Patterico's Pontifications

12/14/2021

Fox News: Texts? What Texts?

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 8:29 am



Dana wrote a great post about those texts to Mark Meadows and their significance. So how is the issue being covered on Fox News? The answer is: it is not.

Sean Hannity had Mark Meadows on as a guest and Hannity’s own texts to him were not mentioned:

Byron York, ever the partisan, does his level best to defend the Fox News hosts for texting Meadows saying Trump needed to call his people off, and then going on the tube and pretending Antifa played a significant role. Like most Byron York pieces, it’s not convincing. I’m sure he has some take about how the network totally ignoring the story in its entirety is defensible, somehow. When all you have is partisan garbage on offer, partisan garbage is what your readers get.

23 Responses to “Fox News: Texts? What Texts?”

  1. I wouldn’t expect Fox News to honestly cover this. But I’m also skeptical of anything Aaron Rupar reports so it’ll be interesting to se if anyone disputes his claims.

    Time123 (59cf00)

  2. Faux noise would rather talk about 2020 election voter fraud. Breaking news 4 people arrested in floriduh at the villages for illegally voting multiple times! No wait they were illegally voting for trump multiple times. Never mind.

    asset (45d022)

  3. All these non-news news networks do this. If they bring up something their “side” got caught on, it is only to defend. Benghazi, Trump’s bimb0s, Fast & Furious and now the Capitol assault. Nothing changes here.

    I can’t watch any of them.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  4. Why does Fox think that the Jan 6th committee should be aimed at “preventing future Riots”? Talk about goalpost moving; they’ve switched entire stadiums.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  5. “Rush” to judgement: ‘Reagan Creations’ all.

    https://www.poynter.org/reporting-editing/2021/how-rush-limbaughs-rise-after-the-gutting-of-the-fairness-doctrine-led-to-todays-highly-partisan-media/

    Keep in mind the current ‘prime time’ evening line-up on unregulated cable television platforms, like Fox News, [from their talk radio stable to cable TV to the likes of ‘Gutfeld’ comedy] is opinion programming– which is entertainment — not hard news. [A money making ratings grabber; the business plan the news management at lesser cable news channels in second or third place have chosen to follow to draw eyes, clicks and dollars.]

    Just don’t seen an issue w/’professional opinionators’ – pundits- or whatever label chosen in whatever medium around, offering up their “opinions” to a sitting politician at any level. Limbaugh wouls spend 3 hours a day, 5 days a week bloviating his entertaining ‘opinions’ out to the masses to make a buck for advertisers and himself. No audience; no show. You have to know the media landscape they’re playing on. If you don’t, you’re ripe for being duped as a viewer. None are ‘journalists.’ It’s when any elected official takes the advice/opinion of unelected windbags is the time to worry. [Per the tapes, entertainer Bob Hope was heard advising Nixon on Vietnam. That’s a nugget of comfort, isn’t it.]

    Spend an hour or two listening to citizen callers to CSPAN’s ‘Washington Journal’ [listen and you can tell which are organized and which are not BTW] and they’re offering up the same fodder to ‘the powers that be’ watching: their opinions.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  6. Revelation.

    Back in the day– oh, say 20 years ago– there was a MSNBC cable news program titled ‘Posner/Donahue’ which aired nightly at 9 PM ET. Vlad and Phil would banter and opinionate about news and events of the times and in pre-internet days, as part of the programming, read viewer faxes [new then -and which were not ID stamped at the time] from a fax machine sitting by the hosts– sent by audience “viewers” to participate– which essentially steered the program content and conversation. And by a quirk in the phone system, any faxes sent from the NYC area got there first. So, on a lark, began to fax the show and to my surprise, they’d get through and read on air almost immediately.

    So let the games begin: by anticipating the program content from the news of the day, one could create/print several faxes with different names/cities and POVs in different fonts– and the key for television was using large point type [easy to read] and short burst copy [thanks to my then new $1500 Apple Quadra660AV] and quickly print and zap them into the show at air time.

    It became a hilariously entertaining ‘video game’ — the objective being to ‘run the show’ by steering the conversation and have every fax read each night – supposedly from different viewers across the land. Which they weren’t. Nine times out of ten times all the faxes would be from one source: me. Would argue with myself – answer my own questions- and watch the two doofuses support one side or the other. Literally ran the program content of a nationally carried cable news show anonymously. One guy. So don’t be suckered by cable news opinionators like Laura, Sean, Rachel, Lemon… or Tucka. They’re all entertainment.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  7. All these non-news news networks do this.

    ‘Tucka’ referred to himself as a ‘journalist’ and he and his evening opinionators as ‘news anchors.’ They are no more ‘journalists’ than Clark Kent and Lois Lane and no more ‘news anchors’ than Ted Baxter and Ron Burgundy.

    This is their bogus self-delusion which they must be called out on.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  8. Oh come now! That’s not being fair to Clark Kent, Lois Lane, and, though you didn’t mention him, Jimmy Olsen.

    Jim Miller (edcec1)

  9. Image getting MSNBC or CNN peoples texts while investigating the Russia Collusion hoax or PeePee Dosier hoax. Those investigations cost this country millions.

    Rich (995a5b)

  10. @rich@9 Are you a bot? There are words there. They contain some of the extreme Trump supporter buzz word. But they don’t appear to be lined up in ways that make sense in context.

    Nic (896fdf)

  11. That’s not being fair to Clark Kent, Lois Lane, and, though you didn’t mention him, Jimmy Olsen.

    I’d allow an iota of grudging respect for Tucker if he called himself, “Tucker Carlson, cub reporter.”

    lurker (59504c)

  12. I suspect the influence of his stepmother, Patricia Caroline Swanson, heiress to the TV dinner Swansons. “How can you have TV dinners without TV?” she must have asked. “The family is counting on you, Tucker.”

    nk (1d9030)

  13. lmao at the rino made crisis.

    mg (8cbc69)

  14. The topic hasn’t been brought up a single time.

    It was brought up last night by Hannity and Ingraham.

    Hannity: ‘Liz, let’s release your phone records and texts, and your family discussing Donald Trump, considering you’re so free to release everybody else’s.’

    Ingraham: ‘This sent the left-wing media hacks into ‘Spin & Defame’ mode’

    The jan6 committee is simply a cudgel to go after enemies of the left, under the color of authority. Subpoena power is used to go after media personalities, and erstwhile “conservatives” like cheney latch on for kicks.

    JF (e1156d)

  15. How soon the Trumpists forget that there was a bipartisan commission on the table, with equal numbers of Dems and Repubs, akin to the 9/11 Commission, but the GOP shot it down. This “cudgel to go after enemies of the left” is the reaping of what my party has sowed.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  16. @15 yeah montagu, and how many republican members would pelosi have vetoed?

    and how many of those vetoes would you have agreed with?

    JF (e1156d)

  17. You should avoid hypotheticals as much as possible, JF. It’s a commenting dry hump.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  18. @17 as with your professed inclination to pee outside, maybe keep your weird turn ons to yourself

    JF (e1156d)

  19. How anyone can watch more than a minute of Hannity without a brain enema is beyond me.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  20. Kevin M (ab1c11) — 12/15/2021 @ 9:19 am

    How anyone can watch more than a minute of Hannity without a brain enema is beyond me.

    You don;t have to think he is right to listen to him. Listen for the underlying facts (and evaluate what are facts from other things you know) There are at least leads in what he says, or at least arguments that will be repeated elsewhere.

    Sammy Finkelman (c49738)

  21. DCSCA (f4c5e5) — 12/14/2021 @ 3:51 pm

    by anticipating the program content from the news of the day, one could create/print several faxes with different names/cities and POVs in different fonts– and the key for television was using large point type [easy to read] and short burst copy [thanks to my then new $1500 Apple Quadra660AV] and quickly print and zap them into the show at air time.

    It became a hilariously entertaining ‘video game’ — the objective being to ‘run the show’ by steering the conversation and have every fax read each night – supposedly from different viewers across the land. Which they weren’t. Nine times out of ten times all the faxes would be from one source: me. Would argue with myself – answer my own questions- and watch the two doofuses support one side or the other. Literally ran the program content of a nationally carried cable news show anonymously. One guy

    You had a chance to steer it in the direction of truth or your genuine opinion, (probably because of the small number of faxes they got, although maybe also because of the fact that faxes got to the stdio faster – or first – either because they were limited to travelling at the speed of light or because you prepared them in advance) and you didn’t do it.

    This is almost as silly as that railroad game I read about today in the Wall Street Journal:

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/do-not-play-chicken-with-a-train-tracks-boyhood-danger-risk-resilience-parenting-childhood-11639433017 Note: this doesn’t sound so risky because they didn’t push it too far

    In my hometown in the 1960s, my friends and I could have walked a standard route to reach our local high school. But we knew better. So we took a shortcut across the railroad tracks running through our New Jersey suburb.

    That cut our commute time by a third. It also promised adventure. There was one problem: It meant crossing train tracks where no pedestrian was ever meant to venture. We were trespassing.

    We always wanted a train to happen along at the same time. We knew a commuter or freight line was bound to approach, but had no idea when. We always looked down the tracks for a hint of imminent arrival, maybe a spouting plume of steam. We listened for the unmistakable clickety-clack of metal wheels grating against metal rails, the whistle wailing its woebegone warning.

    Usually we let the train thunder past us at 50 or 60 miles an hour. But sometimes the tracks inspired us to experiment. We laid branches across the rails to observe the wood crunch and splinter. We chucked rocks at the freight cars to admire how they bounced off without causing any damage.

    In our most extreme prank, one of us would dare another to stand as close as possible to a passing train. That guy would then hold himself still a few feet from the tracks, taking his life in his hands as we all looked on, breathless.

    Upping the ante, one of us would challenge the others to dart across the tracks when the train was only yards away. The bravest among us would execute this bravura feat and come within inches of being killed in front of his friends.

    One day we noticed a dead raccoon sprawled along the tracks, run over by a train. We gaped at the furry mammal. We’d never seen anything dead before. None of us said a word. That dead raccoon taught us a lesson. It taught us that the train could do the same to us….

    Sammy Finkelman (c49738)

  22. Kevin McCarthy named some Republicans to the Jan 6 committee (and not the worst ones) and it ciolated the custom of the House of Representatives not to seat them. They could only have argued and issued a minority report.

    Sammy Finkelman (c49738)

  23. @21. Silly? No. Demonstrative of how silly it is to lend credence to talk TV and radio – and how easy it can be to manipulate content: yes.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)


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