Patterico's Pontifications

3/10/2021

Trump: Donate to Me, Not the GOP

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 8:29 am



Trump is fleecing GOP donors, and he wants them to stop contributing to legitimate GOP organizations and start donating to him exclusively.

The former president this week escalated a standoff over the Republican Party’s financial future, blasting party leaders and urging his backers to send donations to his new political action committee — not to the institutional groups that traditionally control the G.O.P.’s coffers.

“No more money for RINOS,” he said in a statement released on Monday by his bare-bones post-presidential office, referring to Republicans In Name Only. He directed donors to his own website instead.

The best part is, he doesn’t have to use the money for the GOP. He can just profit:

Mr. Trump’s actions could give him a stream of money at a time when his private company is struggling under the scrutiny of investigations, with some discussions of whether properties need to be sold. His business is now politics, and political action committees have few restrictions on how they operate and use their money, according to campaign finance experts.

The former president could, in theory, pay himself and his family members salaries from the money raised there.

“That sort of PAC has no meaningful restrictions on how it could spend its money,” said Adav Noti, the senior director of trial litigation at the Campaign Legal Center.

People close to the former president say there has been no discussion about Mr. Trump giving himself a salary. But historically, his political committees have paid to use his properties, among other things, indirectly enriching him.

What was it Lindsey Graham said recently about Trump? Oh right:

LINDSEY GRAHAM: Donald Trump was my friend before the riot. And I’m trying to keep a relationship with him after the riot. Uh, I can still consider him a friend. What happened was a dark day in American history. And we’re going to move forward. So here’s what you need to know about me. I want this to continue. I want us to continue the policies that I think will make America strong. I believe the best way for the Republican Party to do that is with Trump, not without Trump.

JONATHAN SWAN: Not only does he show no remorse, I mean, he’s still telling everyone he won in a landslide.

LINDSEY GRAHAM: Yeah. And I tell him every day that he wants to listen, that I think the main reason he probably lost in Arizona is beating on the dead guy called John McCain.

JONATHAN SWAN: Do you think you could have won re-election without being an ardent supporter of President Trump?

LINDSEY GRAHAM: Here’s the thing, my election’s over.

JONATHAN SWAN: Yeah.

LINDSEY GRAHAM: I could throw him over tomorrow.

JONATHAN SWAN: Right.

LINDSEY GRAHAM: Why aren’t I?

JONATHAN SWAN: Yeah. That’s what I really don’t understand.

LINDSEY GRAHAM: Well then, you don’t understand me very much.

JONATHAN SWAN: I don’t. That’s why I’m asking you.

LINDSEY GRAHAM: That’s right. So that, I could say, that’s it. It’s over. It’s done. That’s just too easy. What’s hard is to take a movement that I think is good for the country, try to get the leader of the movement who has got lots of problems facing him and the party, and see if we can make a go of it. Mitt Romney didn’t do it. John McCain didn’t do it. There’s something about Trump. There’s a dark side and there’s some magic there. What I’m trying to do is just harness the magic.

To me, Donald Trump is sort of a cross between Jesse Helms, Ronald Reagan, and P.T. Barnum. I mean, it’s just, it’s just this bigger than life deal. He could make the Republican Party something that nobody else I know could make it. He can make it bigger, he can make it stronger, he can make it more diverse. And he also could destroy it.

There’s a sucker born every minute. And every minute, people are donating to Donald Trump.

64 Responses to “Trump: Donate to Me, Not the GOP”

  1. Who’s the idiot now, Lindsey?

    Patterico (115b1f)

  2. The P.T. Barnum comparison is a good one. Donald Trump is a pitchman, and a very, very good one. “Make America Great Again” is perhaps the most effective political slogan we will encounter in our lifetimes. Mr. Trump’s understanding and manipulation of the “news media” was often pitch-perfect.

    As long as the public insists on being entertained, he will remain a force to be reckoned with. The fact that large segments of the public understand that he is a grifter but are willing to overlook it will continue to be a wonder to many of us, but the reasonable expectation is that it will continue.

    John B Boddie (d795fd)

  3. Lindsey Graham is not to be taken seriously. He is completely unreliable in any assessment of Trump. You don’t from this to talking about his “magic”:

    Looking back, we should have basically kicked him out of the party. The more you know about Donald Trump, the less likely you are to vote for him. The more you know about his business enterprises, the less successful he looks. The more you know about his political giving, the less Republican he looks.

    With regard to Trump’s money grab, well, yeah, of course.

    Dana (fd537d)

  4. So at the end of the day it really was all just one big financial swindle? It’s remarkable that we are right back to where we were in 2014: the Dems in control and Donald Trump figuring how he can make a quick buck off of discontent on the right.

    JVW (ee64e4)

  5. Trump doesn’t care about much. But he does care about ‘winning’. He defines that as public acclaim and money.

    If the GOP wins without him he get’s no public acclaim and no money. That’s basically losing to him.

    If the GOP loses without him it costs him nothing that cares about. So if he takes the money that would otherwise go to GOP causes and candidates he’s ‘winning’ in his own terms. It also forces the GOP to align with him publicly which could drive acclaim, the other type of winning that he values.

    It’s frustrating that the GOP is lead by lunatic conspiracy theorists, grifters, white nationalists, and corrupt sycophant’s. The democrats policy goals are bad and they need serious oppositions. Instead we get Trump pulling this and the rest of their energy being spent on the halt of publication of 5 children’s books that sold 5,000 copies last year.

    Amazingly sad.

    Time123 (7cca75)

  6. “We had to let Trump destroy the party to save it”

    –future line from Mitch McConnell.

    Tough love. Do not cushion the fall.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  7. I want Trump as unfettered as possible, in speech and actions, and to receive the full trust of GOP members. The faster it hits bottom, the better.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  8. I have to wonder about anyone who thinks that Trump has “charisma.”

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  9. Kevin, if it’s just the party which is destroyed, America will have been very lucky. It’s much more like, we had to let Trump destroy America in order to save it.

    And your unfettered Trump idea terrifies me; I’m not convinced there is a recovery possible from the bottom that would produce.

    aphrael (4c4719)

  10. I mean, clearly Trump has charisma of a sort, as he’s been able to con people throughout his life and has hoodwinked a huge chunk of the country. His charisma doesn’t work on me, but it’s obvious from the events of the last half decade that it works on a lot of people.

    aphrael (4c4719)

  11. The fact that large segments of the public understand that he is a grifter but are willing to overlook it will continue to be a wonder to many of us,

    The bigger wonder to me is that so many people still believe he isn’t a grifter and that he sacrificed a great deal for us because “he really cares about the people,” as my Fox-listening neighbor recently said. He is obviously quite extraordinarily self-centered, but my neighbor (like many others) denies it. The faithful will continue to deny that he’s selfish, even when he says “donate to me, not the GOP.” Some of them will keep saying that he never lied to us, even though he is clearly congenitally dishonest.

    The Trumpists built a narrative in which everyone in government is at least potentially untrustworthy, while Trump is the true north of patriotic virtue, devoted to saving us from corruption. It’s very weird.

    Radegunda (f4d5c0)

  12. It’s frustrating that the GOP is lead by lunatic conspiracy theorists, grifters, white nationalists, and corrupt sycophant’s. The democrats policy goals are bad and they need serious oppositions. Instead we get Trump pulling this and the rest of their energy being spent on the halt of publication of 5 children’s books that sold 5,000 copies last year.

    Amazingly sad.

    Agree fully.

    Radegunda (f4d5c0)

  13. Trump is just in it for himself, unlike those other politicians

    Who are those btw cuz I’ve got a pen and paper handy

    JF (3efb60)

  14. The GOP died a few years ago. It became undeniable about the time it declared its platform is “Whatever fell out of Don’s mouth last.” It is now the QOP, modulo a few vestigial members that will be cut loose soon enough.

    The problem is the US political system is structurally built for two parties. If we could have more, it would matter far less that the QOP became an ethnic-nationalist party. As-is, they’re assured a baseline of support because of structural issues. They’re on their way to becoming a revolutionary terrorist org with curiously strong political wing.

    I think elections are likely to be violent for the foreseeable future, and our tradition of losers with ego problems shooting up public spaces is going to come back post-Covid, with a vengeance.

    john (cd2753)

  15. I mean, clearly Trump has charisma of a sort, as he’s been able to con people throughout his life and has hoodwinked a huge chunk of the country. His charisma doesn’t work on me, but it’s obvious from the events of the last half decade that it works on a lot of people.

    aphrael (4c4719) — 3/10/2021 @ 9:53 am

    Charisma is a funny thing and hits different people in different ways. You can’t look at the reaction so many people have to Trump and deny he’s charismatic.

    Time123 (306531)

  16. Trump is just in it for himself, unlike those other politicians

    Who are those btw cuz I’ve got a pen and paper handy

    JF (3efb60) — 3/10/2021 @ 10:05 am

    Both Jeffery Dahmer and Tim Tebow eat meat but that doesn’t make them morally equivalent.

    Time123 (306531)

  17. clearly Trump has charisma of a sort, as he’s been able to con people throughout his life and has hoodwinked a huge chunk of the country.

    This is another weird thing. I find Trump to be thoroughly repellent in every way. The same applies to a hugely successful pop star or two who are said to have charisma but make me turn off the video as fast as I can — apart from whether I like the music or not. Just as I think their fans have objectively inferior taste (my own taste being the gold standard), I think there must be something fundamentally wrong with the judgment of people who actually love and admire Donald Trump as a person, not just approving of certain policies.

    Trumpers would say that I must be a snobby elitist, looking down on “ordinary Americans.” But many Trumpers are more elite than I am. I just believe that being a non-elitist doesn’t require being a terrible judge of character.

    Conservatives used to understand that the economically privileged, like Trump, can afford to behave badly, while average people have more to lose from it, so it’s more important for average people to know the lessons of character. Now the Trumpers have turned talk of “character” into an attack on average people — unless it’s directed against people whose politics they dislike.

    Radegunda (f4d5c0)

  18. Trump isn’t the only one raking in the bucks:

    Republican donations surge despite corporate boycott after Capitol riots
    …….
    …..[T]he biggest backers of Trump’s false election-fraud narrative – such as Missouri Senator Josh Hawley (R-Insurrectionist) and Georgia Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Insurrectionist Qanon Caucus) – have been rewarded with a flood of grassroots donations, more than offsetting the loss of corporate money. And contributions from both small donors and rich individuals looking to fight the Democratic agenda have poured into the party’s fundraising apparatus.
    …….
    The waning importance of corporate money reflects a fundamental shift in fundraising over the past decade as the advent of online platforms such as Act Blue and WinRed made it easy to solicit donations from rank-and-file voters. Individual donations, small and large, accounted for two-thirds of funding for last year’s elections. PACs made up only about 4%, down from 9% in 2016, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics. PACs are typically controlled by corporations, industry groups and labor groups.
    ……
    Hawley, the Missouri senator, was pilloried by Republicans and Democrats for leading the coalition of Senate objectors. He took in $969,000 in donations in January, according to a Feb. 1 memo posted on his website. That is eight times some $120,000 in donations Hawley raised in the first quarter of 2020, regulatory filings show.
    …….
    Greene – the freshman congresswoman who has come under fire for promoting baseless conspiracy theories – said in Twitter posts that she had netted $335,000 in contributions on Feb. 2 and 3 alone. On Feb. 4, the House of Representatives voted to strip Greene of two committee assignments over her remarks, including those in which she advocated violence against Democrats.

    “UNREAL! $175,000!!” Greene said in one Twitter post. Democrats are “attacking me because I’m one of you… We will never give up!” she said in another.
    …….
    The brisk fundraising since the insurrection indicates that most Republican voters are “comfortable” with the party that has been remade in Trump’s mold, says J. Miles Coleman, a nonpartisan analyst at the University of Virginia Center for Politics.

    “The Republican Party – it’s not going to go back to the party it was before Trump,” he said.
    >>>>>>>>>

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  19. If people don’t understand by now that Trump is little more than a crackpot bully, then they just aren’t going to see it. There is some unmovable denial in which they have locked themselves. It’s not unlike any nutty religious zealots who continue to give away their hard-earned money to the grifter in the pulpit that they are convinced is God’s ultimate mouthpiece. Any efforts to point out the cold truth are met with anger and/or illogical rationalizations and defense of said individual. I’ll say this: Trump understands human nature at its core, and continues to successfully tap into that need for understanding and validation. In their eyes, that it comes from a “fighter” and billionaire (alleged) only adds to his credibility.

    Dana (fd537d)

  20. So at the end of the day it really was all just one big financial swindle? It’s remarkable that we are right back to where we were in 2014: the Dems in control and Donald Trump figuring how he can make a quick buck off of discontent on the right.

    I momentarily forgot that the GOP controlled the House in 2014, so the right is even worse off these days than it was seven years ago when Donald Trump was mulling his Presidential run. Amazing.

    JVW (ee64e4)

  21. But historically, his political committees have paid to use his properties, among other things, indirectly enriching him.

    That they almost had to do, or else the use of the space could have been considered a political contribution.

    Legal for him to as an individual, but not for his business. It had to be accounted for as him giving a political contribution to his campaign, and then the campaign spending it and giving it back to him. Money going from his right hand to his left hand and back to his right hand. It was an accounting necessity.

    He presumably avoided taxes by renting space to his campaign at calculated cost. (and he also paid for the campaign use of his private airplane the same way.)

    After he won the Republican nomination in 2016, and began accepting campaign contributions from others,. he raised the amount of rent he was charging is campaign.

    So, yes he could pay himself or members of his family – but only for actual services rendered, and at market rates. But I think this is like what he says – to avoid having money going to people whose candidacies he opposes.

    I think many Republican candidates will face a dilemma: Do they say the 2020 election was stolen from Trump, or do they say the election was honestly won by Joe Biden?

    Kevin M (ab1c11) — 3/10/2021 @ 9:43 am

    I want Trump as unfettered as possible, in speech and actions, and to receive the full trust of GOP members. The faster it hits bottom, the better.

    It could take two or three presidential elections for another major party to arise.

    It is hard to see the hitting bottom part occurring before 2024, but Trump could destroy himself before.

    By the way, an independent candidacy for president might have some kind of a chance in 2024, but you would need a very good candidate; the candidate would have to get started shortly after the 2022 elections without knowing who the Democratic and Republican candidates would be; and the Democratic candidate would have to be bad (and also the Republican)

    Sammy Finkelman (d9efdf)

  22. How does Lindsey Graham get away with being so honest about himself and Trump?

    There’s something about Trump. There’s a dark side and there’s some magic there. What I’m trying to do is just harness the magic…

    …He could make the Republican Party something that nobody else I know could make it. He can make it bigger, he can make it stronger, he can make it more diverse. And he also could destroy it.

    I don;t see Trump making it bigger. And he;s not really the only one who could go after the low income whites or the blacks.

    He’s the only one who tried.

    At the same time he threw away other votes.

    Sammy Finkelman (d9efdf)

  23. There’s a dark side and there’s magic. Ok, dark magic. Or the the Dark Side. Or any number of legends of catering to evil for your present profit.

    So yeah, he’s a combination of Oz and the Wicked Witch. Surely a leader for our times.

    Victor (4959fb)

  24. “There’s something about Trump. There’s a dark side and there’s some magic there. What I’m trying to do is just harness the magic. To me, Donald Trump is sort of a cross between Jesse Helms, Ronald Reagan, and P.T. Barnum.” – Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC)

    Now you know why Charlie McCarthy mouthed similar platitudes for Edgar Bergen. A Reagan Creation; seasoned w/a little racist Helms and showman Barnum, eh, Lindsey?!

    Glorious.

    “You sigh, the song begins; You speak and I hear violins; It’s magic…” – Doris Day, ‘It’s Magic’ 1947

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  25. And your unfettered Trump idea terrifies me; I’m not convinced there is a recovery possible from the bottom that would produce.

    We will hit bottom with Trump one way or the other. Fast and hard is better than slow and twisting.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  26. This is another weird thing. I find Trump to be thoroughly repellent in every way.

    I agree. I just think he should be given every opportunity to repel. Hiding his stench is not the right approach.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  27. And your unfettered Trump idea terrifies me; I’m not convinced there is a recovery possible from the bottom that would produce.

    We will hit bottom with Trump one way or the other. Fast and hard is better than slow and twisting.

    Kevin M (ab1c11) — 3/10/2021 @ 11:27 am

    I fear that you’re right. But since hundreds of supporters storming the capital to steal the election in support of a lie wasn’t rock bottom it’s scary to think about what rock bottom will look like.

    Time123 (7cca75)

  28. So at the end of the day it really was all just one big financial swindle?

    I really would like to correlate the family’s stock trades with the news coming out of the WH. A few inside tips amid all that turmoil might have made someone a bundle.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  29. I fear that you’re right. But since hundreds of supporters storming the capital to steal the election in support of a lie wasn’t rock bottom it’s scary to think about what rock bottom will look like.

    The bottom is what it is. Dropping the frog in the boiling water gets the frog’s attention faster than gradually turning up the heat.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  30. So at the end of the day it really was all just one big financial swindle?

    I really would like to correlate the family’s stock trades with the news coming out of the WH. A few inside tips amid all that turmoil might have made someone a bundle.

    Kevin M (ab1c11) — 3/10/2021 @ 11:31 am

    It’s not just money. He also wants acclaim or glory or what have you.

    Time123 (306531)

  31. it’s scary to think about what rock bottom will look like

    Losing a lot of elections that shouldn’t be lost, and by convincing margins. Coming in third in some races.

    Sammy Finkelman (d9efdf)

  32. In 2024 the Amash/Vermin Supreme ticket beats Trump and Hillary.

    Time123 (7cca75)

  33. With Trump it’s always been about the grift. The thing is that no matter how much money is donated to his Save America PAC, none of it goes to him directly. He can’t use any of that money for personal purposes, like say to bail out his soon-to-be bankrupt businesses, to pay for lawyers in the numerous state prosecutions and civil lawsuits he’s facing, or to enrich himself. That money is not really his; it doesn’t go to him. It’s not like he can spend it any way he wants. He can only legally use PAC money for political purposes, like travel expenses, rallies, and donations to campaigns.

    This is a naked grab for power over the GOP.

    Gawain's Ghost (b25cd1)

  34. leveraging lawlessness to take over a country is called an insurrection only if it happens on one day

    when it happens over many decades abetted by Biden and friends it’s called the border

    JF (3efb60)

  35. With Trump it’s always been about the grift. The thing is that no matter how much money is donated to his Save America PAC, none of it goes to him directly. He can’t use any of that money for personal purposes, like say to bail out his soon-to-be bankrupt businesses, to pay for lawyers in the numerous state prosecutions and civil lawsuits he’s facing, or to enrich himself. That money is not really his; it doesn’t go to him. It’s not like he can spend it any way he wants. He can only legally use PAC money for political purposes, like travel expenses, rallies, and donations to campaigns.

    This is a naked grab for power over the GOP.

    Gawain’s Ghost (b25cd1) — 3/10/2021 @ 12:17 pm

    He can hire a consulting company to help him organize. They can schedule meetings and events at Trump branded properties and we’ll never know what rates they’re paying. They can hire his kids and we’ll new know what they’re paid. He can hold a rally anywhere he wants to travel and pay himself and his family speaking and travel fees.

    It won’t be hard for him to launder this money.

    Time123 (7cca75)

  36. “Make America Great Again” is perhaps the most effective political slogan we will encounter in our lifetimes.

    False prosperity: all it takes is Uncle Sam’s credit card; ask the thespian Trump stole the line from; Ronald Reagan:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qE_31nzDg8g

    DCSCA (f4c5e5)

  37. leveraging lawlessness to take over a country is called an insurrection only if it happens on one day

    when it happens over many decades abetted by Biden and friends it’s called the border

    JF (3efb60) — 3/10/2021 @ 12:24 pm

    You should definitely donate heavily to Trump. He will for sure use that money to fix the issue you care about. He will like and respect you for your help.

    Time123 (7cca75)

  38. It won’t be hard for him to launder this money.

    The guy who managed to profit from multiple bankruptcies will find a way — though it’s possible that his motives in this case are ego gratification and revenge as much as profit.

    Radegunda (f4d5c0)

  39. Merrick Garland confirmed as Attorney General 70-30, Republicans roll over again.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  40. Merrick Garland confirmed as Attorney General 70-30, Republicans roll over again.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8) — 3/10/2021 @ 1:22 pm

    Roll over? Is there any reason not to vote for him as AG?

    Time123 (7cca75)

  41. Why should 74,000,000 populist republicans donate to the r.n.c. so they can give their money to free trade economic libertarian conservatives who will continue to send their jobs out of the country. The 74,000,000 trump voters have more in common with unions the multi national corporations.

    asset (cb8f8a)

  42. *munches popcorn*

    Dave (1bb933)

  43. Roll over? Is there any reason not to vote for him as AG?

    Yes. He is a Biden nominee. Make VP Harris do her job and break the tie. From an earlier post (with Garland and Fudge added):

    Republicans have a done a piss poor job of opposing Biden appointees:

    Gina Raimondo (Commerce) 85-15
    Cecilia Rouse (CEA Chair) 95-4
    Miguel Cardona (Education) 64-33
    Jennifer Granholm (Energy) 64-35
    Linda Thomas-Greenfield (UN Amb.) 78-20
    Tom Vilsack (Agriculture) 92-7
    Denis McDonough (Veterans) 87-7
    Pete Buttigieg (Transportation) 86-13
    Alejandro Mayorkas (DHS) 56-43
    Antony Blinken (State) 78-22
    Janet Yellen (Treasury) 84-14
    Lloyd Austin (Defense) 93-2
    Avril Haines (DNI) 84-10
    Merrick Garland (DOJ) 70-30
    Martha Fudge (HUD) 66-34

    As far as I am concerned, the Republicans should go to the mattresses on each of the appointees. Only one (so far) received less than 60 votes in favor. Make Harris earn her salary by forcing tie votes for each of them.

    So far the average vote is 78.8-19.2 (some votes do not total 100). A pretty poor showing for an opposition party with 50 seats.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  44. @43, that would be one way to do it.

    Time123 (8cfb20)

  45. So far the average vote is 78.8-19.2 (some votes do not total 100). A pretty poor showing for an opposition party with 50 seats.

    I think that automatic opposition to President Biden’s appointments is self-defeating and childish. The man has a right to have a cabinet, just as every other President does.

    However, there are a few of his nominees whom I would have opposed if I were a GOP Senator. Neera Tanden, obviously, but beyond her I would vote against Gina Raimondo, but that’s a personal beef of mine because I have a friend who served on a state board in Rhode Island and Gov. Raimondo refused to reappoint her once she was elected and my friend’s term was up, even though my friend was also a progressive Democrat. So I would vote against her just as payback.

    Beyond that, I would have voted against Jennifer Granholm because she got herself a phony-baloney teaching appointment at Berkeley paying her over $200k of my tax dollars, despite the fact that she had been a pretty weak chief executive in Lansing. I would have voted against Alejandro Mayorkas because he was tied to the issuing of visas to wealthy businessmen who had ties to Democrat operatives when he served in the Obama Administration. I would have voted against Marcia Fudge, whom I blogged about, because she is obviously an incredibly poor judge of character. And naturally I would be doing everything in my power to prevent a hack like Xavier Becerra from becoming HHS Secretary.

    JVW (ee64e4)

  46. I am not impressed with Mayorkas. I remember him well from my working days.

    norcal (01e272)

  47. “Make America Great Again” is perhaps the most effective political slogan we will encounter in our lifetimes.

    “I’m not Trump”
    (Biden’s campaign theme)

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  48. As far as I am concerned, the Republicans should go to the mattresses on each of the appointees.

    Why? What profit is there in it?

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  49. As far as I am concerned, the Republicans should go to the mattresses on each of the appointees.

    Why? What profit is there in it?

    My point is that if the Republican party wants to be an opposition party, then it should behave like one, not give 15-40 votes to Biden’s nominees. Let them be approved by the barest of majorities. Those Republicans voting for the nominees own them and all the crap that follows.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  50. I think that voting against cabinet members simply because you don’t like the party of the guy who nominated them looks petty and wouldn’t be beneficial in the long run.

    Nic (896fdf)

  51. “Let them be approved by the barest of majorities”

    And what comes around goes around. They’e either competent enough to do the job…or they’re not. At some point, the climate has to change or we’ll simply tear each other apart. Every single stupid political move doesn’t need to be exaggerated and sent hyperbolic. How about some good will….just a little bit?

    AJ_Liberty (a4ff25)

  52. They had their chance to disqualify him from future office and didn’t take it. F__ them!

    The only thing that troubles me is that Trump will avoid serious prosecution. Why should Merrick Garland, or whatever Democrat local prosecutor, rescue the GOP from this tapeworm?

    nk (1d9030)

  53. I think that voting against cabinet members simply because you don’t like the party of the guy who nominated them looks petty and wouldn’t be beneficial in the long run.

    Nic (896fdf) — 3/10/2021 @ 5:28 pm

    The left didn’t have any problem or suffer for doing it. How long did they delay for each vote? How many supported even collegial candidates like Sessions?

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  54. Sessions had a long, and far from moderate, voting record to attack, including many positions that are anathema to Democratic voters.

    You can see how senators voted on Trump’s cabinet nominees here.

    Almost half (10/22) received 70+ votes.

    Dave (1bb933)

  55. I think someone made Trump a bet on what he could do and not lose GOP support. This is just a test. By the time he’s done, he’ll be endorsing Harris in 2024 and his posse will be right there with him.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  56. At this point the Republican platform is “Thank you sir may I have another?”

    Assume the position!

    Dave (1bb933)

  57. As far as I am concerned, the Republicans should go to the mattresses on each of the appointees.

    Reasons not to do this
    1. For the government to function properly appointments need to be filled. The natural conclusion of this is that the president doesn’t get an official cabinet unless their party controls the senate.
    2. If every nominee is opposed 100% there’s no differentiation between a moderate democrat and an extreme partisan. Nor is there any incentive find one.
    3. Similar problems exist for corrupt and unqualified candidates.
    4. It’s also a clear signal that there will be no compromise on anything and puts the swing votes on the Dem side in the tough position of aligning with intransigent opposition.

    We don’t have a winner take all parliamentary system. Our system doesn’t work when we treat it like one.

    Time123 (6e0727)

  58. I think that voting against cabinet members simply because you don’t like the party of the guy who nominated them looks petty and wouldn’t be beneficial in the long run.

    Nic (896fdf) — 3/10/2021 @ 5:28 pm

    The left didn’t have any problem or suffer for doing it. How long did they delay for each vote? How many supported even collegial candidates like Sessions?

    NJRob (eb56c3) — 3/10/2021 @ 7:53 pm

    Sessions was a close vote, but that wasn’t uniformly the case for all Trump Nominees.
    https://www.senate.gov/reference/Trump_cabinet.htm

    Shulkin got 100 votes.
    Matis got 98-1

    More Political Appointees got some support as well.
    Perry got 67-32
    Ben Carson got 58 -41 votes.

    Doesn’t look like the Dem’s opposed every candidate.

    Time123 (6e0727)

  59. If you look at the table it appears that the more partisan Candidates had faster votes. Probably once it was clear there wouldn’t be any Dem’s voting for it the GOP pushed it through with out much in the way of hearings.

    Which is another reason not to make 100% opposition your default stance.

    Time123 (6e0727)

  60. Trump’s supporters don’t look underfed to me, and the ones who send him their beer, meth, and 5.56 NATO, money are making the roads and shooting ranges safer for the rest of us.

    He is a practical problem only for the GOP gerbils worried about their phony-baloney jobs. And you know what? Not a single one of them is indispensable.

    nk (1d9030)

  61. DCSCA @24

    “You sigh, the song begins; You speak and I hear violins; It’s magic…” – Doris Day, ‘It’s Magic’ 1947

    I can;t find any mention of this movie (pr a ovie with that name) either in Steveb H. Scheuer’s Movies on TV and Videocassette 1989-1990 or in Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guide, 2010 edition

    IMDb has a couple of movies with that title, including one from 1962, but nothing with Doris Day I thibk.

    Is that maybe a song, and not a movie?

    Sammy Finkelman (4227f2)

  62. Here’s a list of formal cabinet positions with two dates: the first date is the date when Biden’s nominee was confirmed, the second date is the date when Trump’s first nominee was confirmed.

    SecState 1-26; 2-1
    SecTreas 1-25; 2-17
    SecDef 1-22; 1-20
    AG 3-11; 2-9
    SecInt n/a; 3-1
    SecAg 2-24; 4-25
    SecCom 3-3; 2-28
    SecLab n/a; 4-28 (not nominated until 2-16)
    SecHHS n/a; 2-10
    SecHUD 3-10; 3-2
    SecTrans 2-3; 1-31
    SecEng 2-25; 3-2
    SecEd 3-2; 2-7
    SecVA 2-9; 2-14
    SecHS 2-2; 1-20

    As of Feb 1, 3 of Trump’s nominees had been confirmed and 3 of Biden’s had been.

    As of Feb 15, 8 of Trump’s nominees had been confirmed and 6 of Biden’s had been.

    As of Mar 1, 10 of Trump’s nominees had been confirmed and 8 of Biden’s had been.

    As of Mar 11, 13 of trump’s nominees had been confirmed and 10 of Biden’s had been.

    So tell me, NJRob, how the Democrats delayed more in 2017 than Republicans are delaying in 2021, because the data don’t back up the claim.

    aphrael (4c4719)

  63. The Republicans held virtually no hearings on Cabinet nominees before the inauguration this year.

    Sammy Finkelman (4227f2)

  64. Trump is suing the RNC for using his name and picture on its fundraising – he is seeking a cease and desist order. The RNC is fighting back, citing the first amendment. (but this is a copyright, right to control endorsements and privacy issue.)

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-rnc-name-likeness-fundraising

    RNC lawyer Justin Riemer, asserted that the party would continue to refer to public figures, and he stated that Mr. Trump had in fact “reaffirmed” with RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel just this past weekend that he approves of the RNC’s use of his name to raise money. The RNC continued to use Mr. Trump’s name in its correspondence, including one email on Sunday that urged supporters to “DEFEND President Trump’s America First policies.”

    I thought he was friendly with them. Evidently, maybe not completely, because they don’t want to go along with his purge.

    Cease and desist letters were also sent to the National Republican Congressional Committee, and National Republican Senatorial Committee. Also to “faux PACs” that he clearly has nothing to do with who were using Trump’s name.

    Trump wants money to go Save America PAC and DonaldJTrump.com.

    Sammy Finkelman (4227f2)


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