Patterico's Pontifications

6/2/2020

Presidents Talk

Filed under: General — Dana @ 3:31 pm



[guest post by Dana]

I wanted to share excerpts from former presidents Bush and Obama concerning the death of George Floyd and the upheaval in which we find ourselves. Both released thoughtful, measured statements and directives. I feel badly just posting excerpts because I think both statements deserve to be read in full.

From George W. Bush:

Laura and I are anguished at the brutal suffocation of George Floyd and disturbed by the injustice and fear that suffocate our country. Yet we have resisted the urge to speak out, because this is not the time for us to lecture. It is time for us to listen. It is time for America to examine our tragic failures – and as we do so, we will also see some of our redeeming strengths.

It remains a shocking failure that so many African Americans, especially African American men, are harassed and threatened in their own country. It is a strength when protesters, protected by responsible law enforcement, march for a better future. This tragedy – in a long series of similar tragedies – raises a long overdue question: How do we end systemic racism in our country? The only way to see ourselves in a true light is to is to listen to the voices of so many who are hurting and grieving. Those who set out to silence those voices do not understand the meaning of America – or how it becomes a better place.

America’s greatest challenge has been to unite people of very different backgrounds into a single nation of justice and opportunity. The doctrines and habits of racial superiority, which once nearly split our country, still threaten our Union. The answers to American problems are answered by living up to America’s ideals – to the fundamental truth that all human beings are created equal and endowed by God with certain rights. We have often underestimated how radical that quest really is, and how our cherished principles challenge systems of intended or assumed injustice. The heroes of America – from Frederick Douglass, to Harriet Tubman, to Abraham Lincoln, to Martin Luther King, Jr. – are heroes of unity. Their calling has never been for the fainthearted. They often revealed the nation’s disturbing bigotry and exploitation – stains on our character sometimes difficult for the American majority to examine. We can only see the reality of America’s need by seeing it through the eyes of the threatened, oppressed, and disenfranchised.

From Barack Obama’s “How to Make this Moment the Turning Point for Real Change”:

As millions of people across the country take to the streets and raise their voices in response to the killing of George Floyd and the ongoing problem of unequal justice, many people have reached out asking how we can sustain momentum to bring about real change.

First, the waves of protests across the country represent a genuine and legitimate frustration over a decades-long failure to reform police practices and the broader criminal justice system in the United States. The overwhelming majority of participants have been peaceful, courageous, responsible, and inspiring. They deserve our respect and support, not condemnation — something that police in cities like Camden and Flint have commendably understood.

On the other hand, the small minority of folks who’ve resorted to violence in various forms, whether out of genuine anger or mere opportunism, are putting innocent people at risk, compounding the destruction of neighborhoods that are often already short on services and investment and detracting from the larger cause. I saw an elderly black woman being interviewed today in tears because the only grocery store in her neighborhood had been trashed. If history is any guide, that store may take years to come back. So let’s not excuse violence, or rationalize it, or participate in it. If we want our criminal justice system, and American society at large, to operate on a higher ethical code, then we have to model that code ourselves.

I recognize that these past few months have been hard and dispiriting — that the fear, sorrow, uncertainty, and hardship of a pandemic have been compounded by tragic reminders that prejudice and inequality still shape so much of American life. But watching the heightened activism of young people in recent weeks, of every race and every station, makes me hopeful. If, going forward, we can channel our justifiable anger into peaceful, sustained, and effective action, then this moment can be a real turning point in our nation’s long journey to live up to our highest ideals.

And from President Trump today:

Love one another.

–Dana

64 Responses to “Presidents Talk”

  1. Preemptive strike: Yes, I realize that Bush and Obama are former presidents, therefore the post title isn’t quite accurate, but I don’t really care.

    Dana (0feb77)

  2. Two outta three ain’t bad.

    Dave (1bb933)

  3. Those are not quotes of 3 presidents. It’s 2 ex-presidents, and a twitter bot. Currently the office of president is vacant.

    Colonel Klink (Ret) (305827)

  4. His statement yesterday was still vastly different from Bush-Obama: A couple of sentences on Floyd and the rest on stomping the violent protesters and general chest-thumping.

    Paul Montagu (466a99)

  5. I never watch Trump’s speeches or read his tweets. It would make me too sick.

    The last election was a travesty, a false choice between two bankrupt paths. The next election is the same choice, doubled down. There are 300 million people in this country and AT LEAST 100 million of them are eligible for the job.

    Is this the best we can do? A system that forces this choice upon us has abandoned the consent of the governed and is just pretending to let us vote. Donald Trump talks about the Deep State, when he is merely one of its fronts. Joe Biden is no better, albeit better spoken..

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  6. [W]henever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

    Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

    But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.

    This doesn’t seem so far away any more.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  7. Currently the office of president is vacant.

    If only.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  8. I like how Dana juxtaposed GW Bush’s call to examine our consciences and to try to root out ingrained bigotry with BH Obama’s exhortation to stop engaging in violent acts allegedly done in the name of justice.

    JVW (54fd0b)

  9. NYTimes Digital front page.:

    Three stories and a video about Trump church visit and DC tear gas.

    One story about NYC riots at the bottom:

    New Yorkers demonstrate peacefully but there was also widespread looting

    https://mobile.twitter.com/MacaesBruno/status/1267785057558724613
    _

    harkin (9c4571)

  10. Harkin… one would think widespread rioting/looting in Manhattan would spur some interest from the NYT, but one would be wrong.

    Unexpectedly…

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  11. George Bush – Mr. Cuck at his best. Like all the Bushies – George always feels a strong bond with Hispanics and blacks. He was Mr. Affirmative Action when he was President, and was absurdly proud that he got more Hispanic Votes during his 1996 Texas governor run then any other Republican since Ike. Of course, when he ran for President in 2000 and 2004, he didn’t get that much more in the USA than McCain, romney, or trump, but the what the hey.

    That he would pop out of the woodwork with some mindless drivel about “The country needs to come together” and “Boy, Police Brutality is really bad” isn’t surprising.

    rcocean (846d30)

  12. Kevin M (ab1c11) — 6/2/2020 @ 4:43 pm

    There are 300 million people in this country and AT LEAST 100 million of them are eligible for the job.

    Maybe not quite so high.

    Harry S Trumab said there are a million men who could be president. At that time, circa 1948, the population of the United States was about 146 million. Say 1% of all adults over 35 could do a creditable job as president. Another way, in the year 2020, the population of the United States is estimated at 331 million (and 2,651 – if you subtract the 100,000 killed by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, it’s still about 331 million – and it’s really more than 100,000. You need y use the figure of excess deaths anyway.

    So that’s 2 1/4 times as much or 2,267,000 men who could be president. Don’t forget to add in women – even only counting 1/3 as many women, considering equivalent knowledge and experience – although you also need adaptability, where women have more) it’s still over 3 million candidates.

    I suppose the question is does Donald Trump make the cut? I’m talking only about ability not to be incompetent, not to get lost, not character. He probably comes at least close. So does just about every prominent and active politician. Of course they vary widely in wisdom and judgment – I’m just talking about someone who won’t feel in over his head like Harding pr U.S. Grant maybe.. Or Chet Arthur?

    The big problem is campaign finance “reform” and the demolition derby method of picking candidates.

    Sammy Finkelman (fd3539)

  13. 108,000+ people are dead from CoVid-19. 40 million people are unemployed. Rioting, looting, vandalism, and arson scar the streets. Businesses have been destroyed. The economy is in ruin.

    And Trump boasts (lies) that he has done more for the black community than any president since Lincoln? This after threatening to send the US military to attack peaceful protesters, after having Park Police violently remove peaceful protesters, with shields, batons, flash bangs, smoke grenades, rubber bullets, and tear gas, so he could hold “a” Bible upside down and backwards in front of a desecrated church.

    Clearly Bush and Obama (both two-term presidents) have a better understanding of the obligations of and responsibilities of the presidency. Ex-presidents carry those obligations and responsibilities with them.

    Gawain's Ghost (b25cd1)

  14. That he would pop out of the woodwork with some mindless drivel about “The country needs to come together” and “Boy, Police Brutality is really bad” isn’t surprising.

    Yeah, you’re right – we should all murder each other, and the police can show us how it’s done.

    Dave (1bb933)

  15. Covfefe!

    nk (1d9030)

  16. The only police brutality is when the FBI interviews Trump campaign staff.

    nk (1d9030)

  17. The doctrines and habits of racial superiority, which once nearly split our country, still threaten our Union.

    Again, this is complete nonsense. The Confederacy = Police Brutality in Minneapolis. What in the world is Bush talking about?

    rcocean (846d30)

  18. The president had peacefully protesting US citizens shot with rubber bullets because he wanted to get a picture with someone else’ Bible in front of a church. He had US citizens shot to get a picture.

    Apparently he can have people shot on Pennsylvania avenue and still have people vote for him. So that’s a thing.

    Nic (896fdf)

  19. How do we end systemic racism in our country? The only way to see ourselves in a true light is to is to listen to the voices of so many who are hurting and grieving. Those who set out to silence those voices do not understand the meaning of America – or how it becomes a better place.

    Again, what the beep does this mean? We need to Listen to those “grieving” to find out how to end “Systematic racism” ? Huh? Why didn’t Bush do something to end “systemic racism”? He was President for 8 years and it wasn’t 50 years ago, he was still President in 2012. And who is “Silencing” anyone? Certainly not Trump or the Republican party. The only one “Silencing” people is Twitter and those who want Facebook to censor the President of the USA.

    rcocean (846d30)

  20. What in the world is Bush talking about?

    You.

    Dave (1bb933)

  21. The problem with Bush is he’s a White Multi-Millionaire, the son of a President, who went to the most expensive colleges and prep schools in the USA and he has ZERO idea what real life for average Americans is like.

    Black people aren’t “Grieving and hurt” – before the lock-down they never had it so good. Black crime, Black unemployment, and black per capita income had never been higher. We’ve never had so many black people in positions of power whether in Business, Law Enforcement, Politics, or Education.

    So what the hell is Bush talking about? Why is he grandstanding on this issue? I hope he endorses Biden because it will just show what a RINO Fraud he is.

    rcocean (846d30)

  22. #12

    Mr. Cuck at his best. Like all the Bushies – George always feels a strong bond with Hispanics and blacks. He was Mr. Affirmative Action when he was President, and was absurdly proud that he got more Hispanic Votes during his 1996 Texas governor run then any other Republican since Ike.

    Imagine believing that this speaks poorly of Bush or well of you.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  23. What in the world is Bush talking about?

    You.

    Dave (1bb933) — 6/2/2020 @ 7:07 pm

    Yup.

    nk (1d9030)

  24. This entire event has been manufactured. Its like the absurd “Kneeling when they play the anthem” nonsense. What was Kaperknick protesting? He couldn’t say specifically. And the same is true today with Blacks talking about systemic racism. Well, the D’s run all the states and cities where most urban blacks live, so why don’t they talk to nancy pelosi, schumer, and biden?

    According to the WaPo database on police killings, a grand total of NINE, yes NINE unarmed blacks were killed by police in 2019. NINETEEN unarmed whites were killed in 2019. That’s in a country with 15,000 homicides, and a million cops making millions of arrests. Yet, “Police Brutality” is supposed to be some great issue of the day!

    rcocean (846d30)

  25. Black people aren’t “Grieving and hurt” – before the lock-down they never had it so good. Black crime, Black unemployment, and black per capita income had never been higher. We’ve never had so many black people in positions of power whether in Business, Law Enforcement, Politics, or Education.

    Uhh…wha… Well, your clan hood is showing.

    Colonel Klink (Ret) (305827)

  26. @22 I see you are reading Trump’s tweets. Probably you should put quotes around your post or you, like Biden, will be accused of plagiarism.

    Just because someone quits hitting you in the head and proceeds to repeatedly hit you in the foot instead doesn’t mean they’ve stopped hitting you.

    We know that systemic racism is still a problem because people study it. If you send nearly identical resumes out for Kaitlyn vs Shaniqua Johnson or Geoffrey and Da’rell Johnson, Kaitlyn and Geoffrey get far more calls to interview. We know because if you send a minority couple out to an apartment complex and then a nearly identically styled white couple, complexes that had no openings suddenly had an opening. People aren’t just making these things up, there’s a problem. It just isn’t an easy problem to solve.

    Nic (896fdf)

  27. rcocean,

    You know who’s even worse than GWB? Loser Pat Robertson and his low-ratings 700 Club.

    What a RINO cuck, amiright?

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  28. Colonel Klink (Ret) (305827) — 6/2/2020 @ 7:13 pm

    Well, your clan hood is showing.

    And that is the best summary of what we’re seeing play out on the streets. Do what I want, give me what I want, or you are a racist.

    When everyone is a racist does it really mean anything?

    frosty (f27e97)

  29. And that is the best summary of what we’re seeing play out on the streets. Do what I want, give me what I want, or you are a racist.

    When everyone is a racist does it really mean anything?

    When the pointy white hat fits…

    Colonel Klink (Ret) (305827)

  30. Colonel Klink (Ret) (305827) — 6/2/2020 @ 7:26 pm

    When the pointy white hat fits…

    You been trying on new hats lately? I can’t give you much advice there.

    frosty (f27e97)

  31. Do what I want, give me what I want, or you are a racist.

    When everyone is a racist does it really mean anything?

    When “give me what I want” = “treat me like other Americans,” it means something.

    DRJ (15874d)

  32. #32,

    +1

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  33. “ George always feels a strong bond with Hispanics and blacks.”

    – rcocean

    This is what bothers you most about Bush, I’m sure.

    Leviticus (b3a900)

  34. Trump is looking like the Fifth Avenue sissy boy aping masculinity with spit bubbles that he is, that’s the Trumpkins’ problem.

    nk (1d9030)

  35. DRJ (15874d) — 6/2/2020 @ 7:31 pm

    When “give me what I want” = “treat me like other Americans,” it means something.

    Nothing says “treat me like other Americans” like looting, rioting, killing cops, attacking random people that don’t agree with you. But sure, keep up the racial platitudes because that’s going to fix things.

    frosty (f27e97)

  36. Before going further on this exciting day for all America in space, I want to say a few words about the situation in Minnesota. The death of George Floyd on the streets of Minneapolis was a grave tragedy. It should never have happened. It has filled Americans all over the country with horror, anger, and grief.

    Yesterday, I spoke to George’s family and expressed the sorrow of our entire nation for their loss. I stand before you as a friend and ally to every American seeking justice and peace. And I stand before you in firm opposition to anyone exploiting this tragedy to loot, rob, attack, and menace. Healing, not hatred; justice, not chaos are the mission at hand. (Applause.)

    The police officers involved in this incident have been fired from their jobs. One officer has already been arrested and charged with murder. State and federal authorities are carrying out an investigation to see what further charges may be warranted, including against, sadly, the other three.

    In addition, my administration has opened a civil rights investigation, and I have asked the Attorney General and the Justice Department to expedite it.

    I understand the pain that people are feeling. We support the right of peaceful protesters, and we hear their pleas. But what we are now seeing on the streets of our cities has nothing to do with justice or with peace.

    The memory of George Floyd is being dishonored by rioters, looters, and anarchists. The violence and vandalism is being led by Antifa and other radical left-wing groups who are terrorizing the innocent, destroying jobs, hurting businesses, and burning down buildings.

    The main victims of this horrible, horrible situations are the citizens who live in these once lovely communities. The mobs are devastating the life’s work of good people and destroying their dreams. Right now, America needs creation, not destruction; cooperation, not contempt; security, not anarchy. And there will be no anarchy. Civilization must be cherished, defended, and protected. The voices of law-abiding citizens must be heard, and heard very loudly.

    We cannot and must not allow a small group of criminals and vandals to wreck our cities and lay waste to our communities. We must defend the rights of every citizen to live without violence, prejudice, or fear.

    We support the overwhelming majority of police officers who are incredible in every way and devoted public servants. They keep our cities safe, protect our communities from gangs and drugs, and risk their own lives for us every day.

    No one is more upset than fellow law enforcement officers by the small handful who fail to abide by their oath to serve and protect. My administration will stop mob violence and will stop it cold.

    It does not serve the interests of justice or any citizen of any race, color, or creed for the government to give into anarchy, abandon police precincts, or allow communities to be burned to the ground. It won’t happen.

    Those making excuses or justifications for violence are not helping the downtrodden, but delivering new anguish and new pain.

    From day one of my administration, we have made it a top priority to build up distressed communities and revitalize our crumbling inner cities.

    We fought hard with Senator Tim Scott and many others to create Opportunity Zones, helping to draw a surge of new investment to the places in our country that need it most. We must all work together as a society to expand opportunity and to create a future of greater dignity and promise for all of our people. We must forge a partnership with community leaders, local law enforcement, and the faith community to restore hope.

    Radical-left criminals, thugs, and others all throughout our country and throughout the world will not be allowed to set communities ablaze. We won’t let it happen. It harms those who have the least. And we will be protecting those who have the least.

    The leadership of the National Guard and the Department of Justice are now in close communication with state and city officials in Minnesota. And we’re coordinating our efforts with local law enforcement all across our nation.

    In America, justice is never achieved at the hands of an angry mob. I will not allow angry mobs to dominate. It won’t happen. It is essential that we protect the crown jewel of American democracy: the rule of law and our independent system of justice. Every citizen in every community has the right to be safe in their workplace, safe in their homes, and safe in our city streets.

    This is the sacred right of all Americans that I am totally determined to defend and will defend. My administration will always stand against violence, mayhem, and disorder.

    We will stand with the family of George Floyd with the peaceful protesters and with every law-abiding citizen who wants decency, civility, safety, and security.

    We are working toward a more just society, but that means building up, not tearing down; joining hands, not hurling fists; standing in solidarity, not surrendering to hostility.

    Moments ago, as we witnessed the launch of two great American astronauts into space, we were filled with the sense of pride and unity that brings us together as Americans. That same spirit which powered our astronauts to the Moon has also helped lift our country to ever greater heights of justice and opportunity throughout our history.

    So today, as we mark a renewed commitment to America’s future in space, a tremendous commitment it is. Let us also commit to a brighter future for all of our citizens right here on Earth.

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/remarks-president-trump-kennedy-space-center/

    BuDuh (3a4ac3)

  37. Black people aren’t “Grieving and hurt” – before the lock-down they never had it so good. Black crime, Black unemployment, and black per capita income had never been higher. We’ve never had so many black people in positions of power whether in Business, Law Enforcement, Politics, or Education.

    You’re telling black people what they are and are not feeling. Do you hear yourself? I suggest you ask a few black people if they are grieving and hurt. Also, while your list may be true, not everything is measured by external elements (jobs, positions). The issue is, how blacks are treated in America in spite of the external advances.

    Dana (0feb77)

  38. Who made African-Americans the arbiters of what they feel? If rcocean doesn’t know black people better than they do, the terrorists win.

    lurker (d8c5bc)

  39. 108,000+ people are dead from CoVid-19. 40 million people are unemployed. Rioting, looting, vandalism, and arson scar the streets. Businesses have been destroyed. The economy is in ruin.

    And again, which of these is Trump’s fault. Show your work.

    This is what I mean about some people being knee-jerkers one way or the other. There are LOTS of things that ARE Trump’s fault, starting with the low esteem people place on the US government and Trump’s daily beclowning, but Covid-19 and the joined-at-the-hip unemployment are NOT his fault. He did not kill Floyd, and the rioting, if anything, is being egged on by folks like AOC.

    Why do people make such fools of themselves with unrestrained partisanship?

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  40. Imagine believing that this speaks poorly of Bush or well of you.

    Indeed. I suspect that if either Bush or Obama could run again, and ran an independent campaign, they would win in a landslide. I bet even Jeb! would finish in front of Trump. Served cold indeed.

    Kevin M (ab1c11)

  41. And again, which of these is Trump’s fault. Show your work.

    There was already a study that showed that tens of thousands of lives would’ve been saved if shelter-in happened a week earlier. For weeks on end, Trump not only didn’t take the virus seriously, he down-talked it and failed to light a fire under CDC and FDA to fast-track testing. Trump is in the uniquely powerful position to marshal the resources of the federal government, and he went the other way. He’s not responsible for all the dead and unemployed Americans, but he shares responsibility for a chunk of ’em.
    He gets a pass on rioting, vandalism, etc. over the past week.

    Paul Montagu (dc797c)

  42. Hopefully just a few more months of this insanity until this man restores unity of the people and honesty to the White House:

    https://twitter.com/_Miller__Lite_/status/1268025928447336449?s=20
    _

    harkin (9c4571)

  43. No kidding Harkin. Biden’s efforts to capitalize on racial injustice are well known and pathetic. He is no more than a protest against Trump. What we actually need is a great leader, but the political parties are not well equipped to offer any.

    Dustin (d59cff)

  44. Show my work? Why should I, since it’s plainly evident to anyone with a television and a search engine on a computer.

    Gawain's Ghost (b25cd1)

  45. “capitalize on racial injustice” is a very mild description of Biden projecting his own racism and dishonesty unto others.

    If anyone thinks things will get better, not worse with Biden as president, they haven’t been paying attention.
    _

    harkin (9c4571)

  46. “ He gets a pass on rioting, vandalism, etc. over the past week.”

    Lol

    Urban centers owned and operated by Dems for years with corruption, sweeping police misconduct under the rug, 3rd world crime rates and abysmal schools plus releasing criminals back into their own neighborhoods ok we’ll not blame Trump for the past week.

    Who’s to blame if the protests/riots result in a huge virus spike?
    _

    harkin (9c4571)

  47. If anyone thinks things will get better, not worse with Biden as president, they haven’t been paying attention.

    That depends on what “things” they prioritize, their objectives and what they think constitutes success.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  48. The best thing I can say about Biden is that it won’t be hard for him to beat my expectations.

    I have a very hard time summoning an argument for him. I enjoy criticizing politicians exactly like Biden. He is extremely fake and manipulative, like Romney in 2012 (I did wind up voting for Romney but I didn’t volunteer and haven’t been politically affiliated or motivated ever since). He’s not as bad as Hillary’s fake black affect but it’s the same sort of thing.

    But think back to Obama in 2004. That idea he was going to bridge the gap and get America moving past the problem. Very high expectations that Obama never could have met, but he didn’t even try. the first chance he had, ‘that cop acted stupidly’ and the BLM movement became a thing.

    Compared with Trump’s de-escalation policy of bayonets and tear gas and an online army of insane trolls, you’d have to really hate democrats to vote Trump. And I’m still unclear on how Trump isn’t a democrat himself. All this ‘Achtually the KKK was originally democrats’ argument lines up well with Trump’s long history of being that kind of ‘gimme a permit and I give you a bag of cash’ democrat.

    Dustin (d59cff)

  49. Mike Mullen too

    It sickened me yesterday to see security personnel—including members of the National Guard—forcibly and violently clear a path through Lafayette Square to accommodate the president’s visit outside St. John’s Church. I have to date been reticent to speak out on issues surrounding President Trump’s leadership, but we are at an inflection point, and the events of the past few weeks have made it impossible to remain silent.

    Whatever Trump’s goal in conducting his visit, he laid bare his disdain for the rights of peaceful protest in this country, gave succor to the leaders of other countries who take comfort in our domestic strife, and risked further politicizing the men and women of our armed forces.

    There was little good in the stunt.

    Colonel Klink (Ret) (305827)

  50. Brutal.

    nk (1d9030)

  51. DRJ,

    Col. Klink posted Mattis’ statement in full at the AG Upgrades Charges… post.

    Dana (0feb77)

  52. @46 On a superficial level, my life would be better on a daily basis under Biden. Biden is not emotionally compelling and mostly isn’t prone to deliberately verbalizing controversial thoughts for the expressed purpose of making trouble, therefore I will spend less time fighting the urge to *head-desk* all the time.

    On a non-superficial level, Biden is unlikely to make my life either significantly better or significantly worse, so I’ll take what I can get with a superficial improvement.

    Nic (896fdf)

  53. mr. general jim mattis and mr. admiral mike mullen never had bonespurs

    they do not know how bonespurs sear the soul as well as the body

    nk (1d9030)

  54. Trump: I was only inspecting the bunker…

    Trump, who has been angered by reports that he was moved to the secure underground facility and the impression that he was in hiding, on Wednesday disputed that he was rushed to safety.

    “It was a false report. I wasn’t down,” Trump told Fox Radio host Brian Kilmeade. “I went down during the day, and I was there for a tiny, little short period of time, and it was much more for an inspection. There was no problem during the day.”

    Pressed by Kilmeade on whether Trump was “inspecting” the bunker because the Secret Service expressed concern for his safety, the president insisted that wasn’t the case.

    “Nope, they didn’t tell me that at all,” Trump said. “They said it would be a good time to go down, take a look, because maybe sometime you’re going to need it.”

    You can’t make this stuff up.

    Dave (1bb933)

  55. he may need to go stand in front of another church for a few minutes to find healing mr nk

    blessed are the bible wavers

    Dave (1bb933)

  56. Trump just tweetered…

    Probably the only thing Barack Obama & I have in common is that we both had the honor of firing Jim Mattis, the world’s most overrated General. I asked for his letter of resignation, & felt great about it. His nickname was “Chaos”, which I didn’t like, & changed to “Mad Dog”

    His primary strength was not military, but rather personal public relations. I gave him a new life, things to do, and battles to win, but he seldom “brought home the bacon”. I didn’t like his “leadership” style or much else about him, and many others agree. Glad he is gone!

    Literally every single thing he said was a lie.

    Didn’t like his leadership style because Mattis was a leader, and Trump is anti-leader.

    Colonel Klink (Ret) (305827)

  57. mattis is just jealous of mr donalds glorious victory in the battle of lafayette square a few days ago

    Dave (1bb933)

  58. Let’s see…
    Chaos was Mattis call sign, as in “Chaos Actual” which means Commander 1st Battalion 7th Marines. Chaos was the call sign of his combat element. He chose that callsign in 1990 because…

    Mattis has said on several occasions that his call sign of “Chaos” came from troops saying behind his back that the “colonel has an outstanding solution,” a dig which he used as a reminder to listen to his troops.

    Was given the nickname “Mad Dog” by the press in 2004.

    Mattis acquired the nickname ‘Mad Dog’ — a moniker that is not used by people who know him, friends say — after he made comments such as ‘be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet’ and ‘a good soldier follows orders, but a true warrior wears his enemy’s skin like a poncho

    Oh, and…

    Dear Mr. President:

    I have been privileged to serve as our country’s 26th Secretary of Defense which has allowed me to serve alongside our men and women of the Department in defense of our citizens and our ideals.

    I am proud of the progress that has been made over the past two years on some of the key goals articulated in our National Defense Strategy: putting the Department on a more sound budgetary footing, improving readiness and lethality in our forces, and reforming the Department’s business practices for greater performance. Our troops continue to provide the capabilities needed to prevail in conflict and sustain strong US global influence.

    One core belief I have always held is that our strength as a nation is inextricably linked to the strength of our unique and comprehensive system of alliances and partnerships. While the US remains the indispensable nation in the free world, we cannot protect our interests or serve that role effectively without maintaining strong alliances and showing respect to those allies. Like you, I have said from the beginning that the armed forces of the United States should not be the policeman of the world. Instead, we must use all tools of American power to provide for the common defense, including providing effective leadership to our alliances. NATO’s 29 democracies demonstrated that strength in their commitment to fighting alongside us following the 9-11 attack on America. The Defeat-ISIS coalition of 74 nations is further proof.

    Similarly, I believe we must be resolute and unambiguous in our approach to those countries whose strategic interests are increasingly in tension with ours. It is clear that China and Russia, for example, want to shape a world consistent with their authoritarian model—gaining veto authority over other nations’ economic, diplomatic, and security decisions—to promote their own interests at the expense of their neighbors, America and our allies. That is why we must use all the tools of American power to provide for the common defense.

    My views on treating allies with respect and also being clear-eyed about both malign actors and strategic competitors are strongly held and informed by over four decades of immersion in these issues. We must do everything possible to advance an international order that is most conducive to our security, prosperity and values, and we are strengthened in this effort by the solidarity of our alliances.

    Because you have the right to a Secretary of Defense whose views are better aligned with yours on these and other subjects, I believe it is right for me to step down from my position. The end date for my tenure is February 28, 2019, a date that should allow sufficient time for a successor to be nominated and confirmed as well as to make sure the Department’s interests are properly articulated and protected at upcoming events to include Congressional posture hearings and the NATO Defense Ministerial meeting in February. Further, that a full transition to a new Secretary of Defense occurs well in advance of the transition of Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in September in order to ensure stability within the Department.

    I pledge my full effort to a smooth transition that ensures the needs and interests of the 2.15 million Service Members and 732,079 DoD civilians receive undistracted attention of the Department at all times so that they can fulfill their critical, round-the-clock mission to protect the American people.

    I very much appreciate this opportunity to serve the nation and our men and women in uniform.

    James N. Mattis

    Colonel Klink (Ret) (305827)

  59. Enough “talk”…I want my generals to be more like William Sadler and John Amos in Die Hard 2 and take care of what needs taking care of.

    urbanleftbehind (965f56)

  60. Tom Cotton is running unopposed. In the primary and in November. No Democratic opponent. So it’s just his inbred Arkansas chicken-plucker at play?

    nk (1d9030)

  61. Of course, when he ran for President in 2000 and 2004, he didn’t get that much more in the USA than McCain, romney, or trump, but the what the hey.

    Let’s check.
    In 2000, Bush got 35% of the Hispanic vote. In 2004, Bush got 44% of the Hispanic vote.
    In, 2008, McCain got 31%. This was not long after the GOP rejected comprehensive immigration reform over Bush-McCain objections.
    In 2012, Romney got 27%, and his stance was harder-line than McCain’s.
    In 2016, Trump got only 18%. Some, he assumed, were people, but over four of five saw through his racism.
    rc, your comment is full of sh*t false. There is a clear, established trend of Hispanic support for GOP candidates, and it’s not a good trend.

    Paul Montagu (7ad313)

  62. “Nope, they didn’t tell me that at all,” Trump said. “They said it would be a good time to go down, take a look, because maybe sometime you’re going to need it.”

    That would make sense if they didn’t take his family, too. But maybe they wanted everyone to know about it. It seems strange no one has done that before but I doubt this family is compliant with requests from people they view as servants.

    What is also possible, and more troubling, is that Trump is telling the truth. They did tell him to just go look in case he needed it someday. In other words, they actively mislead the President to get him to act in a logical, responsible, prudent manner because common sense and reason don’t work with him.

    DRJ (15874d)


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