Patterico's Pontifications

4/17/2018

CNN’s Brian Stelter Has a Lot of Nerve Getting Snotty About Sean Hannity’s Conflict of Interest

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 10:30 am

Brian Stelter of CNN is getting huffy about yesterday’s revelation that Sean Hannity may have used President Trump’s personal lawyer for legal advice without telling viewers. And Brian Stelter of CNN wants you to know that he is deeply disturbed by this unethical lack of disclosure:

While his off-air relationships might be just a logical extension of Hannity’s on-air cheerleading for Trump, it still came as a surprise, immediately raising questions about both Hannity and Fox.

By any standards of any normal newsroom, the Cohen-Hannity relationship is a glaring conflict of interest.

Fox is not a normal newsroom. And Hannity’s viewers are not typical news viewers — people who watch almost any other show would likely feel lied to when they learned something like this had not been disclosed to them, but Hannity’s want him to have this kind of relationship with Trumpworld.

This comes from Brian Stelter.

Of CNN.

You see the problem? If not, let me sum it up in two words:

Corey Lewandowski.

In June 2016, after Lewandowski left the Trump campaign, he was hired by CNN to be a political commentator. Here’s what one Brian Stelter from CNN said at the time:

There are also swirling questions about whether Lewandowski is still bound to Trump somehow.

Like other Trump employees, he signed a non-disclosure agreement that ensures he will not share confidential information.

The agreement likely included a “non-disparagement clause,” impeding his ability to criticize Trump publicly.

On Thursday night, in his first appearance as a CNN commentator, anchor Erin Burnett asked about the existence of such a clause, and Lewandowski declined to answer directly.

Meaning, of course, that he had one. Does this mean that Brian Stelter opposed the hire? Judge for yourself by reading the last line of his piece:

Adding Lewandowski is another way to ensure ideological diversity on the air. His perspective might be uniquely valuable given that he was Trump’s right hand man up until this week.

LOL. Cue the eternal cry of the hypocritical leftist: But that’s different!

But it got worse. In September, ABC News reported that Lewandowski was still receiving payments from the Trump campaign, even as he gave commentary about Trump on CNN:

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign paid former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski’s company $20,000 in consulting fees in August, campaign filings show.

Lewandowski was fired as Trump’s campaign manager on June 20 . . . Days after the firing, CNN hired Lewandowski as an on-air political commentator, a position he holds currently.

Trump’s campaign finance filing shows a $20,000 payment made to Lewandowski’s company, Green Monster Consulting, LLC, on August 11 for the purpose of “strategy consulting.”

Did CNN immediately fire Lewandowski? No, CNN did not. Indeed, Lewandowski stayed on until days before the election, ultimately resigning in November. As one Brian Stelter from CNN reported:

Lewandowski brought unique first-hand experience running a historic presidential campaign. But some viewers — and even some CNN staffers — felt Lewandowski never should have been hired at all.

Lewandowski was bound by a non-disclosure agreement that impeded his ability to criticize Trump publicly. He also received severance payments from the campaign.

CNN President Jeff Zucker stood by the decision to hire Lewandowski, pointing out that it was critical to have ideological diversity on the airwaves.

Which sounds a lot like Stelter’s own quote (already noted above), when Lewandowski was hired: “Adding Lewandowski is another way to ensure ideological diversity on the air.”

You know what you did not see from Stelter? A passage like this one, in which I take Stelter’s commentary about Hannity and rewrite it for the Lewandowski situation:

While his off-air relationship with Cohen might be just a logical extension of Lewandowski’s on-air cheerleading for Trump, it still came as a surprise, immediately raising questions about both Lewandowski and CNN.

By any standards of any normal newsroom, the Trump campaign’s payments to (and non-disparagement clause with) Lewandowski relationship constitute a glaring conflict of interest.

CNN is not a normal newsroom. And Lewandowski’s fans are not typical news viewers — people who watch almost any other show would likely feel lied to when they learned something like this had not been disclosed to them, but Lewandowski’s fans want him to have this kind of relationship with Trumpworld.

You did not see anything like that in any of Brian Stelter’s pieces. You did not see him calling Lewandowski’s arrangement a “glaring conflict of interest.” You did not see him claiming that CNN is not a normal newsroom. Instead, you saw him praising the Lewandowski hire.

What do you know? He has a different standard for Fox News than he has for his own employer!

Which is to be expected. Just don’t expect us to take your moral preening seriously, Brian Stelter. You guys are hardly the angels you’re trying to appear to be. And we all know it.

[Cross-posted at RedState and The Jury Talks Back.]

337 Responses to “CNN’s Brian Stelter Has a Lot of Nerve Getting Snotty About Sean Hannity’s Conflict of Interest”

  1. the sleazy corrupt judge never should have released Mr. Hannity’s name

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  2. But of course she did. Is anyone honestly surprised?

    Cassandra (a815b9)

  3. “THE MEDIA’S ‘SEAN HANNITY STANDARD’ IS A WONDERFUL IDEA! “Now that we are entering the era of the ‘Sean Hannity Standard,’ we will finally be enlightened with full disclosures from every political journalist/commentator about their personal relationships with Democrat politicians and their respective handlers. I am especially eager to hear from Andrea Mitchell, Maggie Haberman, and Joe Scarborough.”

    As Kurt Schlichter likes to say, the left are going to hate living up to their own rules.”

    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/294368/

    Colonel Haiku (1d71cc)

  4. I mean, this is the leftist game after all. Our side, based on the depth of our opposition, gets fewer and fewer protections till there are none at all.

    So what if they get Trump? They will get Hannity. Do I like Hannity? No. But I like the game even less.

    We live in a world where there is only the pretense of rules. The truth is leftists lie and cheat and manipulate things so that the rules can be used to crush whosoever they please. Or allow them to escape punishment.

    Is there anyone who thinks it is okay to use an investigation of Russian collusion to potentially destroy Sean Hannity’s marriage? Is that an unfortunate side effect? Funny how that mostly happens to our side of the argument, never theirs. Leftists work night and day to limit the damage to their side, while expanding the damage to our side beyond comprehension.

    And we let them.

    Cassandra (a815b9)

  5. When you shoot yourself in the foot– blame the gun.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  6. For those of you who actually care about corruption I introduce Judge Kymba Wood:


    Via The New York Post from 2013:

    Soros and Bolton, a health care consultant, will exchange vows in a small ceremony on Saturday morning at the Bedford, New York estate, which Soros bought in 2003 from “Jurassic Park” author Michael Crichton.

    Kimba Wood, a federal judge, will perform the non-denominational ceremony, which will be attended by members of the couple’s families, including…

    And now a Photo

    https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-m-MwYzcFEis/WtXmgoJXxXI/AAAAAAABbiY/kbRBlQANO_c_WcRLwMPr5ecMG2lQHlSXgCLcBGAs/s1600/aaa429-620.jpg

    Rev.Hoagie (1b0402)

  7. When you shoot yourself in the foot– blame the gun.

    DCSCA (797bc0) — 4/17/2018 @ 11:21 am

    Force them to live by their own rules…

    “Rules For Ridicule”

    Colonel Haiku (1d71cc)

  8. Cohen released Hannity’s name when he presumed to assert Hannity’s attorney-client privilege. Which attorney-client privilege, by the way, is a rule of law made by lawyers, and it has the exception that when you say that someone has attorney-client privilege you need to say who that someone is. But don’t let reality unglue your lips from Trump’s behind.

    nk (dbc370)

  9. Neither Lewandowski nor Hannity should work for any news organization that wants to be taken seriously.

    Dave (445e97)

  10. (((SOROS)))

    Davethulhu (fab944)

  11. Nor propriety unlock thy lips from teh judge’s Johnson

    Colonel Haiku (1d71cc)

  12. ******Cthulhu******

    Colonel Haiku (1d71cc)

  13. But don’t let reality unglue your lips from Trump’s behind.

    i would never do this

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  14. And now a Photo

    Ooh, how exciting – we’re sharing wedding photos!

    Can I join the fun?

    Dave (445e97)

  15. Manhattan Federal Court Judge Kimba Wood sued for divorce yesterday, formally scrapping a 14-year marriage less than a year after her love affair with a Wall Street millionaire was revealed in his private diaries. Wood’s breakup with husband Michael Kramer, a Time magazine political columnist, was expected, but the couple’s efforts to work out the terms of their split privately apparently ended in rancor over money. Wood, 52, is seeking the divorce on grounds of constructive abandonment, meaning her husband has refused to have sex with her for at least a year, according to papers filed in Manhattan Supreme Court. She wants exclusive occupancy of the couple’s homes in Manhattan and Massachusetts, as well as an increase in support payments. “Negotiations broke down,” confirmed Kramer’s lawyer Lawrence Pollack. “I thought we were incredibly close to making a deal. I still hope it can be peacefully resolved.

    ” Pollack said Wood, who earns $133,600 a year as a federal judge, wants more money than Kramer, 50, is able to pay, but he declined to elaborate. Kramer is believed to earn more than $200,000-a-year. The couple has one son, a fifth-grader, who lives with his mother. Wood and Kramer were living apart last summer when the judge’s relationship with investment banker Frank Richardson 3d, whose own marriage had broken up, became front page news in August. In a series of diary entries beginning March 8, 1995, the financier gushed about his affair with Wood and described how it blossomed during quiet dinner dates and on weekend visits to the judge’s home in Massachusetts. Richardson’s wife, Nancy, later filed for divorce,

    http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/news/kimba-wood-divorced-article-1.724964

    Judge Kimba Wood has much in common with Stormy Daniels.

    I’d sue for a less corrupt judge.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  16. Judge Kimba Wood has much in common with Stormy Daniels Donald Trump.

    Let’s hope she can keep the bias for a fellow adulterer in check.

    Dave (445e97)

  17. Neither Lewandowski nor Hannity should work for any news organization that wants to be taken seriously.

    Nor George Stephanopoulos, Chris Cuomo, Chuck Todd, Jake Tapper, Martha Raddatz, Anderson Cooper, etc., etc, ….

    random viking (98d43c)

  18. The day Trump pitches Ivana or Marla out into the snow, demanding support payments on top.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  19. i wonder what Mr. narciso would say cause he remembers a lot of arcane details

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  20. I can’t feature Trump bumping Ivana or Marla for a another girl’s riches.

    Judge Kimba Wood has much in common with Stormy Daniels Donald Trump.

    Let’s hope she can keep the bias for a fellow adulterer in check.

    Dave (445e97) — 4/17/2018 @ 12:28 pm

    I take it back. You’re whole statement is stupid on stilts. Wipe the drool off your chin. Sit up straight.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  21. @7. =Haiku= Gesundheit!

    It’s Lonesome out on them Rhodes.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  22. You’re whole statement is stupid on stilts. Wipe the drool off your chin. Sit up straight.

    No you.

    P.S. “Your”

    Dave (445e97)

  23. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ez5cTYL4paA

    “… goodnight, you stupid idiots…”

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  24. We’re gonna **** this Trump, **** him inside out

    We’re gonna **** this Trump, make him scream and shout

    We’re gonna **** until we pop, We’re gonna **** until we drop

    We’re gonna **** this Trump, **** him inside out

    Brian Stelter

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  25. Carl Kasell is dead now as of today

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  26. Pinandpuller (16b0b5) — 4/17/2018 @ 1:01 pm

    Change the first of the four letters from “f” to “s” and it could be Hannity.

    Dave (445e97)

  27. As Kurt Schlichter likes to say, the left are going to hate living up to their own rules.”

    Colonel Haiku (1d71cc) — 4/17/2018 @ 11:11 am

    It’s called just look at marriage certificates. Lots of conflict of interest.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  28. Pinandpuller (16b0b5) — 4/17/2018 @ 1:01 pm

    Change the first of the four letters from “f” to “s” and it could be Hannity.

    Dave (445e97) — 4/17/2018 @ 1:06 pm

    You’re gonna need to take that up with Vanna White.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  29. Hey do judges who do weddings have a legal limit or a disclosure form they have to fill out for say a briefcase of Krugerrands?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  30. Carl Kasell is dead now as of today

    happyfeet (28a91b) — 4/17/2018 @ 1:05 pm

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5) — 4/17/2018 @ 1:

    Aw gee Gloria, izzat why you’re wearin’ black?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)


  31. Ooh, how exciting – we’re sharing wedding photos!

    Can I join the fun?
    Dave (445e97) — 4/17/2018 @ 12:01 pm


    Your link, like your brain has malfunctioned. I take it you liked the wedding photo of your favorite Nazi and her “friend”. Kymba is as Korrupt as Hillary but you like that don’t ya Dave?

    Rev.Hoagie (1b0402)

  32. And the millions Fusion GPS (and others) pay journalists to pump their lies?

    Biggest scandal in Media Today.

    Journalists don’t write anything, they report what the Fusion GPS’s tell them too.

    Shep's Social Circle (c587a1)

  33. So who actually “outed” Sean Hannity?

    Andy McCarthy presumes it was his old buddies at USAO-SDNY and chastises both them and Judge Wood severely for it. To which my first-level response is, as I’ve argued here (and there), that’s solely Sean Hannity’s fault that no better case was made to keep his identity secret.

    But the WSJ reports the hearing this way:

    At the hearing before Mr. Hannity’s name was revealed, Stephen Ryan, an attorney for Mr. Cohen, said the then-unnamed client didn’t wish to be associated with the notoriety of the search warrant. He said revealing the client’s name would “affect people’s willingness to consult an attorney,” eliciting laughter from the crowded courtroom.

    Judge Wood ordered his attorneys to provide the name in court, saying Mr. Cohen’s team “has not met the standard for an exception to the notion that client identity…must be revealed.”

    After writing the name down on a sheet of paper to prepare to hand to the judge in an envelope, Mr. Ryan announced Mr. Hannity’s name to the court. Some members of the audience gasped.

    But see the WaPo’s account of the same events, from the habitually biased tool Phillip Bump:

    Note: Some people have noted that Ryan had the choice of writing down Hannity’s name or saying it out loud and that he opted for the second option. That distinction is noted to imply that Hannity’s name would have stayed private had Ryan written the name down.

    That’s incorrect. Wood ordered the name be made public; she would clearly have simply read the name aloud herself had it been written down for her. What’s more, the choice between writing it down or saying it out loud was offered by Ryan, not Wood. She was indifferent to how the name was revealed, no doubt because she recognized that the end result was the same: The name would be known publicly in short order.

    It seems to me that Bump may be guilty of projecting and mind-reading with regard to Judge Wood. After almost four decades of trial practice, I wouldn’t purport to make the assumptions he makes about what a federal judge intends or might do.

    But I’m left, in the end, very much wanting to read a transcript.

    And alas, it’s not on PACER-SDNY yet. And Judge Wood today signed a short order (which I’ll link in the next comment, to evade the blog’s spam detectors) denying a CNN request to make & publicly release audio recordings of proceedings in this case, saying it would violate a standing order of the SDNY. The only other new entry on the docket sheet is a short order approving Cohen’s Washington-based lawyer’s belated admission to practice pro hac vice before the SDNY, the paperwork for which he’d previously botched.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  34. Nancy Pelosi was at the Soros nuptials as well.

    So I just saw a girl who looked liked Joffrey Baratheon wearing Kevin from Sin City glasses and it was disturbing. She may as well have been driving a Subaru.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  35. Neither Lewandowski nor Hannity should work for any news organization that wants to be taken seriously.

    Dave (445e97) — 4/17/2018 @ 11:54 am

    It’s not so much that Lewandowski can’t criticize Trump it’s that he can’t dish dirt. He’s exactly on par with George S, ABC News Washington. Who used to lean on people as well.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  36. North and South Korea reportedly set to announce an official end to war

    North and South Korea are in talks to announce a permanent end to the officially declared military conflict between the two countries, daily newspaper Munhwa Ilbo reported Tuesday, citing an unnamed South Korean official.

    Ahead of a summit next week between North Korean premier Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, lawmakers from the neighboring states were thought to be negotiating the details of a joint statement that could outline an end to the confrontation.

    CNBC

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  37. Andrew Kugle
    @AndrewJKugle
    Stelter in his newsletter today, didn’t identify Robby Mook as Clinton’s former campaign manager.
    — –

    Stephen Miller
    @redsteeze
    Or that Media Matters was organizing the Ingraham boycotts, not courageous lone student activist David Hogg. Could do this all day.
    — –
    neontaster 🚟
    @neontaster
    Chuck Todd threw a party for Jennifer Palmieri at his house a year before the election.
    — –

    Stephen Miller
    @redsteeze
    Anderson Cooper hosted a Presidential forum and was on the selectee board at the Clinton Foundation. Journalists covering Planned Parenthood accept awards from them. There are about 100 examples you can throw out.

    ———
    “It’s different when we do it!”

    harkin (379712)

  38. @37. North and South Korea reportedly set to announce an official end to war…

    ‘It’s about time; it’s about space; about two men in the strangest place; this is the tale; of the brave crew; back through the barrier of time they flew…’ -Sherwood Schwartz, 1966

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  39. Ted Turner is spinning in his grave. Well, something like that.

    Ed from SFV (4f3559)

  40. Bastiat was a Communist as well as a Globalist? The Trotskyite!

    nk (dbc370)

  41. Bastiat was a Communist as well as a Globalist? The Trotskyite!

    Proudhon would agree: “La propriété, c’est le vol!”

    I always had my suspicions that Hoagie was a Left Deviationist; now my worst fears have been confirmed!

    Dave (445e97)

  42. Nikki Haley smacks down the White House: “With all due respect, I don’t get confused”

    She is the one bright spot in this train-wreck of an administration. She can’t last much longer…

    Dave (445e97)

  43. As for deep state corruption, one criminal case comes to mind for which Trump needs to issue a pardon: Dinesh D’Souza. The case may have faded from public memory, so here’s a brief recap. In 2014, the young conservative writer and speaker was arraigned in a Manhattan federal court for a $20,000 campaign violation, as he had exceeding arbitrary limits. How? After reaching his own limit, D’Souza asked a friend to donate to a friend, then D’Souza paid back her friend. Honestly, why is this a crime to begin with? This case highlights how criminal law has lots[sic] its basis in mens rea, or criminal intent. People are going to jail for breaking laws they know nothing about!

    Town Hall

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  44. In response to the accusation by Larry Kudlow. Now, when it comes to confusion, whom would your money be on?
    A. Haley
    B. Kudlow
    C. Trump
    D. Kudlow and Trump

    nk (dbc370)

  45. arbitrary limits

    a.k.a. “the law”

    Honestly, why is this a crime to begin with?

    Anyone who needs to ask that is am imbecile. The campaign finance laws have two purposes: first, to limit the obligation incurred by politicians to individual donors, and second, to provide transparency so everyone knows (or can find out) who donated money to whom. Allowing unlimited amounts of cash to be funneled to a candidate through cutout donors completely defeats both purposes.

    People are going to jail for breaking laws they know nothing about!

    If he didn’t know about the law, how did he know he couldn’t make the donation himself?

    I enjoy D’Sousa’s books, and he’s a smart guy. But in this case, he was too clever by half, and should have known better (and I suspect he did know better, but thought he could get away with it).

    Dave (445e97)

  46. From TheHill.com:

    Michael Caputo, a longtime friend of Trump’s who also knows Cohen, said that he had some concerns for both men — based more on what he views as an out of control investigation than in their actual conduct.

    “I am concerned for anyone in the crosshairs of this investigation because it appears to have no boundaries,” Caputo said. “I think the president’s base is by now quite familiar with the ‘Get Trump At Any Cost’ nature of these investigations. And what happens with Michael Cohen is no different.”

    Caputo also insisted that Cohen’s loyalty to Trump was absolute.

    “I can’t imagine Michael Cohen putting the president in harm’s way in any shape or form,” he said.

    Trump allies will be crossing their fingers in the hope his prediction proves true.

    Yeah, Cohen and his lawyers totally went to the mattresses and fought to the bitter, bitter end to protect Cohen’s client Sean Hannity: They defiantly resisted every attempt by the government to force the revelation of his name as Cohen’s mystery client.

    For about six hours.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  47. 47. They’re in agreement now. Kudlow apologized. Haley did not get ahead of policy – policy changed. (Trump decided that since Russia hadn’t made a fuss, he probably didn’t need to add any more sanctions, but he is still considering adding something)

    Sammy Finkelman (02a146)

  48. My question is: Is Dave really a bot? Because I can predict his reaction to nearly anything Trump with utter accuracy. It’s algorithmic. Even bow-tie Republicans like George Will occasionally surprise you, but never Dave.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  49. @47. ‘Hey Snowman, ya’got your ears on??…’

    “I don’t get confused.” – UN Ambassador Nikki Haley

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  50. Because I can predict his reaction to nearly anything Trump with utter accuracy.

    It’s almost like I have principles, or something!

    Dave (445e97)

  51. Sorry Dave, I forgot the best blurb:

    D’Souza was prosecuted in a very public manner, then convicted of a felony. His otherwise liberal attorney was flabbergasted at the outrageous conduct of the federal judge presiding over the case. There was no reason for D’Souza to be sent up the river like that. None. Four years later, Congressional investigations have discovered a criminal dossier on D’Souza, which included special directions for the FBI to go after him because he was a frequent critic of the president.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  52. R.I.P. Barbara Bush

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  53. Dave is not a bot! He is a useful idiot. The left is full of Dave’s and noel’s and Chuluhu’s etc. They are part and parcel of the leftist juggernaut, the skirmishers of you will. The expendable clowns sent out among the people to parrot the latest leftist gripe against America, whites, Christians, Starbucks, or whatever the Soros crew decides is the outrage du jour. They will never surprise you because they are incapable of surprising you, their response is preprogrammed. For example I knew Trump’s Syria policy was wrong because as a conservative I was against Trump but all the leftists were gung-ho for war. Pre-fing-programmed.

    Rev.Hoagie (1b0402)

  54. Nasty Barbara Bush Tweets in 3….2….1….

    Rev.Hoagie (1b0402)

  55. Let’s recap D’Souza. A friend of his is running a vanity 5th-party campaign and Dinesh wanted him to think he had support, so he made a contribution, then a second one by proxy. This last is indeed illegal, but no one has asserted that this affected the election in any way, nor does it matter if the totally unelectable candidate was beholden to D’Souza. Because unelectable.

    Normally no one would care, and this kind of thing goes on a lot. So do other things like major-party candidates “accidentally” allowing foreign nationals to donate to their campaign by forgetting to validate addresses.

    But at the same time, Obama was really really pissed at D’Souza. He might not have said “Go find something on him” but it was pretty obvious that if someone did he’d be OK with it. And, after a great effort, they found this and prosecuted it to the full extent of the law.

    Now, only a complete and utter moron would think that this kind of malicious prosecution for political retribution jibes with “the rule of law”. Lucky us we have one.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  56. It’s almost like I have principles, or something!

    Something. Lenin had principles, too. They just sucked.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  57. But Hoagie — he’s a life-long Republican. Just like all those you used to read about in the newspapers.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  58. Rev H @56
    It is interesting that Rev H (and others) seem to think having principles, and sticking to them, is a form of Leftism.

    Kishnevi (10c258)

  59. D’Sousa simply thought he’d be treated like everyone else.

    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2014/09/double_standard_for_barack_obama_and_dinesh_dsouza.html

    It’s a common theme these days.

    random viking (6a54c2)

  60. They just sucked.

    So criticize what I say, not the fact that I said it…

    If D’Sousa was targeted with exceptional measures due to his views, there may be good arguments for pardoning him. The quote that was posted made multiple stupid arguments that aren’t convincing in the least:

    1) The donation limit in the law is arbitrary – so what? It’s the law.
    2) No harm in allowing people violate the law if they want to – so dumb that it needs no rebuttal.
    3) He didn’t know about the law he went out of his way to circumvent – demonstrably untrue.

    Dave (445e97)

  61. Babs had a good run; just like My Fair Lady. She stood by her man. And baked cookies.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  62. Dave,

    Hillary Clinton and the DNC are being sued, criminal complaints filed, for eighty four million in money laundering and illegal donations

    Oops

    EPWJ (134698)

  63. Hillary Clinton and the DNC are being sued, criminal complaints filed, for eighty four million in money laundering and illegal donations

    Cool. And your point is…?

    Dave (445e97)

  64. Dave

    And have you ever had a point?

    EPWJ (94362d)

  65. Very sorry to hear about Mrs. Bush. She was a charming, classy lady.

    The memorial website is here: http://www.barbarapbush.com/

    Dave (445e97)

  66. Now, only a complete and utter moron would think that this kind of malicious prosecution for political retribution jibes with “the rule of law”. Lucky us we have one.

    Kevin M (752a26) — 4/17/2018 @ 4:44 pm

    It looks like your writing a response to Dave -Clippie

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  67. *You’re*

    Lol, I had that one coming.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  68. I agree with Dave–

    Barbara Bush was, like her husband, a class act. We will not see her like again. Considering my mom’s failing years, it was probably a mercy — she had declined further medical intervention.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  69. Flip out:

    Trump pick Neil Gorsuch sides with liberals on immigration

    ‘The court’s 5-4 decision concerns a catchall provision of immigration law that defines what makes a crime violent.’ – http://www.nydailynews.com

    ‘This just isn’t your day… is it.” – James Bond 007 [Sean Connery] ‘From Russia With Love’ 1964

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  70. The closest thing I have to an edit button is when the Wifi times out and I have to log back in.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  71. Cool. And your point is…?

    People are NOT going to jail for breaking laws they know EVERYTHING about!

    Kevin M (752a26)

  72. Gorsuch was right in this case. Crappy laws don’t get convenient judicial fixes on his watch.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  73. During the past four decades, I’ve appeared before hundreds of federal judges. I was employed by one as a clerk for a year. I count a few dozen as personal acquaintances, and a couple as friends. I have appeared before good federal judges and bad ones, liberal ones and conservative ones, smart ones and stupid ones.

    I am measured in my public statements about federal judges, which indeed is an ethical obligation of my profession, but I have not been hesitant to criticize judges quite harshly from time to time, including with respect to their own ethics. In the post here commenting on Ninth Circuit Judge Reinhardt’s death, I noted that he was survived by a great many capital murderers whose timely demise he’d postponed by twisting the law, which is pretty harsh, but certainly defensible. I once initiated a complaint with the Judicial Council regarding a federal appellate judge’s unethical behavior, and I believe it led to a private censure of that judge.

    I’ve prospered before some judges and suffered under others. I told a war story here a day ago about being held in contempt by a federal judge whom I believe was genuinely crazy, in the sense of being out of control of his emotions and mental faculties, on that particular case.

    And yes, I know of and have appeared before at least a couple of federal district judges who I am entirely confident are indeed corrupt — the beneficiaries of gifts and business deals that haven’t been disclosed fully. (One’s now dead, the other is off the bench for other reasons.)

    So I’m no babe in the woods, pun intended, when assessing federal judges.

    I assess Kimba Wood as ethical and qualified. I assess the people who argue that her agreement to preside over George Soros’ wedding six years ago, meaning she therefore must have been corrupt in her rulings against Trump from the bench yesterday, to be exactly the kind of idiotic paranoid Trump lick-spittles that oblige one to use a blocker script when reading this blogs comments — which I again resolve to use even more conscientiously. I doubt our host is happy to see casual defamation of federal judges on the comments of his blog; I wouldn’t be; but federal law conclusively attributes that nonsense to the person who posts it, and imposes no obligation of him to clean up such crap.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  74. Scientist: “My findings are meaningless if taken out of context”

    Media: Scientist claims his findings meaningless.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  75. The Clinton machine has escaped accountability for its illegal practices for far too long,” Ted Harvey, chairman of CDP, told Fox News. “After months of review, the FEC has refused to address the Clintons’ $84 million money laundering scheme that violated several campaign finance laws.”

    According to Fox News, FEC officials did not respond to a request for comment, “citing an open investigation.”

    “A provision of federal campaign finance law requires that any Commission action on an enforcement matter be kept strictly confidential until the case is resolved,” an FEC statement to Fox News states. “To comply with this legal commitment and to protect the interests of those involved, we have a policy of not commenting on matters that are before the agency.”

    The daily wire

    EPWJ (134698)

  76. During the past four decades, I’ve appeared before hundreds of federal judges.

    You and Tom Sizemore.

    random viking (6a54c2)

  77. if i were a judge i wouldn’t be sleazy and release all the names that’s for sure

    everyone would say judge happyfeet’s court – that’s the one you want

    he’s the most scrupulous one of them all!

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  78. 78… FFS… enough.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  79. Joseph Wapner, even in his present state, is more ethical and qualified than Kimba.

    random viking (6a54c2)

  80. RIP Barbara Bush. Our country will miss her, quite a lady.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  81. Kimba is too tainted for even a taint squad.

    random viking (6a54c2)

  82. hilarious Mr. puller :)

    trannies are so garish and weird they can be fun and surprising elements of decor

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  83. Y’all gonna make me order drinks

    Up in here? Up in here?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  84. “It’s almost like I have principles, or something.”

    Or something. It’s Anal Retentive Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, ConDave

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  85. Doncha know Taint Team
    Is doin’ it for itself
    ringin’ their own bell

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  86. People are NOT going to jail for breaking laws they know EVERYTHING about!

    He said “Hillary Clinton and the DNC are being sued, criminal complaints filed”.

    I am a bit skeptical that there’s an actual crime here, simply because it was all reported openly. And Donna Brazile described exactly what was going on in her 2017 book:

    “Individuals who had maxed out their $2,700 contribution limit to the campaign could write an additional check for $353,400 to the Hillary Victory Fund—that figure represented $10,000 to each of the 32 states’ parties who were part of the Victory Fund agreement—$320,000—and $33,400 to the DNC,” reads a passage from the book. “The money would be deposited in the states first, and transferred to the DNC shortly after that. Money in the battleground states usually stayed in that state, but all the other states funneled that money directly to the DNC, which quickly transferred the money to [Clinton campaign headquarters in] Brooklyn.”

    This makes it sound as if the transfers were actually a way of complying with the law, or a loophole in it. It would be kind of odd for a former DNC chair to spell out an illegal money-laundering scheme in her memoir.

    But if they broke the law, then by all means throw the book at them.

    Dave (445e97)

  87. Dave,

    Gee call the FEC, and tell em

    Quick, hurry

    EPWJ (134698)

  88. Anyone want to raise their hand and say they believe D’Sousa would have been treated the same had he made a film critical of Sarah Palin or Mitt Romney instead of Chairman Zero?

    harkin (379712)

  89. Stormy Daniels in Las Vegas Manhunt! A Sketchy Artist Stu Billet Production.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  90. Donna Brazile is a mountain of honesty!

    Here’s a tissue… you have a little bullschiff on your lip…

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  91. Stormy Daniels in… “Operation Desert Stormy”

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  92. Stormy Daniels stars in… “Field Of Wet Dreams”

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  93. her boobs are too big she looks like a prostitute

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  94. BTW, D’Souza admitted that he knew what he was doing was wrong, and in violation of the law.

    Dave (445e97)

  95. Dave

    And Hilary is a lawyer and knows what she was doing was criminal

    Math test

    Which number is bigger 2,500 or 84,000,000?

    EPWJ (134698)

  96. Stormy Daniels like you’ve never seen her… “On Golden Blonde”.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  97. Col

    Golddigger
    You only get paid once
    From Russia with sludge
    Dr Ho
    Octa… naw to easy
    The lying highlights
    Goonraker

    EPWJ (134698)

  98. It’s fun, ain’t it…

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  99. I have to stop…..

    Maybe

    EPWJ (134698)

  100. what i learned today is getting partially sucked from a jet can be just as bad as being sucked all the way

    and this is extraordinarily wrong and unjust in my opinion

    Mr. narciso would probably be able to contextualize it in a helpful way

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  101. Y’all gonna really trespass me

    Up in here? Up in here?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  102. D’Souza caste down by Preet “You ain’t No Brotha”

    And Obama smiled

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  103. I just proved to me a guy as fat as Auric Goldfinger would never have been sucked out the small window of that little Lear Jet.

    Rev.Hoagie (1b0402)

  104. Gimpinistas use
    mueller investigation
    to cripple teh Prez

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  105. didn’t they do space auric with one of the aliens?

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  106. yes yes alien ressurect

    here is a helpful video for to understand getting sucked out of planes and spaceships

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  107. D’Souza learned that people who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.

    And let’s not be disingenuous about what he did. He pretended to bundle when in fact he was laundering his own illegal campaign contributions. Like me saying: “Here, Hoagie, Kevin, Haiku and Dave. I want to give $20,000 to Candidate X but McCain-Feingold says I can’t. Take this $5,000 each and write me back a check for $5,000 payable to Candidate X.”

    nk (dbc370)

  108. And let’s not be disingenuous about what he did. He pretended to bundle when in fact he was laundering his own illegal campaign contributions. Like me saying: “Here, Hoagie, Kevin, Haiku and Dave. I want to give $20,000 to Candidate X but McCain-Feingold says I can’t. Take this $5,000 each and write me back a check for $5,000 payable to Candidate X.”

    nk (dbc370) — 4/17/2018 @ 6:45 pm

    You can’t even slow walk the Hillary investigation for a lousy 20 grand mr nk.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  109. All Paul Newman did was cut the tops off parking meters. Did he really deserve to be tortured and broken by the state? I guess he could have written Brubaker a letter to protest his treatment.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  110. Stormy says of the guy who intimidated her, she never saw him coming.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  111. D’Souza learned that people who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.

    If only Hillary could learn that.

    random viking (6a54c2)

  112. D’Souza learned that people who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.

    it’s cause the stones might accidentally hit the glass not cause of fascist state intervention all up in it human face stomp stomp stomp stomp stomp

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  113. They call me…Mr…DMX…I’m just kidding, y’all. My name is Earl Simmons. You may know me from Romeo Must Die, Tax Fraud and my daughter Praise Mary Ella. For the next eight hours I will be guiding you through Starbucks Racial Sensitivity Training. So sit back…

    And all y’all [radio edit] [radio edit] STFU!

    Yes, the first chapter in your books is called Double Standards

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  114. Mattis wanted approval from Congress before Syria strikes but was overruled: report

    this makes me think this gaywad wants to run for president

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  115. This report, cited on RedState, but from a place I’ve never heard of before (Sparrow Media) says that a bankruptcy lawyer working on a Trump case in 2009 got a death threat similar to the alleged one against Daniels:

    “My name is ‘Carmine’ I don’t know why you are f*cking with Mr. Trump but if you keep f*cking with Mr. Trump, we know where you live and we’re going to your house for your wife and kids.”

    The lawyer notified the police, and the FBI investigated.

    The report has what purport to be recently released police and FBI logs about the case.

    The call was traced to a payphone across the street from the Ed Sullivan theater in NYC, where Donald Trump and his entourage were taping the Letterman show at the time. This is noted in the FBI logs.

    The veracity of the police and FBI documents should be independently confirmed…

    Dave (445e97)


  116. And let’s not be disingenuous about what he did. He pretended to bundle when in fact he was laundering his own illegal campaign contributions. Like me saying: “Here, Hoagie, Kevin, Haiku and Dave. I want to give $20,000 to Candidate X but McCain-Feingold says I can’t. Take this $5,000 each and write me back a check for $5,000 payable to Candidate X.”
    nk (dbc370) — 4/17/2018 @ 6:45 pm

    I agree with you, nk. My problem is threefold. First, McCain/Feingold is an attack on the first Amendment (in my non-lawyer opinion). Second, sending a guy to jail for that type of petty crime is crazy. And third, we, you me and everybody else, have witnessed so many more egregious campaign contribution crimes of such immense more magnitude than D’Souza’s petty crap go un indicted and un punished from Algore’s bundling from Buddhist monks to the legendary grift of the Clinton Foundation going after a small fry like Dinesh was obviously and blatantly partisan corruption and special application of the law as it can get. And everybody including the leftist who did it know it was. It did teach me a lesson though: a conservative will never get justice in America until we purge all leftists from law and politics. The corruption runs deep in them and as Horowitz once said: “Inside every progressive is a fascist trying to get out”. We actually believe in a fair shake, they in winning at all costs. Why do you think they’re still crying over Hillary’s loss? When the media and the elites are behind you and the deep state is running obstruction of justice for ya and you still lose how does she pay back her political debts? She owes them, big! But she lost so they got to find another way. Coup sounds good. (that’s coupe to corpsman Obummer).

    Rev.Hoagie (1b0402)

  117. @120. Trump White House releases condolence statement for Barbara Bush dated April 17, 2017. Making America Grate Again, Mr. Feet.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  118. you need some advance notice to wake Jeb up for these things Mr. DCSCA

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  119. @120. Trump White House releases condolence statement for Barbara Bush dated April 17, 2017. Making America Grate Again, Mr. Feet.

    DCSCA (797bc0) — 4/17/2018 @ 7:18 pm

    Make America 8 Again

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  120. This is The Big Ragoo. Youse better stop messin’ wit’ Mr Trump, see. We gonna put the knuckle on you and wrap our gats with gaffer tape. Don’t you go gettin’ any ideas. I may be a fiva tree but I rub you out, see?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  121. TV viewers will remember Mekka as a character actor who pops up now and again. But years ago, he earned a Tony nomination for his starring role in The Lieutenant — an unlikely musical about the Mai Lai massacre.

    You’ve got to have guts to turn one of the great horrors of the Vietnam War to song and dance, and Eddie’s got ’em.

    Just two days after Mekka’s arrest, 60-year-old Joyce DeWitt was sited[sic] for drunk driving in Southern California, after she allegedly drove past a barricade near a park in El Segundo. The result was one of the scariest celebrity mug shots we’ve seen in a while. Oh boy

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  122. Wow… pupils blown, 11 herbs and spices:.:

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  123. Hoagie, if it makes you feel any better, D’Souza wasn’t sent to jail.

    He got five years of probation, including eight months in a halfway house in LaJolla an hour from his home, where he had to check-in by 8pm every night, but was free to leave (as long as he stayed within San Diego County) during the day. He also has to do one day of community service work per week (according to this article on his life after sentencing, he teaches English to Mexican immigrants).

    Not something anyone would wish for, but he did plead guilty to a felony, and after pleading guilty, and before being sentenced, he went around (against the advice of his attorney) minimizing the seriousness of what he had done and claiming to be the victim of a conspiracy of which he could not produce a shred of evidence.

    It appears he antagonized the judge by making his professed remorse for his actions look insincere, and that resulted in a somewhat more onerous probation sentence than he might have otherwise received.

    Dave (445e97)

  124. and who would be a democrat example of being treated like this Mr. Dave

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  125. Re D’Sousa: Interesting guy. Smart guy. I don’t care what he claims, I believe he knew better; he certainly should have known better. Many have done worse and gotten away with it, but that is true of most people who break the law.

    I don’t like the kind of law he was convicted of violating: I think campaign finance contribution limitations are stupid and invite exactly this kind of game-playing with ugly collateral effects. The only campaign finance laws I would prefer to see are those requiring transparency, to which end I’d require every campaign contribution to be made by personal check traceable to an identifiable person even if bundled through some advocacy organization, coupled with a real-time net-based reporting system for full transparency.

    But he broke the law we have. He probably took a harder fall than otherwise because he’s a smart guy with a big public reputation, and maybe even because that public reputation was for views contrary to those of the party and presidential administration during whose tenure he was prosecuted, but then again, maybe he wasn’t, and either way that’s impossible to prove and wouldn’t be the first or last time.

    So this really has almost nothing to do with Cohen, or Trump, or any other topic of the day, except that someone who likes him is trying to coordinate a mini-boomlet that might bring it to Trump’s attention now that he’s looking for ways to send pardon-pen messages. I don’t like or approve of that much, but neither is it on the list of the top 100 things I disapprove of about Trump and Trumpkins.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  126. At least JD didn’t rant about the Jews. That would have set her career back about a year.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  127. Otto Kerner, Dan Walker, Dan Rostenkowski, Rod Blagojevich. If you’re going to be a Chicagoan, you should brush up on these things.

    nk (dbc370)

  128. I hope D’Souza didn’t get diddled by WFB IYKWIMAITYD.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  129. rod tried to sell a senate seat though

    Mr. soozle-doozle wasn’t anywhere in his league

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  130. wtf happened to fbi pussyhat gestapo robert mueller’s nose anyway

    someone or someones have found that face to be immensely punchable i think

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  131. I may be a sucker but I saw a little of Rod B on Celebrity Apprentice and I actually liked him. I wonder if he could have taken any Obama Administration people down or would he have ended up on a trade mission like Ron Brown?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  132. and who would be a democrat example of being treated like this Mr. Dave

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesse_Jackson_Jr.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carroll_Hubbard

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelo_Marotta

    The last guy did something pretty close to what D’Souza did, and involving a similar amount ($22K) but in a gubernatorial election. He got 6 months house arrest, and a $35K fine, which isn’t that different from D’Souza’s sentence of 8 months in a halfway house and $30K fine.

    Dave (445e97)

  133. Wasn’t Rod B a lot like Don T in that he didn’t go to the right schools and wasn’t from a polished background and he upset the establishment? And he cuts corners?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  134. You got any white males convicted of similar crimes, Dave?

    Haha jk! I knew you needed a good laugh.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  135. Oh wait.

    I take back everything good I ever said or thought about Judge Kimba Wood. I found another photo on the interwebz, and it’s totally changed my mind. Yes, clearly, Kimba Wood is a tool of the Clintons and the leftists, because here she is at the wedding with ….

    Oh. Wait. Different wedding. I don’t think that person at the far left is actually Judge Wood after all.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  136. the whole Rod thing was before i got here

    my sense though is there’s a lot of people in this city walking around what deserve locking up more than him

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  137. No, Blagojevich is a Chicago alderman’s son-in-law who first got elected to Congress to replace the one-term Republican who had replaced convicted felon Dan Rostenkowski with the help of the 1994 Republican Revolution; and then had the good fortune to run for governor against a Republican named Jim Ryan while Fitzgerald was prosecuting incumbent Republican governor George Ryan.

    nk (dbc370)

  138. saw on drudge where they’ve already spent 150M on the governor’s race so far

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  139. Whichever one wins, we should ship him straight to prison and save the taxpayers the cost of a corruption investigation and trial.

    nk (dbc370)

  140. this raunerbot does not age well

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  141. D’Souza married (for the second time) in 2016. The minister who presided over the ceremony was Rafael Cruz (the same which is father of Ted…

    That bit of truly trivial trivia courtesy pf Wikipedia

    Kishnevi (5a999e)

  142. @GovRauner

    A reminder for #TaxDay. Tell Illinois lawmakers you’re tired of the status quo. Time for a balanced budget with #NoNewTaxes.

    ugh the banality

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  143. No, Blagojevich is a Chicago alderman’s son-in-law who first got elected to Congress to replace the one-term Republican who had replaced convicted felon Dan Rostenkowski with the help of the 1994 Republican Revolution; and then had the good fortune to run for governor against a Republican named Jim Ryan while Fitzgerald was prosecuting incumbent Republican governor George Ryan.

    nk (dbc370) — 4/17/2018 @ 8:25 pm

    That’s a straight up Telenovela, that is.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  144. Wadda? When was Pee-Wee Herman rehabilitated? He has his own Netflix series. Current Netflix series. Dinkleberg! Truuump!

    nk (dbc370)

  145. he should do a cross-over with lostinspace

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  146. D’Souza married (for the second time) in 2016. The minister who presided over the ceremony was Rafael Cruz (the same which is father of Ted…

    That bit of truly trivial trivia courtesy pf Wikipedia

    Kishnevi (5a999e) — 4/17/2018 @ 8:35 pm

    He asked me,” Are you a Christian, child?” and I said, “Raf, I am tonight!”

    Actually my parents used to host lots of missionaries from all over the world. An Indian gentleman was watching my dad and I work on my Willy’s Jeep during his down time. My dad explained to me that the guy was probably wondering why the heck we weren’t paying someone to do it for us. I guess we aren’t good at haggling.

    This one time I wish I had paid someone because I ran over my glorious long hair with the mechanic’s creeper and was temporarily on the horns of a dilemma.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  147. They keep changing the boundaries, but his father-in-law, Alderman Richard Mell, was my alderman since I was a kid. His other daughter inherited his seat. They’re “white ethnic” Northwest Side political powerhouses from the Daley Machine days. The Richard J. Daley who stole the Presidency for JFK; not the Richard M. Daley who stole the Democratic nomination for Bill Clinton.

    nk (dbc370)

  148. damn hippie

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  149. Blagojevich’s father-in-law not Pee-Wee Herman’s.

    nk (dbc370)

  150. And totally offtopic trivia. Sorry for the long but necessary intro…
    You all probably know the 19th Century French composer Camille Saint Saens: the Danse Macabre, the Organ Symphony, the opera Samson and Delilah (or at least the Bacchanal from that opera).

    He was a church organist,and composed a small number of works for organ. Among them is a set of three pieces called Rhapsodies on Breton folksongs.

    The third is based on some traditional Christmas carols, but its main melody is quite clearly and unmistakably a melody which now has a very different context: the Israeli national anthem, HaTikvah!

    Kishnevi (5a999e)

  151. my alderman i hate him so much

    they were gonna put a binny’s under the old sears and he kiboshed it cause there’s an elementary school near there (and a liquor store)

    this was over a year ago and the sears is empty and crumbling

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  152. Pee Wee is a guy Mel Gibson would have a few words for on a really epic Voice Mail, I think.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  153. The third is based on some traditional Christmas carols, but its main melody is quite clearly and unmistakably a melody which now has a very different context: the Israeli national anthem, HaTikvah!

    Kishnevi (5a999e) — 4/17/2018 @ 8:50 pm

    Considering Anacreon in Heaven that seems all right but now you’ve given me some homework. I have a CD from some cute violin player doing Saint Saens so I guess I will look for that tonight.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  154. I grew up with the Pee-Wee Harris books and creepy Herman using that name has always annoyed me.

    nk (dbc370)

  155. @124. Well played, Mr. Feet.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  156. I grew up with the Pee-Wee Harris books and creepy Herman using that name has always annoyed me.

    nk (dbc370) — 4/17/2018 @ 8:57 pm

    He was on The Dating Game. So was Andy Kaufman and a serial killer. And Tom Selleck I think.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  157. P&P
    Yes, he did some famous stuff for violin. But this was for organ, and the only Youtube GOOGLE shows for this Third Rhapsody is for MIDI string quarter
    https://youtu.be/bcqNnsvA6a4

    Kishnevi (5a999e)

  158. How did a species of wood beget a patronage city government position?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  159. If you are interested, Mr Kishnevi, I just completed something that’s free and downloadable Here

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  160. On the pro Kimba side we have Beldar’s vehement exhortation that she is a wonderful judge.

    On the con side we have a report that Judge Kimba cheated on her husband of 14 years, opting for the millions behind married millionaire door number 2, then used the entirely understandable actions of her estranged husband ( who correctly read her character as a person who would parley her legal position to use anything and everything he said or did within the bedroom in the between time as evidence against him in the divorce) ie: avoiding her embrace, as grounds for taking the house and property and also leveraging support payments, for a professional woman who was obviously capable of supporting herself, and was the transgressing party in the wrong who breached the marriage contract.

    Sorry Beldar. Your personal estimate of your own ego doesn’t weigh in the balance as much as Judge Wood’s multiple home wrecking gold digging hor behavior.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  161. I agree with papertiger, an adulterer, especially a serial adulterer, should absolutely be disqualified from any sort of public office.

    Davethulhu (7e7722)

  162. What Davethulhu said.

    nk (dbc370)

  163. ‘Twernt what I said, mugwumps.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  164. But if you meant Kimba Wood shouldn’t be in a position to rule over how much damage a gold digging hor should be allowed to extort from her victim, twelve years after the fact, I agree, she should recuse in favor of a more impartial magistrate.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  165. Judge Wood should probably avoid breach of contract cases in the future as well.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  166. She’s a lot safer in the courtroom than the bedroom.

    Cause when we get behind closed doors

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  167. What rhymes with doors?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  168. What rhymes with doors?

    Trump’s women?

    nk (dbc370)

  169. Mr. Trump the President is a man who enjoys being pre-cuckolded.

    nk (dbc370)

  170. @ Cassandra, who asked (#4, sorry I missed it earlier):

    Is there anyone who thinks it is okay to use an investigation of Russian collusion to potentially destroy Sean Hannity’s marriage? Is that an unfortunate side effect?

    I don’t follow what you’re saying here. How does Cohen’s lawyer outing Hannity as one of Cohen’s three clients — even assuming that can indeed be attributed to the investigation of Russian collusion and Mueller’s team, the only proof for that being Cohen’s self-same lawyer saying he was told by USAO-SDNY lawyers that the search warrants were based “in part” on some kind of referral from Mueller — have anything to do with Sean Hannity’s marriage?

    Hannity claims Cohen represented him once, briefly and not very formally, by giving advice about a real estate matter. What’s that got to do with Hannity’s marriage?

    And how is it the fault of the USAO-SDNY lawyers or Judge Wood that one of Cohen’s three clients was Hannity? For all they knew, the third client could have been Paul Manafort.

    And how is it their fault, or Robert Mueller’s fault, or anyone else in the world but Sean Hannity’s fault, that Hannity didn’t hire a lawyer of his own the instant he learned of the Cohen search warrants to immediately take action to protect Hannity’s privacy rights, if he wanted them protected?

    Beldar (fa637a)

  171. Baboons used 55-gallon barrel to escape from San Antonio research facility, officials say. [SFGate]

    In Texas, there is a whole research facility of people who failed the lesson of Donkey Kong.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  172. Trump’s women?

    nk (dbc370) — 4/17/2018 @ 10:30 pm

    Are you as big a Star Trek fan as Mr Beldar?

    Mr. Trump the President is a man who enjoys being pre-cuckolded.

    nk (dbc370) — 4/17/2018 @ 10:31 pm

    Did you just invent the pre-cuck agreement? Or the pre-Trump agreement? With the latter he gets 10% for licencing.

    Pinandpuller (249a91)

  173. There’s the TSA pre-cuck line where your wife gets groped in front of you but she gets to keep her shoes and belt on.

    Pinandpuller (249a91)

  174. I don’t want to judge a judge harshly because we have established that they are people too but if you marry a ball player you might expect to wake up on an elevator floor wondering how you got there.

    Pinandpuller (249a91)

  175. mr, um, papertiger, did you know there are more tigers in Texas than in the wild everywhere else on Earth?

    Texas lawmakers are considering legislation that would crack down on those who choose to keep big cats and primates as pets.

    A measure sponsored by state Rep. Ryan Guillen , D-Rio Grande City, and Sen. Eddie Lucio , D-Brownsville, would ban ownership of big cats and some primates, including chimpanzees and baboons, in counties where there are more than 75,000 residents, reports the San Antonio Express.

    “Since 1990, more children have been killed or injured by captive big cats in Texas than any other state. Texas’ law needs to prevent people from keeping dangerous animals in their backyards and basements. These animals are not intended to be pets. They deserve the care and respect that can only be provided by professional facilities,” said Lucio.

    The Humane Society of the Unites States (HSUS) believes Texas is one of the worst states when it comes to injuries and fatalities involving captive wild animals, and reports that “two children have been killed and more than four dozen people have lost limbs or suffered other traumatic injuries, many requiring hospital treatment, after being mauled, bitten or scratched by captive tigers, lions, leopards, cougars, chimpanzees and monkeys.” Since 1990 there have been 22 deaths and 500 injuries nationwide.

    They also believe that there are currently more tigers living in captivity in Texas than in the wild, where their population is estimated to be around around 3,000. It’s also believed that there are between 10,000 to 20,000 privately owned big cats including tigers, lions and cougars currently living in captivity in the U.S., but the exact number is unknown due to insufficient record keeping.

    Care2

    Pinandpuller (249a91)

  176. papertiger, Judge Wood is not presiding over any litigation involving Stormy Daniels. Ms. Daniels had nothing to do with the issuance or execution of the search warrant on Cohen. Ms. Daniels and her lawyer showed up at the hearing Monday as spectators, to capture the attention of the extremely foolish and simpleminded who need stimulation but can’t be bothered to learn what’s actually going on. They succeeded.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  177. As for who else has vouched for her, that would include Connecticut College, the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Harvard Law School, all of which gave her degrees; the partners of LeBoeuf, Lamb, Leiby & MacRae, who made her one of them; that firm’s clients, which included a cross-section of the Fortune 500; and then, rather consequentially, Ronald Reagan and, by unanimous consent, the United States Senate.

    Who vouches for you?

    Beldar (fa637a)

  178. I’ve been trying to figure out exactly when it was I worked with Judge Wood when she was in private practice. As typically happens when I start reminiscing, the internet helps me refresh my recall substantially. And I think it must have been some time in the first three months of 1988.

    In re Insurance Antitrust Litigation, 723 F.Supp. 464 (N.D. Cal. (MDL) 1989), was the main case, or actually set of cases, all filed in federal court and then consolidated by the Multi-District Panel before Judge William Schwarzer in San Francisco. As his opinion recites:

    Nineteen states and numerous private plaintiffs have brought actions against a group of insurance companies, reinsurance companies, underwriters, brokers, and individuals, and the Insurance Services Office, Inc. (“ISO”), charging them with violations of the federal antitrust laws and state laws. The charges rest on alleged conspiracies, boycotts, threats, intimidation, and other coercive conduct by defendants to restrict the availability of certain coverage under policies for commercial general liability insurance (“CGL”) and property insurance. The filing of these complaints followed lengthy investigations conducted by the regulatory agencies of several states.

    The outrider was Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox, a rabble-rousing populist, good old boy, and friend of the plaintiffs’ personal injury bar who was preparing a campaign for governor. He sued some, but not all, of the same companies, plus a few others, in state district court in Texas. And he affirmatively disclaimed any reliance on federal law, basing his case solely on Texas state antitrust statutes (which are quite robust), and made sure to join some Texas-based defendants to destroy complete diversity and prevent removal.

    Bill Montgomery of Schiff Hardin in Chicago was the national coordinating counsel for Hartford Insurance Co.; Hartford was one of the target defendants, and arguably the target defendant. To represent Hartford in Texas, he in turn hired me. I’m not listed in the linked case, because I wasn’t counsel of record for Hartford in the federal case; but I was in Texas (including in this parallel private-party case that generated a reported Texas Supreme Court opinion). It was one of the coolest representations I’ve ever been involved in, and ultimately one of the most successful.

    Kimba Wood, then an antitrust partner at LeBoeuf, Lamb, Leiby & Macrae, and her firm represented a collection of the leading “names” from Lloyd’s of London (a distinction quickly lost on everyone, who referred to her clients, as the industry does, simply as “Lloyd’s”). It was also considered a target defendant. You’ll see that firm referenced in the linked opinion from 1989, but by then she’d left LeBoeuf to take the bench, so there are different lawyers listed.

    The defense strategy was to tee up the case for a sweeping summary judgment motion before Judge Schwarzer, whom the defendants thought would be receptive, and to keep the parallel Texas case on the back burner as long as possible in order to keep it from screwing up the federal case. Except, of course, not everyone agreed with that strategy, especially the companies who’d been sued in Texas but not in the consolidated federal cases, who wanted to seek an early dismissal in Texas. All of these companies had slightly different interests and multiple sets of counsel. But if they didn’t hang together, they would all assuredly hang separately. Hence, a contentious meeting of defense counsel was held in Atlanta, with King & Spalding hosting IIRC, for almost an entire week.

    As primary targets, a small handful of defendants including both Hartford and Lloyd’s took the lead in trying to meld together the different proposed draft joint defense agreements submitted by, as best I can recall, all but two of the defendants — i.e., several dozen drafts — during the course of that week. I think we met at the Peachtree Hyatt for 12-hour sessions on the first two days, then gave everyone half a day off while the targets incorporated the results of those first two days’ arguments and agreements, and then we met for another full day. Most people then left on Friday, but some of us still involved in drafting stayed another day.

    Thus it was that I got to watch, and participate a little at the edges (on matters pertinent to the Texas case especially), as Kimba Wood and a couple of other lead lawyers (including Bill Montgomery) herded these stampeding cats into some sort of semblance of order. With the internet’s help, I recall now that she’d already been nominated by Reagan (December 18, 1987) but that her nomination was still pending before the Senate at the time of the meeting. It couldn’t have been before the first week in January, though, because I’d changed firms at year-end 1987 and I was at my new firm when hired for Hartford.

    At the time of the meeting, she was already a modest celebrity in this crowd of lawyers, and she made new fans quickly. I saw her work in big meetings; I saw her in small groups; I saw her in one-on-one negotiations (and did some tag-team arm-twisting with her). In the end, I believe every defendant in both cases ended up joining in the agreement (some with “signing statements” or reservation codicils, but that didn’t much matter).

    The whole point of these joint defense agreements is to let defendants with a common interest cooperate with each other confidentially and candidly, sharing in joint labors when practicable, avoiding friendly fire, and managing an otherwise unmanageable piece of multi-state litigation, without anyone seriously risking a waiver, or compelled disclosure, or other bad consequence with respect to any privilege any of them could assert. And these agreements must be written with the full expectation that during the course of the litigation, one or more defendants will have a falling out and become adverse, in which case they may settle separately and flip — with all the shared defense information still in their hot little hands. How do you handle that? We managed, in her case with conspicuous competence. Her attention to detail was meticulous.

    I’d be tempted to say that Kimba Wood has forgotten more attorney-client privilege law than most lawyers have ever learned, but that would be wrong: I’m sure she’s never forgotten any of it. I came away powerfully impressed by her. I wrote both of my senators to support her nomination, and I recall being very pleased when I learned she’d been confirmed on April 19, 1988, by unanimous consent.

    Here’s a fairly comprehensive write-up about her. I take nothing from CBS News on faith, but I have enough independent knowledge to verify this article’s overall accuracy, including the statements regarding her reputation on the SDNY. As the article points out:

    In 1993, she became the leading contender to become attorney general after the Clinton administration’s first choice, Zoe Baird, was dropped from consideration because she had employed two illegal immigrants. It then came to light that Wood had also employed an illegal immigrant as a babysitter when it was still legal to do so, forcing her to remove herself from consideration for the post.

    Wood hadn’t broken any laws, but the Clinton administration accused her of being less than forthcoming about her arrangement with the babysitter. According to the New York Times, the White House also worried that her very brief [five days!] tenure as a Playboy bunny trainee in the 1960s would become fodder for jokes.

    “Bunny trainee” means “cocktail waitress trainee,” not centerfold trainee. But typical of Bubba’s hypocrisy, I guess. She’d have been a hell of an AG in my opinion, chosen as she was from across the aisle. The article asserts:

    In legal circles, Wood is a respected and well-liked judge who is frequently described as brilliant. She assumed senior status in 2009 after a three-year stint as the court’s chief judge.

    So I suppose y’all can make up your own minds about her. Mine’s made up, I confess.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  179. Aetna was represented in the Texas case by Lee Godfrey, who’d taken me to trial with him on behalf of Evel Knieval back in 1978 (he’s on the other side of Knieval from me in the photo of us entering court), and it was through him that I also briefly met Zoe Baird, then in-house counsel for Aetna, who was also at that meeting. It’s a pretty small world sometimes.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  180. The London school of economics is a average school with an imperious name. The Kansas State School of Economics, probably turns out just as qualified graduates

    EPWJ (134698)

  181. During that week-long meeting, I kept thinking: This must have been what the League of Nations was like. Watching the difficulties this disparate group of companies had in trying to agree on something to protect them all, it was very hard to believe they’d secretly conspired to restrict commercial general liability insurance coverage world-wide. They couldn’t agree on the time of day.

    Jim Mattox lost his gubernatorial race, Godfrey & I whipped the AG’s office at a key motion to compel hearing, and they kind of lost interest in the case, so it settled with smoke and mirrors and promises that all would compete nicely in the future. Ultimately, as per the original plan, the insurance companies won in the federal court case, in the end before the SCOTUS: Hartford Fire Ins. Co. v. California, 509 U.S. 764 (1993), for which I’m due no credit whatsoever. :-)

    Beldar (fa637a)

  182. Beldar

    I don’t doubt you are a very competent lawyer with many successes over other very good attorneys.

    But, you’re not on the level, nor even close to a business major, an engineer, a physicist, a geologist etc.

    Which a lot of us are. It’s not that attorneys are not smart, they are, but there a droves of more accomplished people who don’t need a forty year legal career to realize, you still don’t respect the basic tenement of the law, the attorney client privilege. You threw away an entire professions reputation to go after someone you hate.

    The problem is that our system of justice the basic building block of our society depends on emotional hateful disrespectful Lawyers who are throwing the principles of the constitution away for political differences including our basic rights.

    EPWJ (134698)

  183. But, you’re not on the level

    WTF does this even mean? “Not on the level”?

    Weren’t lawyers supposed to be the arrogant ones?

    you still don’t respect the basic tenement of the law, the attorney client privilege. You threw away an entire professions reputation to go after someone you hate.

    “Basic tenement of the law”… LOL.

    You seem to believe, somehow, that Michael Cohen is the first lawyer in history to be served with a search warrant.

    You hate lawyers, and yet you apparently think that they, alone among the members of our society, should have blanket immunity from a basic law enforcement process spelled out explicitly in the constitution – simply because they’re lawyers! If lawyers are such barbaric sociopaths, shouldn’t we hold them to at least the same standards of accountability under the law as “higher level” beings like you and me?

    There are well-established procedures for protecting attorney-client privilege in cases like Cohen’s, and they are being followed meticulously.

    emotional hateful disrespectful Lawyers

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_projection

    Psychological projection is a theory in psychology in which humans defend themselves against their own unconscious impulses or qualities (both positive and negative) by denying their existence in themselves while attributing them to others. For example, a person who is habitually rude may constantly accuse other people of being rude.

    Dave (445e97)

  184. Dave

    I don’t hate lawyers, I have run law firms, da’s offices as a high level manager over senior attorneys. In fact, I respect greatly good people. You’re trying for political reasons, to justify the unthinkable.

    There are only a handful of lawyers out there that think this was done correctly and Rosenstein is a corrupt, not so smart lawyer and mueller was not reappointed because of his incompetence and his political sjw infusion of the FBI.

    Few agents shared tears when he left

    EPWJ (134698)

  185. Beldar @183. Engaging papertiger seriously is mostly a pointless act, particularly when he pretends not to understand that the case before Judge Wood is neither about marital infidelity nor breach of contract but, instead, about the search warrant in a criminal case — I suspect a RICO case.

    nk (dbc370)

  186. When, according to Cohen’s lawyer own self
    1. “Millions” of pages of documents were seized; AND
    2. Only three clients in an attorney-client relationship could be named; AND
    3. One has denied the attorney-client relationship; AND
    4. The “attorney’s” only work for the other two which we know of were payoffs to two women to conceal sexual scandals;
    there wasn’t a whole lot of attorneying going on.

    nk (dbc370)

  187. Happy, is your Alderman the woke Apu guy?

    urbanleftbehind (bb5d4e)

  188. more or less yes i think so

    he’s a useless douche named Ameya Pawar

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  189. Nk,

    He was the attorney for a billionaire investor, yeah, no paperwork ever gets created in complex developments….

    EPWJ (8f35c3)

  190. Wow didnt know nk was the fly on the wall in trump tower for 25 years and has knowledge yhat no one else has including the fbi and doj who modt likely illegally surveilled Cohen when trump got the nomination

    EPWJ (8f35c3)

  191. Here’s the story of another “attorney for a billionaire [in today’s money] investor” who is part of Chicago’s history.

    nk (dbc370)

  192. You are making a lot of stuff up, Eric, is what I think you are doing.

    nk (dbc370)

  193. “MICHAEL MUKASEY: Trump, Cohen, and Attorney-Client Privilege: The protection has limits, but is it worth testing them over a possible campaign-finance offense?

    After anthrax spores killed five people, infected 17 others, and showed up in envelopes mailed to U.S. senators and media organizations in 2001, the current special counsel, then director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, spent years chasing and destroying the reputation of a microbiologist named Steven Hatfill, zealous in the belief that Mr. Hatfill was the guilty party. Another zealot, James Comey, then deputy attorney general, said he was “absolutely certain” no mistake had been made.

    After Mr. Hatfill was exonerated—he received more than $5.5 million in damages from the government—Mr. Mueller then decided that another microbiologist, Bruce Ivins, was the culprit. When Ivins committed suicide, Mr. Mueller pronounced the case closed. A subsequent investigation by the National Academy of Sciences suggests Ivins too was innocent.

    Mr. Mueller is not a bad man, nor is Mr. Comey. It’s just that both show particular confidence when making mistakes, which makes one grateful for safeguards like the attorney-client privilege.”

    Well, I wouldn’t say that Mueller and Comey are good men. And neither has faced any significant accountability for his mistakes and misbehavior.’

    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/294464/

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  194. NK,

    My thesis in time billing and document management at Tulane was used at times as a reading topic in the law school and the school of engineering for a better part of a decade. Funny cause I only got a B on it…

    I was one of two preferred Juris software consultants for the Americas 4th largest city.

    What I think is, you are a fierce advocate for your clients, and are making stuff up on a Beldar level 6 out of a ten, because you have lost it over trump.

    6 years to go to your return to sanity.

    Hope u make it

    EPWJ (94362d)

  195. Who vouches for you?

    I imagine in an unguarded moment, under the right circumstances, ex-husband Michael Kramer would have a kind word.

    Mrs. Nancy Richardson has sat for several interviews to express her opinion of Kimba’s character.

    Those other people seems like they were willing to look the other way regarding Judge Wood. I don’t think they knew her too well.
    Probably Friday afternoon reviews, aided by a specific issue of Playboy magazine in the company john.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  196. Paper tiger

    Also a bunny sleeping around for the better part of a year at the mansion, becomes a hostess at a casino……

    EPWJ (94362d)

  197. Since I have been living daily with the attorney-client privilege and the secrets and confidences of clients for only 35 years, I’ll defer to your expertise, Eric. But that’s not what I meant about you making things up. I meant that you are making things up about the government’s actions against Cohen. Strawmen arguments.

    nk (dbc370)

  198. And now to attacking the judge’s character with things entirely unrelated to anything in the case. The tactics of desperation. Of desperate losers without a legal leg to stand on.

    nk (dbc370)

  199. Just as a primer on how paperwork grows in time billing firms

    My first accounting job was a controller for a 60 person engineering consulting firm. In increments of an hour I insisted on at least a paragraph description of services rendered, the client, the project, the phase, etc. also any supplies such as copying, drawing generation, testing results, lab results, generated per person at least 5 pages a day, I think we averaged two thousand pages a week for a 7 million dollar firm. All this was sent to our attorneys. They sent these to the clients.

    This was close to a million pages a year, all sent to the lawyers, all protected.

    Trumps a multi billion dollar, multi state, multi country organization and his vast and wide legal affairs were managed by Cohen

    But it’s insidious that Cohen didn’t have dozens more clients right?

    EPWJ (94362d)

  200. I meant at least two thousand a day, not a week, when my first daughter was born I was sitting there in the recovery room with 4 boxes of the weeks paper work checking that all the billing and documents were correct

    EPWJ (94362d)

  201. Trumps a multi billion dollar, multi state, multi country organization and his vast and wide legal affairs were managed by Cohen

    That is one example of you making things up. We have seen any number of real lawyers managing Trump’s vast and wide legal affairs. We have only seen Cohen as an occasional spokesperson on TV and as the fixer in the Stormy Daniels kerfuffle.

    nk (dbc370)

  202. Nk

    Yeah, her character, law breaking, immorality has nothing to do with her abilty to distinguish between right and wrong.

    Got it.

    EPWJ (94362d)

  203. Desperate?

    I’m not the one rolling in bed all night, trying to justify himself.

    At some point did Beldar say the raid on Cohen had nothing to do with Stormy Daniels?

    Didn’t Beldar famously have me on the block list?

    Say my name [YouTube]

    papertiger (c8116c)

  204. Nk,

    So you’re inside trumps legal department? Your office is two door closer to the man than cohens?

    Hey, 6 years to go, you”ll make it.

    EPWJ (94362d)

  205. Mueller-Comey: Taint Twins … Teh Desperate Losers… Hot Poop… Monkey Rictus… Suckn’Spit… filed under “Appropriate Band Names”

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  206. Saltn’Saltier…

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  207. Teh Spazmodics…

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  208. Whatever. That’s what courts are for. To eventually declare which blog commenter was right.

    nk (dbc370)

  209. Goon Squat

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  210. Peace, muh Bros…

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  211. more and more’s coming out about sleazy dirty judge kimba licklick

    new york values?

    word is she has them

    she has them new york values all up in it

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  212. Oh, and being appointed as a political favor to her democrat fund raising husband, by a rapist impeached president who was disbarred, is another plus

    EPWJ (94362d)

  213. Nk,

    No the courts are there where 6 to 12 non lawyers decide the issues of law because all the way back tom1215, lawyers could not be trusted to be impartial

    EPWJ (94362d)

  214. plus when she was younger she wanted to show her boobies for money like a hooker

    who does that

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  215. Did you know Judge Kimber was only one illegal alien heartbeat away from being the Clinton crime family’s Loretta Lynch? After Kimber was shot down out of the gate, he hired Janet Reno.

    Here’s my shocked face.

    Good thing too. Imagine the rumors after that tarmak meeting.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  216. yes yes the Clintons must have assessed kimba licklick and found her sufficiently flexible

    ethically

    morally

    and now we all know who she is

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  217. I have no one to blame but myself.

    nk (dbc370)

  218. Nk,

    You’re a very good person, there are lots of reasons to dislike trump, making assumptions about the out of control prosecutors, the same ones you have fought fiercely against with all your means as a hard charging litigator, well it jarring.

    Even sludge like me and trump and Cohen get basic rights correct?

    Or is it politically dependent?

    EPWJ (94362d)

  219. Bill Clinton liked Judge Kimba Wood’s qualifications for Attorney General. Both of them.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  220. Since I have been living daily with the attorney-client privilege and the secrets and confidences of clients for only 35 years, I’ll defer to your expertise, Eric. But that’s not what I meant about you making things up. I meant that you are making things up about the government’s actions against Cohen. Strawmen arguments.

    nk (dbc370) — 4/18/2018 @ 7:00 am

    Oh and so have I, and All arguments are straw yours mine, pats Beldars DRJ the col, paper tiger because we all don’t know why the govt under obama was intercepting cohens calls and emails in 2016 till today. And what certain information that they used to get this unprecedented warrant.

    We don’t know so we use our intelligence and our different expertise and experiences to make straw arguments.

    It’s also called the legal system

    EPWJ (94362d)

  221. Heh, nk. At least we learned that big law firms/attorneys are actually run by the billing software guy. It felt that way when we did billing at the end of the month, but why weren’t they at the Partners’ meetings?

    DRJ (15874d)

  222. Hey but at least we aren’t weathermen or economists

    That would really suck

    EPWJ (94362d)

  223. It’s the smears against the judge which bother me, DRJ. That’s so, so ….

    nk (dbc370)

  224. what kimba licklick did on Mr. Hannity was tacky at best

    but i think the word thuggish applies better

    she’s a corrupt thug-judge

    the positive thing is people are understanding how the courts are being used to prosecute the political enemies of the gestapo pussyhat fbi

    it’s a dark time

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  225. EPWJ,

    I think you just make sh*t up. Do you have any evidence that “the govt under Obama was intercepting Cohen’s calls and emails in 2016 til today”? A link, even?

    Leviticus (aa4e35)

  226. One thing we can agree on: it’s all Trump’s fault… amirite?

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  227. In all the centuries of the attorney-client privilege, there are maybe three (or four) cases that extended it to the identity of the client, and I mean cases from 1815, 1904 and 1962, and they involved grave risks to the client if his enemies knew who he was. Like an idiot lawyer blurting out in a grand jury proceeding that a client had told him that mobster X had committed such and such a crime, and even though that could not be taken back at least the client’s identity could be protected.

    nk (dbc370)

  228. what kimba licklick did was to make it less likely President Trump will be able to find representation

    lawyers don’t want to be gestapo-raided just on general principles, but especially not now that we’re in the part of the season where there’s lots of fun things to do on the weekend (last weekend was reptile fest here in chicago for example… there was big sneks)

    and now they know their other clients will be dragged through the cable news sewer

    and that’s what kimba licklick’s thuggishness has wrought

    and it was on purpose

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  229. It’s “Hate Law and Lawyers Month/Year/Decade” in the comments. Judges are the ultimate lawyers and the symbol of the law. It’s just an extension of the hate for lawyers that goes along with a society that seems too complex and litigious.

    My father, the engineer and a linear thinker, liked lawyers but he never could accept how they think. Neither can doctors, who are trained in the scientific method but think like statisticians. We are taught to think in different ways because our professions require different approaches. The Founders thought a law-based approach was the best way to run a society, but that’s no longer true.

    DRJ (15874d)

  230. Drj

    Yeah large law firms don’t have financial or oversight managers because managing partners have sooo much free time and expertise to research case outcome financial risk variance costs, firm liability exposure sure drj that’s all covered in that magic 4th year of law school.

    Partners like to bill to cases that are going to get paid, the lack of funds is the main reason why some firms go under

    Managing partners in big firms also have free time to research clients do forensic analysis, manage investigations, cause managing clients and their expectations take so little time

    Also having people who are between the letterhead and the rank and file attorneys gives them insulation on a variety of topics

    EPWJ (94362d)

  231. Leviticus

    Nuts, Fox News abc news reported it wsj just watched the managing editor of the wsj ask why

    EPWJ (94362d)

  232. Nuts was supposed to br NYT

    EPWJ (94362d)

  233. Yes, I’m sure all large law firms have managers or administrators who work for the firm.

    DRJ (15874d)

  234. Juries are the ultimate deciders

    Good lord…….,.

    The law is settled by 12cpeople who thank the lord, are not imperious lawyers

    And the laws are created by legislators who are elected by non lawyers

    Another blessing

    EPWJ (94362d)

  235. “Judge just ruled towards Cohen, putting a hold on everything until Cohen, reviews the documents first.”

    – EPWJ

    “Judge Says Trump and Cohen Can’t Yet Review Materials Seized by the FBI

    – Fake News NYT

    Leviticus (efada1)

  236. I once served on a jury that had 7 lawyers.

    DRJ (15874d)

  237. #fakejury

    Leviticus (efada1)

  238. Drj

    Everyone one works for the firm, and the firm works for their clients

    Cases are decided, not by John Grishamish court room theatrics but by the witnesses who tell what happened.

    Better lawyers understand that by the grace of god they had a client and witnesses and evidence that carried the case and not an emotion drama laden opening and closing statement

    EPWJ (94362d)

  239. Haiku,

    I give Trump credit for Gorsuch, even though some of his supporters seem unhappy about the Dimaya case. I think Gorsuch was right in that case. Trying to make the laws more limited, fair, predictable and understandable is good.

    DRJ (15874d)

  240. “Nuts, Fox News abc news reported it wsj just watched the managing editor of the wsj ask why”

    – EPWJ

    Maybe you can provide a link, then.

    Leviticus (efada1)

  241. Drj

    That means whatever town this occurred in has problems :)

    EPWJ (94362d)

  242. Hahaha I’m just now seeing nk’s comments accusing you of the same thing. Funny.

    Leviticus (efada1)

  243. Everyone one works for the firm, and the firm works for their clients.

    Some law firms are partnerships and some are corporations, typically PLLCs. The partners and shareholders are the owners.

    DRJ (15874d)

  244. It means the laws need to be clarified so they aren’t vague.

    DRJ (15874d)

  245. Gotta go

    6 more years

    You guys will make it

    Just think of the fun well all have when trump retires in 2024 and a whole new set of politics is up for grabs

    Good times

    And I want to thank the lawyers here for proving my point that lawyers hate being managed, it’s a good trait

    EPWJ (94362d)

  246. Did you even read those articles? They say nothing remotely similar to what you claimed earlier: that “the govt under Obama was intercepting Cohen’s calls and emails in 2016 til today.”

    Leviticus (efada1)

  247. Leviticus: I think you just make sh*t up. Do you have any evidence that “the govt under Obama was intercepting Cohen’s calls and emails in 2016 til today”? A link, even?

    More than a year into the “collusion” investigation, Leviticus makes a plea to not “make sh*t up”, apparently applying a level of standard to a blog comment section that he doesn’t apply to the government.

    This comment could’ve been written a year ago regarding Manafort, but as of September we knew that he had been wiretapped as the result of a FISA warrant. Like Manafort and Page, Cohen is referenced in the Steele dossier. Who is making sh*t up, exactly?

    random viking (6a54c2)

  248. A dog ran into a butcher shop and grabbed a roast off the counter. Fortunately, the butcher recognized the dog as belonging to a neighbor of his. The neighbor happened to be a lawyer.

    Incensed at the theft, the butcher called up his neighbor and said, “Hey, if your dog stole a roast from my butcher shop, would you be liable for the cost of the meat?” The lawyer replied, “Of course, how much was the roast?” “$7.98.”

    A few days later the butcher received a check in the mail for $7.98.

    Attached to it was an invoice that read: Legal Consultation Service: $150 .

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  249. My fellow Viking

    Some people can’t read

    Months ago the fbi was investigating Cohen, on tv just now it’s years not months

    EPWJ (94362d)

  250. Some people can’t read, indeed. Some people think that “the Trump DOJ investigating Cohen in 2018″ is equivalent to ““the govt under Obama intercepting Cohen’s calls and emails in 2016 til today.”

    Leviticus (efada1)

  251. Leviticus

    He was unmasked by Susan what’s her name

    EPWJ (94362d)

  252. Reading the reports of the TRO hearing, it appears Judge Wood ruled:

    1.) Cohen will get copies of the seized documents now. (They were Cohen’s documents so he should know what they are, but his attorneys need to see them.)

    2.) The Judge will decide later whether the DOJ taint team will do the review to identify privileged documents, or whether a special master will do it. (My guess is she will appoint a special master as I think was done in the Stewart case, not only because it prevents an appearance of conflict in a very high-profile case but also because the Judge went out of her way to compliment the SDNY US Attorney. Some judges do that when they are inclined to rule against them.)

    3.) Trump’s attorney wanted the documents released to her client, Trump, as holder of the attorney-client privilege. That will not happen. His side was the only clear loser that appeared at the hearing. (It’s my understanding that Hannity and Broidy did not appear, either in person or by counsel.)

    4.) If Trump’s attorneys want documents, it is up to Cohen to give them to him. (Probably the same is true for Broidy and Hannity.)

    DRJ (15874d)

  253. It’s the smears against the judge which bother me, DRJ. That’s so, so ….

    nk (dbc370)

    There’s this thing called truth. It’s different than going on a prosecutorial fishing trip. When the judge cheats on her husband with another married richer man, destroying both marriages, then sues him for both houses and support payments that her husband can’t pay even if he wanted to AND WINS [AAAAAAAARRRRR!!!] all in court records, it’s not a smear to point out who she is.

    papertiger (c8116c)

  254. And the fbi opened an investigation in 2016

    Also,any us citizen making overseas phone calls are swept up, trump,organization is world wide, Cohen is their attorney

    EPWJ (94362d)

  255. If you’re going to San Francisco
    Be sure to wear some feces in your hair
    If you’re going to San Francisco
    You’re gonna meet some homeless people there

    For those who come to San Francisco
    Summertime will be like winter there
    In the streets of San Francisco
    Homeless people relieve without a care

    All across the nation
    Such a strange sensation
    Put on teh lotion
    There’s a whole generation
    With a weird undulation
    Put on teh lotion
    Put on teh lotion

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  256. I cannot even begin to decipher what that means. You’ve taken the narciso route of argument evasion.

    Leviticus (efada1)

  257. (Not your comment, Colonel. Yours makes relative sense)

    Leviticus (efada1)

  258. Ultimately, teh judge will be judged.

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  259. 269… lol

    Colonel Haiku (46f395)

  260. EPWJ, don’t “make sh*t up”. That’s the government’s job.

    random viking (b2b139)

  261. Rice unmasked Bannon and Kushner. Maybe she unmasked far more Trump affiliates. I wouldn’t doubt it, but we don’t know if it happened.

    The House Intelligence Committee also subpoenaed Cohen and his firm a year ago about unmasking, but I don’t know if anything came of it. I think the Committee ended its investigation.

    DRJ (15874d)

  262. Mr. narciso would shed some light on the implications here

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  263. Then by all means he should apologize and comment, hf, hopefully in a language we can understand.

    Eric, lawyers take direction from their clients who employ them, subject to the disciplinary and ethical rules. They take suggestions from their employees.

    DRJ (15874d)

  264. Drj

    Most of my oversight was before we take a client or if in the conduct of the case the client or the attorney misrepresented materially finacially the facts or risks of a case.

    EPWJ (8f35c3)

  265. Tvs blowing up today

    Gowdy asking for IG probes into comey, which will lead to mueller which will lead to…..

    EPWJ (8f35c3)

  266. That is interesting, EPWJ. You investigate the firm’s clients?

    DRJ (15874d)

  267. And I want to thank the lawyers here for proving my point that lawyers hate being managed, it’s a good trait. EPWJ (94362d) — 4/18/2018 @ 8:51 am

    I’ve worked with many lawyers, and two traits always come to mind:

    1) When it comes to the law they are always right, and you are always wrong. Now sometimes that means they have to insult you, or misinterpret you, or put words into your mouth, but at the end of the day they are right and you are wrong about the law. They only defer to other lawyers (there is a silly pecking order I won’t go into). And they like to pretend that all discussions are about the law in some way, when they are not, so they can assert the privilege of being right all the time.

    2) When it comes to any other field of study, those same rules don’t usually apply. Lawyers are perfectly good journalists, plumbers, doctors, engineers, and scientists. They are free to speculate wildly in those fields, and their opinions are just as valid as supposed “experts”. There is no field they cannot master, often by just glancing at a few papers.

    Most lawyers are blissfully unaware of this self-granted privilege.

    Cassandra (a815b9)

  268. Lawyers are perfectly good journalists, plumbers, doctors, engineers, and scientists.

    Be it noted that a lot of the work lawyers do stems from the fact that journalists, plumbers, doctors, engineers, and scientists, etc. have screwed up, and it’s necessary for the lawyer to learn how they screwed up….

    When it comes to the law they are always right, and you are always wrong.
    Well, the legal profession does seem to attract more than its proportionate share of self important jerks, but very few lawyers I know act the way you describe. I am sorry that you have run into so many of the jerks and so few of the nice ones. But it is probably correct to assume that the average nonlawyer knows less about law than the average lawyer, just as the average nonmedical professional knows less about medicine that the average doctor or nurse.

    kishnevi (aaa345)

  269. Michale Cohen wassn’t the only lawyer Sean Hannity used who was associated with Donald Trump.

    The New York Daily News reoports, at the end of their article about Sean hiding link to Trunmp lawyer being OK with Fox

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/fox-news-stands-sean-hannity-article-1.3939138

    ,,,,that on May 25 2017, KFAQ, a radio station in Tulsa, Oklahoma, received a cease and desist letetr signed by attorneys for Sean Hannity, who were:

    Victoria Toensing and Jay Sekulow. (in addition Joseph DiGenova is also identified as “Counsel for Sean Hannity:” in the letter.)

    Jay Sekulow has now since become Donald Trump’s personal attorney and works on the Muller probe.

    Victoria Toensing and Joseph DiGenova were also going to work on that until they discovered a conflict.

    The story propbably originated in the Atlantic:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2018/04/sean-hannity/558272/

    Sammy Finkelman (02a146)

  270. Cassandra, that is so spot on I’m tempted to ask you what I had for lunch today.

    Skorcher (5b282a)

  271. Be it noted that a lot of the work lawyers do stems from the fact that journalists, plumbers, doctors, engineers, and scientists, etc. have screwed up, and it’s necessary for the lawyer to learn how they screwed up….

    Because 20/20 hindsight belongs to the lawyer class. Of course if it got screwed up because of some idiotic legal hurdle created by the lawyers you hired or the ones who wrote stupid laws, it’s your fault for not hiring a lawyer to review the contract you had with the lawyer you hired to protect you from the lawyers who wrote the stupid laws. Thus pretty much proving Cassandra’s points in the first place. The arrogance of you people is stunning. Fortunately for yourselves, you lack the self awareness nor understanding of what plumbers, doctors, engineers, and scientists, etc. do such that you can’t comprehend the degree of your own arrogance.

    Skorcher (5b282a)

  272. You should know what’s up Mr nk because when you call him Eric I start imagining you as Professor X for some reason.

    Pinandpuller (a2dea8)

  273. @265 papertiger

    I will agree with you that all the anti male doings of the justice system need to be purged. Like paying an ex wife for life and automatic child custody. But most lawyers here agree with that too I’d wager. I’d say Judge Wood sounds kind of entitled and petty in her personal life but don’t be a Playa Hatah.

    Pinandpuller (a2dea8)

  274. @280 kishnevi

    I heard you don’t pay or consult doctors so much for what they know about medicine but for their judgement and experience.

    Pinandpuller (a2dea8)

  275. Plumbing and electrical work is actually pretty easy. Legal Zoom is me wiring up my 220 well pump or installing a new bathroom sink. My liability is too high if I do it for someone else’s house though.

    Pinandpuller (a2dea8)

  276. Skorcher,

    It sounds like you’ve had some pretty bad experiences with lawyers. Sorry about that. Do you think you’re painting with too broad a brush, though?

    Leviticus (efada1)

  277. Do you think you’re painting with too broad a brush, though?

    Yes, I’m willing to cop to that. Just as soon as I see some lawyers cop to not just the existence of bad lawyers, but the lack of responsibility by the Bar(s) to deal with them, as well as the institutional mess that has been created. As I’ve noted before, consider the cost (tax) that excessive liability puts on a society such that the cost of a ladder is 25% legal liability. Consider the costs of liability to every single thing we by and you realize we are being taxed not just by our government, but by the shadow government of the tort world.

    For the record, no I myself have not had bad legal experiences because I keep my head down and avoid them as much as humanly possible. However in organizations with which I have had contact and with whom I have participated, not-for-profit organizations included, I have seen some things that remind me of Dickens’ Bleak House.

    Skorcher (5b282a)

  278. “Just as soon as I see some lawyers cop to not just the existence of bad lawyers, but the lack of responsibility by the Bar(s) to deal with them, as well as the institutional mess that has been created.”

    – Skorcher

    Consider it done. There are tons of bad lawyers, more bad lawyers than bad plumbers or bad doctors or bad engineers. And they are given far too much leeway by the Bar organizations, in my opinion.

    That said, there are tons of good lawyers, too. Believe it or not, they share your great frustration with bad lawyers and bad lawyering, because bad lawyers and bad lawyering drag down the image of the profession – and fairly so.

    Leviticus (efada1)

  279. “Consider the costs of liability to every single thing we by and you realize we are being taxed not just by our government, but by the shadow government of the tort world.”

    – Skorcher

    And there are insurance costs to be considered as well. I understand the frustration.

    Leviticus (efada1)

  280. You could be right, mr papertiger. I went to school with this hot girl who used to cheat off me. She became a lawyer, then later my lawyer. She had the nerve to charge me $750 after she owed her whole career to me. Then she spent some of my money on breast implants she didn’t even need. Sad!

    Pinandpuller (a2dea8)

  281. Thank you, Leviticus. Some acknowledgement around here of the existence of the problem, not to mention its significant depth, instead of the usual denial or personal attacks is appreciated.

    Skorcher (5b282a)

  282. But to be clear, my original comment here was to the topic (though I guess it was a previous thread but similar topic) and support of one SH who, while not somebody I really care for, I felt was being savaged for his lack of lawyerly savviness. Then somehow we got sidetracked…

    Skorcher (5b282a)

  283. I agree with Leviticus. I blame the deterioration in values in general, and the zealous advocacy standard in particular. But it isn’t just lawyers. I have stories about problems dealing with plumbers, electricians, contractors, and medical professionals — but that doesn’t mean all are bad or even that the ones I had problems with are bad. Even if a few are bad folks … the rest just had a bad day, or tried but failed to do a good job, or we just weren’t good matches.

    DRJ (15874d)

  284. 295.I agree with Leviticus. I blame the deterioration in values in general…

    ROFLMAO

    Times have changed
    And we’ve often rewound the clock
    Since the Puritans got a shock
    When they landed on Plymouth Rock
    If today
    Any shock they should try to stem
    ‘Stead of landing on Plymouth Rock
    Plymouth Rock would land on them

    In olden days, a glimpse of stocking
    Was looked on as something shocking
    But now, God knows
    Anything goes
    Good authors, too, who once knew better words
    Now only use four-letter words
    Writing prose
    Anything goes

    If driving fast cars you like
    If low bars you like
    If old hymns you like
    If bare limbs you like
    If Mae West you like
    Or me undressed you like
    Why, nobody will oppose
    When ev’ry night the set that’s smart is
    Intruding at nudist parties
    In studios
    Anything goes
    – Cole Porter, ‘Anything Goes’ 1934

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  285. Appreciate your point, DRJ. Yes, there are weak/bad people in every profession. The problem is the law has no checks on it. To a significant extent, the design of our system of government worked so well due to the checks and balances between the branches. However the judicial branch, along with the various mandarins in government and in the somewhat similar tort world, have done an end run around the people. They have definitely had significant help from corporations and guilds and such, where the concept of licensing has been abused (whole other deep dive). But what is most frustrating is the tyrannical (in illegitimate rule sense) nature of much of the legal profession has seeped into the egos of the profession such that bad lawyers don’t get tossed out. There is no controlling authority over them. And as the meaning of words is becoming so fluid that we can redefine the meaning of well understood terms like “marriage” (and I say this as someone who would support some liberalizing there if done through plebiscite) suddenly mean something completely different and people are losing their rights of refusal based on public whim.

    In short, if I need a lawyer to review a contract I am signing with another lawyer in order to guarantee that the lawyer of the first part will treat me fairly, the Bar Association is not doing its job. Which has been apparent for decades now.

    Skorcher (5b282a)

  286. You haven’t had a health problem where you needed to see lots of doctors, have you?

    DRJ (15874d)

  287. It can be frustrating, too. Things are more complex in every profession.

    DRJ (15874d)

  288. In short, if I need a lawyer to review a contract I am signing with another lawyer in order to guarantee that the lawyer of the first part will treat me fairly

    That’s where you misunderstand. The suggestion that you consider legal advice for the contract is to make sure you understand there are different duties owed to you. There is a fiduciary duty owed by your lawyer to you as the client for the Wills, but you are equal as a parties when it comes to the contract.

    THus, the lawyer can cheat you no more and no less than Trump cheats people he contracts with in business. Who do you trust more?

    DRJ (15874d)

  289. Because of the Bar Association in most states, and maybe all, a lawyer has ethical duties to treat clients fairly in the contract.

    DRJ (15874d)

  290. My father, the engineer and a linear thinker, liked lawyers but he never could accept how they think. Neither can doctors, who are trained in the scientific method but think like statisticians. We are taught to think in different ways because our professions require different approaches. The Founders thought a law-based approach was the best way to run a society, but that’s no longer true.

    I think if I had to go back and choose a different profession from physics, law would be pretty high on the list of possibilities. I never seriously thought about it when I was young, because I really knew nothing about the law.

    I love figuring out rules to games, writing, and arguing (obviously), although I would have to temper my use of sarcasm and train myself to suffer fools with greater equanimity. From what I can tell, only judges get to be smart-@sses…

    Dave (a28aee)

  291. only judges get to be smart-@sses

    nk being the exception that proves the rule, I suppose…

    Dave (a28aee)

  292. “I don’t follow what you’re saying here. How does Cohen’s lawyer outing Hannity as one of Cohen’s three clients — even assuming that can indeed be attributed to the investigation of Russian collusion and Mueller’s team, the only proof for that being Cohen’s self-same lawyer saying he was told by USAO-SDNY lawyers that the search warrants were based “in part” on some kind of referral from Mueller — have anything to do with Sean Hannity’s marriage?” Beldar

    Beldar – Can’t you follow the bouncing leftist ball? The purpose of the special prosecutor is to throw shade on anyone and everyone associated with Trump. You and I argued, a few threads back, about the consequences and purpose of the Cohen raid. If you’ll recall, I predicted exactly this outcome – that materials and information obtained from the raid, should it prove embarrassing to any conservative or Trump supporter, would be immediately leaked to the press. Has this not started happening mere days after the raid?

    That was the entire purpose of the referral and the raid. They don’t know who they are going to get, just that it will be someone close to Trump.

    Disclosing Hannity’s name in open court violated longstanding standards against identifying uncharged persons in legal proceedings attendant to criminal investigations. There is no evidence that Hannity is involved in any crimes whatsoever. His only relevance to the probe involves the question of whether Cohen can claim an attorney-client relationship with Hannity, and prevent them from digging through Hannity’s files.

    But here we are. The CNN/Times lawyer whispered in the judge’s ear, and poof, Hannity is exposed. The public does not have the right to know the names of people who pop up in a criminal investigation. None at all. The United States Attorneys Manual admonishes that “in all public filings and proceedings, federal prosecutors should remain sensitive to the privacy and reputation interests of uncharged third-parties.” What happened to that standard? It doesn’t matter – Hannity is on the official enemies list.

    The investigation involves extramarital affairs. Cohen’s work for Trump and Broidy, the only other clients he claims, involves non-disclosure agreements for this purpose. It was inevitable, then, that if the third alleged client was identified publicly, there would instantly be media speculation that this client, too, must be entangled in some tawdry sex scandal that he retained Cohen to hush up.

    It doesn’t have to be true to ruin a man’s life. I’m sure he is having some hard discussions tonight with his wife.

    And that sir is the purpose of the raid. Again, if this was all above board, this would never have come up at all in open court – the grand jury would have subpoenaed records, and if not relevant, they would have been forgotten. But instead they do it in open court…then allow a CNN lawyer to make a plea to release the information (by the way, what possible standing do they even have to plea for anything?), and force Hannity’s name out…just another day’s work for leftists.

    Now, if you were conspiracy minded, my guess is CNN’s lawyers already knew it was Hannity. So did the judge. So did the prosecution. Everyone knew – it had already been leaked to them. But it looks much better for all concerned if the information is somehow, under some pretext, accidentally divulged. So you concoct some excuse – have CNN’s lawyer, who knows exactly what name will be divulged, make the request.

    Cassandra (a815b9)

  293. sleazy judge kimba would’ve made sure he was exposed anyway even if cnn hadn’t had their lawyer there

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  294. Naturally. It didn’t matter what Cohen’s lawyer did.

    But mark my words, CNN’s lawyer was there for a very specific reason, to give Judge Kimba and everyone else involved cover. To muddy the waters. Otherwise it would have had to be leaked, which would be less convenient, because some stupid prosecutor might decide to track down the leak. Can’t have that.

    No, CNN probably knew about Hannity, as did the judge, and the prosecution, probably very early on, shortly after the raid. Hmmmm. How to get this out? The prosecutors decided to go an unorthodox path, violating their guidelines. The lawyer with no standing shows up to make an unusual, and typically refused request, and the judge immediately grants it.

    And Cohen’s is not Hannity’s lawyer. Ultimately his job is to protect Cohen, not Hannity. So perhaps this wasn’t a mistake, he simply read the name because he knew the fix was in, and hoped to curry a small amount of favor with the judge. To further his client’s interest and screw Hannity.

    So c’mon patterico and beldar – tell me again how this is going to be a fair process, and not to worry, and everything is above board. And explain how I predicted nearly exactly this outcome, that all sorts of things that would be typically secret during an investigation would get leaked to the press at every opportunity. That the entire process would be structured in such a way to ensure such a thing happened. And no one would be responsible, in fact such ethical breaches would be ignored by the press and judicial system.

    What happens next? As Cassandra, I know. But why bother saying it if no one listens?

    Cassandra (c33ba9)

  295. Now you’re hunting where the ducks are, Cassandra. Cohen (and Cohen’s attorney is the same as Cohen) should have said: “The government has no legitimate governmental interest in knowing my clients’s identities unless it has probable cause that they have committed or are committing a crime. And this court has even less of a legitimate governmental interest in making their identities public to a literal prostitute sitting in the back of the courtroom and the figurative prostitutes of the media.” And if Judge Wood did not agree with him, taken his argument to the Second Circuit,

    But he did not. He argued attorney-client privilege, then folded like a wet knish. The judge had no obligation to do his job for him.

    nk (dbc370)

  296. That’s where you misunderstand. The suggestion that you consider legal advice for the contract is to make sure you understand there are different duties owed to you.

    Sigh…And we’re back to square one. I understand that. Do you not understand that at some point lawyers need to be accountable? Is this not what the Bar is supposed to do? Do you not grasp how arrogant and self-serving it is for lawyers to suggest that I should hire other lawyers to protect myself from lawyers? Or to explain to me what the lawyer I am contracting (paying) to work for me is going to do? This is the ideal world for you people. The ultimate goal of lawyers certainly seems to be to have every single human interaction overseen by lawyers. Oh what a paradise that will be. Nothing bad will ever happen because we have lawyers paid to watch over us poor cretins. Until you get two lawyers with three different opinions.

    THus, the lawyer can cheat you no more and no less than Trump cheats people he contracts with in business. Who do you trust more?

    Trump. He is what he is. And anyone who manages to piss off so many lawyers definitely has some good points. The enemy of my enemies is my ally, though one to be kept at arm’s length. Not saying he has done much in this department but he more than any recent president, or other politician that I know of, has done more to cut back on the over-regulation that has become our shadow government. Please, name for me ONE person in political power who has shown themselves to be the least bit effective in doing so? The TEA Party politicians have been a huge slap in the face to those who elected them. And at least with Trump, though I probably disagree with a significant percentage of the opposition to him, there is opposition to keep him in check. Those opposing him however have run roughshod over our society for decades now.

    Skorcher (5b282a)


  297. Those opposing him however have run roughshod over our society for decades now.


    They sure have. They’ve ignored our rights when they see fit and create nonexistent rights from thin air when it serves their purpose. They twist the law so every citizen wakes up every day a criminal. They buy elections, give false testimony, create “leaks” and generally corrupt the law and wonder why The People no longer respect it. They pollute the public schools, academia, the media, entertainment and even sports because they believe everything is political. They threaten making Caucasians “the minority” for political purposes and call us racists when we get offended by being threatened in our own country. They have made the extinction or Western Civilization, Christianity and America their foremost goal and with the help of our own quisling people are on the verge of doing so.

    Rev.Hoagie (1b0402)

  298. Now you’re hunting where the ducks are, Cassandra. Cohen (and Cohen’s attorney is the same as Cohen) should have said: “The government has no legitimate governmental interest in knowing my clients’s identities unless it has probable cause that they have committed or are committing a crime. And this court has even less of a legitimate governmental interest in making their identities public to a literal prostitute sitting in the back of the courtroom and the figurative prostitutes of the media.” And if Judge Wood did not agree with him, taken his argument to the Second Circuit, But he did not. He argued attorney-client privilege, then folded like a wet knish. The judge had no obligation to do his job for him. nk (dbc370) — 4/19/2018 @ 4:35 am

    Again, looking around the room, he may have decided it didn’t matter what he argued. Pro forma as they say.

    Quit making excuses. Quit pretending a different outcome was ever possible. If only he had done a back flip, this would have never happened. Except it would have happened. CNN would have gone to press anyway. because they already knew. That is why they were there, and why the Judge allowed them to whisper in her ear.

    Cassandra (c33ba9)

  299. I love figuring out rules to games, writing, and arguing (obviously), although I would have to temper my use of sarcasm and train myself to suffer fools with greater equanimity. From what I can tell, only judges get to be smart-@sses…

    Dave (a28aee) — 4/18/2018 @ 4:56 pm

    Some lawyers have science/medical degrees and law degrees. It’s a good combination. Also, many lawyers love sarcasm if it is witty. I certainly do, but I try not to use it online because it often seems like I am being cruel when I mean it as a shared joke. You can usually tell that in person but not online.

    But none of these traits are problems and all are helpful if your goal is to help people. Too many people become lawyers because they think it is the path to wealth, fame, and power. It can be and making a living is important, but the real joy of being a lawyer is knowing you’ve made your clients’ lives better without ruining someone else’s life.

    DRJ (15874d)

  300. Quit making excuses. Quit pretending a different outcome was ever possible.

    Sigh. A different outcome was absolutely possible. He could have refused to answer. Period. He snitched out his clients. Period. If he was held in contempt, he could have appealed. Even if he lost the appeal, his contempt would have become “purged” when the filter team had gone through all the documents. Or in the event his client had come to court to assert his rights. Either way. But ok.

    nk (dbc370)

  301. Competence is an ethical duty, too. Don’t take a case if you don’t know what you’re doing.

    nk (dbc370)

  302. It’s about values, Skorcher and Cassandra. Either people have them or they don’t. There are lawyers that don’t have values, and doctors and plumbers and politicians and reporters. Even judges. It is a human condition, not a professional affliction.

    PS to Skorcher – you say you understand and, if so, then you know your position means attorneys would owe their clients a fiduciary duty when it comes to payment as well as services. If so, all or almost all payment disputes would be resolved in the client’s favor. (That probably is what you want but imagine your life if everyone you did business with wins every dispute you have.) Is that the price lawyers should have to pay to earn a client’s business? Isn’t it enough to provide a good service with higher duties of care than even doctors have to meet?

    DRJ (15874d)

  303. Well, DRJ, I agree.

    And yet…as a non-lawyer who has routinely interacted with lawyers as well as many other professions, I’d say a significantly lower percentage of lawyers have any sense of morals and values. Why do the rest of us make fun of you? Why is your noble profession lumped in with used car salesmen and telemarketers in popularity with the general public?

    Why do you think that is?

    It is easy to assume that lawyers are just as honest as anyone else, but the only people who push that line of reasoning are lawyers.

    Cassandra (a815b9)

  304. I think it is because of the zealous advocacy standard that makes high-profile lawyers seem like hired guns instead of trusted advocates. Some of them act that way, too. I think it was a mistake to change the standard.

    However, tell me, if you or a family member were charged with a crime or hurt in an accident that was the other guy’s fault, would you want an advocate or a hired gun on your side? Most people want a no-holds-barred lawyer so every decision helps them and hurts their opponent, right or wrong. If so, that’s not just the lawyer’s fault. That’s on them, too.

    DRJ (15874d)

  305. As for why people make fun of lawyers, you tell me. I think it’s because most people go through life without needing a lawyer so we make easy targets/scapegoats for all their problems and anger.

    DRJ (15874d)


  306. If so, that’s not just the lawyer’s fault. That’s on them, too.
    DRJ (15874d) — 4/19/2018 @ 11:10 am


    Sorry, Charlie, we didn’t create this system the lawyers did. They made it and they broke it. As I’ve said before, the Founding Fathers were brilliant and honorable men but I do wish they put into the Constitution that lawyers may NOT serve in any elected government position.

    Rev.Hoagie (1b0402)

  307. 314.It’s about values, Skorcher and Cassandra. Either people have them or they don’t.

    If only the world was that black-and-white-simple.

    You might be ‘pro-life’ yet not think twice about killing spiders.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  308. “As I’ve said before, the Founding Fathers were brilliant and honorable men but I do wish they put into the Constitution that lawyers may NOT serve in any elected government position.”

    – Rev. Hoagie

    You’re pegging out the cognitive dissonance meter on that one.

    Leviticus (efada1)

  309. I do wish they put into the Constitution that lawyers may NOT serve in any elected government position

    Hate to argue with you Hoagie but I do think that is a tad unfeasible. What I do think is more reasonable and I suggested this previously and got some agreement from I believe Leviticus, is to have minimum age requirements such that a greater number of lawyers would have to find some non-lawyerly form of employment before becoming a member of the Bar. Much as our founders had age limits for serving in the House (25), Senate (30), and P/VP (35), which I believe was to ensure some level of real world experience before serving, back in a time when there weren’t so many lawyers per capita. Thus many who served were business men, etc. Also was a time were there wasn’t so much longevity. The pool would be much deeper and wider today with an age restriction to the Bar of say 35 or 40. While there’s likely a snowball’s chance in H-E-double-hockey-sticks of that ever happening, in my wildest dreams it would be sweet if such a restriction was required of our secondary school and above educators. Well, that an a unicorn. A purple one. For my niece, of course.

    Skorcher (5b282a)

  310. have minimum age requirements such that a greater number of lawyers would have to find some non-lawyerly form of employment before becoming a member of the Bar

    Yeah, making lawyers even more of a protected class is exactly what we need.

    Suggest giving via-gra to every applicant to the bar. If they get taller, they’re rejected.

    random viking (6a54c2)

  311. Yeah, making lawyers even more of a protected class is exactly what we need.

    Sorry, did I misstate that? Perhaps clearer would be:

    have minimum age requirements such that people would have to find some non-lawyerly form of employment before becoming a member of the Bar
    ?

    Not seeing how that’s protecting them. My point is to make people have real-world business experience before making the rules for the rest of us….but maybe now I see your point…by restricting who can be a lawyer I suppose it does give more power to the existing/remaining ones. But on the flip side, fewer lawyers to do less damage. Or consider this alternative, and forgive me as I am not clear on how the Bar currently works, but possibly have non-lawyer oversight of the Bar such that they can’t so easily protect themselves. Better?

    Skorcher (5b282a)

  312. Damn…argaiv is a bad word here…let me restate….I do like your thing-that-starts-with-v idea, but I think the results would be similar to my original suggestion, protecting the existing class.

    Skorcher (5b282a)

  313. As for why people make fun of lawyers, you tell me. I think it’s because most people go through life without needing a lawyer so we make easy targets/scapegoats for all their problems and anger.

    DRJ (15874d) — 4/19/2018 @ 11:12 am

    Lawyers haven’t figured how to make lawyer jokes illegal.

    You’d find if we were in person I would have a good natured smirk on my face.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  314. Is man hear knock on door. He say: “Who is?” Voice say: “Is lawyer. As sue you for all your potato.” Man open door. Is not lawyer. Is secret police. Man very happy. He laugh. He say: “Is good joke.”

    nk (dbc370)

  315. The only good lawyer is a taxi fleet operator with a law license who pays off hookers for rich jerkoffs, right guys?

    nk (dbc370)


  316. 321.“As I’ve said before, the Founding Fathers were brilliant and honorable men but I do wish they put into the Constitution that lawyers may NOT serve in any elected government position.”

    – Rev. Hoagie

    You’re pegging out the cognitive dissonance meter on that one.
    Leviticus (efada1) — 4/19/2018 @ 12:20 pm


    So you believe me to show cognitive dissonance because I think it’s a conflict of interest for the same people who make the laws to be the ones who make money off of their interpretation and finding ways to get around them? Wow, you are a lawyer.


    I think it’s because most people go through life without needing a lawyer so we make easy targets/scapegoats for all their problems and anger.

    DRJ (15874d) — 4/19/2018 @ 11:12 am


    You believe that somehow people who never came to need a lawyer magically developed blame and anger for them? Filks are just moseying around minding their own business and POOF! they suddenly target lawyers for all their problems and anger. The practice of law and the type of people drawn to said profession have nothing to do with it? The shoddy reputation of lawyers throughout Western culture even before Shakespeare suggested that “first we kill all the Lawyers” is incidental to people’s problems and anger? I see. Now let’s talk about the supreme a$$holes of the legal profession: Judges.

    Rev.Hoagie (1b0402)

  317. I honestly didn’t hate lawyers until I needed one.

    random viking (6a54c2)

  318. “I think it is because of the zealous advocacy standard that makes high-profile lawyers seem like hired guns instead of trusted advocates. Some of them act that way, too. I think it was a mistake to change the standard. However, tell me, if you or a family member were charged with a crime or hurt in an accident that was the other guy’s fault, would you want an advocate or a hired gun on your side? Most people want a no-holds-barred lawyer so every decision helps them and hurts their opponent, right or wrong. If so, that’s not just the lawyer’s fault. That’s on them, too.
    DRJ (15874d) — 4/19/2018 @ 11:10 am”

    I might want to hire a hit-man as well. Should I be allowed to do that? Or better still, have numerous eager offers for the position? How does what the public wants absolve lawyers from blame? Your entire profession has a self-inflicted black eye, and at the end of the day, you are the only people that can fix it.

    The discovery process in civil litigation is tightly restricted in Canada, for instance. By contrast, generous U.S. discovery rules, which often impose on defendants millions of dollars in expenses, permit opportunistic plaintiffs to hold up defendants with settlement offers that are less than the costs the defendant would incur on discovery alone. Canada has a losers pay law. Civil juries don’t exist. Only in America are lawyers told to advance the client’s interest over justice.

    Cassandra (a815b9)

  319. Lawyer: I have good news and bad news.
    Convict: What’s the bad news?
    Lawyer: Your reprieve was denied. They throw the switch at 6:00 a.m. sharp.
    Convict: Good Lord! What’s the good news?
    Lawyer: My tee time is at 7:00.

    nk (dbc370)

  320. A man was stopped by the police around 2 am. The officer asked him where he was going at that time of night.

    The man replied, “I’m on my way to a lecture about alcohol abuse and the effects it has on the human body, as well as smoking and staying out late.”

    The officer then asked, “Really? Who’s giving that lecture at this time of night?”

    The man replied, “That would be my wife.”

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  321. The only good lawyer is a taxi fleet operator with a law license who pays off hookers for rich jerkoffs, right guys?

    nk (dbc370) — 4/19/2018 @ 2:30 pm

    Get out of my dreams

    Get into my taxi

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  322. I think manafort is in deep tax avoidance trouble, but the othrr charges are in danger of being dropped. Also, i wonder how far the judge is going to go, she noted that rosensteins memo authorizing the scope was several months after the fact. I doubt it but could she throw the entire russian probe out?

    EPWJ (8f35c3)

  323. rosensteins memo authorizing the scope was several months after the fact

    That’s how it’s supposed to work, by law. From USC 600.4:

    (b)Additional jurisdiction. If in the course of his or her investigation the Special Counsel concludes that additional jurisdiction beyond that specified in his or her original jurisdiction is necessary in order to fully investigate and resolve the matters assigned, or to investigate new matters that come to light in the course of his or her investigation, he or she shall consult with the Attorney General, who will determine whether to include the additional matters within the Special Counsel’s jurisdiction or assign them elsewhere.

    Dave (445e97)

  324. Sorry, the full reference to the statute is 28 CFR 600.4.

    Dave (445e97)

  325. It’s one thing to act as a Solicitor, helping clients navigate legal minefields while drawing up contracts. It’s quite another to be a Barrister, who simply must be as a pit bull.

    Mankind being what it is, any theater of war (conflict) is bound to be messy. I’m not much for ethics if I am fighting. If things have come to such a head, I want nasty. I need nasty.

    As I see it, there is a Pogo argument ongoing here. Who is the enemy?

    Ed from SFV (4f3559)

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