Patterico's Pontifications

8/27/2020

CDC Kinda Sorta Walking Back Stupid Guidelines That Were Obviously Forced on Them By Trump

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 8:29 am



New York Times:

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has scaled back the agency’s recommendation advising some people not to get tested after exposure to the novel coronavirus, now saying “testing may be considered for all close contacts of confirmed or probable Covid-19 patients.”

The statement by Dr. Robert R. Redfield was issued to some news outlets late Wednesday, and more broadly Thursday morning, after a storm of criticism over the new C.D.C. guidelines — involving potentially asymptomatic people — which were the product of the White House Coronavirus Task Force and not C.D.C.’s own scientists. Dr. Redfield made the statement in an effort to clarify the new policy, an official said. However, the guidelines issued earlier this week remained on the C.D.C.’s website as of Thursday morning, and it appears unlikely that the agency will change them.

Trump has been against testing people from the beginning because, while it is good for the country and saves lives, he thinks it hurts him politically — and, frankly, he has shown he does not care about Americans’ lives if saving those lives causes him the slightest inconvenience. They rushed through this rule while Fauci was in surgery — he thinks it’s misguided — under pressure from the top. Now there is an outcry, and like the dismantling of sorting machines at post offices, they’re sort of pretending to undo the action while not really undoing the action.

A government under Donald Trump is rotten and has to go.

71 Responses to “CDC Kinda Sorta Walking Back Stupid Guidelines That Were Obviously Forced on Them By Trump”

  1. In a previous thread I said that I thought Biden would do a better job at the basic functions of government. I think this is an example of that. Everyone makes honest mistakes. But this doesn’t look like an honest mistake, it looks like deliberately putting the welfare of the US at the bottom of the list. I don’t expect Biden will do that.

    Time123 (52fb0e)

  2. ‘… deliberately putting the welfare of the US at the bottom of the list. I don’t expect Biden will do that.’

    He already has:

    Voted to overturn Glass-Steagall

    Glass-Steagall was one of the first things that [America] did in the wake of the Great Depression, as it created a firewall between investment banking and FDIC-insured deposits, meaning that Wall Street could not gamble with your savings. It is one of the central reasons why so many Wall Street banks are too big to fail. Joe Biden, Bill Clinton and the rest of powerful Democrats in 1999 changed all that, to the dismay of the longest tenured congressman in U.S. history, the late John Dingell, who called our coming crises the night of Biden’s vote in 1999:

    I think we ought to look at what we are doing here tonight. We are passing a bill which is going to have very little consideration, written in the dark of night, without any real awareness on the part of most of what it contains.

    I just want to remind my colleagues about what happened the last time the Committee on Banking brought a bill on the floor which deregulated the savings and loans. It wound up imposing upon the taxpayers of this Nation about a $500 billion liability …

    Having said that, what we are creating now is a group of institutions which are too big to fail. Not only are they going to be big banks, but they are going to be big everything, because they are going to be in securities and insurance, in issuance of stocks and bonds and underwriting, and they are also going to be in banks.

    And under this legislation, the whole of the regulatory structure is so obfuscated and so confused that liability in one area is going to fall over into liability in the next. Taxpayers are going to be called upon to cure the failures we are creating tonight, and it is going to cost a lot of money, and it is coming. Just be prepared for those events.

    Again, when confronted in the future with the failure of his policies, all Biden could do is apologize.’ -source, pastemag.com/10 worst tings Joe Biden as done

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  3. But this doesn’t look like an honest mistake, it looks like deliberately putting the welfare of the US at the bottom of the list. I don’t expect Biden will do that.

    Don’t be too sure. The Biden of the early Obama years is gone. He’s going full left and the welfare of many Americans will be at the bottom of the list, well below the welfare of his friends in Beijing.

    The hardest hit: the unborn. And anyone who has a job here in the U.S. that might be done more cheaply in China.

    You don’t think China spent all that time and money grooming Biden and the Democrats for nothing, right?

    Hoi Polloi (2f1acd)

  4. if that’s the worst thing mr. joe biden, whose hair transplants were successful unlike someone else we know BTW, has done, and it was 21 years ago too, mr. DCSCA, then everybody should vote for him

    like they say in some country, you can tell a good day in the morning

    or a not horrible day, anyway

    nk (1d9030)

  5. the high reporting numbers, support the lockdown, that kills main street, that feeds the riots, that keeps churches closed, wash rince repeat, yet you look away at the ziggurat of bodies that kull cuomo bequeathed us, you ignore the findings from the cruise ship, from santa clara,

    bolivar de gris (7404b5)

  6. The Glass-Steagall bill that has Deezy-eska’s Depends in a twist was passed by the Senate 90–8, and by the House 362–57 in 1999.

    Dave (1bb933)

  7. @1

    In a previous thread I said that I thought Biden would do a better job at the basic functions of government. I think this is an example of that. Everyone makes honest mistakes. But this doesn’t look like an honest mistake, it looks like deliberately putting the welfare of the US at the bottom of the list. I don’t expect Biden will do that.

    Time123 (52fb0e) — 8/27/2020 @ 8:55 am

    I absolutely expect Biden to do that.

    Biden threatened aid money to Ukraine unless they drop the prosecutor who was investigating Burisma. A company that was paying Hunter Biden $50,000 a MONTH. You can argue that Biden/Obama may have legit reason to making that demand (a quid pro quo), but you can hand-wave that Biden’s son was benefiting from his father’s actions. That’s just one aspect.

    whembly (c30c83)

  8. 6. So what you’re saying is Delaware banking pal Plagiarist JoeyBee is a follower… not a leader.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  9. @4. But is it?

    Beau knows.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  10. Trump has been against testing people from the beginning because, while it is good for the country and saves lives, he thinks it hurts him politically — and, frankly, he has shown he does not care about Americans’ lives if saving those lives causes him the slightest inconvenience.

    Actually, Trump is very much in favor of testing everyone who comes into close proximity to him.

    He just doesn’t want the rest of us to have the same protection.

    Dave (1bb933)

  11. Trump and his enablers, high and low, must be tried for mass murder. Coronavirus deaths passed 180,000 yesterday with another 1,260 waiting to be officially added to the statistics.

    nk (1d9030)

  12. @8 “mainstream” is the word you’re looking for.

    Dave (1bb933)

  13. @12. No. Follower is the term you’ve found.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  14. You don’t get it, DCSCA. A follower is what we want. A dull, boring, plodder, who to whom revolution is what a wheel does. Who will “preserve, protect and defend”, and not tear down anything.

    nk (1d9030)

  15. Oh, yeah, and not take orders from the Kremlin, either.

    nk (1d9030)

  16. “I don’t think there should be any debates.”- Nancy Pelosi, 8/27/20

    ROFLMAO. She’s scared.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  17. Please to tell me, all you all Trump supporters, what Trump has preserved, protected, and defended? You can’t even eat your waffle in peace in Columbia Heights.

    nk (1d9030)

  18. 14.A follower is what we want. A dull, boring, plodder, who to whom revolution is what a wheel does. Who will “preserve, protect and defend”, and not tear down anything.

    ROFLMAO “Abra-cadaver!”

    You mean like… President Harris?!

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  19. More like evers writ large

    https://mobile.twitter.com/AlexBerenson/status/1298979981071134720

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  20. Biden threatened aid money to Ukraine unless they drop the prosecutor who was investigating Burisma.

    The only one who claimed the corrupt prosecutor was investigating Burisma at the time was … the corrupt prosecutor.

    In fact, by demanding reform – as other western countries and international organizations were doing at the same time – Biden was increasing the risk to Burisma.

    Dave (1bb933)

  21. When the defense secretary and the chairman of the joint chiefs were derelict in handling rioters.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  22. @17. He’ll tell you himself.

    Tonight.

    Be sure and tune-in! It’s all about the ratings you know.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  23. @7, It’s fully possible i’m wrong. It’s a forward lookign statement.

    But I have a problem with your example. The evidence doesn’t show that Biden was subverting US Policy for his own interests. See this from Axios. As well as this.

    3 Republican senators joined a 2016 push for Ukraine to reform its prosecutor general’s office and judiciary, a bipartisan letter uncovered by CNN shows, mirroring the contemporaneous work of then-Vice President Joe Biden.

    Why it matters: The letter to former Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko illuminates bipartisan support in the U.S. to pursue corruption reforms in the prosecutor general’s office. It also undermines claims from President Trump and Republicans that Biden demanded Ukraine terminate Prosecutor General Viktor Shokin and drop its investigation into the company for which Biden’s son, Hunter, sat on the board.

    The letter was signed by 8 senators — 5 Democrats and 3 Republicans: Sens. Ron Johnson (Wis.), Rob Portman (Ohio) and Mark Kirk (Ill.). Kirk is no longer serving in the Senate.

    The signatories acknowledged governmental reforms already made in Ukraine and expressed concern about the resignation of a Cabinet minister who heralded those reforms.
    “We similarly urge you to press ahead with urgent reforms to the Prosecutor General’s Office and judiciary,” the letter reads. “The unanimous adoption by the Cabinet of Ministers of the Basic Principles and Action Plan is a good step.”

    Time123 (52fb0e)

  24. mar-a-lago bedminster and the trump hotel in washington have never looked better mr nk

    president donald has also preserved protected and defended mr rocket mans nukes and icbms

    all the war criminals and crooked friends he pardoned too

    Dave (1bb933)

  25. Room rentals, resort fees and furniture removal: How Trump’s company charged the U.S. government more than $900,000
    …….
    Trump has now visited his own properties 270 times as president, according to a Washington Post tally — with another visit planned for Thursday, when he is scheduled to meet GOP donors at his Washington hotel.

    Through these trips, Trump has brought the Trump Organization a stream of private revenue from federal agencies and GOP campaign groups. Federal spending records show that taxpayers have paid Trump’s businesses more than $900,000 since he took office. At least $570,000 came as a result of the president’s travel, according to a Post analysis.

    Now, new federal spending documents obtained by The Post via a public-records lawsuit give more detail about how the Trump Organization charged the Secret Service — a kind of captive customer, required to follow Trump everywhere. In addition to the rentals at Mar-a-Lago, the documents show that the Trump Organization charged daily “resort fees” to Secret Service agents guarding Vice President Pence in Las Vegas and in another instance asked agents to pay a $1,300 “furniture removal charge” during a presidential visit to a Trump resort in Scotland.

    In addition, campaign finance records have provided new details about the payments the Trump Organization received from GOP groups, as a result of the 37 instances in which Trump headlined a political event at one of his properties. Those visits have brought the company at least $3.8 million in fees, according to a Post analysis of campaign spending records.

    Since taking office, Trump has taken other actions that have shattered his early promise to “completely isolate” himself from the Trump Organization.
    …….
    “One would think that if he was trying to completely isolate himself from his businesses, he wouldn’t talk about his business, he wouldn’t promote his business, he wouldn’t go to his businesses,” said Noah Bookbinder, executive director of the watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington.

    Instead, Bookbinder said, “his businesses have been a constant presence in his presidency. No. The idea that he was going to isolate himself completely — it’s been quite the opposite.”
    ……
    On the campaign trail in 2016, Trump had offered one simple way to underline his separation from his properties: He just wouldn’t visit.

    “I may never see these places again,” Trump said during a rally in August 2016. “Because I’m going to be working for you. I’m not going to have time to go play golf. Believe me.”
    …….
    ……Eric Trump said that the company charges taxpayers “like 50 bucks” for rooms used by his father’s aides and Secret Service agents.

    But The Post has found no evidence to support that assertion. Instead, the Trump Organization charged rates as high as $650 per night for rooms at Mar-a-Lago and $17,000 per month for a cottage at President Trump’s club in Bedminster, N.J., according to previously released federal receipts and two people who have seen nonpublic records.
    …….

    Rip Murdock (d2a2a8)

  26. On the campaign trail in 2016, Trump had offered one simple way to underline his separation from his properties: He just wouldn’t visit.

    “I may never see these places again,” Trump said during a rally in August 2016. “Because I’m going to be working for you. I’m not going to have time to go play golf. Believe me.”

    Believe him!

    nk (1d9030)

  27. Seeing as kolomoisky owns half the rada, his privat bank was the one that collapsed thar led to zelenskys election, well do the math.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  28. Trump just approved a deal for 150 million rapid tests.

    That’s contrary to the leftists like Cuomo that just stopped counting.

    NJRob (eb56c3)

  29. We shouldn’t vote for Cuomo for president.

    Time123 (66d88c)

  30. 7, whembly (c30c83) — 8/27/2020 @ 9:42 am

    Biden threatened aid money to Ukraine unless they drop the prosecutor who was investigating Burisma.

    It’s not an established fact that the prosecutor was inestigating Burisma. And Biden didn’t want to get rid of the prosecutor: Obama did. And Biden lied when he claimed he was instrumental in getting rid of Viktr shokin. Some Russian agents told lies to Giuliani.

    A company that was paying Hunter Biden $50,000 a MONTH.

    That was not a bribe. That was to create the appearance, in Ukraine that Mykola Zlochevsky had paid off the America government so people there would think investigating Burisma was futile.

    You can argue that Biden/Obama may have legit reason to making that demand (a quid pro quo),

    Getting rid of the prosecutor was just one of the things Obama wanted. Maily e wanted Ukraine to pass a package of anti corruption legislation and when they did, the second loan guarantee was given. BY the way the replacement rosecutor General wasn’t so good.

    but you can hand-wave that Biden’s son was benefiting from his father’s actions. That’s just one aspect.

    Not from his father;s actions, but from his father;s station.

    It was really really high grade honest graft. All that Hunter Biden had to do was, do nothing to disturb the status quo, recommend some good Delaware lawyers who cold give advice on ways of maintaining corporate control, and let Mykola Zlochevsky or his lawyers tell people that they had paid off the U.S. government.

    Sammy Finkelman (86c6e0)

  31. It also undermines claims from President Trump and Republicans that Biden demanded Ukraine terminate Prosecutor General Viktor Shokin and drop its investigation into the company for which Biden’s son, Hunter, sat on the board.

    I think Biden lied about his role in getting that prosecutor fired.

    Sammy Finkelman (86c6e0)

  32. no sammeh it’s not the appearance, they dismissed two different prosecutors, they found two tranches of cash, one in delaware last year, and in miami and cleveland banks just some weeks ago,

    bolivar de gris (7404b5)

  33. A government under Donald Trump is rotten and has to go.

    What would you replace it with, Pat?

    Gryph (f63000)

  34. Biden threatened aid money to Ukraine unless they drop the prosecutor who was investigating Burisma.

    FakeNews.
    There’s zero evidence that Shokin was investigating Burisma or Hunter Biden or Zlochevsky at the time of his sacking.

    Paul Montagu (a2078e)

  35. @33

    A government not under Donald Trump.

    Dave (1bb933)

  36. Repealing Glass-Steagall was the right move. It helped keep a number of banks afloat during a massive financial/liquidity crisis. Biden was on the right side of the issue, as were 89 other Senators.

    Paul Montagu (a2078e)

  37. 35. Right. But who would you replace Trump with? Anyone but Trump seems kind of counterproductive to me, but whatevs…

    Gryph (f63000)

  38. the problem was the content of the investments, subprime debt, churned by the cra revision, hud determinations like andrew cuomo and mel martinez, to be bipartisan,

    bolivar de gris (7404b5)

  39. 17.

    Please to tell me, all you all Trump supporters, what Trump has preserved, protected, and defended? You can’t even eat your waffle in peace in Columbia Heights.
    nk (1d9030) — 8/27/2020 @ 10:04 am

    The answer you’ll get, when it’s unwrapped and laid bare, is that Trump defends us from the dark, conspiratorial forces that are organized and arrayed to thwart Trump from defending us against anti-Trumpers. The unfalsifiable circularity of the argument is its defining feature.

    I can’t recommend highly enough this Twitter thread by Julian Sanchez. He explains the operation of Trump’s closed ideological ecosystem far more cogently than I could.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  40. About 80% of the tests taken are hypochondriacs, and this makes the reporting times longer. Also not helping are the special people who can get an instant test because they are better than us. Every time a bigwig gets an instant test, millions are hoping it’s positive.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  41. You can’t even eat your waffle in peace in Columbia Heights.

    With the Democrats in power, you’ll be lucky you’re allowed waffles.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  42. A government not under Donald Trump.

    So, David Duke would be OK? You don’t sound picky.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  43. Duke is a Trump supporter.

    Obviously Uday, Qusay and Javanka are not welcome either.

    Dave (1bb933)

  44. 42.

    No, not David Duke. I’m tentatively OK with anyone plausibly electable who’d run against Trump.

    Duke fails on both counts.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  45. Duke is a hazbeen kicked out of russia and iran, why raise his profile, only ilhan omar does that.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  46. Some puzzling that someone who always talks like a self-centered sociopath would act in a way that’s kinda self-serving.

    Radegunda (e1ea47)

  47. 44. “Plausibly electable,” huh? You mean like Joe Biden? The “Anybody but Trump” crowd is starting to sound more and more like the “Anybody but Biden” bunch, the closer we get to the election.

    Gryph (f63000)

  48. @36 I don’t think repealing Glass-Steagall was the right move, Paul Montagu. Nor do I believe it kept banks afloat during a financial/liquidity crisis. In fact, it had the opposite effect, but there were other factors involved.

    The purpose of Glass-Steagall was it required banks, lenders, mortgage companies, and financial institutions to maintain sufficient liquidity in the event of an economic downturn. In effect, it separated commercial banking (home and business loans, savings accounts, etc.) from financial banking (speculations on retirement accounts, investment funds, stock markets), in order to insure depositors’ money, protected by the FDIC, and enforce lending standards.

    The repeal of Glass-Steagall allowed banks to play fast and loose with depositors’ accounts, but it was the Community Reinvestment Act, which began under Bill Clinton and continued in full force under George W. Bush, that lowered lending standards. It was the whole idea that home ownership was a right, and that lending standards under Glass-Steagall were discriminatory against minorities.

    The federal government actually threatened banks, lenders and mortgage companies with IRS audits, if they did not lower their lending standards. That resulted in a financial crisis, manifested in real estate.

    No credit? No down payment? No problem! Just sign here, and everything will be taken care of. Uh huh. “I’m from the government, and I’m here to help you.”

    What happened was that these banks, lenders, mortgage companies, made all these bad loans, then hid them with a few good loans, and sold them as collateralized dept obligations on the secondary market. That way, the original lender would not be held responsible for the foreclosure in the event of an inevitable default.

    I saw it happen, time and again, when I first went into real estate in late 2003, right at the beginning of the bubble. Between 2004 and 2014, my mother and I were listing and selling on average 120 homes a year! (The average realtor nationwide will list and sell 6.) It was insane!

    I get this assignment. I locate and secure the property, do a walk-through inspection, take pictures, perform a comparative market analysis, and recommend a price opinion. And my recommended price opinions were almost always accurate to within +/- 5% of the actual sales price.

    I get this assignment. I locate, secure, inspect, do the research and recommend a price opinion. The house sells! Hey, I’ll take the commission. Then, six months later, I get an assignment. It’s the same house. I’m like, how do you lose a house in six months? I do not get it, but I understand it, if you know what I mean.

    These people never could have afforded to begin with. But they were approved for a loan. Mortgage payments, utilities, property taxes, they just couldn’t handle it. Either that, or it was their plan from the beginning. Hey, all they had to do was take out a mortgage. Everything else was provided to them–furniture, for example–No credit. No down payment. No problem! All they had to do was wait for the eviction/foreclosure notice, then pay for a moving van, strip the house, and drive away.

    I’ve seen it, over and over again. And Donald Trump is the one who is going to take care of this problem? Please, he’s the worst realtor/developer imaginable. I have seen his ilk too many times before.

    Gawain's Ghost (b25cd1)

  49. Great link, lurker 39. Thank you.

    DRJ (aede82)

  50. You do know the boston fed study. From a researcher who now heads the bank was the vhicle, like ferguson behind the flatline.the tools were the cra revisions back in the clinton administrations, hud regulations imposed by cisneros cuomo martinez and that othef cipher in w’s cabinet.

    Bolivar di griz (7404b5)

  51. 49. YW

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  52. https://twitter.com/THEHermanCain/status/1300211456126803968

    this is my favorite version of this ‘COVID isn’t that big a deal’ talking point. Imagine being the person typing that in to a dead man’s twitter account.

    Dustin (5418f4)

  53. @52, what do you think caused the other 150,000+ excess deaths so far this year? Slip and Falls?

    This dumb argument is like saying “Being obese doesn’t kill you unless you already have heart problems.”

    Time123 (daab2f)

  54. Townhall, LOL. They’re so far up Trump’s wazzoo, they’re tickling his tonsils. From the article:

    It helps to understand The Times’ religious devotion to testing if one understands that Democrats have long-since committed to taking the polar opposite position of whatever President Trump believes. It’s a symptom of Trump Derangement Syndrome. If Trump is hopeful about the effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine, then Democrats believe the drug will kill you. If Trump believes we should focus less on testing and more on treatments, Democrats and the media will insist we do nothing but testing and forget about treatments altogether.

    Bite me!

    nk (1d9030)

  55. well consider the lockdown was a strategy china pushed on all their platforms, they didn’t recommened nailing people in their houses, but that was likely the next step, also consider the strategy to handle any contagion, social distancing masks, et al, was gamed out in october, with the usual suspects the cdc the gates foundation, john hopkins university, of course we know the who’s part in this, and who they are accountable to, imperial college’s ferguson, provided their ‘hockey stick’ to make us mere mortals kneel, in the interim china seized the patent for remdesvir, the lockdown was to strangle all economic activity, which causes massive social turmoil, then you have the spark of insurgency, that was lit in minneapolis, and furthered by among other things the houston consulates media platform, along with the splc media matters chimera,

    bolivar de gris (7404b5)

  56. fwiw

    httpsFwww.powerlineblog.com%2Farchives%2F2020%2F08%2Fgetting-to-the-bottom-of-cuomos-coronavirus-nursing-home-scandal.php

    bolivar de gris (7404b5)

  57. https_www.powerlineblog.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.powerlineblog.com%2Farchives%2F2020%2F08%2Fgetting-to-the-bottom-of-cuomos-coronavirus-nursing-home-scandal.php

    bolivar de gris (7404b5)

  58. Have you ever considered paragraphs?

    Time123 (ae9d89)

  59. Surprise, the hyperpartisan at Townhall was being misleading. The same NYT piece that he’s relying on also said: “But researchers say the solution is not to test less, or to skip testing people without symptoms, as recently suggested by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Instead, new data underscore the need for more widespread use of rapid tests, even if they are less sensitive.”

    Paul Montagu (a2078e)

  60. 11 – Come and citizen arrest me, nk.

    mg (8cbc69)

  61. Charlotte, having seen his body
    Borne before her on a shutter,
    Like a well-conducted person,
    Went on cutting bread and butter.

    nk (1d9030)

  62. @55,
    With all due respect lycanthropy is not my thing. Thank you kindly for the invitation anyway. ^_~

    Towering Barbarian (7ce0bf)

  63. @54,
    Perhaps there would have been fewer deaths if Democrats did not believe in shoving China Virus patients into nursing homes in order to increase the body count? o_O

    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/390850/

    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2020/08/andrew_cuomo_serial_killer.html

    Towering Barbarian (7ce0bf)

  64. That was not to you, Towering Barbarian. It was to Salem Media.

    nk (1d9030)

  65. @66
    Understood. Sometimes I am way too much of a compulsive smartleck for my own good and become a bit boorish with it. Sorry about that.

    Towering Barbarian (7ce0bf)

  66. @64, Housing CV19 positive patients in nursing homes was a huge mistake. But that wasn’t your initial point. Your initial point was that the deaths were overstated, which isn’t accurate based on the data.

    Time123 (ae9d89)

  67. @60,
    But would that have been the first time the New York Times walked back something that contradicted the liberal narrative after reporting it? Keeping Walter Duranty in mind I would claim that they have not exactly been innocent of partisanship either. I’m less than certain that larger samples would compensate for inaccurate testing.

    Towering Barbarian (7ce0bf)

  68. I still have The Iron Scroll linked on my site, and your keyboard shortcuts too, Towering Barbarian. Always glad to see you drop by here.

    nk (1d9030)

  69. keyboard *emoticons*

    nk (1d9030)

  70. Checked back in (do it about every three months) to see if Patrick Frey is still suffering from advanced Trump Derangement Syndrome. He still is. This blog used to be entertaining and relevant. Not so much these days.

    Comanche Voter (ec29d0)


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