The Jury Talks Back

6/14/2017

Hospital Issues Update on Scalise’s Condition

Filed under: Uncategorized — Patterico @ 6:00 pm

It’s pretty grim but let’s remain hopeful.

Congressman Steve Scalise sustained a single rifle shot to the left hip. The bullet travelled across his pelvis, fracturing bones, injuring internal organs, and causing severe bleeding. He was transported in shock to MedStar Washington Hospital Center, a Level I Trauma Center. He underwent immediate surgery, and an additional procedure to stop bleeding. He has received multiple units of blood transfusion. His condition is critical, and he will require additional operations. We will provide periodic updates.

It was an attempted assassination, and Rep. Scalise faces a tough road ahead. Best to him and his family.

3 Comments »

  1. Prayers for the Congressman and his family.

    Comment by Sean — 6/14/2017 @ 6:22 pm

  2. This is sad. I want all the victims to make miraculous recoveries, like it never happened, but it doesn’t work that way. Now I hope they all live.

    Comment by DRJ — 6/14/2017 @ 7:06 pm

  3. At his hometown paper, a doctor speaks hypothetically about Scalise’s injury:

    Wounds like Scalise’s ‘complicated,’ surgeon says

    Dr. Peter DeBlieux, the chief medical officer at University Medical Center in New Orleans, said gunshot injuries like the one Scalise suffered can be complicated to treat. DeBlieux is not Scalise’s doctor and has not reviewed his specific injury, but he said he’s treated many similar injuries in New Orleans.

    “The lay public assumption is that a bullet goes straight in, not on a trajectory, but that trajectory could be up, in which case you’re shot to the hip but there’s a bullet in your chest or your abdomen or your pelvis,” DeBlieux said. “It may shred your intestines, could hit your liver, rupture your spleen, go through your bladder or small intestine.”

    The fact that Scalise remained in critical condition means he suffered “severe injuries … and he requires close monitoring a and aggressive management and critical care,” DeBlieux said.

    Comment by DRJ — 6/14/2017 @ 7:22 pm

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