Patterico's Pontifications

9/16/2020

Only Minorities Need Apply: A Story in Two Parts

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 12:01 am



Part One comes from San Francisco:

Mayor London Breed announced today the launch of a new pilot program that will provide a basic income to Black and Pacific Islander women during pregnancy and after giving birth.

The 150 women chosen will receive a monthly income supplement of $1,000 for the duration of their pregnancy and for the first six months of their baby’s life, with the goal of eventually providing a supplement for up to two years post-pregnancy.

It’s a public/private partnership, but Eugene Volokh says it sounds unconstitutional:

But a partly public funding program limited to people of particular races or ethnic groups generally violates the Equal Protection Clause (see, e.g., City of Richmond v. J.A. Croson Co. (1989); Podberesky v. Kirwan (4th Cir. 1994)). And that is true even when it is an attempt to remedy racial disparities (such as the higher premature birth rate, maternal death rate, or infant death rate, cited by the S.F. Mayor’s office press release). If the government wants to provide benefits for poor mothers, or mothers who have other traits that directly put them at risk (e.g., certain health conditions), it can do so. But it can’t use race as a proxy for special risk or special need.

Prof. Volokh explains that the sole exception would be if the program were designed to remedy specific discrimination against these groups by San Francisco, but as he says in his typically understated fashion: “I very much doubt that San Francisco would be able to demonstrate that.” Uh, yeah.

Part Two is apparently an older story, from July, but I just learned about it. From the University of Chicago English Department:

The English department at the University of Chicago believes that Black Lives Matter, and that the lives of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and Rayshard Brooks matter, as do thousands of others named and unnamed who have been subject to police violence. As literary scholars, we attend to the histories, atmospheres, and scenes of anti-Black racism and racial violence in the United States and across the world. We are committed to the struggle of Black and Indigenous people, and all racialized and dispossessed people, against inequality and brutality.

For the 2020-2021 graduate admissions cycle, the University of Chicago English Department is accepting only applicants interested in working in and with Black Studies. We understand Black Studies to be a capacious intellectual project that spans a variety of methodological approaches, fields, geographical areas, languages, and time periods. For more information on faculty and current graduate students in this area, please visit our Black Studies page.

Now, technically, non-blacks may apply, so the headline is not entirely accurate — but one suspects that the message is really that non-blacks need not apply. And what if a student isn’t interested in “Black Studies”? What if, heaven forfend, a black student isn’t interested??? Too bad. Next year it’s “Black Studies” or nothing.

I took a class in college heavily skewed towards black American writers, and it was great. There are many fantastic black writers in American history, and you should know them. I’m not a big fan of Toni Morrison, but Ralph Ellison? James Baldwin? Richard Wright? These are people worth reading.

But for heaven’s sake, there is more to life and there is more to English and more to literature. Segregating “Black Studies” from all other English studies and making it the only thing graduate students are allowed to study is the kind of virtue signaling that helps nobody, but makes the woke crowd feel good about itself.

And it’s more emphasis on race in a country that needs to revert to the color-blind ideal that has underlay the civil rights struggles for most of its history.

Thanks to S.J.

84 Responses to “Only Minorities Need Apply: A Story in Two Parts”

  1. There are lots of useful courses that would be of interest to all — history of black folk in America, a sometimes-parallel, sometimes underground narrative that would surely allow for some soul-searching by all. DuBois, Cleaver, Douglass, Ellison as above. You could do a whole semester on Reconstruction and its failure.

    But I doubt what they have in mind.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  2. It’s kind of funny how William O Douglas would be called a conservative had he been on the Court today.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  3. I read somewhere that English majors at UClA don’t even have to take a Shakespeare class. My uncle, an English professor and diehard liberal, would be aghast at such a development if he were still alive.

    I realize I have now reached my quota of two Shakespeare references in one 24-hour period.

    (returns to hole)

    norcal (a5428a)

  4. I found that juxtaposition really helpful. It showed me something about my reaction to these things which I didn’t fully appreciate before. I read about the SF program and thought to myself, “nice try, you meant well, but sorry folks, that won’t fly.” Then I read the Chicago announcement and realized it wasn’t really any worse or less well-intended than the SF one, but like every other academically sourced woke proclamation I’ve ever seen it was so suffocatingly pretentious and smug that it just made me want to hit something. Will these people ever stop shooting themselves in the foot? If anything could make me consider voting for Trump — and trust me, nothing could — it would be this. As I already said here once today, it’s stuff like that which forces me to remind myself over and over that the Dems are only the second worst party.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  5. Much of the social history of the Western world, over the past three decades, has been a history of replacing what worked with what sounded good.
    Thomas Sowell
    He is a gift for all to enjoy.

    mg (8cbc69)

  6. Great post, and great comment mg.

    DRJ (aede82)

  7. There’s a glut of people with doctorates in the humanities that far outpaces the demand for those skills. Since we’ve made the consumer insensitive to price signals I don’t really mind a policy that will reduce the production of further surplus. It takes brains and hard work to get a doctorate, i have to imagine that the people who could likely made it into that program could contribute more if they had better role models and incentives.

    Time123 (89dfb2)

  8. Much of the social history of the Western world, over the past three decades, has been a history of replacing what worked with what sounded good.
    Thomas Sowell

    He traded in his Mercedes diesel for a Tesla?

    nk (1d9030)

  9. No harlem renaissance no langston hughes thats awfully provincial.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  10. 4. Clarify for me, Lurker. Are you voting for Biden instead? A clinically demented (barely) living sockpuppet?

    Gryph (f63000)

  11. Much of the social history of the Western world, over the past three decades, has been a history of replacing what worked with what sounded good.

    So from 1980 on things have gone down hill? The 1970’s aren’t part of the decline? Seems like one of those statements that older people make about how life was better back when they were younger. Pick a time in living memory, but far enough back that nostalgia overshadows the harsher realities of the time.

    Time123 (89dfb2)

  12. #10 Please provide evidence of Biden’s “clinical dementia”. Do you have a doctor’s report?

    Appalled (1a17de)

  13. It used to be if you wanted to be an over-educated untalented, and unskilled unemployable, you needed a trust fund. Not anymore. Now the academic racket has a workfare program for you which forces students to support you with “electives”.

    nk (1d9030)

  14. Sowell sounds good, but just what part of “what worked” is he a part of?

    nk (1d9030)

  15. 12. This is the court of public opinion. If you don’t think he’s clinically demented, we’ll just have to agree to disagree. Unless you’re punching at me because you think “senile” is a better description. That just may be…

    Gryph (f63000)

  16. 14. I believe it was Sowell who pointed out that in the mid-1930’s when he was a young child, crime rates in the black community were roughly in parity with the rest of the nation and they remained so until the mid-1960’s when the war on poverty was declared and black fathers started disappearing from black households.

    Thomas Sowell is a pre-eminent economist. If you have not already, I suggest you read “Basic Economics” and watch his myriad of video content on Youtube for an answer to your question.

    Gryph (f63000)

  17. And it’s more emphasis on race in a country that needs to revert to the color-blind ideal that has underlay the civil rights struggles for most of its history.

    This is increasingly looking like an ideal that has been rejected.

    frosty (f27e97)

  18. @16, I tried to look that up on google but didn’t see data going back that far. Do you have a link?

    Time123 (b0628d)

  19. “Demented” is just an opinion without “clinically”, which is defined as “in a way that relates to the observation and treatment of actual patients rather than theoretical or laboratory studies”. You have no clinical evidence that he has dementia, Gryph. Words mean things.
    That said, I think Joe is mentally diminished but, then, so is his opponent. Hopefully, the debates will decide which person has lost more in the acuity department.

    Paul Montagu (1fbb64)

  20. Democrats have always been the party of racism. I guess we can label it “fun racism.”

    Kinda like “funemployment.”

    Hoi Polloi (093fb9)

  21. 10.

    Clarify for me, Lurker. Are you voting for Biden instead? A clinically demented (barely) living sockpuppet?
    Gryph (f63000) — 9/16/2020 @ 6:09 am

    I’ll make it even clearer than that. I’d vote for you over Donald Trump.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  22. From Wikipedia:

    In politics and economics, a Potemkin village is any construction (literal or figurative) whose sole purpose is to provide an external façade to a country which is faring poorly, making people believe that the country is faring better. The term comes from stories of a fake portable village built solely to impress Empress Catherine II by her former lover Grigory Potemkin, during her journey to Crimea in 1787. While modern historians claim accounts of this portable village are exaggerated, the original story was that Potemkin erected phony portable settlements along the banks of the Dnieper River in order to impress the Russian Empress; the structures would be disassembled after she passed, and re-assembled farther along her route to be viewed again as if another example.

    Joe Biden is the Potemkin presidential candidate. Once he gets in, the real power will lie with the radical left, headed by one Kamala Harris. They don’t even need the 25th Amendment, just keep him on for show.

    Edith Wilson, Kamala Harris wants to talk to you.

    Bored Lawyer (7b72ec)

  23. I listened to Biden yesterday in a town hall about veteran’s issues. He had full command of the issues, but spoke somewhat slowly. He also referred to the Harris-Biden administration, and triggered instapundit in the process.

    Now, the news tells me Trump also had a town hall, and the result was a lot of misinformation. Do we need to compare tge events and see who gets things wrong more often?

    Appalled (1a17de)

  24. Appalled (1a17de) — 9/16/2020 @ 7:58 am

    Do we need to compare tge events and see who gets things wrong more often?

    No, I think we’re all familiar with the drill. Biden words good. Trump words bad.

    frosty (f27e97)

  25. who gets things wrong more often?

    Biden, if full command of the facts, gets things wrong more often because his solutions are “more programs!” With Biden we all sink a little deeper into the State, which seems infinitely deep.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  26. In .. it .. is .. if — all the same word to my fingers.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  27. frosty;

    Trump’s words aren’t bad until he tosses them in a salad and flavors them with contempt and ignorance. It’s like perfectly good veggies flavored with bargain brand oil and vinegar.

    Appalled (1a17de)

  28. I’ll make it even clearer than that. I’d vote for you over Donald Trump.

    And that’s Biden’s ENTIRE appeal: “I am not Donald Trump!”

    How far we have fallen.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  29. And that’s Biden’s ENTIRE appeal: “I am not Donald Trump!”

    How far we have fallen.

    Kevin M (ab1c11) — 9/16/2020 @ 8:22 am

    I think this is right. I think it’s amazing that the democrats couldn’t just present a reasonably with-it moderate, but they simply can’t these days. If either party was able to present itself as mainstream and competent, just not do that much to push any envelopes, they would crush the other party, but that’s not how the primaries work.

    Dustin (4237e0)

  30. And that’s Biden’s ENTIRE appeal: “I am not Donald Trump!”

    How far we have fallen.

    Best platform of my lifetime.

    Patterico (115b1f)

  31. I think this is right. I think it’s amazing that the democrats couldn’t just present a reasonably with-it moderate, but they simply can’t these days. If either party was able to present itself as mainstream and competent, just not do that much to push any envelopes, they would crush the other party, but that’s not how the primaries work.

    Honestly, I think they did well given the field they had.

    Patterico (115b1f)

  32. Gryph:
    Glad this wasn’t you.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  33. The University of Chicago thing really bothered me. I saw some people on Twitter defending it, saying that there were 70 some odd graduate students in the English Department there, doing all kinds of things, so that was okay. But the fact is, ONLY five people are going to be joining the English Department at the University of Chicago, and ALL of them must work in Black Studies.

    I find it amazing that the administration and faculty can function with all of their shoulders damaged from patting themselves on the back. More “white savior-ism,” in my opinion.

    Simon Jester (41c481)

  34. Honestly, I think they did well given the field they had.

    Patterico (115b1f) — 9/16/2020 @ 8:41 am

    Versus a Bloomberg or a Bernie? Absolutely.

    Dustin (4237e0)

  35. Honestly, I think they did well given the field they had.

    I think Klobuchar would have been the better choice. She struck me as the most moderate of them bunch. Unfortunate timing for her though.

    Dana (292df6)

  36. Trump during the ABC town hall:

    TRUMP: I’m not looking to be dishonest. I don’t want people to panic. And we are going to be OK. We’re going to be OK, and it is going away. And it’s probably going to go away now a lot faster because of the vaccines.

    It would go away without the vaccine, George, but it’s going to go away a lot faster with it.

    STEPHANOPOULOS: It would go away without the vaccine?

    TRUMP: Sure, over a period of time. Sure, with time it goes away.

    STEPHANOPOULOS: And many deaths.

    TRUMP: And you’ll develop — you’ll develop herd — like a herd mentality. It’s going to be — it’s going to be herd-developed, and that’s going to happen. That will all happen.

    But with a vaccine, I think it will go away very quickly.

    Mooooo!

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  37. Trump’s supporters certainly have a herd mentality.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  38. @35

    Honestly, I think they did well given the field they had.

    I think Klobuchar would have been the better choice. She struck me as the most moderate of them bunch. Unfortunate timing for her though.

    Dana (292df6) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:10 am

    Yang intrigued me quite a bit… but, yeah I view Amy probably much more moderate than even Biden.

    Speaking of Biden and the progressive “tilt”… look no further than the squad leader:
    https://justthenews.com/politics-policy/elections/ocasio-cortez-we-can-likely-push-biden-more-progressive-direction-if-hes

    Ocasio-Cortez is optimistic that her party’s progressive wing can push Biden to the left.

    “I think, overall, we can likely push Vice President Biden in a more progressive direction across policy issues,” she told Just the News in an interview Tuesday on Capitol Hill.

    whembly (c30c83)

  39. @36

    TRUMP: And you’ll develop — you’ll develop herd — like a herd mentality. It’s going to be — it’s going to be herd-developed, and that’s going to happen. That will all happen.

    But with a vaccine, I think it will go away very quickly.

    Mooooo!

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:14 am

    LOL…great find!

    I hung out with a college buddy who lived in the sticks, and everytime we saw a cow we yelled “moo MOO!”, kind like our own version of slug bug.

    whembly (c30c83)

  40. @37

    Trump’s supporters certainly have a herd mentality.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:17 am

    That’s true of any political base. 😉

    whembly (c30c83)

  41. Dustin (4237e0) — 9/16/2020 @ 8:31 am

    I think this is right. I think it’s amazing that the democrats couldn’t just present a reasonably with-it moderate, but they simply can’t these days. If either party was able to present itself as mainstream and competent, just not do that much to push any envelopes, they would crush the other party, but that’s not how the primaries work.

    It’s not a problem with the primaries. The problem is that it’s all a game. One of the reasons we got Trump was both parties decided 2016 was Hillary’s turn. Both sides wanted to rerun the 2008 and 2012 game plan. Both sides put up a bag of rocks and Trump saw the opportunity. Oligarchs gonna get their oligarch on and sometimes it blows up in their face.

    The US has over 300m people and the D’s put up a candidate for POTUS who gets off a plane and waves at an empty field. In that 300m there have to be two better candidates than anything we saw on either ticket in 2020 and 2016. You could probably pick better by lottery.

    frosty (f27e97)

  42. The democratic base. Is certifiable they will burn this country down to the ground if you let them.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  43. Rip Murdock (d2a2a8) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:14 am

    Now you’re denying the science on herd immunity?

    frosty (f27e97)

  44. The University of Chicago thing really bothered me. I saw some people on Twitter defending it, saying that there were 70 some odd graduate students in the English Department there, doing all kinds of things, so that was okay. But the fact is, ONLY five people are going to be joining the English Department at the University of Chicago, and ALL of them must work in Black Studies.

    I find it amazing that the administration and faculty can function with all of their shoulders damaged from patting themselves on the back. More “white savior-ism,” in my opinion.

    Simon Jester (41c481) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:08 am

    I probably should have read more about this before commenting…if it’s only 5 openings I’m not bothered at all that they’re focusing on Black Writing. Any more than I would be if they wanted to focus on Comic Book Movies or an Electrical Engineering department said they were only going to admit PhD candidates that wanted to work on Sensor technology or the Biology department wanted to focus on fire management, each for 5 spots.

    Time123 (89dfb2)

  45. Oligarchs wanted jeb like rocky road and hillary for two scoops.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  46. Rip Murdock (d2a2a8) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:14 am

    Now you’re denying the science on herd immunity?

    frosty (f27e97) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:31 am

    in a recent press event Trump said Herd Mentality when he probably mean Herd Immunity. It’s a silly mistake, but maybe a funny one.

    Time123 (89dfb2)

  47. Paul singer made sure cruz wouldnt get support, remember fusion gps was his deal

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  48. Mooooo!
    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:14 am

    Careful. Devin Nunes has sued people for less.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  49. 35 and 38, it almost makes me wonder if Derek Chauvin knew exactly what he was doing. But then again, the Jill Stein fanboys and BIPOCers were already calling Amy a female Tim Kaine.

    urbanleftbehind (3568e2)

  50. It would have been any incident down the road, arbery was a wet match, blake was the next one.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  51. @50, are you saying that there are frequent or regular outrageous killings of black people that aren’t investigated in a way that gives the community confidence justice will be done?

    Time123 (b0628d)

  52. Frosty @43-

    Now you’re denying the science on herd immunity?

    No, I am denying the science on herd mentality, while pointing out the obvious decline in Trump’s mental acuity. Beyond his confusion between “mentality” and “immunity”, the quote demonstrates his inability to construct a simple sentence. Trump may have been speaking about his supporters, but I doubt that.

    As far as herd immunity goes, I agree with the science, but it is unattainable without a vaccine, unless the country is willing to see an extremely high death rate from COVID-19:

    ……
    ……For COVID-19, which has an estimated infection fatality ratio of 0.3–1.3%1, the cost of reaching herd immunity through natural infection would be very high, especially in the absence of improved patient management and without optimal shielding of individuals at risk of severe complications. Assuming an optimistic herd immunity threshold of 50%, for ….. the USA, this would translate into ……..500,000–2,100,000 deaths……. Men, older individuals and those with comorbidities are disproportionally affected, with infection fatality ratios of 3.3% for those older than 60 years and increased mortality in individuals with diabetes, cardiac disease, chronic respiratory disease or obesity. The expected impact would be substantially smaller in younger populations.

    An effective vaccine presents the safest way to reach herd immunity. …..

    ……..
    Source

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  53. No, I am denying the science on herd mentality, while pointing out the obvious decline in Trump’s mental acuity. Beyond his confusion between “mentality” and “immunity”, the quote demonstrates his inability to construct a simple sentence. Trump may have been speaking about his supporters, but I doubt that.

    He used the wrong word…it’s funny but not sure that it’s meaningful.

    Time123 (b0628d)

  54. He used the wrong word…it’s funny but not sure that it’s meaningful.

    Given that he has made that mistake more than once, I’m not so sure.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  55. People acting stupidly like charging a shotgun often ends badly.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  56. I’d chalk it up as no difference than Obama’s “corpse-man” than “kor-muhn” (who did that more than once too).

    It’s a flub… very funny though.

    whembly (c30c83)

  57. It’s all part of Trump’s decline.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  58. There are many articles and editorials I read that I would like to post.

    Thisis the one encountered last, but not the most important one:

    https://www.tabletmag.com/sections/news/articles/china-covid-lockdown-propaganda

    TI saw one that backed me up – had the same idea I had months ago – that masks, while they might not prevent infection, could give people a smaller dose that amounted to a vaccination:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/08/health/covid-masks-immunity.html

    THat seems based on a New England Journal of Medicine article:

    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp2026913

    I am not sure when whoever wrote that had the idea, but it seemed obvious to me, and I’m sure people thought about it. But now it broke into print. Glad to see that some scientists are catching up to me.

    There is another explanation for a large amount of immunity: Infection by a coronavirus cold virus
    – the cowpox version of Covid-19, but that would largely predate Feb. 2020, and this immunity has been increasing – and I’m assuming that the tests they are using are specific to the new coronavirus but I don;t know. It would be nice if the general media – or anybody – published details like that.

    Sammy Finkelman (42d229)

  59. People acting stupidly like charging a shotgun often ends badly.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:54 am

    It ended terribly for the murder victim.

    Time123 (b0628d)

  60. Time123 (89dfb2) — 9/16/2020 @ 6:15 am

    So from 1980 on things have gone down hill? The 1970’s aren’t part of the decline? Seems like one of those statements that older people make about how life was better back when they were younger. Pick a time in living memory, but far enough back that nostalgia overshadows the harsher realities of the time.

    In hind-sight I think we could start measuring “replacing what worked with what sounded good” from the 1960’s. But it’s arguable that to people in the 60’s and 70’s this wasn’t obvious. By the 80’s it was clear that postmodernism was garbage and marxism was pie in the sky wishful thinking at best and usually just a fast path to authoritarianism.

    As far as nostalgia goes, I think it’s more an issue of the 1st and 2nd derivatives than the value of the function at a point. In a variety of ways things are better now but the shape of the curve has changed.

    frosty (f27e97)

  61. There’s more they can catch up to – not mainly with me but with things I read.

    Like the University of Pittsburgh has developed a cure for Covid-19 (neutralizing antibodies of course)

    https://www.pittwire.pitt.edu/news/pitt-scientists-discover-tiny-antibody-component-highly-effective-preventing-and-treating-sars

    University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists have isolated the smallest biological molecule to date that completely and specifically neutralizes the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which is the cause of COVID-19. This antibody component, which is 10 times smaller than a full-sized antibody, has been used to construct a drug—known as Ab8—for potential use as a therapeutic and prophylactic against SARS-CoV-2.

    The researchers report today in the journal Cell that Ab8 is highly effective in preventing and treating SARS-CoV-2 infection in mice and hamsters. Its tiny size not only increases its potential for diffusion in tissues to better neutralize the virus, but also makes it possible to administer the drug by alternative routes, including inhalation. Importantly, it does not bind to human cells—a good sign that it won’t have negative side-effects in people

    Of course Joe Biden and the Democrats have psyched Donald Trump out from promoting anything like this. You can sell things like this just so long as you don’t actually try to cure anybody with this:

    https://abclonal.com/search/index?keyword=SARS-COV-2+antibody&catid=56&__hash__=2f4e7c83b12aa7759519436ce5ce4035_22c443f3c1f025e523bbafc01c1bcb10&Searchbar=&gclid=CjwKCAjw74b7BRA_EiwAF8yHFPVQpAvcTQmpJ5GUydR4_nj1lUmrtKpI19Zd1Oc_OcMNpvtMpXUSMRoCNPcQAvD_BwE

    By the way, you can DIY – you can make a do it yourself vaccine, for instance:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/01/science/covid-19-vaccine-diy.html

    These Scientists Are Giving Themselves D.I.Y. Coronavirus Vaccines

    Impatient for a coronavirus vaccine, dozens of scientists around the world are giving themselves — and sometimes, friends and family — their own unproven versions.

    Just don’t advertise or try to sell it:

    Several residents reported all of this to a variety of law enforcement and regulatory agencies. In June, the Washington attorney general filed a lawsuit against Mr. Stine not only for pitching the mayor with unsupported claims, but also for administering his unproven vaccine to about 30 people, charging each $400. In May, the Food and Drug Administration sent a letter warning Mr. Stine to stop “misleadingly” representing his product

    Does it in fact not work? They don’t have to examine that question.

    A lot of scientists are trying that, just not publicly:

    Although his promotional tactics were unusual, Mr. Stine was far from the only scientist creating experimental coronavirus vaccines for themselves, family, friends and other interested parties. Dozens of scientists around the world have done it, with wildly varying methods, affiliations and claims.

    Sammy Finkelman (42d229)

  62. No the Dems are the party of “funning”, which is analogous to wilding.

    urbanleftbehind (3568e2)

  63. 60. frosty (f27e97) — 9/16/2020 @ 10:03 am

    In hind-sight I think we could start measuring “replacing what worked with what sounded good” from the 1960’s.

    People have been trying to do this since well before the end of the 19th century. (1800s)

    Has it become a general trend? I don’t know, but it might speed up with a Biden Administration.

    It happens at different times with different things.

    With criminal justice there have been episodes before, but a real trend of replacing what works with what is supposed to sound good started around 2015 and really accelerated in 2019.

    Sammy Finkelman (42d229)

  64. With teaching children how to read “replacing what worked with what sounded good” happened in the 1930s. Nobody did that badly before that.

    Sammy Finkelman (42d229)

  65. Alexandre Dumas in one of the greatest writers in French literature–The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After (often mistakenly titled The Four Musketeers), The Man in the Iron Mask, The Count of Monte Christo are exceptional works, especially that latter which is a real page turner.

    Did you know he was Black? Yep, he was a Haitian, but he knew the French better than the French knew themselves.

    Technically, though, he doesn’t qualify as a “Black” author, because he not an American of African descent. That’s the problem with these so-called “Black Studies.” They leave out the best, for purely political reasons.

    In literary history, the University of Chicago is where the New Criticism originated, in the early 1930s. This is a theory of interpretation that states a poem, a novel or short story can be understood without any knowledge of the author. In other words, a literary work stands on its own, meaning no biographical, cultural or source research is required. That allows a critic or interpreter to say a work means whatever he or she thinks it means. The intention of the author is irrelevant. Suddenly, the intention (or personal bias) of the critic is all that matters. That was the beginning of the end.

    I believe it was Stanford that first abandoned the Great Works curriculum, some time in the early 1970s. Prior to that every student in every school read the same works, so there was a common knowledge. Discussions could be had, interpretations argued, because everyone had read the same works.

    That is all gone now. There is no common knowledge, everyone has not read the same works, and any work is left to the interpretation of the reader, while the intention of the author is ignored.

    It’s madness. I understand that biographical, cultural, historical research is laborious, but it’s the only way to truly understand the author’s intention. And that is what really matters, right?

    I reject the New Criticism, and base my own theory of literary criticism on ethology (the science of animal behavior). The seminal work is by Niko Tinbergen–The Animal in Its World. One cannot understand behavior by observing an animal in captivity, a cage, a laboratory or a zoo. One must observe the animal in its natural environment, free and unrestrained, in order to understand why it behaves as it does. The same is true of humans, certainly of artists.

    One cannot possibly interpret literature without knowing the author–his or her life, personal contacts, source materials, influences cultural and historical. The Artist in Its World, that’s the only way to interpret any work–and this applies to every work, whether it be poetry, painting, music, or architecture. You have to see the artist in his or her world, in order to understand his or her intention in creating a work. There is no other way to interpret meaning.

    As to norcal’s reference to Shakespeare studies, this is the problem. It’s not that students are not reading Shakespeare, it’s that what they’re being taught about Shakespeare is wrong. You do know that the true author was Edward de Vere, the Earl of Oxford, don’t you? The evidence is overwhelming. But “Shakespeare Studies” insist that these great works were written by some illiterate burger, a seller of bagged commodities, who never went to school a day in his life. It’s preposterous!

    Artists in captivity of academic institutions. Studied without understanding, with misinterpreted intentions, and whatever political meaning rules the day–in other words, no meaning at all.

    Such is modernity. A life without intention or meaning, just a shallow existence devoid of a life, held in captivity.

    Gawain's Ghost (b25cd1)

  66. In hind-sight I think we could start measuring “replacing what worked with what sounded good” from the 1960’s. But it’s arguable that to people in the 60’s and 70’s this wasn’t obvious. By the 80’s it was clear that postmodernism was garbage and marxism was pie in the sky wishful thinking at best and usually just a fast path to authoritarianism.

    The problem with saying the decline started in the post WW2 era is segregation, Jim Crow, and Women’s rights. If you’re going to say that things were better before the 1960’s you have be clear what you’re talking about, and what you’re not. It’s even harder since there was a lot of overlap between people advocating for those things and economic leftists. The icing on the cake is the overlap between people on the economic right, and people that opposed those things.

    Time123 (89dfb2)

  67. @28.

    “I am not Ronald Reagan” didn’t work for ‘President’ Walter Mondale.
    “I am not Richard Nixon” didn’t work for ‘President’ McGovern.
    “I am not Harry Truman” didn’t work for ‘President’ Dewey.
    “I am not FDR” didn’t work for ‘President’ Wilkie.
    “I am not Donald Trump” didn’t work for ‘President’ Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    And “I am not Donald Trump” was plagiarized by Hidin’ Biden from you-know-who. 😉

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  68. Rip Murdock (d2a2a8) — 9/16/2020 @ 9:58 am

    It’s all part of Trump’s decline.

    I won’t argue that Trump at 74, and after 4 years as POTUS, is as sharp as Trump at a younger age. Time and stress take a toll on us all.

    Biden recently made comments about the BO/JB administration and said if re-elected. Do you wonder if he thinks this is 2012? Maybe he thinks they are running for a 3rd term. Harris and Biden have both made the Harris administration comment. Mental decline, Freudian slip, or nothing to see move along?

    frosty (f27e97)

  69. On top of fracking, now vaccine intransigence…that probably kills PA going for Biden.

    urbanleftbehind (3568e2)

  70. Gawain’s Ghost (b25cd1) — 9/16/2020 @ 10:14 am

    That is all gone now. There is no common knowledge,

    Everybody knows the Wizard of Oz. The movie, not the book.

    I am nor sure if that is still true.

    It is ridiculous to say that anybody else but William Shakespeare of Stratford wrote his plays.

    Do you think anyone would gain his knowledge of human nature from schools? This is a person who had insight. He got it from thinking, and from studying other plays.

    Nor were his sources so impossible to get to read.

    Sammy Finkelman (42d229)

  71. This piece on both candidates’ mental decline makes sense to me.

    His sister, Maryanne, is on tape calling him a clown. I disagree. A clown intends to be funny. Trump never intends to be funny. “Buffoon” is a better description. A buffoon is a stupid person who is trying to be serious but instead is unintentionally funny, a more apt description of Trump.
    And now he is an old man, slipping into senility while occupying one of the most powerful offices on the planet. I am not a mental health expert but my understanding of senility is that it emphasizes existing personality traits. So that means that Trump’s malignant narcissism will grow worse as time goes on. His paranoia will grow worse over time. His disordered thinking will grow worse over time.
    And he is running for a second term. Four more years of mental decline. Or, according to him, 12 more years of mental decline.
    Trump’s supporters claim that Biden is the one who is suffering from cognitive decline. I don’t see it but I have to tell you, given a choice between a senile malignant narcissist and a senile decent man, I’ll take Biden any day.
    Think about that as you are filling out your ballot. Yes, your choices aren’t ideal, between two possibly senile old men, but if senility accentuates existing personality traits, which personality would you want running the country? The one who hid the severity of the pandemic from the public because he didn’t want to cause panic in the stock market? The one who destroyed the post office so that your mail in ballot may not make it on time? The one who wants to defund cities run by mayors who don’t support him? The one who gasses peaceful protestors so that he can have a photo op in front of a church that he doesn’t attend while holding a bible (upside down) that he doesn’t read?

    FTR, as of today, I’m flipping a coin between Jo Jorgensen and Larry Hogan as a protest vote.

    Paul Montagu (1fbb64)

  72. @12. Biden surely does. You could ask him for it but he doesn’t take questions– unless teleprompted to do so.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  73. Time123 (89dfb2) — 9/16/2020 @ 10:14 am

    If you’re going to say that things were better before the 1960’s you have be clear what you’re talking about, and what you’re not.

    I tried to make it clear that I was very much not saying this. Specifically, I was not saying things were better before the 60’s. Things are better now. My distinction was about the direction and rate of change. In Where Do We Go from Here (post ’65) King articulated some concerns but was generally hopeful and tried to argue that he was not advocating marxism or socialism. The current social justice movement has rejected King’s position.

    frosty (f27e97)

  74. It’s all part of Trump’s decline.

    https://babylonbee.com/news/biden-cancels-trip-upstairs

    beer ‘n pretzels (a6fbf9)

  75. SF @61-
    The researchers report today in the journal Cell that Ab8 is highly effective in preventing and treating SARS-CoV-2 infection in mice and hamsters…..Of course Joe Biden and the Democrats have psyched Donald Trump out from promoting anything like this.

    Good for the mice and hamsters. Just because it works in them, doesn’t mean it will work in humans. We can cure cancer in mice.

    Trump shouldn’t be promoting anything, that has gotten him in trouble in the past. If it’s promising, then it should go through the usual scientific reviews.

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  76. I cringe at what he may put on the playlist for a similar rally in NV, AZ or TX:

    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/biden-panned-for-playing-despacito-off-his-phone-at-hispanic-heritage-month-event

    urbanleftbehind (3568e2)

  77. Frosty, i didn’t mean to imply that you yearned for Jim Crow…just the appeal to the good old days is a tricky one.

    Time123 (89dfb2)

  78. 67.

    “I am not a Herbert Hoover“ workd for FDR in 1932, and “I am not a Republican” worked even better in 1936.

    “I am not careless abut nukes Barry Goldwater” worked for LBJ in 1964. He wold have won anyway, but it helped him to a landslide.

    “I am not George McGovern” worked for Richard Nixon in 1972, and resulted in a landslide victory for him during the Watergate scandal.

    “I am not Gerald Ford, and Democrats are good for the economy” worked for Jimmy Carter in 1976.

    “I am mot Jimmy Carter, and I am not some radical extremist and are you better off now than you were four years ago“ worked for Ronald Reagan in 1980.

    “I am not (incompetent) George Bush – and don’t forget about Dan Quayle, he’s coming next – and Ross Perot is crazy” worked for Bill Clinton in 1992.

    “I am not shaky-or-over-his-head=in-a crisis John McCain” worked for Barack Obama in 2008.

    “I am not Hillary Rodham Clinton” worked for Donald Trump in 2016.

    The problem Donald Trump has is that “I am not Joe Biden” isn’t as potent an argument.

    Sammy Finkelman (42d229)

  79. @68. Few people are but NYers who knew and experienced the Trump Act in the Reagan excess days of the go-go 80’s see the same guy w/t same routine, more or less – long before ‘The Apprentice’ was a hit on NBC TeeVee.

    He loved the attention, then and now, was easily accessible in the TT lobby around lunch time for tourists– and would show up for a door opening… as long as there were cameras there and a chance to make Page Six. Spawned and nurtured in Ronnie’s cesspool; he is the Reagan era GOP’s ‘Picture of Dorian Gray.’ He is your horror; your creation. And just like a host of TeeVee’s ‘Death Valley Days’… he is 21st century reality TeeVee star.

    He is entertainment.

    He is you.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  80. 67.

    “I am not Ronald Reagan” didn’t work for ‘President’ Walter Mondale.
    “I am not Richard Nixon” didn’t work for ‘President’ McGovern.
    “I am not Harry Truman” didn’t work for ‘President’ Dewey.
    “I am not FDR” didn’t work for ‘President’ Wilkie.
    “I am not Donald Trump” didn’t work for ‘President’ Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    And “I am not Donald Trump” was plagiarized by Hidin’ Biden from you-know-who. 😉
    DCSCA (797bc0) — 9/16/2020 @ 10:15 am

    I guess that settles it. When Biden’s lost DCSCA, he’s lost America.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  81. 62.

    No the Dems are the party of “funning”, which is analogous to wilding.
    urbanleftbehind (3568e2) — 9/16/2020 @ 10:08 am

    “Wilding.” Now there’s a word I haven’t thought about since the last time Donald Trump refused to stop accusing five exonerated-by-DNA teenagers of murder.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  82. DCSCA @79 on 09/16/2020 @ 10:50 am

    He…was easily accessible in the TT lobby around lunch time for tourists

    Well, at least in the movies he was: (although I think that’s another hotel)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1WngHOFYVQ

    Here it is as a (mistaken) claim:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYtsCfGmQ-k

    Sammy Finkelman (42d229)

  83. lurker (d8c5bc) — 9/16/2020 @ 11:01 am

    since the last time Donald Trump refused to stop accusing five exonerated-by-DNA teenagers of murder.

    He didn’t want to ssay he was wrong.

    The teenagers really were wilding.

    They confessed to the attack on the Central Park jogger because of the prisoner’s dilemma.

    https://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/prisoners-dilemma.asp

    That works, even if neither of them is guilty.

    Sammy Finkelman (42d229)

  84. Gawain’s Ghost said:

    This is a theory of interpretation that states a poem, a novel or short story can be understood without any knowledge of the author. In other words, a literary work stands on its own, meaning no biographical, cultural or source research is required. That allows a critic or interpreter to say a work means whatever he or she thinks it means. The intention of the author is irrelevant. Suddenly, the intention (or personal bias) of the critic is all that matters. That was the beginning of the end.

    I realized that this concept also applies to how the Supreme Court interprets the Constitution. In my opinion, the Court should adhere to the original intent of the Founders, which indeed requires “biographical, cultural, and source research”.

    Unfortunately, leftist Justices often don’t adhere to the original intent, and instead decide that the Constitution and other laws can be interpreted in ways that fit their pet causes. That’s much easier than deferring to Congress, and letting Congress do the hard work required to pass a new law or amend the Constitution.

    A case in point is when the Court ruled in June that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT employees. That was not the intent of the legislators in 1964.

    norcal (a5428a)

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled. Your comment may take some time to appear.


Powered by WordPress.

Page loaded in: 0.4598 secs.