Patterico's Pontifications

11/17/2021

Dems: Hey, How About We Double Down on Critical Race Theory?

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 8:29 am



All I have here is a tweet; the story is paywalled. Still, the tweet is enough to give you an idea:

What could be smarter?

I am nearly done with Undoctrinate: How Politicized Classrooms Harm Kids and Ruin Our Schools―and What We Can Do About It by Bonnie Kerrigan Snyder. Anyone who thinks CRT — or more accurately, today’s “antiracist” racial essentialism — is not a problem should read it. But of course it will not be read by the kind of people who think it’s not a problem.

I think the Democrats are trying to motivate their base because they see that the GOP base is motivated by CRT. But Democrats have a problem, and it’s not just that truth is not on their side here. It’s also that parents — not just Latino parents, but I am betting even many black parents — are just not as motivated by this issue as Dems think they are. Not too long ago, a Democrat ad maker hosted a focus group of suburban women from Virginia to discuss why Youngkin won and McAuliffe lost. The whole thread is worth reading, but this really stood out to me:

Remember, too, that black folks also mostly want the police to stick around; 81 percent of black Americans want the same level of police or more in their communities. They’re not as woke as Dems think they are.

Really, the only people who will be motivated by an increased emphasis on CRT are the ultra-annoying hyper-woke KendiAngelo BLM-sign-displaying virtue-signaling whites. I’m not sure there are as many of those as Dems think there are. And the backlash will be enormous.

118 Responses to “Dems: Hey, How About We Double Down on Critical Race Theory?”

  1. More to the point, independents are repelled by this kind of race-baiting. It’s like the Democrats, frustrated by Trump, think the answer is to be as repulsive to the center by amping up their echo chamber message. After all, it works for Trump!

    The problem with CRT (and some other activist issues) in the classroom lately is that the parents have gotten firsthand experience with it. It’s one thing to drown kids in politics or turn them into vegans while in that distant classroom — you can just call it “misunderstanding” — but when Mom actually spends quality time with her kids’ telelearning, it’s really hard to accept the school’s later spin.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  2. The way to teach about America is not to show how many wrong paths it has trod, but to show how it has continually managed to find a better path through the freely chosen actions of its people.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  3. The dumb liberals are trying to force CRT into classrooms all at once, in one piece, and calling it CRT. The smart ones are already doing that, but in bits and pieces and calling it something other than CRT.

    Republicans are focusing on the former. They need to start focusing on the latter. I am confident most big suburban public school systems have already implemented pieces of CRT into their curriculum, or use it to guide how to teach children.

    Hoi Polloi (ade50d)

  4. Andrew Sullivan noted:

    We were — and still are! — being told by most of the media that critical race theory isn’t in high schools at all. Meanwhile, a tsunami of evidence is out there showing that it absolutely is — in every subject, and every class, as the central philosophy behind many states’ education policies.

    We all get things wrong. What makes this more worrying is simply that all these false narratives just happen to favor the interests of the left and the Democratic party. And corrections, when they occur, take up a fraction of the space of the original falsehoods. These are not randos tweeting false rumors. They are the established press.

    CRT itself, an academic idea taught in graduate schools, really isn’t in the elementary and secondary schools, but the basic premises of it are becoming part of curricula across the country.

    Terry McAuliffe noted that 80% of Virginia’s public school teachers are white, while only 50% of public school students are white. That ought to have raised real alarms; why, with Virginia’s population being 67.63% white, is the public school student body so much lower? What does that say about the quality of the public schools, that parents are willing to pay thousands of dollars in private school tuition, along with their taxes to support the public schools?

    The esteemed Mr McAuliffe then said that the high percentage of white teachers needed to be addressed; what would the public hear in that other than ‘we’ve got to fire a bunch of white teachers’?

    The libertarian, but not Libertarian, Dana (17bc78)

  5. I remember others on here playing the same clown nose on, clown nose off game pretending CRT wasn’t a thing and wasn’t being forced upon our children.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  6. Excellent post. Back in the day, grade school laid down the basic foundations… ‘Columbus-sailed-the-ocean-blue-in-fourteen-hundred-and-ninety-two’ type stuff. HS filled in the cracks, dips, nuances and general contradictions– and, if you pressed on to higher education, the deeper complexities, and progress and set back would be discussed, fleshed out and absorbed w/an adult frame of mind. If you were lucky enough to further your education from outside the confines of your mother country and learn its strengths and flaws from the perspective of others, it is all to the better. CRT in part, whole, or pitched in fragmented diffusion under other labels is simply destructive.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  7. These are not randos tweeting false rumors. They are the established press.

    As I said last week: a seditious conspiracy. And cui bono? Not the United States of America, that’s for sure.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  8. OTOH, as someone who survived high school circa 1970, I know that many students have good BS detectors. Just not all of them. I have a niece that has swallowed the thing whole: vegan, won’t drive, thinks global warming will kills us all and that things should be free. *sigh*

    She may be right about global warming, but not because of any thought she’s put into it.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  9. @8. OTOH, as someone who survived high school circa 1970…

    Kevin– remember ‘Earth Shoes’??? The footwear that sloped backwards?!?!

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  10. Critical Race Theory is not about the past – it’s about the present. It asserts that things are arranged – always 0 so as to harm blacks.

    And it’s about the future, because the racism is systemic – built in, you can;t get rid of it. (unless people continuously do just as they say – then they can avoid some of the harm.)

    It’s a pack of lies. It’s based on asserting things without evidence.

    There are problems with the way things work, but even if it looks it is about race, it is not about race. Race isn’t really the reason blacks tend to get lower quality health care, for instance, or get worse bankruptcy advice, and it’s not blacks qua blacks that is the determining factor.

    Sammy Finkelman (c49738)

  11. CRT would insist that backs should be admitted to higher achievement schools at the same rate as their proportion of the population, and if they’re not, either they are not being graded fairly, or it’s culturally unfair to expect them to be as interested as others in learning, say, trigonometry.

    Putting aside whether that makes sense for anyone – CRT would say that’s a white thing.

    Sammy Finkelman (c49738)

  12. OT: On Labor Day I happened to run across a cherry ’66 GTO with an appropriate license plate. Maybe this is where Leroy Jethro Gibbs retired to.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  13. I believe that including material on the lives of African Americans, Native Americans and immigrant groups such as Irish Americans and Italian Americans as part of the history of our country is beneficial because it gives younger students some insight into the melting pot we enjoy today. This introductory material can be extended as students progress through middle school, high school and college, but delaying its introduction serves no useful purpose.

    Middle school students can watch news about statues being pulled down. Why shouldn’t they also have some information about why that is happening?

    John B Boddie (9f8361)

  14. Cheer up. North Dakota just passed a law banning the teaching of CRT, defined as

    “…the theory that racism is not merely the product of learned individual bias or prejudice, but that racism is systemically embedded in American society and the American legal system to facilitate racial inequality.”

    https://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2021/11/north-dakota-bans-something-not-being-taught-in-its-schools-because-parents-are-concerned-that-political-bias-may-intrude-on-the-education-of-their-children

    So not until they get to college will North Dakota hear the theory that perhaps there are perhaps systematic issues with race in American institutions, or at least if they do the person making such a claim will end up in jail. Deftly demonstrating that no, race isn’t a sore point at all in this country.

    Victor (4959fb)

  15. it’s culturally unfair to expect them to be as interested as others in learning, say, trigonometry.

    And who says you need that for an engineering degree, I ask you!

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  16. Sammy @10 – I’m working my way through Rothstein’s “The Color of Law” and feel that it contains some of the evidence you may be looking for.

    John B Boddie (9f8361)

  17. Raise your hand if you’re surprised to see that Victor has grossly misrepresented the North Dakota law.

    Yeah, me neither.

    JVW (9d76ce)

  18. I am a current college student. CRT rears its head a lot. In theory I think it’s interesting. What is race? Is it a social construct or a biological fact? The idea that it is the former and not the latter is quite appealing to me. But in practice you get a lot of denunciations of “whiteness” and “white men.” It’s not fun. And if you complain you run the risk of being labelled “fragile” or worse. I can see why parents would not like their kids being subjected to it. Proponents will say they aren’t criticizing a group of people based on biological characteristics — they are critiquing societal constructs and power structures. But I’m not sure your average adult much less an average kid would be able to tell the difference. It’s good we as a society are talking about this.

    JRH (52aed3)

  19. To the typical progressive activist, every black parent is an Angela Davis admirer and every Latino parent is an immigrant or a first-generation American who desperately wants open borders and a curriculum written by La Raza.

    JVW (9d76ce)

  20. Also I will add it’s suicidal lunacy for Dems to think this is a winning strategy.

    JRH (52aed3)

  21. Victor,

    I think it is obvious that the US is not yet a race-blind society, but the reasons for that are complex and at this point not a product of white folk’s intentions. I’m old enough to remember when that was still the case.

    While I’d agree that a black man pulled over by the cops might not be treated exactly as a white man in the same situation, it is not that likely either. Not at all like what it was in 1966. Not that that excuses it if it does happen, but it’s really not the same world at all.

    CRT, though, sees the world as if nothing had changed since the march over the Edmund Pettis bridge, and sees all whites, whatever their circumstances, as witting or unwitting accomplices in racial oppression. A simple (and wrong) answer to a complex problem.

    Part of that problem is a basis for CRT as well, the idea that Western values and civilization are impenetrable to “people of color.” Nothing can be further from the truth. The West, and especially US society has assimilated wave after wave of newcomers. That there are people who resist that assimilation (on both sides) doesn’t mean the assimilation isn’t happening.

    The argument that assimilation is bad, and that we all need to become islands of culture constantly grinding against each other is a (malicious) strategy designed to keep people in everlasting poverty and otherness. I can see the benefit for those who hold the fief, but not so much for the people themselves.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  22. Shorter: CRT is about power. To gain power for some and to get the majority to acquiesce to the new rules. The recent Black Supremacist “Watchmen” series was pretty much the endgame scenario.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  23. every Latino parent is an immigrant or a first-generation American who desperately wants open borders and a curriculum written by La Raza.

    Not even every illegal resident wants that.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  24. And if you complain you run the risk of being labelled “fragile” or worse.

    And yet, stuff going the other direction has to have all the edges rounded off, lest someone feel bad.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  25. Near the end of Starship Troopers, Heinlein describes how history used to be taught, almost everywhere:

    Juan Rico is talking to his friend, Bennie Montez, as they listen to a list of warships

    I said, “There ought to be one named Magsaysay.”
    Bennie said, “What?”
    “Ramon Magsaysay,” I explained. “Great man, great soldier–probably be chief of psychological warfare if he were alive today. Didn’t you ever study any history?”
    “Well,”, admitted Bennie, I learned that Simon Bolivar built the Pyramids, licked the Armada, and made the first trip to the moon.”
    “You left out marrying Cleopatra.”
    “Oh that. Yup. Well, I guess every country has its own version of history.”

    And so did we, when Heinlein wrote that novel (1959). (Or, to be more precise, versions of history, which varied from state to state.) But those taught in public schools tended to emphasize the admirable parts of our history and omit the “warts”, just as Heinlein described in that passage.

    Now, far too many of our schools have gone in the opposite direction, and teach what I call “warts only” history, omitting what is admirable. For me, “Critical Race Theory” is one large part of this obsession with warts, a part that has sometimes gone beyond historical truth, as in the 1619 project.

    What is the right balance? I think that depends on the age of the kids, just as the right nutrition and the right exercise do. I think, for example, that every high school student should learn how the Royal Navy suppressed the Atlantic slave trade, and how the American Navy assisted in that effort. And about the Soviet Union’s Gulag. And where and how slavery continues to exist.

    But I wouldn’t teach such things in 1st grade.

    (I assume everyone knows that “old-fashioned” versions of history are still being taught in Putin’s Russia, Xi’s China, and many other nations.)

    Jim Miller (edcec1)

  26. 22. Kevin M (ab1c11) — 11/17/2021 @ 12:48 pm

    Shorter: CRT is about power. To gain power for some and to get the majority to acquiesce to the new rules.

    Yes that’s right. With the addtion that things will be dysfunctional if we listen to them – which will be all the more reason to listen more.

    Sammy Finkelman (c49738)

  27. Democrats are pretty much seeing the writing on the wall, and are planning for the loss of control of Congress in next year’s midterms. More and more congressional Democrats are retiring in anticipation of losing their congressional majority. I don’t think a good number of them deep down, are naive to misread the tea leaves of what happened in VA and NJ elections. I think that their doubling down on going KendiAngeloesque woke amounts to them conceding defeat in 2020 by essentially saying f___ it, we don’t care.

    HCI (ed8ecd)

  28. Democrat base is anti-racist. Corporate establishment democrats now realize moderate establishment blue dog democrats will get defeated in 2022 while progressives/radicals are in safe seats. AOC and the squad relishes leading the minority democrats in congress and will take over the democrat party sooner rather then later.

    asset (dc9ffa)

  29. One of the things I love about “Hamilton” is its ability to criticize many of the Founders while not minimizing their accomplishments. It is a very patriotic play in many respects.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  30. I think that their doubling down on going KendiAngeloesque woke amounts to them conceding defeat in 2020 by essentially saying f___ it, we don’t care.

    This is pretty much a QED to the populist overthrow of the late Party System. They didn’t care and the electorate noticed. The electorate isn’t all that good at deciding what they want, but it knows instinctively what it does not want, and both sides of the former debate had lost their trust.

    The Democrat reaction was this Bernie/AOC class-and-culture-war, which has proven unattractive to all outside a narrow base. The Republican reaction was Trump which has similar problems.

    So the frack it, we don’t care. thing has got at least two sides. It remains to be seen what the GOP does when they have Congress. Maybe they impeach Biden for The Steal.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  31. @29. One of the things I love about “Hamilton” is its ability to criticize many of the Founders while not minimizing their accomplishments. It is a very patriotic play in many respects.

    That’s an interesting take on the use of an ‘entertainment production’ as an educational tool. Especially how ‘dull’ teaching history can often be- memorizing names/dates and so forth. Back in the day in Britain, our British History class was dragged to see the film ‘Lion In Winter’ when it first opened. It remains a memorable and educational experience. The specifics of the history itself are inaccurate but the prof wanted the class to exposed to the interactions, lifestyles etc., of the period. Her follow-up lecture in ‘Old English’ was startling as well– at least the first 10 minutes of it- the old language is difficult to try to discern w/only a few words comparable to use today. Which was the point of the exercise.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  32. Also doubling down on gas prices. Biden is ordering the FTC to investigate collusion in gas prices. To me this is like the guy who steals your stuff then helps you look for it.

    Here is the classic free-market explanation of oil price moves, and how they respond quickly to future expectations:

    The price of oil at any time depends on market participants’ expectations about future supply and demand. The role of expectations makes the oil market very different from most others. In the market for fresh vegetables, for example, prices must balance the supply and demand for the current harvest. By contrast, oil producers and others in the industry can keep supply off the market if they think that its price will rise later, or they can put extra supply on the market if they think the price will fall.

    Oil companies around the world keep supply off the market by reducing the amount of oil that they take out of the ground. Oil producers can also restrict supply by holding oil inventory in tankers at sea or in other storage facilities. Conversely, producers can put more oil on the market by increasing production or by running down their inventories.

    The market expectations reflected in today’s price reflect lower future demand and increased future supply. Lower demand reflects both the current weakness of economic activity, particularly in Europe and China, and, more important, the longer-term changes in technology, which will increase cars’ fuel efficiency and induce the use of solar power and other non-oil energy sources. The increase in the future potential supply of oil reflects new output produced by fracking, the development of Canada’s tar sands, and Mexico’s recent decision to allow foreign oil companies to develop the country’s energy sources.

    These changes in demand and supply suggest that the future price of oil will be lower than industry participants expected until just a few months ago. Some of the recent changes in expected future demand and supply could have been anticipated earlier. But there is no way to know when attitudes and expectations will change. The historic volatility of oil prices reflects these psychological shifts as well as changes in objective reality.

    (Martin Feldstein, 2014)

    And right now the future expectation is that the Biden administration will make oil extraction as hard as possible, festooned with lawyers, bureaucrats and environmental whackjobs.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  33. ‘Lion In Winter’

    A King!

    Alive!

    And fifty!

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  34. Also doubling down on gas prices. Biden is ordering the FTC to investigate collusion in gas prices. To me this is like the guy who steals your stuff then helps you look for it.

    He outta look into canned cranberries, too. Swung by the grocery store today- Ocean Spray cranberries: $3.29/can. Last year it was $1/can- still have one priced in the pantry. Unreal.

    Thanks, Joe.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  35. My oldest daughter teaches at a private neuro-diverse school in St. Pete. They are partially funded by Johns Hopkins and promote crt.
    She wants to quit, but has signed a contract through the year. She will serve out her contract to protect her kids from the money hungry administrators. I think she will start up an in home private service in the future. She has been teacher of the year two years in a row. When she try’s to have conversations with the people in charge, they insult her. Such a shame as she is gift from heaven to these kids.

    mg (8cbc69)

  36. President Biden called on the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether oil-and-gas companies are participating in illegal conduct aimed at keeping gasoline prices high, in the latest effort by the White House to respond to public concerns about costs for everything from fuel to groceries.

    Well, I’ve often wondered if the CA refineries are colluding with government officials to keep a captive market. They could instead produce the federally-mandated clean-air-region formula and be subject to imports from other states at more than a dollar less per gallon.

    What California is doing amounts to a non-tariff barrier against out-of-state refineries. There is no indication that this formulation is any better than the federal one (and the previous state formula was not only worse, it was toxic). But it *does* keep the supply lower than it might be and the price high. The environmentalists AND the oil refinery folks are quite happy every time the price goes up.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  37. He outta look into canned cranberries, too.

    And strawberries, too! Someone has take away all the strawberries!

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  38. A commenter who is an asset to this blog wrote:

    Democrat base is anti-racist.

    Which raises the question: what is “anti-racist”?

    Elizabeth Hughes, the publisher of The Philadelphia Inquirer, wrote that her goal was to turn the third oldest continuously published newspaper in the country into “an antiracist news organization.” And, to that end, she stated that the newsroom would be organized to view their reporting through the lens of:

    * – Producing an antiracism workflow guide for the newsroom that provides specific questions that reporters and editors should ask themselves at various stages of producing our journalism.

    * – Establishing a Community News Desk to address long-standing shortcomings in how our journalism portrays Philadelphia communities, which have often been stigmatized by coverage that over-emphasizes crime.

    * – Creating an internal forum for journalists to seek guidance on potentially sensitive content and to ensure that antiracism is central to the journalism.

    * – Commissioning an independent audit of our journalism that resulted in a critical assessment. Many of the recommendations are being addressed, and a process for tracking progress is being developed.

    * – Training our staff and managers on how to recognize and avoid cultural bias.

    * – Examining our crime and criminal justice coverage with Free Press, a nonprofit focused on racial justice in media.

    * – Setting specific diversity goals for 2021, with an emphasis on promotions, hiring, and representation in leadership.

    * – Establishing a formal process that will allow, upon petition and approval, for certain types of stories to be rendered harder to find in online searches. This recognizes that our digital archives includes countless stories focused on minor crimes and disproportionately affect people of color.

    Simply put, the inquirer, under her ‘leadership,’ will filter everything through whether the news they report might disproportionately hurt ‘communities of color.’

    The Lexington Herald-Leader, going along with the McClatchy Mugshot Policy, refuses to publish mugshots of criminal suspects who have not been convicted yet:

    Publishing mugshots of arrestees has been shown to have lasting effects on both the people photographed and marginalized communities. The permanence of the internet can mean those arrested but not convicted of a crime have the photograph attached to their names forever. Beyond the personal impact, inappropriate publication of mugshots disproportionately harms people of color and those with mental illness.

    Except, of course, as I have pointed out here, as well as many other times, they won’t publish mugshots of actually convicted killers who happen to be black, but do publish mugshots of suspects, but who have not yet been convicted, who are white.

    ‘Anti-racism’ in this country has come to mean reverse racism, the censoring of news in the credentialed media based on race..

    The libertarian, but not Libertarian, Dana (17bc78)

  39. @36. Brings to mind the CA Dairy situation as well. CA dairy products seem priced surprisingly higher than one would expect ‘local’ product to be compared to competitive product if shipped in from other locales. It’s like produce as well; $2/head for lettuce– grown just 100 miles north. Though the pitch was always growers produce to ship out of state in winter months.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  40. Kevin- not to forget, in CA the gas tax is 51 cents/gallon which really stings with a 20 gallon fill-up on top of the price rises– and you know how CA residents are dependent on their cars.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  41. Oh, gimme a break! Like three-fourths of them are going to learn CRT any better than they learn reading, writing and arithmetic. And the ones who can learn the three Rs are too smart to fall for CRT. But I will grant you that keeping the proles at each others’ throats over phantom menaces is as socially beneficial a thing as anything that politicians do.

    nk (1d9030)

  42. #37 Kevin – I saw what you did there– and smiled at it.

    (Several years ago, one of the local sub-channels put on The Caine Mutiny and The Manchurian Candidate (1962 version, if I recall correctly) within a few days of each other. I couldn’t help wonder whether the station was making a political point by that combination.)

    Jim Miller (edcec1)

  43. @41. nk, consider this- two recent college grads- the niece and neff. One a biotech engineer; the other an engineer as well. The neff completed HS and had absolutely no idea how to fill out a check. Never had an checking account; never had to write one– his world was totally plastic cards. The niece was completely ignorant of history in HS as well- even though she was raised in a family surrounded w/historical elements and items from Britain & the U.S.- Civil War and so forth. Zero interest. Her excuse was always the same: it’s dumb; memorizing names, dates- what good will it do me getting a job? Can’t use it. It got so bad the family forced her to played a history flash card game every week to try to make learning something about it “fun.”

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  44. DCSCA: yet I was graduated from a small high school, with 78 students in the Class of 1971, in which we had exactly one teacher who had his masters, and all of us who were graduated were able to actually read our diplomas.

    The libertarian, but not Libertarian, Dana (17bc78)

  45. Brings to mind the CA Dairy situation as well.

    Funny thing, but that also has a non-tariff barrier, at least as far as eggs are concerned. California mandates cage-free/cruelty-free egg production. This costs money to the egg-producer. Enough money that they can’t compete against those who don’t follow the rules. So, they have to decide: am I going to sell to California, or am I going to sell elsewhere. This limits the supply of eggs to California, mostly to CA producers.

    Not quite as much a barrier as with gasoline — the barriers to entry are far smaller. BUt it does have an effect.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  46. @44. Small schools/classes are better. My schooling in Britain was stellar- no distractive activities [like cars, rallies, football games and such]– over holidays the school offered inexpensive trips through Europe and the CCCP- from $25 to $300, tops. Pretty much everybody took advantage of it to experience and see places first hand. And unlike US schools. we finished the textbooks while the same classes taught stateside only got through 1/2 to 3/4 of same.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  47. @43: Would not have worked for me. I went to a STEM school that required each student to carry a humanities minor. Art, history, language, poli sci — 10 semesters minimum — something that wasn’t math, science or engineering. Having been founded in the immediate post-war era, it was the mission of the school to turn out well-rounded engineers. Most of the accepted applicants did as well on verbal as math on the exams.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  48. 15. Kevin M (ab1c11) — 11/17/2021 @ 12:28 pm

    And who says you need that [trigonometry] for an engineering degree, I ask you!

    The idea that everybody needs to get taught semi0advanced mathematics in order that more people might find it possible, or easier, to get some specialized training is a bad idea. If true you could say that about a lot of kinds of jobs, and we simply don;t teach everyone the rudiments of many other things. Maybe there should be a mandatory course on identifying trees. And if someone doesn’t have the taste for it, they won’t enjoy it and go in for it. It shouldn’t be an obstacle, just like doctors should not be required to learn calculus before beginning training to be a doctor..

    The whole standard high school curriculum is just going along its own momentum from circa, say, 1920.

    Nothing much is subtracted (although they are subtracting script (or cursive, it’s called I heard) writing in elementary school, and nothing much is added.

    Who teaches people area and zip codes (although now a call from an area code can be from anywhere)

    Sammy Finkelman (c49738)

  49. Kevin M (ab1c11) — 11/17/2021 @ 5:07 pm

    Good for your school. I was once told by a wise and rich man (he was on the University of Utah Board of Regents, and I believe he was the chairman) to study humanities and the liberal arts as an undergrad, and only specialize once in graduate school.

    I did the former (majored in history and Chinese), but never went on to graduate school.

    norcal (b9a35f)

  50. @48. Yeah, eggs are hovering at $3/doz or more around here– sometimes you can pick up 18 for $3 at the Dollar Store. Add to that $7-$14/pkg. for bacon – depending on the label/cut- and beef is more affordable- though London Broil is still at $10/lb., here. Somebody outta wake up Joe- these prices for basic items are just skyrocketing– almost daily.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  51. FFS. We aren’t teaching CRT in public schools. Why can’t anyone on either side figure that out? We are teaching the same bloody curriculum we’ve been teaching since common core came in, which is not that different from the one we were teaching for the 10 years before that. It’s too bloody expensive to buy new curriculum more often than “when we really have to” and common core hasn’t been in that long. CheeseandRice.

    Nic (896fdf)

  52. 38.

    everything through whether the news they report might disproportionately hurt ‘communities of color.’

    More like activists of color, except they’re mostly white.

    Sammy Finkelman (c49738)

  53. @49. Enjoyed German- came easy to me in HS; the options in JHS were Spanish or French. Opted for French but in retrospect Spanish would have been the better and more practical choice for today. Was able to understand most of the radio broadcasts from France at the time- like 8 out of 10 words… but will never forget, after 7 years of French classes, getting to Paris and asking a taxi driver in French to take us someplace and the dude answered in perfect English. Instantly though those 7 years were a waste.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  54. @51. Nic– Yet Education Week posted a piece on CRT to explain it; and says it “is an academic concept that is more than 40 years old”…

    What Is Critical Race Theory, and Why Is It Under Attack?

    https://www.edweek.org/leadership/what-is-critical-race-theory-and-why-is-it-under-attack/2021/05

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  55. 45. DCSCA (f4c5e5) — 11/17/2021 @ 4:00 pm

    The neff completed HS and had absolutely no idea how to fill out a check.

    Maybe not that common in 1920, so not in the curriculum.

    Never had an checking account; never had to write one– his world was totally plastic cards.

    How did he pay the monthly credit card bills? By going with cash to the bank? And where did he get the cash?

    Yu need a checking account for direct deposit, or for ACH transactions. Checks themselves you almost don’t need any more.

    The niece was completely ignorant of history in HS as well- even though she was raised in a family surrounded w/historical elements and items from Britain & the U.S.- Civil War and so forth. Zero interest. Her excuse was always the same: it’s dumb; memorizing names, dates- what good will it do me getting a job?

    Chronology is the basis for history but not history itself. I suppose the names were just arbitrary things to her. Knowledge of history will help people detect things that are wrong. Like Critical Race Theory. Or you can believe the Simon Bolivar built the Mayan, if not the Egyptian pyramids, and Chevron wants to destroy them.

    Or you could tour the ben Ezra synagogue in old Cairo, Egypt and find nothing wrong with claims that Moses was put into the water just there, or that Jeremiah built it with permission from Alexander the Great or that Ezra the Scribe came there after the destruction of the Temple. Actually such a person wouldn’t even understand what that was saying.

    Or maybe not know enough not to join a cult, or at least a crazy political party.

    Sammy Finkelman (c49738)

  56. @DCSCA@ Many things are academic concepts more than 40 years old. We aren’t generally teaching Existentialism in public school either (though I was forced to read The Stranger, I was in private school. I don’t recommend, especially if you are 15 and trying to read it in French). Or Evo-psych (which I don’t recommend at all unless you know what you are doing, because mostly the pop-Evo-psych is a bunch of ridiculousness). If you read down to the end of the article you linked, they also agree we aren’t teaching CRT to kids in schools.

    Nic (896fdf)

  57. Nic,

    Call it whatever you want, but you are teaching anti-American propaganda and anti-white racism just like every other public school system.

    It’s a religion on the left and as such should be banned from all schools.

    NJRob (f85558)

  58. 49, NorCal, do you / did you ever have to apply Chinese in your line of work, or do you deal mostly with the rougher hombres?

    I took Spanish in JHS and deliberately avoided it in HS so I wouldn’t be depended on in the classes (in reality the extended famon both sides was rather “coconut”, in demeanor and down to liking football and baseball rather than soccer), but took German in college.

    urbanleftbehind (c073c9)

  59. @NJRob@57 I’m sure the kids who have to memorize the preamble of the Constitution would be surprised they are learning anti-American propaganda and anti-white racism.

    You have no idea and the less you know, the louder you yell it.

    Nic (896fdf)

  60. @51 no, no, we’re not teaching CRT

    that’s why we hate laws that make sure we’re not teaching CRT

    cuz we’re not teaching CRT

    JF (e1156d)

  61. I’m retired now, urbanleftbehind, but I used my Chinese quite a bit when I was working. Sometimes my ABC (American-born Chinese) co-workers would ask me to interpret for them when they were interviewing people from China.

    One of my co-workers said, “Just stand behind me and talk, and I’ll move my mouth.” Good times.

    norcal (b9a35f)

  62. @55. Debit cards and such. It was a bit of a shock when it came up at holiday. Everything was ‘electronic’ transfer for him. At 18 years old, he had no idea how to fill out an actual paper check. Never had need to. Brave New World, Sammy.

    @56. Yeah, Nic, but apparently it is fragmented in use or ‘masked’ as another form and subtle. What puzzled me was that it has been a framework for 40 years yet never really heard about until only ‘recently’ when it has become such a hot button topic.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  63. @55. The ‘trip wire’ for the niece was HS ‘World History’ after a year of HS ‘U.S. History.’ She just found it all an absurd waste of her time– and a useless, total bore, hence the family using the history flash card game.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  64. @JF@60 We are not, in fact, teaching CRT.

    Nic (896fdf)

  65. @DCSCA@62 The people really obsessed with the idea of CRT are also not big fans of any kind of multi-cultural stuff and so they’ve decided that the same multi-cultural things that have been in use since the 90s should suddenly be labeling “CRT” because they don’t like that either. It’s like calling the government bureaucracy the “Deep State”. It’s just a way to create a conspiracy by making scary noises about something that’s been normal and boring for decades.

    Nic (896fdf)

  66. JF@60 We are not, in fact, teaching CRT.

    Nic (896fdf) — 11/17/2021 @ 9:21 pm

    “We” huh? What is the name of your school district?

    BuDuh (4a7846)

  67. @56. Many things are academic concepts more than 40 years old.

    Yeah- back in the day for my public grade school it was the ‘New Math’ thing- which Tom Lehrer gleefully lampooned. Recall the folks looking at some of the homework assignments and being quite puzzled by it.

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  68. @BuDuh@66 Sorry. OPSEC.

    Nic (896fdf)

  69. @BuDuh@66 Sorry. OPSEC.

    Nic (896fdf) — 11/17/2021 @ 10:40 pm

    In other words, your expertise in this subject is unverifiable.

    BuDuh (4a7846)

  70. @Kevin@69, the radicalmath site almost looks like parody….I was more or less expecting algebra problems related to street hookers and crack distribution. Look, where there remain discriminatory practices….like red lining or racial covenants….they should be exposed and punished where appropriate. However, the goal at that radicalmath site seems to be about building grievance….and not about creating a color-blind meritocratic society where knowledge, hard work, and creativity are consistently rewarded. Blaming stastictal difference primarily on omnipresent systemic racism avoids the habits and actions that individuals do in fact control. That isn’t to say that we should sugar-coat the discriminatory practices of past generations….or not support outreach and seeing the value of many types of diversity where they make sense, but I believe you can lose track of what is available in front of you if you are conditioned to always be looking behind you and feeling paranoid. The New Right has its own obsessions and misdirected fears….but we live in a time where we don’t challenge or question wrong assumptions…we just retreat to our own safe places. It’s reason 1,753 that social media is insidious….and making us less able to self-govern.

    AJ_Liberty (3cb02f)

  71. @DCSCA@62 The people really obsessed with the idea of CRT are also not big fans of any kind of multi-cultural stuff

    Ah yes, the “you just don’t want to learn about America’s history of racism!” charge, typically pulled out by left-liberals when their anti-white propaganda gets challenged.

    Cultural Marxists on school boards wouldn’t be joining closed Facebook groups or gathering dossiers on parents pushing back against them if this was just about angst over “multi-cultural stuff,” that if they push back against the circular reasoning of “anti-racism” that they’re racist, or pedantically argue that “we’re not teaching a college-level legal theory!”

    so they’ve decided that the same multi-cultural things that have been in use since the 90s should suddenly be labeling “CRT” because they don’t like that either

    The tenets of CRT–that white people, especially white men, are the root of all evil, and that they’re sustaining a racist society even when they don’t realize it–have been incorporated into educator training for several years now.

    Sorry, I don’t want you freaks teaching my light-skinned kids that they have “privilege” because of their skin color. Sorry that upsets you and your left-liberal allies, but maybe your class needs to accept the fact that parents do, in fact, have a say in what their kids are being taught.

    Factory Working Orphan (2775f0)

  72. DCSCA wrote:

    Enjoyed German- came easy to me in HS; the options in JHS were Spanish or French. Opted for French but in retrospect Spanish would have been the better and more practical choice for today. Was able to understand most of the radio broadcasts from France at the time- like 8 out of 10 words… but will never forget, after 7 years of French classes, getting to Paris and asking a taxi driver in French to take us someplace and the dude answered in perfect English. Instantly though those 7 years were a waste.

    Duobus annis in alta schola linguam Latinam studui atque adhuc opus est Google Translate!

    Oderam epistolas Caesaris ex Gallia.

    The libertarian, but not Libertarian, Dana (338514)

  73. we live in a time where we don’t challenge or question wrong assumptions…we just retreat to our own safe places. It’s reason 1,753 that social media is insidious….and making us less able to self-govern.

    Sounds like a great comment for the Rittenhouse thread.

    BuDuh (4a7846)

  74. Ubi solitudinem facient pacem appellant.

    nk (1d9030)

  75. faciunt

    nk (1d9030)

  76. Nic: “The people really obsessed with the idea of CRT are also not big fans of any kind of multi-cultural stuff and so they’ve decided that the same multi-cultural things that have been in use since the 90s should suddenly be labeling “CRT” because they don’t like that either. It’s like calling the government bureaucracy the “Deep State”. It’s just a way to create a conspiracy by making scary noises about something that’s been normal and boring for decades.”

    NJRob: “It’s a religion on the left and as such should be banned from all schools”

    Like anything, the extreme examples often drive the narrative….and in most cases, raw ignorance of what is actually going on gets replaced by an ideological certainty that the other side is just plain evil. It’s not to say that there aren’t bad curriculum fads that should be opposed….but that we attack everything…including anything to do with multiculturalism….to make it seem like CRT is a more nefarious threat. Step 1 should be to know what is going on in your local schools….are there state mandates….how are they being implemented….what do the students perceive….are there abuses….what are the principals saying? If parents and citizens in different communities arrive at different conclusions about what should or should not be emphasized, are we devolving to the point of thinking there should be federal laws controlling local education decisions? I agree that we should expose dubious educational practices that push political ideology into the classroom….but we should remain rational and provide perspective….it’s simply untrue to assert that it’s everywhere….and that every case is as bad as the worst case. Just because something is going on in Berkeley…doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s just around the corner….

    AJ_Liberty (3cb02f)

  77. raw ignorance of what is actually going on gets replaced by an ideological certainty that the other side is just plain evil.

    Another good comment for the Rittenhouse thread.

    BuDuh (4a7846)

  78. So, we see the standard playbook we see every time CRT come up.

    step 1 – it’s not happening, this is a made up thing
    step 2 – it’s happening but it’s what we’ve been doing for years so there’s no reason to worry about it now
    step 3 – you’re only worried about the CRT we’re teaching because you’re racist

    frosty (f27e97)

  79. The standard playbook has been used for all sorts of things.

    “”claims from Trump supporters that the dossier is a Clinton campaign project are overstated” — National Review, October 7, 2017. Sometimes sobering to remember how alone those few of us who got it right were back when it mattered most.” – Mollie Hemingway

    Obudman (9f866e)

  80. Listening to some, you would forget that the last 50 or so years saw the greatest strides forward in civil rights that this (or any) country has ever seen. Is there more to do? Sure. But I really don’t have time for those who think that nothing has changed since 1962 (or 1859), or that it did not happen with the willing (and at times enthusiastic) participation of white folk.

    The transformation of the 1960s and 70s happened largely because MLK and his movement shamed white folk and made them want to rid themselves of the world their ancestors had left them. To turn around and say that these folks are still all racist oppressors is guaranteed to piss people off. Which often seems like the real point.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  81. Kevin M (ab1c11) — 11/18/2021 @ 8:18 am

    It’s a little more interesting than just pissing people off. The civil rights movement is largely seen as “MLK and his movement” but that glosses over the reality that it was made up of at least two, and maybe more, factions. One faction was very much not interested in peaceful non-violent methods.

    If you read Where Do We Go From Here you’ll get a flavor of this from MLK’s perspective. He was worried about what has basically unfolded. At this point the “power” elements of the movement survived and have, for the most part, overwhelmed MLK’s elements.

    frosty (f27e97)

  82. Kevin,

    they’ve turned their backs on MLK and claim he’s just a lapdog which is why they hate the idea of a colorblind society.

    They’ve gone full Malcolm X and Farrakhan.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  83. @Kevin@69 Culturally responsive teaching and critical race theory aren’t the same thing. Culturally responsive teaching is doing things like basing math word problems on experiences that students might have had. frex, for culturally responsive teaching, a student in Texas is probably pretty familiar with driving long distances while a student in NYC might be more familiar with taking the subway, so for Texas you might write your math word problem about driving, while in NYC you might write it about the subway. It just makes things more relevant to a student’s life and so they tend to pay more attention. The radicalmath site appears to be a one man consulting show with no resources and no contracts run by a man who has not had a successful career in education (his linked in is… interesting… if you know what you are reading.)

    @Buduh@70 I certain there’s a reason someone would spend several years impersonating a school district employee as a casual commenter on a blog, but I don’t know what that reason would be.

    @FWO@72 Well, since I didn’t say they were racist, I can see where you got confused. You read words that weren’t there. Also, if you aren’t happy with your school board members, you can elect different ones. School board member is an elected position.

    @frosty@80. We aren’t teaching CRT. I’m sorry you’re bored with that.

    Nic (896fdf)

  84. I’m not suggesting that you are impersonating anyone, Nic. I am suggesting that you set this up so you can make claims about how your school district does things while leaving no possible way to verify what you say.

    You are an expert for yourself and for no one else in this debate. So I cannot trust your information because I cannot verify your information.

    BuDuh (4a7846)

  85. @FWO@72 Well, since I didn’t say they were racist, I can see where you got confused. You read words that weren’t there.

    Oh, so this is just about you, and not the multiple other complaints across the nation. Guess the left’s making much ado about nothing, then.

    Also, if you aren’t happy with your school board members, you can elect different ones. School board member is an elected position.

    Isn’t that what the left’s been clutching their pearls about? Trying to dox parents or compiling a dossier on them for complaining about school district policies seems rather out of bounds if nothing is actually going on.

    Factory Working Orphan (2775f0)

  86. Nic (896fdf) — 11/18/2021 @ 5:17 pm

    No need to apologize. The no true Scotsman version of we’re not teaching CRT is at least good for a little laugh. It’s possible you actually believe it and that’s a little interesting so it’s not a complete loss.

    frosty (f27e97)

  87. @BuDuh@86 *shrug* Well, I’m not going to dox myself for your benefit. You can look at what I’ve written over the last several years and decide whether you think I seem to know what I’m talking about or don’t. Personally, if a person says they are a lawyer and posts for several years knowledgeably about the law, I generally assess that they are probably telling the truth, I don’t need to know what firm they work for.

    @FWO@87 I mean, you quoted me and then addressed me as part of “you freaks” and “you and your left-liberal allies” and ” your class”. Though apparently you’ve somehow missed my explanation of how communities choose curriculum. So. You know.

    @frosty@88 An impossibleburger is no true steak.

    Nic (896fdf)

  88. The shorter exchange…
    Nic: “We’re not teaching CRT.”
    Frosty, FWO, BuDuh: “Yes you are! We don’t believe you!”

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  89. I never said “yes you are,” Paul.

    Your lack of reading comprehension never fails.

    Nic, most of the lawyers will point to the information that backs their claim. You won’t.

    BuDuh (4a7846)

  90. @BuDuh91 How do you link to something that isn’t happening?

    Nic (896fdf)

  91. How do you link to something that isn’t happening?

    https://www.usatoday.com/81241526

    BuDuh (4a7846)

  92. @FWO@87 I mean, you quoted me and then addressed me as part of “you freaks” and “you and your left-liberal allies” and ” your class”. Though apparently you’ve somehow missed my explanation of how communities choose curriculum. So. You know.

    Yes, I’m sure the whole “we’re not teaching CRT and anyone who doesn’t want us teaching CRT is a racist” NPC response was just a coincidence.

    Paul Montagu (5de684) — 11/18/2021 @ 6:55 pm

    Simp.

    Factory Working Orphan (2775f0)

  93. I never said “yes you are,” Paul.

    It was a distilled observation.

    Paul Montagu (5de684)

  94. Nic (896fdf) — 11/18/2021 @ 6:48 pm

    Recall that I warned you several months ago, when you were bellyaching about parents complaining because your teachers were terrified to go back to school because they thought the kids were going to cough all over them and kill them, that this behavior was going to come back and bite you later on. But please, do keep up the passive-aggressive behavior, I’m sure it won’t have any consequences whatsoever.

    Factory Working Orphan (2775f0)

  95. I figured you were distilled.

    BuDuh (4a7846)

  96. @82. Yep. Home run, Kevin. For instance, just look at some of the video of a JFK special message to a joint session of Congress in May, 1961. And compare the faces of that crowd to those in Congress today:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EB9TwLt54Kc

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  97. AJLiberal practices the “Always Be Dissembling” school of thought:

    “It’s not to say that there aren’t bad curriculum fads that should be opposed….but that we attack everything…including anything to do with multiculturalism.”

    I have a simple algorithm: If the Democrat party supports it, it’s probably a mythical narrative they intend to use to corral simple people into a state religion of their own making.

    “to make it seem like CRT is a more nefarious threat. Step 1 should be to know what is going on in your local schools.”

    The best thing about the pandemic is that parents finally got to see exactly what their kids were getting taught on a day-to-day basis. Surpise! It was Democrat party agitprop and ethno-narcissistic blue urban fantasy versions of history that beared little to no resemblance to how history actually proceeded! Now they’re more hyped up and involved in their kid’s education than ever! Are you not happy?

    “are there state mandates….how are they being implemented….what do the students perceive….are there abuses….what are the principals saying? If parents and citizens in different communities arrive at different conclusions about what should or should not be emphasized, are we devolving to the point of thinking there should be federal laws controlling local education decisions?”

    You took way too many words to say that ‘banning a dumb-ass one-size fits all racial narrative approved by the Democrat party for its own purposes is JUST AS BAD as NOT banning it and leaving it up to the states!’

    “I agree that we should expose dubious educational practices that push political ideology into the classroom….but we should remain rational and provide perspective….it’s simply untrue to assert that it’s everywhere.”

    Just because it was smuggled into the standard curriculum as the latest top-down mandated educational fad doesn’t mean it’s everywhere, despite parents and teachers suddenly seeing it everywhere at once!’

    “and that every case is as bad as the worst case. Just because something is going on in Berkeley…doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s just around the corner.”

    JUST BECAUSE BERKELEY CRAZIES ARE WRITING THE TEXTBOOK USED NATIONWIDE DOESN’T MEAN WE NEED TO OPPOSE ITS ADOPTION NATIONWIDE!

    Demonagizer (c9bbb4)

  98. @FWO@95 Again, I didn’t say anyone was racist. I have said that the people who are most obsessed with CRT also don’t like multiculturalism in schools. While there may be some overlap in the ven-diagram of the the three groups, they are not the same group.

    @FWO@97 Do you mean you calling names? Because that seems more like you fulfilling your own prophecy. Adhominim attacks are lousy debate.

    @BuDuh@97 Ah, you want someone else to say it isn’t happening? Do we accept the Brookings Institution as a source? Blog post by a CRT prof who clearly thinks CRT ought to be taught in schools writing for the Brookings Institution: “teachers in K-12 schools are not actually teaching CRT” Or is Pew OK? “There is no evidence that critical race theory, as defined by its originators, has been taught in any public school. Nor has a school board in any state cited critical race theory as an element of its curriculum.”

    Nic (896fdf)

  99. @101 CRT also isn’t mentioned by name in the state laws banning stuff that you want to classify strictly as CRT, so you can dismiss the laws cuz “CRT isn’t taught in schools”

    e.g., see the texas law

    the OP correctly refers to it as “today’s ‘antiracist’ racial essentialism”, but CRT is an appropriate shorthand

    so, why not deal with what we’re all talking about, and what we know is taught in schools, and what we know the intent is going forward, and quit with the dishonest word games

    JF (e1156d)

  100. @FWO@95 Again, I didn’t say anyone was racist. I have said that the people who are most obsessed with CRT also don’t like multiculturalism in schools.

    Which is a distinction without a difference.

    @FWO@97 Do you mean you calling names? Because that seems more like you fulfilling your own prophecy. Adhominim attacks are lousy debate.

    Hey, it’s not my allies that have been getting rebuked on school boards lately.

    Factory Working Orphan (2775f0)

  101. AJ_Liberty (3cb02f) — 11/18/2021 @ 5:02 am

    That isn’t to say that we should sugar-coat the discriminatory practices of past generations….or not support outreach and seeing the value of many types of diversity where they make sense, but I believe you can lose track of what is available in front of you if you are conditioned to always be looking behind you and feeling paranoid.

    More golden writing from AJ_Liberty. This is so true. I saw it in my career. Blacks who immigrate from Africa and the Caribbean tend to flourish in the U.S. because they see what is available in front of them, and don’t impute racism to every unpleasant thing they encounter, whereas many native blacks fall into the alluring trap of believing that racism is behind every misfortune.

    An example is Rob Parker, who is a Fox Sports radio host. He is the one who called Robert Griffin III, a black NFL quarterback, a “cornball brother” who wasn’t “down with the cause”. Parker tends to see racism in all too many places. I still enjoy listening to him, however, because he’s rather good when he takes the chip off his shoulder, and leaves politics out of his sports talk.

    norcal (b9a35f)

  102. AJLiberal practices the “Always Be Dissembling” school of thought

    Mr. VPN practices the “Never See Nuance” school of thought, also known as the “Always Be Absolute” school of thought.

    norcal (b9a35f)

  103. @JF@102 Actually, a rather large number of the bills mention CRT with the tenets of the other stuff they are forbidding. Though, as I said, nobody is teaching Critical race theory in schools, so it’s just fear mongering. I don’t know if you’ve ever done it, but it’s interesting to read all the bills at one time and see what they all did with the template provided to them. I think there may be some interesting effects that might not have been predictable. Frex I think that Oklahoma’s law may have banned anti-sexual harassment training and one of them, Pennsylvania maybe? may have accidentally required them to accommodate trangendered kids and prohibited anti-trans advocacy. I think that it’s possible several might have also inadvertently (or not) required teaching creationism along side evolution as part of the “teaching divisive topics” section. And I still don’t think it’s possible to prevent a particularly sensitive student from feeling bad about their race when covering slavery.

    @FWO@103 I mean, I would say that there is a difference, and in fact did. There may be overlap, but I don’t think they are all the same group. Especially given that the people fearmongering about CRT are often being extremely dishonest to the people they are trying to convince that there is a problem. In one article I read they cited a survey where 78% of the people surveyed were against teaching CRT and 48% of the people couldn’t say what it was, not even were wrong, just flat didn’t know, so a lot of people are just kind of against it without knowing what it is.

    And I’m assuming the last part is humor?

    Nic (896fdf)

  104. Oh! and one of the laws requires teaching that our rights were endowed by our creator (not just that the founders believed that, or that it was written in the declaration, but exactly that) which I think might be a 1st amendment violation, but IANAL.

    Nic (896fdf)

  105. https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2021/11/they-are-after-our-children.php
    If given a chance, I’m betting the republicans screw the pooch.

    mg (8cbc69)

  106. I wonder if ivermectin taken prophylactically, alone or in combination with hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, and fluvoxamine for children eight years old or older, would reduce the risk of contracting CRT, the severity of the symptoms, and the likelihood of hospitalization.

    nk (1d9030)

  107. @106 more dishonest word games, zero specifics

    “I think there may be some interesting effects…”

    “I think that Oklahoma’s law may have…”

    “I think that it’s possible…”

    “Pennsylvania maybe? may have…”

    “I think that it’s possible several might have…”

    lol you have nothing

    JF (e1156d)

  108. @107 yeah, the declaration is a 1A violation

    looks like our kids are in good hands

    JF (e1156d)

  109. nobody is teaching Critical race theory in schools

    No one is teaching the theory? As in Critical Race Theory 101? Probably not.

    But if you mean “no one is teaching tenets that come out of that theory”, I beg to differ. Pretty sure that the ideas of “structural racism” and “group identity” are taught and discussed. Discussions of “marginalized people” and “historically disadvantaged groups” and matters of inclusiveness, diversity and community outreach occur frequently in education circles. Absolutely certain that Howard Zinn’s books about Amerikkka sell well to school districts.

    Those who attempt to refute or counter these ideas in any way are themselves marginalized, if not cast out. You don’t get a professor nearly canned for showing Lawrence Olivier as “Othello” unless the intellectual environment is already well seeded with this rot.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  110. @109: Hey, don’t knock Z-packs. They are actual drugs that work. Those other drugs might work for CRT, but only when given to instructors.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  111. That was aimed at, and about, the “Who are you, what do you know, and whose side are you on?” people, Kevin. Since they decided to go ad hominem. Which is what ad hominem means, BTW, for those who did not learn Latin at Rio Linda.

    Which is not to say that CRT is not real, and to quote Donald Rumsfeld “You go to the local school council meeting with the allies you have and not the ones you might have had or wish you had”. But I’d rather go with Patterico and not Jack Posobiec.

    nk (1d9030)

  112. The 2021 Runaway Inflation Bill has passed the House 220-213, with no Republican votes.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  113. The sprawling bill calls for creating a universal prekindergarten program, capping child-care costs for many families, negotiating lower prescription drug prices and expanding tax credits for reducing carbon emissions, among other programs. In addition to expanding tax-enforcement efforts at the Internal Revenue Service, the legislation raises taxes on some corporations and very high-income Americans.

    Democrats initially hoped to pass the bill Thursday night, but an eight-and-a-half-hour speech by House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R., Calif.) slamming the legislation prompted Democrats to postpone the vote until later Friday morning. Republicans have united against the bill, arguing that it would exacerbate rising inflation and slow the economy’s growth.

    “This is the single most reckless and irresponsible spending in the history of this country,” Mr. McCarthy said in his floor speech, which stretched past 5 a.m. A senior Democratic aide said Mr. McCarthy “is welcome to continue his raving as late into the night as he wants.”

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/house-votes-220-to-213-to-pass-2-trillion-social-spending-and-climate-bill-11637333460

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  114. @JF@110/111- Commentary on the laws is “dishonest word games” eh? I see that you didn’t follow my earlier links, or you would also have found the links to the laws and get to the sources I was commenting about. Alternatively, googling is possible. And yes, I do wonder if forcing an atheist to teach that there is an actual creator who endowed our rights is a violation of that atheist’s first amendment. Sometimes I wonder that about the “under God” portion of the pledge as well. However, IANAL and don’t have a definitive legal opinion, I just wonder sometimes.

    @Kevin@112

    But if you mean “no one is teaching tenets that come out of that theory”, I beg to differ. Pretty sure that the ideas of “structural racism” and “group identity” are taught and discussed. Discussions of “marginalized people” and “historically disadvantaged groups” and matters of inclusiveness, diversity and community outreach occur frequently in education circles. Absolutely certain that Howard Zinn’s books about Amerikkka sell well to school districts.

    People are probably teaching some things that include pieces of what you are saying here. Probably mostly at the HS or college level. I think that you would agree that a topic like, say “How did structural racism (this be Jim Crow) in the past influence economic/social structures today, is it still in place, and do those past effects interact with class prejudice to effect poor communities today” is probably a reasonable educational topic for an upper level high school or university class. The term marginalized people is basically “people very much outside power” historically disadvantaged “people that the majority didn’t used to like much.” inclusiveness “don’t be a dick to people who are different than you, involve them too.” diversity (see inclusiveness) and community outreach in education is “get the parents involved. It’s 5 dollar words for pretty normal concepts.

    Nic (896fdf)

  115. @FWO@103 I mean, I would say that there is a difference, and in fact did. There may be overlap, but I don’t think they are all the same group. Especially given that the people fearmongering about CRT are often being extremely dishonest to the people they are trying to convince that there is a problem. In one article I read they cited a survey where 78% of the people surveyed were against teaching CRT and 48% of the people couldn’t say what it was, not even were wrong, just flat didn’t know, so a lot of people are just kind of against it without knowing what it is.

    Of course they know what it is. It’s the same cultural Marxist claptrap that’s been de rigeur in universities for several decades and mainstreamed itself over the last 10-15 years.

    And I’m assuming the last part is humor?

    Nic (896fdf) — 11/18/2021 @ 11:19 pm

    Just facts.

    Factory Working Orphan (2775f0)


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