does The Economist?

    One, I already said “Catoggio is right in every respect”, which covers MSM complicity.

    Two, thanks for telling me you didn’t read the Economist link. Quote: “The Economist first said in 2022 that Mr Biden should not seek re-election because he was too old.”

    Paul Montagu (3a796b)

  320. The Economist first said in 2022 that Mr Biden should not seek re-election because he was too old.”

    What does that have to do with his cognitive state?

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-B-AUfGPgLs

    BuDuh (d43404)

  321. Cataggio correctly points out that the cover-up was not a strategic plan, as such would be suicidally stupid. Instead it was backed into after the facts began to leak out from the inner circle and in the face of the “threat” of Donald Trump. It was not so much to protect Joe Biden but to thwart the hated Trump.

    That doesn’t actually make it better, but it shows how the mainstream media has been co-opted and corrupted by the Democrat Party. It’s not like they were willing conspirators so much as predictable fellow travelers.

    Kevin M (a9545f)

  322. One good piece of news from the UK elections: George Galloway has lost his seat in Parliament.

    (Technically he lost it when Parliament was dissolved for the snap election, but he failed to win his riding today).

    Kevin M (a9545f)

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