Patterico's Pontifications

12/1/2018

Cohen’s Lawyers: Cohen Kept Trump Apprised About His Ongoing Discussions with Russia About Trump Tower into June 2016

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 10:40 am



Last night, Michael Cohen’s lawyers filed a sentencing memorandum on his behalf. You can read it here. There are a couple of ledes buried in the thing at pages 20 and 21. This one at page 21 jumped out at me — in particular the phrase “and kept Client-1 apprised of these communications”:

Cohen Sentencing Memo Page 21

Another thing, which is getting a lot of attention but may or may not be noteworthy: remember what Ken White said in The Atlantic:

They still might. Cohen admitted that he lied to Congress to support President Trump’s version of events. He notably did not claim that he did so at Trump’s request, or that Trump knew he would do it. But if Cohen’s telling the truth this time, then this conclusion, at least, is inescapable: The president, who has followed this drama obsessively, knew that his personal lawyer was lying to Congress about his business activities, and stood by while it happened.

That italicized “not” gets a lot less meaningful when you consider this passage at page 20, in which Cohen’s lawyer says that during the preparation of his dishonest testimony, he was in regular contact with White House staff and legal counsel:

Cohen Sentencing Memo Page 20

It doesn’t say what he told them, which is why it may not be noteworthy. I have a feeling that question is going to get asked.

[Cross-posted at The Jury Talks Back.]

177 Responses to “Cohen’s Lawyers: Cohen Kept Trump Apprised About His Ongoing Discussions with Russia About Trump Tower into June 2016”

  1. White: “But if Cohen’s telling the truth this time….”

    But if Julie Swetnick is telling the truth this time….

    Munroe (79cf78)

  2. meanwhile the sleazy trash of the dirty Chris Wray fbi are raiding the houses of whistleblowers

    happyfeet (1e784d)

  3. and also texas doesn’t have a defense, which is many problematic

    happyfeet (1e784d)

  4. Cant be helped, a bogus inquiry deserves bogusresponses,

    Narciso (bbe94c)

  5. So its Hillary’s people who can go on an infinite witchhunt while she gets off Scot free for actual felonies.

    Narciso (bbe94c)

  6. More smoke, no fire 🔥

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  7. He followed the payoff of two skanks quite closely, so there’s reason to believe that he’s been closely following his other immoralities.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  8. That is correct Narciso.

    NJRob (ef9082)

  9. Stephens has as good an explanation as any as to why Trump lets Putin grab him by his pu$$y:

    The abiding mystery with Trump is why he continually attempts to ignore outrages, finesse differences and curry personal favor with Putin. Ideologically it makes no sense: Conservatives have been hawkish on Russia since the days of Warren Harding and V. I. Lenin. Politically it makes no sense: A pro-Russia policy has no domestic constituency. Policy-wise, it makes no sense: Trump has actively fought Senate Republicans and his own senior advisers over taking a tougher Russia line. (The sanctions enacted last year were forced on him over his fierce objections.) Psychologically, it makes no sense: If there’s one thing Trump detests, it’s being mocked and derided as a weakling and the creature of stronger, smarter adversaries.
    Hence the only other sensical hypothesis — namely, Trump’s self-interest — which even conservatives need to admit has become much more plausible following Michael Cohen’s guilty plea this week. The president’s former fixer now admits that he lied to Congress over the timing and extent of his efforts to make contacts and win contracts in Moscow on behalf of the Trump Organization, which lasted until at least June 2016, after Trump had essentially clinched the Republican nomination for president. By then questions about his Russia ties were fast becoming a political liability.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  10. The soviet union represented a distinct ideological system that threat from western Europe to the far east, do we really want to get into a scrum with Russia in their front yard.

    narciso (d1f714)

  11. narciso (d1f714) — 12/1/2018 @ 1:09 pm

    Survey says “no.” But maybe we can buy them a subscription to “wine of the month” and debrief the delivery guy.

    felipe (023cc9)

  12. Even Reagan didn’t want an open confrontation until they crossed the fulda gap

    https://townhall.com/columnists/ryanmauro/2018/11/30/congress-must-investigate-major-terrorismfinancing-case-n2536719

    narciso (d1f714)

  13. In this case it seems were collaborating with Qatar:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/MZHemingway/status/1068927734385180673?p=v

    narciso (d1f714)

  14. “Even Reagan didn’t want an open confrontation until they crossed the fulda gap”

    What kind of weird revisionist history is this?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reagan_Doctrine

    Davethulhu (519d49)

  15. Did we invade east germany, Grenada was in the midst of a p of a power struggle Nicaragua was a proxy war as was Angola Cambodia Mozambique and afghanistam

    narciso (d1f714)

  16. “Did we invade east germany”

    Who is suggesting Trump invade anything?

    Davethulhu (519d49)

  17. Davethulhu (519d49) — 12/1/2018 @ 1:22 pm

    Wikipedia revisionist history?

    You can’t believe everything on the internet – Mark Twain

    felipe (023cc9)

  18. Happy Saturday, everyone; I am off to worship my Creator.

    felipe (023cc9)

  19. Felipe, I’m referring to narciso revising history, not wikipedia. Reagan openly confronted Russia, as shown by the “Reagan Doctrine”. Narciso seems to define “open confrontation” as acts of war.

    Also, Afghanistan wasn’t a proxy war, at least not for Russia.

    Davethulhu (519d49)

  20. Direct militaty intervention, happened only when absolutely necessary we supported proxy elements like savimbi, (one of manaforts earliest clients) and the other relevant favtiond.

    narciso (d1f714)

  21. Ok, so what’s your point. People aren’t criticizing Trump because he won’t intervene militarily (proxy or otherwise), he’s being criticized because he won’t intervene unless his arm is twisted. Which is the opposite of Reagan.

    Davethulhu (519d49)

  22. *won’t intervene in any fashion at all

    Davethulhu (519d49)

  23. The soviet union represented a distinct ideological system that threat from western Europe to the far east, do we really want to get into a scrum with Russia in their front yard.

    Putin has been an imperialist threat to his neighbors, and that’s just a fact. Does it really matter if the desire to take or control the territory of other sovereign states is Soviet-inspired versus Putin-inspired. I don’t see anything wrong with floating a few American military vessels into the Sea of Azov, with Ukrainian permission. It sends a message. I also don’t see anything wrong with Ukrainian jets sinking the cargo ship that that was or is illegally blockading Kerch Street. I also don’t see anything wrong with those jets disintegrating the Crimea Bridge, which was illegally built in the first place.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  24. So, lessee. The DNI himself lies to Congress about something really important (tapping everyone’s phones) and nothing happens.

    Trump’s lawyer lies to Congress about something that was arguably none of Congress’ business, and Trump should have been aware he lied, and it’s the crime of the effing century. Trump has at least two defenses, one regarding the word “aware” and the other regarding his understanding of the word “lie.”

    C’mon. Catch him in something big, or it’s Beria’s version of the ham sandwich: “Show me the man, and I’ll show you the crime.”

    Kevin M (a57144)

  25. Um, Kerch Strait, not Kerch Street.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  26. Far as we know, the captured Ukrainian navy personnel are not only still being held by Putin, they’ve been taken to Moscow prisons, which is a breach of the 2003 treaty between the two nations and a violation of international law. Also, when a Putin flack tells you that there’s no blockade at Kerch Strait, he’s lying. Even the Putin toadies at GlobalResearch know that such a blockade is an act of war. To date, the only thing Trump has done in response to Putin’s belligerence was to cancel a meeting.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  27. Some folks just don’t like Trump and they drum up, gin up, spread gossip, polish turds… ANYTHING that they think will hurt Trump. It has gotten to be a serious illness, manisfested in many ways.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  28. That’s because every inch of that ground they’re fighting over has been soaked with Russian blood many times over, and Russians are not verpy foopter boys who shrug and have some avocado toast and a LaCroix when somebody tries to take it. Why, I’ll bet you couldn’t find an avocado toast in all of Russia.

    nk (dbc370)

  29. So Trump’s crime is as a hotelier and real estate developer he tried unsuccessfully to build something in a major Euro capital. The crime here is…..trying to make money? He wasn’t president, he was a private citizen. There’s still no showing of any quid for a pro quo. Not like Melania took a BS half mil speaking fee and President Trump sold Putin 20% of the US uranium reserve.

    Trumps greatest mistake here is employing a half wit like Cohen.

    Bugg (024e40)

  30. As for Cohen, this is obviously a deal he made with Mueller to confess to a fake crime which implicates Trump in exchange for being let off on his real financial and tax crimes.

    nk (dbc370)

  31. you think they will apologize right:

    https://dailycaller.com/2018/12/01/epa-scott-pruitt-samantha-dravis/

    narciso (d1f714)

  32. To date, the only thing Trump has done in response to Putin’s belligerence was to cancel a meeting.

    He still found a way to give Putin a quickie – err, ah…informal meeting” – in the dining room.

    Dave (1bb933)

  33. 26, but if Cubans are indeed the Brahmins/Badasses of the Spanish infused peoples of the western hemisphere, couldn’t even a fraction of the Florida emigre community have made quick work of Castos regime without a scintilla of US military support?

    urbanleftbehind (5e7f00)

  34. …and Russians are not verpy foopter boys who shrug and have some avocado toast and a LaCroix when somebody tries to take it.

    I don’t what “verpy foopter” means, but it’s still funny, but there’s only one side that’s doing the taking here, and it’s the Russians. Putin’s government gave its word at least twice that they would take no Ukrainian land, word that was welshed on.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  35. I know no one was really watching it,

    https://libertyunyielding.com/2018/12/01/murphy-brown-remake-canceled-but-not-before-telling-it-like-it-isnt/

    communism is insidious that way, they promise ‘hope and change’ or ‘bread and liberty’ and then you end up with neither,

    narciso (d1f714)

  36. Russians feel entitled to Ukraine, like we feel about Texas, with a little Kansas thrown in, so you want to show the fleet in the black sea, what’s the next step,

    narciso (d1f714)

  37. Russians feel entitled to Ukraine…

    That’s quite the paternalistic and patronizing perspective by those Russians who feel that way, but a deal is a deal. Putin has no more right to Ukraine than Saddam Hussein had for Kuwait.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  38. There is some tradition that Ukraine is Magna Ruthenia, but the parts that are non-negotiable are the Crimea and the Black Sea. Russia will never give those up. Not never, ever, ever.

    nk (dbc370)

  39. oh, never mind then:

    https://legalinsurrection.com/2018/12/brenda-snipes-on-second-thought-im-not-resigning-as-broward-co-election-supervisor/

    the earlier link is symbolic of it’s trek to zimbabwezation,

    narciso (d1f714)

  40. Back on topic,
    1) Where does Congress get off asking an attorney about the confidences and secrets of, and communications with, his clients; and
    2) What kind of idiot White House based legal counsel authorized Cohen to say anything more than “Go soak your heads”?

    Was it because they thought they had a friendly committee under Republican control, and could get away with anything?

    nk (dbc370)

  41. It was probably Schiff for brains investigators that went for this, remember how they tried to purge nunes, to prevent the declassifications which seems to have worked,

    narciso (d1f714)

  42. Isn’t Adam Schiff a Democrat? From California to boot? Cohen should have booted him. He should have been ordered to boot him. Too late now.

    nk (dbc370)

  43. so they think having petrillo who was part of the sdny fraternity, he will get leniency, the statement is very cloying citing Floyd Meriwether and willy nelson of all people,

    narciso (d1f714)

  44. Putin has no more right to Ukraine than Saddam Hussein had for Kuwait.

    The main difference being that we were willing to go to war with Hussein over Kuwait.

    Kevin M (a57144)

  45. ah paul did the Budapest memorandum, stop them from invading the Donbass the first time,

    So might makes right? I’m not sure what your link had to do with your comment, but Putin has been welshing on the memorandum and treaty ever since he invaded the Crimean region of Ukraine. Either the rule of law means something or it doesn’t.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  46. I’m curious. What should the US do about Ukraine? Give them tanks and fighter jets? Put an Army division there? Nuke Moscow? Putin has made it very clear that he doesn’t care about sanctions (and I doubt his Swiss bankers care either).

    Kevin M (a57144)

  47. Like Putin said: “Russia was weak then. We are not weak now.”

    Crimea is not historically part of Ukraine. It belonged to Russia until 1954 when Khrushchev transferred its administration to Ukraine SSR. Russia was weak in the last days of Gorbschev and during the administration of Yeltsin and could do little about it when the Soviet Union broke up. The orchestration of the ouster of Russia-friendly Yanukovych by the United States in 2014 was Putin’s Red Line,and Russia was not weak anymore.

    nk (dbc370)

  48. “What should the US do about Ukraine?”

    We should give Putin a $50 million penthouse apartment, obviously.

    Davethulhu (519d49)

  49. We should give Putin a $50 million penthouse apartment, obviously.

    What? Are you kidding? Putin is no cheap hood from Little Rock. He’s big-time. We gotta give him at least 20% of our uranium production.

    (I know, I know, but one hyperbole deserves another.)

    nk (dbc370)

  50. I guess it shouldn’t surprise.

    Narciso (d1f714)

  51. This isn’t an American problem.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  52. @58. ^Re-Crimea/Ukraine.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  53. Like Putin said: “Russia was weak then. We are not weak now.”

    Propaganda.

    Russia is a verpy foopter boy economically, with a GDP 25% smaller than Italy. They don’t eat avocado toast because they can’t afford it, and instead of LaCroix they knock back antifreeze.

    The Russians bankroll certified @ssholes like Iran and Syria to mess with us, why shouldn’t we repay the favor? Hit back twice as hard!

    Dave (1bb933)

  54. Thus was why the Iran deal, was very bad, the Russians have had contacts in south Yemen going back to the 70s

    narciso (d1f714)

  55. The number of Trump campaign operatives who lied (or “made misstatements” if we want to be generous) about their contacts with Russia is not small. We have Mike Flynn, Rick Gates, Paul Manafort, Michael Cohen, Carter Page, KT McFarland, Jared Kushner, Donald Trump Jr. We also have meetings with Russians by Scaramucci, Roger Stone, Erik Prince and Jerome Corsi.

    Meeting and communicating with Russians is not in and of itself a crime. Which leads to the question, why make lying about Russian contacts an established practice and custom within the campaign at a time when Russia is attempting to tamper with our election? That’s just bizarre and leads any sane non-hyperpartisan to ask “why?”

    JRH (f51cae)

  56. whoops I think I’m wrong about Corsi. scratch that.

    JRH (f51cae)

  57. And Stone didn’t meet, just communicate. I should have edited. d’oh.

    JRH (f51cae)

  58. And I left out good ol Jeff Sessions.

    JRH (f51cae)

  59. Like the 30 senators who kissed kislyaks ring to get the Iran deal passed, how did said ambassador get invited to the conventions why was he sitting in with the Democrats on inauguration eve.

    Narciso (d1f714)

  60. Meanwhile Syria wasnt challenged, Cuba was openly courted the reward were the damaged diplomats Venezuela was only slightly inconvenienced

    Narciso (d1f714)

  61. What should the US do about Ukraine?

    One, double down on sanctions against Putin’s pet oligarchs, invoking the Magnitsky Act as much as possible. Putin may claim that it doesn’t affect him, but his oligarchs hate it. Two, provide Ukrainians with humanitarian and military aid. Three, help them qualify for inclusion in the EU. Four, keep oil prices down as much as possible by expanding North American oil exploration. Putin’s economy is afflicted with Dutch Disease, and his dependence on oil and gas exports will hurt him. Five, create incentives to expand our LNG exports to Europe.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  62. You have it all figured out, what if he targets a tank division or goes poaching in the western end of ukraine.

    Narciso (d1f714)

  63. Crimea is not historically part of Ukraine.

    That shouldn’t matter, and Putin didn’t stop at the Crimean region of Ukraine because he’s undertaking a slow-motion invasion of eastern Ukraine. Putin can claim that it’s part of Russia but, in this century, the claim is illegitimate.
    It seems to me the attitude that says Ukraine is part of Russia is the same attitude you see with Hamas when they say they seek a “free Palestine from river to sea”, like that crackpot professor said; in other words, that Israel belongs to Greater Palestine. Hamas, after all, seeks a one-state solution, with that one state being run by Palestinian Arabs and Israel eliminated, written out of existence. Problem is, Israel is an internationally-recognized sovereign state with the full right of self-determination. If you can agree that Israel has a right to exist then, for the sake of intellectually consistency, you should also agree that that same full right to exist applies to Ukraine.
    Ukraine isn’t a vassal state. Their rights are subjugated to Russia’s. They’re not like an autonomous region like Kurdish Iraq. They have just as much a right to exist as Russia does. If Hamas doesn’t have a legitimate claim over Israeli territory, then Putin has no more of a legitimate claim over Ukrainian land.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  64. You have it all figured out, what if he targets a tank division…

    Putin is already taking out tanks in eastern Ukraine, so what’s the dif? And now Putin is escalating the conflict to Kerch Strait and the Sea of Azov. He’s not even hiding this act of war. The question I have is, why hasn’t Trump figured this out, and why isn’t he doing more than semi-canceling a meeting?

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  65. The orchestration of the ouster of Russia-friendly Yanukovych by the United States in 2014 was Putin’s Red Line,and Russia was not weak anymore.

    That’s Putin propaganda. Yanukovych fled his office after a popular revolution.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  66. 71 you want to fight putin go ahead.

    lany (e61c75)

  67. you want to fight putin go ahead.

    Strawman. No one has suggested that Americans fight Putin, in Ukraine or anywhere else.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  68. Crimea is not historically part of Ukraine.

    Kaliningrad – aka Konigsberg, East Prussia – is not historically part of Russia, either…

    Any claim that entitles Putin to the Ukraine also entitles him to the rest of the Soviet empire, and that fantasy needs to be terminated with extreme prejudice.

    Dave (1bb933)

  69. Israel is an internationally-recognized sovereign state with the full right of self-determination. If you can agree that Israel has a right to exist then,

    I can agree that Israel has a right to exist within its internationally recognized borders. Look them up.

    for the sake of intellectually consistency, you should also agree that that same full right to exist applies to Ukraine.

    For the sake of intellectual honesty, please don’t imply that that I support Putin annexing Ukraine when I have only, and repeatedly only, discussed the Crimea and the Black Sea.

    If possession is nine points of the law, either in the context of Israel taking the West Bank, Gaza, and Golan Heights, or in the context of Khrushchev joining Crimea to the Ukraine 64 years ago, then Mother Russia now has the nine points. She has possession of the Crimea and the Black Sea.

    nk (dbc370)

  70. Dave, your words for the day are strength and wealth.

    nk (dbc370)

  71. And I am not particularly a fan of consistency, intellectual or any other kind. A wide variety of widely inconsistent things enter a person’s digestive tract, to be turned into a consistent mass which is excreted. If you know what I mean. But that’s a subject for another day.

    nk (dbc370)

  72. Are you defending Russia again nk? Is the Kremlin “very legal and very cool”?

    One askpect of all this lying about Russia that’s not getting much attention is that the minute down-and-dirty Donnie started lying to us about his Russia deal in the works, Putin had him under his thumb – even if he didn’t before. Putin could show that we were being fed a pack of lies. At that moment and lasting his whole Presidency to-date, Trump was, and has been, compromised.

    Are we just going to sweep this monster under the rug too and pretend it didn’t happen?

    Would he have been elected if we knew what was really going on at the time? I seriously doubt it. Of course, he did too. That’s why he lied about it.

    Tillman (61f3c8)

  73. askpect? -> aspect

    Tillman (61f3c8)

  74. I’m a so happy, happy, happy Mrs duechbag Clinton is not president.

    mg (ebf6c2)

  75. Even the pos Dowd has had enough of the uranium witch.

    mg (ebf6c2)

  76. Never knew the French had this much fight in them.

    mg (ebf6c2)

  77. Tillman: “At that moment and lasting his whole Presidency to-date, Trump was, and has been, compromised.”

    Yeah, this is the key….and too many Republicans chose to stick their collective heads in the sand when Trump was signalling a very bizarre admiration for Putin during the campaign. We now know why…Trump was hedging his bets. We will endlessly hand-wring about what was legal and is it a high crime….but there is little question about the ethical nature of what was done and not revealed. This is why character matters….and why the company you keep matters. We now have some here with over 2 years invested in running cover…they desperately want to not be wrong in their assessment of the man and situation…because why would we ever trust their judgment again?

    AJ_Liberty (165d19)

  78. For the sake of intellectual honesty, please don’t imply that that I support Putin annexing Ukraine…
    But you are implying that you support Putin’s take the Crimean region of Ukraine, which is intellectually inconsistent.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  79. Well this is what happens when political options are precluded

    Narciso (c47fd3)

  80. Dave, your words for the day are strength and wealth.

    And yours are dialectical materialism.

    :)

    Dave (1bb933)

  81. R.I.P. actor Ken Berry (F-Troop, Mama’s Family)

    Icy (cffe1c)

  82. And Mayberry RFD. R.I.P

    JRH (f51cae)

  83. Yes Dave we know dialectical materialism, it is pertinent in China perhaps south Africa but not here.

    Narciso (773cb9)

  84. So was Trump letting Cohen lie to cover-up collusion or the appearance of collusion? Was Trump covering up something even more important in June 2016, that he did not expect to win the Presidency, but wanted to make money from the chance he could win?

    Dale Newland (510e40)

  85. “Would he have been elected if we knew what was really going on at the time? I seriously doubt it.”
    Tillman (61f3c8) — 12/2/2018 @ 6:23 am

    What was going on at the time? You mean if we knew about the FISA warrants, Russian-sourced golden showers dossier, surveillance, frenzied unmaskings, FBI love bird texts, etc.?

    Yeah, he would’ve won the popular vote going away.

    Munroe (15e677)

  86. nk (dbc370) — 12/2/2018 @ 4:18 am

    Heh, very well said.

    felipe (023cc9)

  87. “Life sucks, but in a beautiful kind of way.”

    —- Axl Rose

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  88. For the sake of intellectual honesty, please don’t imply that that I support Putin annexing Ukraine…

    NK! Are you doing things again? Don’t you know how readers might take it? Don’t you care what readers might say, or think about you*?

    No? Well, then have a seat and share a drink with me while we….

    * because it is always about you, of course.

    felipe (023cc9)

  89. Ken Berry and WOW

    felipe (023cc9)

  90. Bad tan or blackface?

    urbanleftbehind (1d8f1a)

  91. Or good tan and brown face, forgive me I’m watching Creed 2 and out of courtesy not playing sound from any YouTube vids.

    urbanleftbehind (1d8f1a)

  92. On the fire stick?

    Narciso (d1f714)

  93. Meh! I am only laying out bare facts. But that doesn’t help embarrass Trump, so “Shut up!” they explained.

    It would be nice, though, if *some people* were as passionate about the defense of our border as they are about the defense of Ukraine’s post-1954 borders. But what am I talking about? That would not be consistent with criticizing everything Trump does (or does not do).

    And one more thing. Google *Victoria Nuland F**k the EU*. Η ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΩΣΕΙ ΥΜΑΣ.

    nk (dbc370)

  94. Η ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΩ ΣΕΙ Υ ΜΑΣ

    felipe (023cc9)

  95. ?

    nk (dbc370)

  96. Η ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΩ Υ ΜΑΣ

    felipe (023cc9)

  97. I am playing a parsing game, nk.

    felipe (023cc9)

  98. nowhere….now here.

    felipe (023cc9)

  99. Useful Ukrainian history is complicated swoboda ‘freedom’ is descendent of oun, which to put it charitably has bad ju ju, which they seem to repeat.

    Narciso (d1f714)

  100. urbanleftbehind (1d8f1a) — 12/2/2018 @ 10:54 am

    The worst face of all – white-face.

    felipe (023cc9)

  101. Something like this, felipe?

    (Start with Greek)
    Η ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ
    The Truth.
    ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΩ
    I free.
    (Switch to Spanish.)
    Υ ΜΑΣ
    And More.

    It doesn’t work all that well because Η ΑΛΗΘΕΙΑ (The Truth) is nominative and cannot be the objective of ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΩ (I free.)

    nk (dbc370)

  102. Exactly right. Being a multi-lingual, it was too tempting not to indulge. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, nk; you rock.

    felipe (023cc9)

  103. Narciso (d1f714) — 12/2/2018 @ 12:12 pm

    Of course it will be filed under “lessons ignored.”

    felipe (023cc9)

  104. The Paralysis of Analness continues to be practiced by teh NeverTrump…

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  105. Which is not to say hes not dead, but that’s nowhere near the end of the story,

    Narciso (d1f714)

  106. K.B.: R.I.P. Mayberry R.F.D.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  107. Tune for a Sunday afternoon… https://youtu.be/slnTV4TqXbo

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  108. 89 – “RIP actor Ken Berry”

    Combat/McHale’s Navy/F Troop -Tuesday nights on ABC were armed forces heaven.

    Berry’s first wife Jackie Joseph used to guest host on one of the LA morning shows, my mom said I was mesmerized by her balcony.

    harkin (a53154)

  109. And another… https://youtu.be/fjkVYOArUQM

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  110. @ nk, who I’m pretty sure already knows about the topics on which I’m about to write, but who triggered this screed when he wrote (#44):

    Back on topic, 1) Where does Congress get off asking an attorney about the confidences and secrets of, and communications with, his clients; and 2) What kind of idiot White House based legal counsel authorized Cohen to say anything more than “Go soak your heads”?

    I don’t particularly blame Congress-critters for asking; whether they have an expectation to get answers is another, slightly different subject.

    Before there can ever be an assertion of privilege, there must first be a question or request, the response to which might arguably be privileged. And sometimes the client’s overall strategic goals are deemed by the client — after thorough consideration with the benefit of private advice of counsel — to justify declining to assert and stand on that privilege.

    It’s to Trump’s credit that he’s done a lot less than he theoretically might have done to assert various privileges — chief among them executive privilege and attorney-client privilege — on various matters, and in response to various questions and requests, whose responses were at least arguably subject to privilege. The relevant model is not Bill Clinton’s White House during the various investigations into his and his wife and staffers’ misdeeds, but rather George W. Bush’s in L’Affair Plame, when Dubya instructed, in writing, everyone in his administration, including among them many lawyers, that as a condition of their continued employment, they must cooperate fully with Patrick Fitzgerald’s investigation and decline to assert, on their own or on Dubya’s behalf, any arguable privileges. Trump proxies like Rudy Giuliani constantly argue, as part of their “witch hunt” meme, about how open and cooperative the Trump Administration has been in responding to Mueller’s questions and inquiries, including production of millions of pages of responsive documents, and including submission to FBI or Mueller staff interviews by many Trump Administration personnel, including lawyers. Ditto, for the most part, with regard to requests for documents and testimony from Trump subordinates in various congressional committee proceedings. And in the SDNY proceedings before Judge Kimba Wood regarding the screening of materials seized from Cohen’s office, despite Trump’s (and others’) initial assertions of dramatic outrage over the FBI raiding a lawyer’s files, Trump likewise ended up asserting privilege as to only a tiny, tiny slice of those documents.

    My inference is that Trump, guided by reasonably wise counsel who well appreciate Trump’s potential political as well as his legal jeopardy, decided not to pick these potential privilege fights because he and his team calculated that they had more to gain, in terms of PR and husbanding of resources, than to lose, based on their internal confidence that “smoking gun” documents and witnesses were unlikely to turn up.

    But in spectacular contrast to the Bush-43/Plame paradigm, Trump is emphatically not waiving any privileges when it comes to securing his own personal participation in a live Q&A. Dubya welcomed Fitzgerald’s team into the White House for a detailed and lengthy on-the-record interview during which he walked the same walk he’d prescribed for his subordinates: He answered every question, and hid behind no privileges even when he clearly could have made a legally valid privilege assertion to avoid having to answer.

    Recall that despite his Yale diploma and Harvard MBA, George W. Bush never claimed to be a stable genius, never claimed to be smarter than his own advisers, and even played along with SNL’s whole “misunderestimated” meme. Yet Dubya confidently strode into the supposed “perjury trap,” and disarmed it in the traditional way — by telling the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.*

    Trump … won’t. And at least with respect to any sort of obstruction of justice jeopardy, there is no other direct evidence except for his personal testimony as to his state of mind during the events in question; every other bit of evidence, from any source, is no more than circumstantial on the key question of whether he was acting with the requisite “corrupt heart” to prove such offenses. And while Giuliani and other Trump proxies continue to try to shape public opinion by aggressively pointing out all the cooperation, all of the non-assertion of arguable privileges, that the Trump Administration, has agreed to “voluntarily,” I don’t think that will end up influencing the judges who will resolve the privilege and related claims that Trump’s team will assert as to him personally if Mueller secures a grand jury subpoena with Donald J. Trump’s name on it.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  111. The asterisk from my #120 above: One indirect subordinate of Dubya’s — his Veep’s chief of staff, Lewis “Scooter” Libby, somehow managed to fall from that path for reasons that are still inexplicable to me; that which the jury found to be his deliberate lies to the FBI made no sense either at the time or with the benefit of hindsight, in that they had no prospect of benefiting Libby himself, nor VP Cheney, nor Bush-43.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  112. Specifically re Cohen: My presumption is that Cohen’s (new) lawyers (no longer paid by Trump) have come to a meeting with the minds with Mueller’s team, to the effect that Cohen is no longer bound by any arguable attorney-client privilege due to the “crime-fraud exception.” Trump’s lawyers certainly have had a chance, and ample motivation, to try to ask a judge to force Cohen to honor Trump’s wishes if Trump wished to assert attorney-client privilege over anything he might tell Mueller; and beyond making an appearance before Judge Wood and participating in the privilege screen for Cohen’s documents, they really haven’t tried to stuff a sock in Cohen’s mouth. At this point it would be hard for any judge to reach any conclusion other than that Trump has waived, either deliberately or through inaction, whatever privilege objections he might wish to assert on anything Cohen has to say about his communications with Trump in furtherance of his engagement as Trump’s lawyer.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  113. Instead of trying to hunker down behind privilege as to Cohen, the new strategy depends on making “poor abused Michael Cohen” into a nunc pro tunc sonuvabitch.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  114. if *some people* were as passionate about the defense of our border as they are about the defense of Ukraine’s post-1954 borders. But what am I talking about? That would not be consistent with criticizing everything Trump does (or does not do).

    Well, if you don’t like “intellectual consistency”, there’re other words, such as hypocrisy, i.e., applying one standard to Nation A and a double standard to Nation B.
    As for Ms. Nuland, the basic Putin propaganda is that she was somehow involved with a US-led “coup” against Yanukovych, which has always been heavy on insinuation and light on actual facts. As Rush once said, for liberals (and apparently an uncomfortable number of Trumpalistas), what’s more important is the seriousness of the allegation than the weight of the evidence.
    As for the “defense of our border”, put me in the “yes” column but, to me, it’s not about passion because there’s already not much emotion on the subject. And as to your insinuation that I’m “criticizing everything Trump does”, that’s hyperbole. Let’s not go there.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  115. Where does Congress get off asking an attorney about the confidences and secrets of, and communications with, his clients

    As I understand it, a special master went through all of Cohen’s materials and found that only a fraction of his work involved actual lawyering. He might’ve labeled himself “Trump’s personal lawyer” but he spent most of his time being Trump’s fixer and bagman, which is outside of any legal privilege that know of. As they say in this language, the truth shall set you free.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  116. Back on topic, 1) Where does Congress get off asking an attorney about the confidences and secrets of, and communications with, his clients; and 2) What kind of idiot White House based legal counsel authorized Cohen to say anything more than “Go soak your heads”?

    (and in response to Beldar)

    How could attorney-client privilege apply to discussions they claimed never took place?

    I am no expert at this (obviously) but since they denied that Cohen and Trump had spoken after a certain date about his Moscow deal and attempt to bribe Putin, how could a conversation they ostensibly never had be privileged?

    It would seem like in order to assert privilege, they would have to admit first that the conversations in question took place, which they (falsely) denied at the time. Then they could assert privilege as to the substance of said discussions.

    Dave (1bb933)

  117. The deal was struck before the special master went through, it was a mcguffin

    Narciso (d1f714)

  118. You might not want people to know that I’m your attorney, Dave. That’s your secret and I’m supposed to protect it. But as Beldar pointed out, the considerations were strategic, political and public relations, not legalistic.

    nk (dbc370)

  119. That’s not my understanding, Narc (link).

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  120. The Master ruled only on the documents seized. Whether they were privileged or “responsive”. Nothing outside the documents themselves.

    nk (dbc370)

  121. Look at the plea of the original plea,

    Narciso (d1f714)

  122. The date of the plea, months before it was announced.

    Narciso (d1f714)

  123. Look at the plea of the original plea,

    Did that. The special master finished August 16, and Cohen made his first plea deal on August 22.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  124. Going back to Cohen, Jurecic/Wittes have a good, thorough take of the sentencing memo. Other than finishing with Manafort, Flynn and Putin’s chef’s company, Mueller looks like he’s close to being done and we should be expecting his report to Rosy, hopefully before Christmas, maybe sooner.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  125. About those sanctions on Putineers: They’re working. Starting in 2014, real wages have fallen every year. Putin’s approval ratings are falling because he had to prop up his wheezing economy by raising the retirement age.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  126. Here’s a non-paywalled graph of Russian GDP per capita.

    They are barely doing better than in 1989, and the recent trend is downward, although the collapse of crude oil prices at the end of 2014 probably has more to do with it than sanctions.

    Dave (1bb933)

  127. Cohen and seventeen others in Trump’s orbit are either perjurers or probable perjurers, not including the present Liar-in-Chief. But hey, give Trump credit for calling a truce on his trade war with China, so there’s that.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  128. But hey, give Trump credit for calling a truce on his trade war with China, so there’s that.

    And in September (the last month with official figures available) the US trade deficit with China was the largest in history.

    But Trump likes setting records, so I guess it’s all good.

    Dave (1bb933)

  129. We’re on track to exceed last year’s all-time record annual trade deficit with China by another 10%, too…

    Dave (1bb933)

  130. Trumpety Trump Trump…

    Colonel Haiku (5b7649)

  131. Republicans should smarten up and start pushing for colleges and universities to dip into their warchests to fund their inflated costs for education and stop saddling students with the debt. Set a ceiling on what they can charge for tuition, student housing, etc…. e.g., tie it to the “cost of living”. Same goes for administration salaries.

    Colonel Haiku (5b7649)

  132. the only way would be to cut education funding, Mulvaney pushed for that and he got his hat handed to him, now with the Pelosi’s peanut gallery, the sky’s the limit,

    narciso (d1f714)

  133. Call for Herr Mueller on the courtesy phone…

    “In the old days, we would refrain from ringing up the cops until after there was fairly clear evidence of a crime, such as Professor Plum lying in a pool of blood in the conservatory. Off everyone would go looking for clues, with the concrete fact of Professor Plum’s corpse to focus their energies. Today, though, we frequently summon our sophisticated investigative technicians before there is evidence of a crime. We run to the phone as soon as someone suggests Colonel Mustard might have committed some impropriety. We then try to solve the mystery of whether this or some other past indiscretion of Colonel Mustard just might constitute a crime. Nowadays, it is more remarkable when the ethics crime laboratory cannot come up with a viable theory of criminality than when it can.”

    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3295191

    Colonel Haiku (5b7649)

  134. The email hacking and disinformation campaign by Putin–together with all the lies by Trump people about contacts with Putineers–was more than good enough reason to start a counterintelligence investigation. It wasn’t a criminal investigation to begin with, until the lying to investigators started. The felony indictments and plea deals bear that out, but Mueller’s report to Rosy should end the rest of the speculation.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  135. Process crimes and a whole lot of noise and bullschiff…

    Colonel Haiku (5b7649)

  136. 9. Paul Montagu (8afb2a) — 12/1/2018 @ 1:02 pm

    Stephens has as good an explanation as any as to why Trump lets Putin grab him by his pu$$y:
    The abiding mystery with Trump is why he continually attempts to ignore outrages, finesse differences and curry personal favor with Putin. Ideologically it makes no sense: Conservatives have been hawkish on Russia since the days of Warren Harding and V. I. Lenin. Politically it makes no sense: A pro-Russia policy has no domestic constituency. Policy-wise, it makes no sense: Trump has actively fought Senate Republicans and his own senior advisers over taking a tougher Russia line. (The sanctions enacted last year were forced on him over his fierce objections.) Psychologically, it makes no sense: If there’s one thing Trump detests, it’s being mocked and derided as a weakling and the creature of stronger, smarter adversaries.

    Hence the only other sensical hypothesis — namely, Trump’s self-interest — which even conservatives need to admit has become much more plausible following Michael Cohen’s guilty plea this week.

    No, that makes no sense either. He has no self interest in this.

    Well, except in avoding contradicting himself.

    What could have started it was maybe a pathetic hope that Putin would, one day, let him build, or put his name on, a Trump Tower in Moscow. Which he wanted, not for the money, but for the ego, (being everywhere) or because he imagined himself a big peacemaker.

    The president’s former fixer now admits that he lied to Congress over the timing and extent of his efforts to make contacts and win contracts in Moscow on behalf of the Trump Organization, which lasted until at least June 2016, after Trump had essentially clinched the Republican nomination for president. By then questions about his Russia ties were fast becoming a political liability.

    Cohen says he lied to be consistent with what Trump said, but it seems like Trump never said anything about it! (That is, about when was the last contact with Russian officials about the idea of building the Trump Tower in Moscow by anyone associated with him)

    Trump never said that talk about it ended sooner than July, 2016, and he wasn’t asked by Mueller when it ended. In one sense, of course, ot never ended – it just faded away, and in anotehr respect, it never was a real proposition in the first place.

    Trump tried to do something in the Soviet Union and in Russia for almost 30 years, (1987-2016) and the only thing that resulted was the holding of the Miss Universe pageant in a suburb of Moscow in 2013.

    Sammy Finkelman (102c75)

  137. 147. Paul Montagu (8afb2a) — 12/3/2018 @ 11:44 am

    The email hacking and disinformation campaign by Putin–together with all the lies by Trump people about contacts with Putineers–was more than good enough reason to start a counterintelligence investigation.

    The basis (or much of the basis) for the counterintelligence operation seems to have bene the claims in the Steele material that Trump was on the take from Putin. The talk among a few Trump associates about offering Putin a free penthouse in the proposed Trump tower seems to put the lie to that.

    What could have bene was real was Trump’s favorable attitude toward Putin or saying things that Putin would like, (e.g. about NATO or Syria) plus some connections to Russia among some people he hired.

    Sammy Finkelman (102c75)

  138. Dave (1bb933) — 12/2/2018 @ 3:09 pm

    since they denied that Cohen and Trump had spoken after a certain date about his Moscow deal

    Who denied it? Cohen denied it, maybe, at some point.

    and attempt to bribe Putin,

    There’s no indication that that idea was ever put to Trump. Cohen was going on telling Russians that Trump might visit Russia after the convention. There doesn’t seem to be any indication that he ever mentioned that idea to Trump.

    Cohen wss most likely freelancing.

    Sammy Finkelman (102c75)

  139. Re: 144… looking at it as a long-term trend, college tuition has been rising nearly 6% above the rate of inflation.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2015/06/16/why-college-costs-are-so-high-and-rising.html

    Rising at a rate well above almost anything else. IOW, out of control.

    Colonel Haiku (5b7649)

  140. He has no self interest in this.

    Sure he did, and he does. I doubt he expected to win in 2016, boasting nothwithstanding, and none of the polls had him winning. He only canceled the Trump Tower Moscow deal when the hacked DNC emails came out. There’s no reason to believe that he wouldn’t go back to that project (or some other deal) as he’s been angling for a big glossy building in Russia for over a quarter-century. And there’s no reason to believe that he would retire from the real estate business after he’s done being president, so it would definitely be in his personal wealth-growing interests to keep all money-making options open.
    As for Cohen, we don’t know what conversations he had with Trump, only that he had a lot of them, or what Trump said to him. What we do know is that Trump (and his people) hid the fact that he was working a real estate deal with a dictator who’s been consistently hostile to American interests, while running for President of the United States. In any other universe, this would be, at minimum, a conflict of interest, not unlike Hillary’s foundation getting millions from foreign nations and leaders while serving as SecState and doing government business with those verysame foreign nations and leaders.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  141. Rising at a rate well above almost anything else. IOW, out of control.

    From the quoted article:

    Meanwhile, teaching salaries, one of the biggest single line items, have remained relatively flat—much like those across most of the U.S. labor market. Despite heavy spending by a handful of top universities for the most talented, grant-winning researchers, most schools aren’t seeing big wage pressures, largely because teaching jobs are in high demand.

    […]

    So if the cost of providing an education has remained fairly stable, why does the price students pay keep rising?

    The reason, say researchers, is that deep budget cuts in state funding for public higher education and shrinking subsidies at private schools have pushed a greater share of the cost onto students and their families.

    Mystery solved!

    If you look at the graphs labeled “Budget Squeeze”, spending per student is DOWN by 5-10% over the last decade, while tuition is UP by as much as 60%. (Using California numbers)

    I should say, I think it’s appropriate for the cost of colleges to be borne by the people getting the education. So one could view the price increase to students as a feature, not a problem.

    That is a very interesting article though, thanks for linking it.

    Dave (1bb933)

  142. The basis (or much of the basis) for the counterintelligence operation seems to have bene the claims in the Steele material that Trump was on the take from Putin.

    The FBI already had their suspicions, and the Steele report* affirmed those suspicions.
    * Portions of which have been verified.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  143. as pointed out in 142, mueller seems to be leaving much out of the statements, and of course the legitimacy of this investigation, is dubious to begin with,

    narciso (d1f714)

  144. He has no self interest in this.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a) — 12/3/2018 @ 12:36 pm

    Sure he did, and he does.

    Not the kind of self-inteerst, getting money and all kinds of things from Putin, that’s being portrayed or darkly hinted at..

    I said: maybe a pathetic hope that Putin would, one day, let him build, or put his name on, a Trump Tower in Moscow. I should stress pathetic. But Trump may not have realized it was pathetic. We also don’t know how interested he wa sin all of this.

    He wanted it, not for the money, (which was how much? Enough to matter to him? I doubt it) but for the ego, (being everywhere) or because he imagined himself a big peacemaker.

    Now if Trump still had this idea in the back of his mind, that could have made him very reluctant to say anything Putin didn’t like, and that’s how you can have a connection.

    I doubt he expected to win in 2016, boasting nothwithstanding, and none of the polls had him winning.

    We’re talking about the primary campaign here. Polls were unclear. None of the experts thought he would win but that doesn’t mean he wasn’t trying and getting more confident with time.

    He only canceled the Trump Tower Moscow deal when the hacked DNC emails came out.

    When he saw that not ruling out any deals with Russia or other foreign powers would adversely impact his election chances. How were the hacks a factor? Because they hurt Hillary? Hillary was in major new trouble from March 2015 on. Because of the email server, not the DNC hack.

    Now you can say, when, having won the nominaiton, his chances of eventually becoming president were much higher than a year before.

    There’s no reason to believe that he wouldn’t go back to that project (or some other deal) as he’s been angling for a big glossy building in Russia for over a quarter-century. And there’s no reason to believe that he would retire from the real estate business after he’s done being president, so it would definitely be in his personal wealth-growing interests to keep all money-making options open.

    Not wealth building. Ego building. A sense of accomplishment. He wasn’t after this tower because he would make a great deal of money with it. Same thing with wanting to build the world’s tallest building in Chicago – a project al Qaeda destroyed on Sept 11, 2001.

    You can say maybe he had this other motive (not quite a mercenary one, but it’s not good anyway)
    It’s not self-interest, though. It’s stupid. It’s stupid even to believe that he would ever get the chance while Putin and his system were running things in Russia.

    Trump had tried, as you say, for 25 years. That should have made it clear to him it wasn’t going to happen.

    How would Putin let him run a hotel that he might want to put bugs in? Whose guest list he would know?

    Maybe Trump was too dumb to realize this.

    But all this probably pales in comparison with doing things as president. he won’t go back to the real estate business in any large way.

    Sammy Finkelman (102c75)

  145. comey and McCabe and prietap were all in on this scam.

    narciso (d1f714)

  146. As for Cohen, we don’t know what conversations he had with Trump, only that he had a lot of them, or what Trump said to him. What we do know is that Trump (and his people) hid the fact that he was working a real estate deal with a dictator who’s been consistently hostile to American interests, while running for President of the United States.

    I get the feeling that Cohen told the bare minimum to otehr people in the Trump organization. He knew it might be cancelled at any time for political reasons. He thought bringing this in would help him.

    In any other universe, this would be, at minimum, a conflict of interest, not unlike Hillary’s foundation getting millions from foreign nations and leaders while serving as SecState and doing government business with those verysame foreign nations and leaders.

    The difference is nothing actually happened.

    What we have here shows you can have a conflict of interest just from hope.

    Sammy Finkelman (102c75)

  147. now felix sater who has been an asset for various federal agencies, who had to have been aware of his Russian contacts, but let them continue, it follows a pattern with mifsud, halper, Greenberg et al,

    narciso (d1f714)

  148. We’re talking about the primary campaign here.

    Um, no. From the convention to election eve, Trump was losing in the polls, both popular and electoral college. I was there. I saw it unfold.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  149. 154… no denial of the stagnation of teachers’ salaries, that’s why they call it “administrative bloat”. The money goes everywhere but the classroom. Google’s your friend: “Universities have increased spending, but very little of that increased spending has been related to classroom instruction; rather, it is being directed toward non-classroom costs. As a result, there has been a growth in academic bureaucracies, as universities focus on hiring employees to manage or administer people, programs, and regulations. Between 2001 and 2011, these sorts of hires have increased 50% faster than the number of classroom instructors. This trend…has become ubiquitous in…American higher education. (p.2). [Data draws on WSJ article “Deans List: Hiring Spree Fattens College Bureaucracy—And Tuition.”]

    The situation is worsened by the fact that administrators tend to be highly paid. The 2012-13 “Administrators in Higher Education Salary Survey” conducted by the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources found the average annual salary of a “Chief Executive Officer of a System” in a two-year institution to be $291,132; in a four-year institution, $370,470; in a doctoral context, $431,575. Annual salaries may not render an accurate picture, however, as they do not include benefits or non-salary compensation. The Boston Globe, for example, stated that the President of the UMass system received at least $769,500 in annual compensation “including salary, annual performance bonuses, and car and housing allowances.”

    Since administrators must comply with federal or state regulations, most of them also have paid staff. The average hourly wage for an administrative assistant at the University of California is $20.98 per hour or $839 a week based on a 40 hour week or roughly $43,600 annually.

    By contrast, a 2015-16 report from the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) found the average salary of a tenured professor at a public college to be $78,762. Another AAUP report, however, indicated a sharp decline in tenured instructors. “[O]ver the past four decades, the proportion of…full-time tenured positions has declined by 26 percent and…full-time tenure-track positions has dropped by 50 percent.” Colleges heavily favor less expensive instructors, especially part-time adjunct professors or graduate students. The AAUP stated that, as of 2011, adjunct and part-timers composed 70 percent of college faculties. Adjuncts typically earn between $20,000 and $25,000 annually and have few to no benefits. They are widely considered to be less qualified and less committed than their tenured counterparts, which further deprives students of quality education.”

    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2939915%2523%252523

    Colonel Haiku (5b7649)

  150. how does a 5% reduction in growth, lead to a 60% pay increase, it doesn’t compute,

    narciso (d1f714)

  151. “The two big cost drivers are bureaucrats and buildings – obviously neither of those are directly going to the classroom experience,” Zywicki says, referring to gyms and 4-star kitchens. “They’ve actually looked at the classroom experience as a place where they end up conserving money.”

    Colonel Haiku (5b7649)

  152. The difference is nothing actually happened.
    This was the argument I was having with liberals about Hillary circa 2015. It was a conflict–at the bare minimum an appearance of a conflict. You can argue whether or not it’s illegal, but it is certainly unethical. On top of that, dishonest, because Trump and his organization put a lid on it, kept it out of public view, just like his paying off two women of ill-repute to keep their stories out of the tabloids.

    Paul Montagu (8afb2a)

  153. It appears the bureaucracy are Luddites, they’ve witnessed no improvements in efficiencies, narciso, through employment of technologies. That is not often said about other areas or professions. There must not be much in the way of incentives to drive “no-brainer” improvements.

    Colonel Haiku (5b7649)

  154. there are plenty of statutes that Hillary actually violated, re the server, but it seems it’s impossible for her or any of her people to be indicted or tried for anything,

    narciso (d1f714)

  155. you know I can’t think of a single one of these parasites in the body politic, not media matters, not splc, not American progress, nor Sharpton’s traveling sideshow are brought to heal, same with Michael mann’s medicine show, in fact it’s mark steyn who has been hanging on the vine for seven years,

    narciso (d1f714)

  156. for an errant comment echoing another commentator, a little like the human rights kangaroo courts,

    narciso (d1f714)

  157. in Canada, in both instances, the process is the punishment, in part to discourage anyone willing to challenge the powers that be,

    narciso (d1f714)

  158. Another AAUP report, however, indicated a sharp decline in tenured instructors. “[O]ver the past four decades, the proportion of…full-time tenured positions has declined by 26 percent and…full-time tenure-track positions has dropped by 50 percent.” Colleges heavily favor less expensive instructors, especially part-time adjunct professors or graduate students. The AAUP stated that, as of 2011, adjunct and part-timers composed 70 percent of college faculties. Adjuncts typically earn between $20,000 and $25,000 annually and have few to no benefits. They are widely considered to be less qualified and less committed than their tenured counterparts, which further deprives students of quality education.

    Certainly far from the case at my university. In my department, at least 90% of the courses are taught by tenured (or tenure-track) faculty. Temporary lecturers are hired quarter-to-quarter, on an as-needed basis. Most also teach at community colleges in the area and they get excellent evaluations.

    Dave (1bb933)

  159. Yes, my nephew teaches CC in NorCal. Well, you see where the money goes, where the priorities are.

    Colonel Haiku (5b7649)

  160. So Corker is helping the Russians here:

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/russias-latin-american-offensive-1543786397

    Narciso (d1f714)

  161. Re: higher ed’s rising costs. Mark Perry addressed one of the causes here:

    http://www.aei.org/publication/diversity-and-other-administrative-monstrosities-in-higher-education/

    ColoComment (943515)

  162. I think this was alittle bit of an error:

    How would Putin let him run a hotel that he might want to put bugs in? Whose guest list he would know?

    The TrumpTower in Moscow was probably not going to be strictly,or evven mainly a hotel. Sater was talking about condominiums. Trump’s bigger projects have been combined use – office space, lliving space but maybe also a hotel. But the argument about bugs applies also if important people lieve tere,

    I think the Moscow project was dormant then revived in 2015.

    Sammy Finkelman (102c75)

  163. 166. I mean nothing happened with the Trump Tower in Moscow. With Hillary she or Bill got money

    Cohen was talking about the Trump Tower past January 2016 (when he attempoted to make contact with the Russian government – the second email resulted in him getting a telephone call back telling him not to email that address)

    But his talks seem to have been with an intermediary.

    Felkix Sater claimed to know a friend of a friend of a friend of Putin. Putin’s friend and the friend’s friend had some real estate in Moscow.

    Sammy Finkelman (102c75)

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