Patterico's Pontifications

11/28/2017

Revealed: Female Journalists Enabled John Conyers For Years, Another Former Staffer Accuses Him Of Inappropriate Behavior

Filed under: General — Dana @ 9:01 am

[guest post by Dana]

On Sunday, Rep. John Conyers (D) stepped down from his leadership role on the House Judiciary Committee due to an ethics investigation being launched into allegations of sexual harassment, as well as using taxpayer dollars in a $27,000 payout to the former staffer. This morning, another former female staffer has come out and made allegations against the Democratic “icon”:

A former staffer of U.S. Rep. John Conyers said the veteran lawmaker made unwanted sexual advances toward her, including inappropriate touching, adding to allegations by other unnamed former employees that have prompted a congressional investigation.

Deanna Maher, who worked for him from 1997 to 2005, told The Detroit News that the Detroit Democrat made unwanted advances toward her three times.

I didn’t have a room, and he had me put in his hotel suite,” said Maher, 77, adding that she rejected his offer to share his room at the Grand Hyatt in Washington and have sex.

The other incidents with the now 88-year-old Conyers involved Commercial inflatable water slide unwanted touching in a car in 1998 and another unwanted touching of her legs under her dress in 1999, she said.

When questioned as to why she didn’t report Conyers at the time, and in fact, kept working for him, Maher claimed:

“I needed to earn a living, and I was 57. How many people are going to hire you at that age?” she said.

“I didn’t report the harassment because it was clear nobody wanted to take it seriously,” she said. “John Conyers is a powerful man in Washington, and nobody wanted to cross him.”

However, Maher told reporter Joel Thurtell, of the Detroit Free Press, about the incidents at the time but was afraid to go on the record with her claims:

“She told me about the sexual harassment claims, but at the time she didn’t feel confident she wouldn’t be hung out to dry and retaliated against,” said Thurtell, who left the Free Press in 2007 and runs a blog, “Joel on the Road.”

“So there was no way I could report it. I spoke with her last week, and she said she just didn’t feel comfortable at the time going on the record with the allegations.”

Apparently Conyers’ bad behavior toward women was another one of those open secrets we keep hearing about. Except that this time, it was an open secret among female news journalists, as Cokie Roberts explained during a Sunday “powerhouse” round-table segment with Martha Raddatz:

Don’t get in the elevator with him, you know, and the whole every female in the press corps knew that, right, don’t get in elevator with him. Now people are saying it out loud. And I think that does make a difference.

It’s not surprising that Roberts didn’t say anything sooner about Conyers, given her consistent defense of Bill Clinton against his accusers. It’s laughable to see yet another powerful Democratic woman, whose professional occupation happens to be that of journalist, choose to remain silent for who knows how many years and enable the bad behavior of a powerful lawmaker. One could easily assume every female in the press corps remained silent about Conyers, at least publicly, because advancing their careers took priority over protecting female subordinates and staffers in Conyers’ office and publicly exposing the dirty secret of rampant sexual misconduct in the halls of Congress. If they spoke out publicly about Conyers (and who knows who else), they risked being blackballed by him and by extension, any other Congressmen behaving badly. That was a risk they were likely unwilling to take. It also stands to reason that in order for every female in the press corps to collectively know that it wasn’t wise to get into an elevator with Conyers, something had to have happened in the first place to alert them to the potential danger. What was that, and to whom did it happen?

For the side of the aisle that, for decades, has smugly claimed to be the champion of women, it becomes yet again too obvious what a sham that claim is, based on the inaction of Nancy Pelosi and Cokie Roberts. And when every female in the press corps who have a unique platform from which to speak, are revealed to have enabled and protected a powerful, badly behaving lawmaker, then the gig is up.

(Cross-posted at The Jury Talks Back.)

–Dana

239 Responses to “Revealed: Female Journalists Enabled John Conyers For Years, Another Former Staffer Accuses Him Of Inappropriate Behavior”

  1. How many congressmen have gotten away with this behavior over the years because of the press corps remaining silent?

    Dana (023079)

  2. Roberts will take one for the home team, team D. She will not be hurt by any of this. She will be lauded by her fellow leftists in the press. You can bet she knows a great deal more about many other members of congress and D administrations that she will remain silent for. Gotta keep going to the right cocktail parties and have the right access to the right people.

    Ipso Fatso (7e1c8e)

  3. Thanks for this post, Dana. I’d just raised this on the other thread.

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  4. “The question, of course, is why didn’t she or any of the other women in the press corps say it out loud? And what are you still not saying out loud? Are you just waiting until somebody else exposes one of the politicians you have been protecting or is there no one else you’re just hanging back not talking about until the day comes when you’ll be saying, once again, oh, yeah, we all knew that?”

    http://althouse.blogspot.com/2017/11/dont-get-in-elevator-with-him-you-know.html

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  5. So all this happened decades ago right? It’s not like the lefty press has enabled predators right?

    harkin (a9a478)

  6. Cokie Roberts gets on an elevator with John Conyers.

    He says, “Hit the floor, Cokie.”

    So she did.

    Pinandpuller (8f47ed)

  7. Paraphrasing on something I saw at Althouse:

    It seems the one guy in DC they can be sure is safe in an elevator is Mike Pence, and if entering the elevator means they’ll be alone together, he’ll get out.

    harkin (a9a478)

  8. Cokie Roberts flatters her sandpaper snatch.

    Admiral Ben burn (0f35a5)

  9. Typical disdain for females from a “Rear Admiral”…

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  10. They had no qualms about pillorying Packwood, more than 20 years ago. But he was not a Democrat. They cover up for Democrats, and make up scandals for Republicans.

    nk (dbc370)

  11. Self pity party.

    Why can’t we always have our way?

    Admiral Ben burn (0f35a5)

  12. the thing is does anyone really care if “Hill staffers” get all kinds of molested 6 ways to sunday?

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  13. Consultant has a Franken moment on film.

    You can’t mansplain it away

    Admiral Ben burn (0f35a5)

  14. e thing is does anyone really care if “Hill staffers” get all kinds of molested 6 ways to sunday?

    Taxpayers should. Why should we pay to maintain a harem for Conyers? Let him pay his doxies out of his own pocket, not the U.S. Treasury.

    nk (dbc370)

  15. Remember that Cokie Roberts’ parents were Lindy Boggs and Hale Boggs, members of the House of Representatives both. Cokie is more of the Democrat political establishment than even most “journalists”.

    SPQR (240837)

  16. Cokie is more of a mantype wrestling wth feminine conflicts.

    Admiral Ben burn (0f35a5)

  17. good point

    they should do this on their own dime i agree 100%

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  18. She got bogged down in teh minutiae?

    Maybe all these Democrat Operatives with bylines, er, female reporters were afraid of being called racist!!!®

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  19. All the news that’s fit to NOT print.

    NJRob (b00189)

  20. Conyers and his odalisques, jointly and severally, should be made to pay back not only the “settlements” and “severance pay” the women got when they left but also the salaries they received while they were there.

    nk (dbc370)

  21. Buh-bye, Luis Gutierrez!

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  22. If you believe that the female press corps kept quiet for decades because they didn’t want to be shunned, and lose career opportunities, and, if you believe that Maher kept quiet all these decades because she feared losing her job and various retaliation, then why don’t you believe Moore’s accusers, who also waited decades to come forward for their own fears of retaliation and being shamed, ironically, by the press?

    Dana (023079)

  23. “I’m sorry for what you think I did.”

    —- Senator Al Franken (D)

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  24. Mr. Moore’s accusers are low class honey boo boos what tell stupid stories about how they dated Roy Moore and they kissed twice in two months and one time we had a glass of Mateus Rosé even though i was seventeen but see you had to be eighteen to drink wine back then and I was just seventeen

    i waited to come forward to tell my story cause of I felt so ashamed of myself

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  25. If you believe that the female press corps kept quiet for decades because they didn’t want to be shunned, and lose career opportunities,

    That was secondary. The primary reason was that it was happening to someone else and not them.

    if you believe that Maher kept quiet all these decades because she feared losing her job and various retaliation,

    She left 12 years ago, but let that slide. If she realized that her feminine mystique was more of an asset than her office skills, she was being pragmatic.

    then why don’t you believe Moore’s accusers, who also waited decades to come forward for their own fears of retaliation and being shamed, ironically, by the press?

    The similarity is less than superficial. See above.

    nk (dbc370)

  26. If you believe that the female press corps kept quiet for decades because they didn’t want to be shunned, and lose career opportunities, and, if you believe that Maher kept quiet all these decades because she feared losing her job and various retaliation, then why don’t you believe Moore’s accusers, who also waited decades to come forward for their own fears of retaliation and being shamed, ironically, by the press?

    Dana (023079) — 11/28/2017 @ 10:06 am

    When Clinton was President, leftists said they’d give him oral for his politics. Democrats are a protected class. Christian Conservatives are guilty of any dirt they can dig up. Mind you, they go looking through the trash to find it. Literally or do you forget the dumpster diving they did on Governor Palin.

    NJRob (b00189)

  27. I would have went a more smuttier version of Facts of Life – The Postgrad Years, as told by Natalie: http://nypost.com/2017/11/27/good-riddance-to-lena-dunham/

    urbanleftbehind (5eecdb)

  28. That’s the Gillibrand Strategy you just enunciated, Dana. Their target is Trump: “If you believe the stuff about Clinton, and Franken, and Conyers, and Rose, and Weinstein, et al, then you MUST believe the stuff about Trump and force him to resign.” Not that Roy Moore does not also embody everything the Left hates.

    nk (dbc370)

  29. These kind of stories certainly buttress the deep skepticism that people feel about the Roy Moore story as either made up, or a hit job. Personally, I think he is a scum-bag, but I am sympathetic to the view that WAPO cannot be trusted.

    Bored Lawyer (998177)

  30. “i waited to come forward to tell my story cause of I felt so ashamed of myself”

    Louis Gutierez and I are ashamed for you, Mr. Feets. Just want to keep this in the Chicago family.

    Ipso Fatso (7e1c8e)

  31. One could easily assume every female in the press corps remained silent about Conyers, at least publicly, because advancing their careers took priority over protecting female subordinates and staffers in Conyers’ office and publicly exposing the dirty secret of rampant sexual misconduct in the halls of Congress.

    How much of this is liberal white women not wanting to lodge accusations against an African-American liberal legislator?

    JVW (42615e)

  32. @Dana:then why don’t you believe Moore’s accusers

    Which ones, are we conflating all the things he’s been accused of? I speak only to sexual assault here.

    My reason for not treating accusations of sexual assault as true are lack of contemporaneous evidence, other than their own word, and lack of any detail which Moore could possibly refute (no dates, for example, Nelson won’t even specify the month).

    Doesn’t mean they’re lying. It means that I’m not willing to treat as true claims without enough detail to refute. It is unfair to expect Moore, for example, to have to show that he couldn’t possibly have done it by having some kind of alibi for each and every evening of December 1977 and January 1978 simply because Nelson doesn’t remember or won’t say which day it was, or offer any detail that can be used to check that day.

    The accusers are not expected to provide anything except their unsupported word, so in basic fairness Moore shouldn’t have to provide anything but his unsupported word.

    In Al Franken’s case, there is photographic evidence that establishes that Franken and his victims were at the same place at the same time when they were allegedly assaulted–though the pictures do not prove he assaulted them, they at least show he was there when they say he was. There is nothing like that for Moore’s accusations of sexual assault. Perhaps that information will come out later.

    Frederick (64d4e1)

  33. LG’s aldermanic successor, Billy Ocasio, was way worse. His tongue wagging at my then-girlfriend and now ex-wife a decade and 1/2 ago at a lawyer-kind-of-LaRaza networking affair led me to cast them in the same league as their more militant campus-based tocayos.

    urbanleftbehind (5eecdb)

  34. alert- blackfeet -alert
    rear admiral ben burnee bro is on the prowl

    mg (60b0f7)

  35. Being a Hill staffer is at least as safe as Iggy Azalea crowdsurfing.

    Frieda Got Fingered

    Pinndpuller (16b0b5)

  36. sounds like Mr. Gutierrez has him a Harvey problem he’s trying to get in front of, and I wish him the best Mr. Fatso

    as long as he’s for reals gonna go away

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  37. so gooty timed it for the chooster

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  38. (deadline to submit signatures for to get on the stage of the ballet is december 4)

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  39. Chinga laChuey! Beto por Congresa!!

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  40. Lena Dunham is like if Nicolas Sparks fell into the vat of chemicals that spawned The Joker.

    Pinndpuller (16b0b5)

  41. “For the side of the aisle that, for decades, has smugly claimed to be the champion of women… the gig is up.” ~ Dana

    I’m not defending Conyer’s personal behavior. He should go.

    But you are conflating his bad personal actions and other’s reactions to them with his voting record. His voting record would also need to be against women to support your grandiose conclusion.

    What is on his voting record that makes you think that he did not help women’s causes?

    Tillman (a95660)

  42. Gutierrez has him a Harvey problem he’s trying to get in front of, and I wish him the best Mr. Fatso

    as long as he’s for reals gonna go away
    happyfeet (28a91b) — 11/28/2017 @ 11:41 am

    It’s more of a Brown Bunny than an imaginary Rabbit.


    The Brown Bunny 2003

    Pinndpuller (16b0b5)

  43. @Tillman:What is on his voting record that makes you think that he did not help women’s causes?

    As though women were an undifferentiated block that has all the same opinions on the same issues–or should.

    But leaving that aside, Conyers may have championed “women” in the abstract, and acted abominably toward actual women he came into contact with. I think Dana’s position is that the one does not make up for the other.

    Frederick (64d4e1)

  44. Its sad that I personally know 2 of LG’s quixotic slightly-to-the-right former opponents – one who ran in the D primary as the “actual Mexican in the race”, Marty Castro, and one – the bullet headed host in this video – who ran in the general in the doom 2008 year.

    urbanleftbehind (5eecdb)

  45. brown bunny’s cringe-worthy even 14 years later

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  46. “Chicago ain’t ready for reform yet”

    –Paddy Bauler

    Which is why Gutierrez endorsed Jesus “Chuy” Garcia. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

    Ipso Fatso (7e1c8e)

  47. barack no puede

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  48. @47. “As though women were an undifferentiated block that has all the same opinions on the same issues–or should.”
    That’s politics, Frederick. You have to try to please most of the people; individuals are out of the question for obvious reasons.

    As for gig-upery, if you can say “the gig is up” when some men are found guilty, then the gig’s up for both parties, no? If that’s the case, then Dana should point that out too.

    Tillman (a95660)

  49. Flag Ship USS Blackfoot announces next Port of Call: Fantasy Island.

    Pinndpuller (16b0b5)

  50. brown bunny’s cringe-worthy even 14 years later
    happyfeet (28a91b) — 11/28/2017 @ 12:15 pm

    Professional motorcycle racer Bud Clay heads from New Hampshire to California to race again. Along the way he meets various needy women who provide him with the cure to his own loneliness, but only a certain woman from his past will truly satisfy him.

    Pinndpuller (16b0b5)

  51. How much of this is liberal white women not wanting to lodge accusations against an African-American liberal legislator?

    How much of the delay in Moore’s accusers speaking up is conservative white women not wanting to lodge accusations against an evangelical conservative jurist?

    Dave (445e97)

  52. @55 And Dave cleverly flips the coin to expose the other side.

    Tillman (a95660)

  53. This is something liberals could do, but not evangelical conservatives, and none of these women claim to be evangelical conservatives. The whole presenatioon is geared to a secular viewpoint. Which is indeed strange for Alabama.

    They say they are Republicans.

    None of them has been asked if they ever voted for Moore.

    Sammy Finkelman (e3cf91)

  54. Well at least Dave isn’t pretending anymore. Keep worshipping the party of Molech.

    NJRob (c191ed)

  55. What everyone ‘knows’ and what you can prove well enough to publish are two different things.
    It’s still pretty bad for women to come forward, and it’s better than it’s ever been.
    You want less silence than make it easier for women to come forward.
    And it’s always possible to demand more, like you did in this article.

    You’ve done a lot of good posts about this issue. It would be wrong of me to deny their validity and impact just because you haven’t done more.

    Personally I hope this blows up like the house banking scandal and everything comes to light before the mid-term.

    Joe (441f53)

  56. @Sammy:They say they are Republicans. None of them has been asked if they ever voted for Moore.

    Sometimes we’re told they’re “Trump voters”, as though it’s some kind of an admission against interest that they voted for the guy who opposed the man they are accusing in the primary…

    Frederick (64d4e1)

  57. Al Green from Texas is seeking an all aboard from rear admiral ben burnee bro

    mg (60b0f7)

  58. Personally I hope this blows up like the house banking scandal and everything comes to light before the mid-term.

    Teapot Dome sure comes close to a sexual fantasy.

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  59. Harding…pre Trump.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teapot_Dome_scandal

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  60. These allegations should be believed because Conyers is a Demmycrat. The ones against Roy Moore are fake news because media.

    Patterico (572840)

  61. Correction: Demonrat is more vilifying.

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  62. These allegations should be believed because Conyers is a Demmycrat.

    well plus he slathered gobs of taxpayer hush money all up on the victim of his sex attack

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  63. happyfeet, your comments are still worthless, in case you care.

    Tillman (a95660)

  64. they are not take it back

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  65. These allegations against Conyers should be believed because they are current, not 40 years old and corroborated since he’s already paid off women with our tax money.


    Speaking on ABC’s “This Week,” Cokie Roberts made a startling admission: “every female in the press corps knew” to avoid being in an elevator with Rep. John Conyers (D-MI), and has apparently known about this “for years.”

    She’s known for years but like a true comrade covered it up for the narrative. Leftists are liars by nature. They have to be to be leftists.

    Rev.Hoagie® (6bbda7)

  66. These allegations should be believed because Conyers is a Demmycrat. The ones against Roy Moore are fake news because media.

    happyfeet, your comments are still worthless, in case you care.

    Cicero, Lincoln, Reagan…Patterico, Tillman.

    CFarleigh (094b61)

  67. Lieawatha belongs to the Harvard tribe.

    mg (60b0f7)

  68. All those Carrier jobs just got a transfer to Paradise. Pay is a little lower but you can buy a house/Hut for next to nothing.

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  69. If you like Luis Gutierrez you won’t like Ari Shaffir

    Ari Hires LA County Day Labot NSFW

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  70. 73. To side with the other side the judge would have had to declare both irreparable harm and a likely prospect of winning the case.

    The real question is was therw a vacancy when Trump acted. There could be two ways of filling a vacancy – one if the president does nothing and one if he does, and the president can change the acting official. The general counsel of the agency held that Trump did have the power to appoint an interim director. The law is really more on his side.

    The vacancies act of 1998 (which aimed to clarify the rules) says that a president may appoint any Senate confirmed officeholder as an acting official to a Senate confirmed position. This was always understood to mean some deputy, or as in Justice Department, someone occupying a related office. But there was only one confirmed official there I think.

    Sammy Finkelman (e3cf91)

  71. The Patterico co-blogger with the best name ever wrote:

    For the side of the aisle that, for decades, has smugly claimed to be the champion of women, it becomes yet again too obvious what a sham that claim is, based on the inaction of Nancy Pelosi and Cokie Roberts. And when every female in the press corps who have a unique platform from which to speak, are revealed to have enabled and protected a powerful, badly behaving lawmaker, then the gig is up.

    Thing is, they’d all have had to have banded together, and made their presentations all at once, to have had an effect. Even then, most of them would have been at the mercy of their editors.

    The blatantly obvious question: if the highly educated ladies of the Washington press corps were hiding this ‘open secret’ from the public for all of these years, saying nothing until someone else finally blabbed, just how many other Democratic congressmen¹ have been so protected?
    ____________________
    ¹ – I specified Democratic congressmen because we all know that if a Republican had behaved that way, the Washington press corps would never have kept that quiet.

    The non-feminist Dana (ecab7a)

  72. Dana:

    When will conservative men have an epiphany?

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  73. Come on down, you’re the next contestant

    https://legalinsurrection.com/2017/11/rep-grijalva-paid-almost-50k-in-taxpayer-money-to-hush-former-staffer/#comments

    narciso (d1f714)

  74. Would these allegations against Moore stand up in court? No?

    Next!!!

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  75. No narco I asked when will conservative men get out of denial?

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  76. An awful lot of these demmycrats – as our beloved host calls ’em – paying off the women that they harassed or abused. There might be a real story there!

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  77. 34. Frederick (64d4e1) — 11/28/2017 @ 11:13 am

    Nelson doesn’t remember or won’t say which day it was, or offer any detail that can be used to check that day.

    She said it closed at 10 pm, and that’s wrong according to two ads in January.(maybe the first one was placed in ate December)

    On the other hand, the inscription says the place is called and spelled “Olde Hickory House” and the ads bear that out, although there were some restaurants called “Old Hickory House” in other places, and in Gadsden for a awhile around 2001.

    There’s apparently a Google Earth photo from 1997 – but we need 1977 to know if the parking lot had an exit to the next street.

    Maybe someone could also verify the changing of the address numbering.

    Most of the cross checking though would be testimony, ith maybe things to back that up.

    Sammy Finkelman (e3cf91)

  78. Of course the answer to my rhetorical question is….

    Saint Swithins Day

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  79. The much better looking Dana wrote:

    If you believe that the female press corps kept quiet for decades because they didn’t want to be shunned, and lose career opportunities, and, if you believe that Maher kept quiet all these decades because she feared losing her job and various retaliation, then why don’t you believe Moore’s accusers, who also waited decades to come forward for their own fears of retaliation and being shamed, ironically, by the press?

    That’s just it: I do believe that they are probably telling the truth. But I also believe that having a Senator who may have, probably did, attempt to f(ornicate) teenagers when he was in his thirties, forty years ago, isn’t as bad as having a Democrat in the seat who will try to f(ornicate) the entire country today.

    Yes, that’s a cold calculation, but it still stands. Had these revelations come out with some time before the primary, perhaps Luther Strange would be the nominee, and we wouldn’t be worrying about this. That didn’t happen, so all we have left is a probably bad Republican and an even worse Democrat.

    The Republican Dana (ecab7a)

  80. Rear Admiral BeenBurned still getting his decks swabbed…

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  81. Pedophiles do not reform.

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  82. Just ask kernel popcorn…

    Typecasting..

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  83. Mr Tillman wrote:

    What is on his voting record that makes you think that he did not help women’s causes?

    Well, that’s what Hillary Clinton thought, yet 53% of white women cast their ballots for Donald Trump. More, due to the presence of third party candidates, only 43% of white women cast their ballots for the lovely Mrs Clinton.

    The Dana who laughed at the Democrats' angst on November 8th (ecab7a)

  84. Denial is a river running by the conservative treehouse.

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  85. Dave wrote:

    How much of the delay in Moore’s accusers speaking up is conservative white women not wanting to lodge accusations against an evangelical conservative jurist?

    Well, that’s just it: Mr Moore is currently a private citizen. If they were simply worried about Mr Moore, they could have spoken up before the primary, (probably) causing him to lose there. Instead, they waited until he was the Republican nominee, and the only alternative was a Democrat.

    The Dana who has never been to Alabama (ecab7a)

  86. Wait a second – how could there be a Google Earth picture from 1997? That’s one yearbefore Google started?

    did Google obtain older pictures?

    I think a city would have fire insurance or fire department maps. They used to be kept pretty confidential, because of World War II, and then they were not, and then later again because of terrorism.

    Sammy Finkelman (e3cf91)

  87. There was a Rear Admiral BeenBurned
    With many port visits he’d learned
    That a curtsy or sashay
    Won’t be taken the wrong way
    With a nod and a wink that worm turned

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  88. Oh, moon of Alabama
    Been now must say goodbye
    He took that mama jama
    He just got frisky, oh, you know why

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  89. @90 Educated women did not vote for “blood coming out of her wherever” Trump. The others must watch Fox News, where his true identity is hidden.

    Tillman (a95660)

  90. AP

    Bannon hasn’t yanked his support for Moore, but if he’s standing by him, it’s at a distance. Associates say he has no plans to campaign in the state before the Dec. 12 election. Meanwhile, his public statements have gone from glowing endorsements of Moore to broadsides against Democratic contender Doug Jones.

    The shift reflects the high stakes for Bannon in the race. By backing the renegade Moore, Bannon transformed the sleepy special election into the first battle in what he calls his war on the establishment. But the accusations against Moore have turned what should have been an easy win for Republicans into a nail-biter, and raise the possibility that Bannon will emerge from his first effort bruised and blamed.

    The former adviser to President Donald Trump is already moving on, looking past the Alabama election and trying to raise money and build momentum for the next round.

    Bannon is moving on..lol

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  91. Dana is po’d @ patterico Tillman.

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  92. Trump got 45% of white women who had graduated college. Probably all the STEM is my guess, with Hillary getting the Snowflakes majors.

    nk (dbc370)

  93. Tillie doesn’t have much to say about the propensity of proggie “men” to harass, abuse and then payoff their female victims… with taxpayer money.

    Colonel Haiku (647002)

  94. North Korea demonstrates ICBM with enough range to hit DC.

    Now, back to the important stuff that isn’t in any way partisan.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  95. North Korea demonstrates ICBM with enough range to hit DC.

    Trump has sure out-foxed those North Koreans, eh?

    Empty threats or puerile insults – how will he respond this time?

    Dave (445e97)

  96. Yup. That dumbass Trump should have gifted them the ICBMs, the way Clinton gifted them their nuclear reactors.

    nk (dbc370)

  97. Clinton’s lost nk.

    But you really gave it to Obama without respect to his predecessors wrongheadedness.

    all perception is selective

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  98. nk,

    I don’t know if there is a STEM vs Snowflake difference but I have a Snowflake degree and I voted for Trump. (Maybe that difference doesn’t apply in red states.) I wonder if the main difference isn’t Trump but Hillary. My guess is a lot of those votes — male, female, college, not college — were votes against Hillary instead of for Trump. Women may have been especially motivated to vote against Hillary.

    DRJ (15874d)

  99. @103

    The reactors weren’t capable of producing weapon grade material, but it doesn’t matter because they weren’t even completed.

    Davethulhu (fab944)

  100. That was William Jefferson Clinton when he was President; not Hillary Rodham Clinton when she was Secretary of State, BTW.

    nk (dbc370)

  101. When will conservative men have an epiphany?

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab) — 11/28/2017 @ 3:09 pm

    Epiphany Washington? Dances at Deja Vu?

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  102. Fair enough, DRJ.

    nk (dbc370)

  103. Mr Tillman wrote:

    Educated women did not vote for “blood coming out of her wherever” Trump. The others must watch Fox News, where his true identity is hidden.

    The lovely Mrs Clinton won a bare 51% of white women who had been graduated from college, but lost white women who had not completed college by a whopping 61 to 34%. Mr Trump won white college graduated me 53 to 39%. and white men who had not been graduated from college by a stunning 71 to 23% margin. Among all white college graduates, Mr Trump won 48 to 45%.

    Interestingly enough, Mr Trump carried the middle class — $50,000 to $100,000 earners — 49 to 46%, and was tied at 47% among the top producers, those earning $100,000 or more. ‘Twas only among the low producers where Mrs Clinton won, 53 to 41%, and, given Mr Trump’s high rate among the white working class, it has to be assumed that Mrs Clinton’s margin was generated by the indolent, the unemployed and the welfare leeches.

    The Dana who actually checked the statistics (ecab7a)

  104. Mr burn wrote:

    Dana is po’d @ patterico Tillman.

    Hardly. I disagree with him on a couple of issues, but I’m certainly not angry with him.

    The Dana who respects our esteemed host (ecab7a)

  105. Whatever..

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  106. Good thing Fauxcohontas’ is not biased politically……

    “The Obama-era Consumer Financial Protection Bureau under fire by the Trump administration has been a Democratic Party donor bank, its bureaucrats writing checks to liberals at a rate of 593 to one Republican.”

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/consumer-bureau-execs-workers-gave-593-donations-to-democrats-1-to-gop/article/2641781

    They should get some sort of Lois Lerner award.

    harkin (7dcbff)

  107. Above should read Fauxcohontas’ CFPB.

    harkin (7dcbff)

  108. DRJ, I confess that when it comes to Trump on the one hand and the Democrats on the other, I have an inkling of how the Ukrainians must have felt in 1941. 😉

    nk (dbc370)

  109. “Whatever?”

    This is what happens when two men can disagree with each other politely and respectfully. Our host has engaged me both here and on Twitter, but he hasn’t tried to block me or ban me, nor has he called me an idiot.

    I disagree with him on capital punishment, on Roy Moore, and on some of his economic positions and support for the ‘Austrian school.’ BFD.

    The Dana who very much respects our esteemed host (ecab7a)

  110. @113

    I can’t understand why the CFPB employees don’t support the party that wants to shut them down.

    Davethulhu (fab944)

  111. nk “Only 37% of those polled approve of Trump’s performance in office.” He’s a national embarrassment, and yet there you are, trying to brag on Captain Chaos. I predict that he’ll be out of office within a year.

    Tillman (a95660)

  112. They try to cover the story with a pillow, there were some interesting bits I want aware of

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/aug/25/red-famine-stalins-war-on-ukraine-anne-applebaum-review

    narciso (d1f714)

  113. @147. Zing. +1

    Tillman (a95660)

  114. I accept that Dana. I just had a vibe and you seemed curt.

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  115. *117 not 147.

    Tillman (a95660)

  116. 117

    First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Socialist.

    Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

    Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Jew.

    Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  117. Dave thulhu wrote:

    @113: I can’t understand why the CFPB employees don’t support the party that wants to shut them down.

    Which demonstrates just how partisan the agency created under President Obama is. But it also demonstrates what needs to be done: the entire federal civilian bureaucracy needs to be pared down, shrunk by half, if not more, to return Virginia to the rank of the red states.

    We have too many federal workers, and we have a federal government involved in too many things. We created a federal Department of Education, yet our students are more poorly educated now than they were before the feds got so involved in education. We survived for over two hundred years without the CFPB, and our economy was in better shape before it than since. We don’t need the National Endowment for the Arts or Humanities, we do not need the Corporation for Public Broadcasting or National Public Radio, we could dispense with almost all except the statistical functions of the labor and Commerce Departments, we could return the Department of Energy nuclear functions to Defense and get rid of the rest, and all of Health and Human Services and Housing and Urban Development should be wiped out, disbanded, destroyed.

    The Republican strategist Dana (ecab7a)

  118. There’s an irony in leftist citing niemoller, for Stalin purged the tritskyites the social democrats, unaligned union activist, Jan valti. Relates some of this.

    narciso (d1f714)

  119. reveals that the previously unknown identity of a Russian that Erik Prince met in the Seychelles in January is the CEO of the Russian Direct Investment Fund.

    The identity of the Russian individual was not disclosed, but on January 11, a Turkish-owned Bombardier Global 5000 charter plane flew Kirill Dmitriev, CEO of the Russian Direct Investment Fund, to the Seychelles, flight records obtained by The Intercept show. Dmitriev’s plane was an unscheduled charter flight and flew to the island with two other Russian individuals, both women. The RDIF is a $10 billion sovereign wealth fund created by the Russian government in 2011.

    [snip]

    Although Prince repeatedly stated he couldn’t remember the Russian’s name — “We didn’t exchange cards” — a spokesperson for Frontier Services Group confirmed to The Intercept in September that Prince “crossed paths” with Dmitriev in the Seychelles.

    https://www.emptywheel.net/2017/11/28/the-seychelles-meeting-inches-kushner-closer-to-quid-pro-quo-with-sanctioned-russian-money/

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  120. ¹ – I specified Democratic congressmen because we all know that if a Republican had behaved that way, the Washington press corps would never have kept that quiet.

    I think you are letting the GOPsters off too lightly.

    The GOP has had control (meaning a voting majority)of the House since Jan 2011. Before that they had control of the House from 1995 to 2007. In that same 12 year period the GOP controlled the Senate ten years. The GOP has controlled both House and Senate since Jan 2015.

    Did no rumor of members behaving badly reach them? Did no talk come up of using such accusations against Democrats ever occur? Yet, to the best of my knowledge, no one ever tried to discipline Conyers or any other member. And for how many years was that slush fund he used maintained? Has anyone yet moved to officially discipline him?

    I suspect some GOPers were either guilty themselves of harassment or afraid other GOPers were guilty and thought it best to keep things hushed. If not, then the GOP seems to have been remarkably blase about this.

    kishnevi (8d3389)

  121. It does raise a question, knish the number of settlements increased under notma and searchlight read in 2007:

    https://www.ft.com/content/f9b294ba-3ff2-11e4-936b-00144feabdc0

    However you know how vulnerable a white republican would be going after a black congressman who was on Nixon’s enemy’s list
    E a

    narciso (d1f714)

  122. In the meantime, Liewatha claimed to be an American Indian, due to (purported) 1/32nd Cherokee ancestry: that would mean that one of her great-great-great-grandparents was an Indian. Even by the notorious ‘even one drop‘ rule she’d be considered white.

    The genealogist Dana (ecab7a)

  123. The intercept has to make up its mind, are the greatest evil us or Russia, certainly greenwald thinks the former, I guess the rest of the board rides the pantomime horse

    narciso (d1f714)

  124. 127. kishnevi (8d3389) — 11/28/2017 @ 5:33 pm

    Did no rumor of members behaving badly reach them? Did no talk come up of using such accusations against Democrats ever occur?

    I think the Republicans decided, particularly Mitch McConnell, that, in the interests of bipartisan comity, they weren’t going to try to discipline Democrats. Each party took care primarily of its own. A party would not act against a majority of the other party.

    McConnell took action against Craig (and much earlier against Packwood) but he did not touch Democrats. When Democrats wanted to make partisan hay out of Packwood, then he said maybe they’d take a look at Ted Kennedy, and the Democrats kept quiet. Balance of Terror.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/14/us/politics/sex-scandals-mitch-mcconnell.html

    Though he wanted Mr. Packwood gone, Mr. McConnell wanted it done his way. When Democrats pushed for public hearings that could embarrass Republicans, Mr. McConnell blocked the effort by threatening retaliatory hearings on various Democrats like Edward M. Kennedy.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  125. Yet, to the best of my knowledge, no one ever tried to discipline Conyers or any other member. And for how many years was that slush fund he used maintained? Has anyone yet moved to officially discipline him?

    They’re pressuring him now to resign quietly, and have enlisted the Black caucus, and he may do so very soon.

    The thing is, the “severance payment” of $27,000 probably was itself an ethics violation.

    But, short of expulsion, each party disciplines its own members. (regarding committee chairmanships, and ranking.)

    I think the full House might also levy fines. They can’t on ex-members.

    I suspect some GOPers were either guilty themselves of harassment or afraid other GOPers were guilty and thought it best to keep things hushed. If not, then the GOP seems to have been remarkably blase about this.

    Maybe in the House. But in the Senate Mitch McConnell is still not going to go after Democrats.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  126. 129.. Virginia had a 1/16 rule because of Pocohauntes. There were some prominent Virginia families that claimed descent from her. Of course caling Elizabeth Warren Pocohauntes is not a slur – that’s the kind of Indian ancestry people like very much.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  127. Bezos fabricated the accusers so of course he’s gonna be suspicious of accusations that he didn’t fabricate.

    It was so obvious. All these accusers didn’t know each other but one person supposedly had all of their phone numbers which he handed over to an Amazon journalist? All you had to do was stop right there and consider the logistics to realize that it was a fake news smear operation from the start.

    jcurtis (776dca)

  128. They;’re giving (assuming) North Korea until sometime next year when they might have a working ICBM.

    Still missing: proof that they can actually detonate a muclear bomb far away.

    Thee Pentagon is not at all confident in Star Wars.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  129. The Pentagon is not at all confident they can navigate the cargo ship menace

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  130. I Dream of Geneology

    Do you know about the Blackfoot “One Toe” standard?

    Pinandpuller (8f47ed)

  131. 135. jcurtis (776dca) — 11/28/2017 @ 6:11 pm

    Bezos fabricated the accusers so of course he’s gonna be suspicious of accusations that he didn’t fabricate.

    I don’t think Bezos did that. But they took information from somewhere.

    This might have been financed (all this private detective work costs money) by partisan Democrats so much as someone virulently in support of abortion. This is more national than confined to Alabama.

    It was so obvious. All these accusers didn’t know each other but one person supposedly had all of their phone numbers which he handed over to an Amazon journalist?

    That’s right. There’s no other way of putting 2 and 2 together.

    But the Washington Post will protect the confidentiality of its sources – except those trying to damage the Washington Post.

    All you had to do was stop right there and consider the logistics to realize that it was a fake news smear operation from the start.

    Could be somebody had a tip. But it would take a lot for more than one of those stories to be true, unless some of them were actually semi-public already.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  132. @124

    Do you have a specific objection to the CFPB? In what way you believe that they’re partisan?

    Davethulhu (6a4a84)

  133. First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Socialist.

    Then they came for the Liberals, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Liberal.

    Then they came for Antifa and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not Antifa

    Then they came for Rear Admiral BeenBurned and I cheered – Because it was problem solved.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  134. I enjoyed free college until my black toe nail fell off and they gave me the boot.

    Pinandpuller (8f47ed)

  135. I think there was a Republican Congressman from Florida about whom the Democrats kept quiet, and kept it quiet until the time was right for them.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  136. Cokie Roberts is the big disappointment here. I knew she was a Lefty but I really thought she had some principles. Oh, well. Dreams die hard.

    Bang Gunley (5a4596)

  137. And he was doing things that we unethical but not illegal, and he was placed by a co gresdman with two mistresses.

    The nature of many nuclear programs are a black box, we didn’t know much about atzamas 16 initially, Aq khan derived much kg his technology from the Dutch while the Chinese supplied the fuel, who is a comparable figure in north korea?

    narciso (d1f714)

  138. 86. The Republican Dana (ecab7a) — 11/28/2017 @ 3:16 pm

    so all we have left is a probably bad Republican and an even worse Democrat

    Moore, in the Senate, is not likely to be a standard Republican. he’d be off in a corner all by himself, making unreasonable or unrealistic demands, rarely voting for legislation that was getting just about 50 votes, and most solid only for confirmations. McConnell might get his vote maybe one third of the time.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  139. Cokie Roberts is the big disappointment here. I knew she was a Lefty but I really thought she had some principles. Oh, well. Dreams die hard

    Remember who her father is? She’s a second generation swamp dweller.

    kishnevi (91d450)

  140. Here are some details about their nuclear program, the missile program is something else:

    http://isis-online.org/uploads/isis-reports/documents/DPRKplutoniumFEB.pdf

    narciso (d1f714)

  141. 29.. Virginia had a 1/16 rule because of Pocohauntes. There were some prominent Virginia families that claimed descent from her. Of course caling Elizabeth Warren Pocohauntes is not a slur – that’s the kind of Indian ancestry people like very much.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00) — 11/28/2017 @ 6:10 pm

    It works a lot like reincarnation.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  142. You know, if there is anything at all that makes me think Leftists are fools, if not traitors, its the way they treat existential threats to the nation as being about Trump.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  143. I got curious…
    For the Cherokee Nation, citizenship requires at least on ancestor on the Dawes Rolls. In practice, that boils down to having an ancestor who was a Cherokee living on the Reservations c.1900. For Eastern Band Cherokees, who are primarily those living in North Carolina, it means having at least one full blooded Cherokee great grandparent (or maybe two great grandparents who were half-bloods). I doubt Lizzie qualifies for the former, and that Cherokee ancestor she claims would be one generation too far back for the Eastern Band (if he actually existed).

    kishnevi (91d450)

  144. The reactors weren’t capable of producing weapon grade material, but it doesn’t matter because they weren’t even completed.

    No, they wre given to the Norks BECAUSE they signed the Non-Proliferation Treaty. They produced plutonium which could be refined through gaseous diffusion to weapons-grade material. Just like everyone else did.

    To say that “the reactor” could not produce weapons-grade material is like saying “cows don’t produce butter.” True, and a knowing lie at the same time.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  145. Then they came for Rear Admiral BeenBurned and I cheered – Because it was problem solved.

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0) — 11/28/2017 @ 6:23 pm

    IDK he pretty much checks all of those boxes.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  146. its the way they treat existential threats to the nation as being about Trump.

    I think for many of them, Trump himself is an existential threat to this country, not merely because of his political agenda, but because of how bad he might turn out to be in foreign policy matters.

    kishnevi (91d450)

  147. I don’t want to be a jerk but I think they came for the guns first.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  148. My guess is a lot of those votes — male, female, college, not college — were votes against Hillary instead of for Trump. Women may have been especially motivated to vote against Hillary.

    White men without a college degree voted for Trump by about 70-30. That wasn’t so much a vote against Hillary as it was a vote FOR big changes in DC, and a pox upon both parties.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  149. Mr Finkelman wrote:

    so all we have left is a probably bad Republican and an even worse Democrat

    Moore, in the Senate, is not likely to be a standard Republican. he’d be off in a corner all by himself, making unreasonable or unrealistic demands, rarely voting for legislation that was getting just about 50 votes, and most solid only for confirmations. McConnell might get his vote maybe one third of the time.

    Even Rand Paul, the most difficult of the Republicans due to his libertarian leanings, votes with the GOP the majority of the time.

    Where does Mr Moore go, if he isn’t happy with GOP-sponsored legislation, to the Democrats? And the last thing he’d want to do is piss off the Majority Leader enough to get an expulsion motion started.

    He won’t be great, not at all, but he’d still be better than a Democrat.

    The realistic Dana (ecab7a)

  150. They;’re giving (assuming) North Korea until sometime next year when they might have a working ICBM.

    If they wait until next year, the Norks will have 50 ICBMs with hydrogen bombs on them and we’ll throw up our hands and surrender to endless nuclear blackmail. And it will be Trump’s fault for listening to pinheads.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  151. D you remember the 80s knish, the way Robert schemer and price talbot acted as if Reagan was the problem, they learned nothing fringe that period in fact Kerry Biden panetta all believed in the nuclear freeze at that time, Obama was three bongs less coherent.

    narciso (d1f714)

  152. Mr Thulhu asked me:

    Do you have a specific objection to the CFPB? In what way you believe that they’re partisan?

    When you have a 593 to 1 Democratic contribution advantage, yeah, I’d say that they are heavily partisan. The outgoing administrator’s attempt to name his replacement before the President could do so was clearly a partisan power grab attempt.

    But my primary objection to the agency is that it is not needed. We got along just fine without it for over two centuries; we don’t need it now.

    The practical Dana (ecab7a)

  153. And the last thing he’d want to do is piss off the Majority Leader enough to get an expulsion motion started.

    I’m betting that he would do it anyway. Filibuster Medicare legislation or something.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  154. I doubt Lizzie qualifies for the former, and that Cherokee ancestor she claims would be one generation too far back for the Eastern Band (if he actually existed).

    kishnevi (91d450) — 11/28/2017 @ 6:46 pm

    She does have crows-feet.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  155. @161

    I was hoping you’d have an example of a rule or regulation that you object to, rather than a general objection to a regulatory agency.

    Davethulhu (6a4a84)

  156. It was designed by Elizabeth warren whose understanding of economics was deficient,ostensibly tie prevent a crisis, that it had no role in regulating, the gse’s that created the matjet for subprime fnancing

    narciso (d1f714)


  157. It works a lot like reincarnation.

    No, it works like deception. Because it’s a lie. And it’s used to benefit the liar, in this case Warren, at the expense of another person. Just because we cannot identify the exact person Warren did irrevocable and permanent harm to by taking their place at Harvard does not mean that the more deserved person was not injured immorally by the liar Warren. Warren should be punished and forced to pay for her fraud and the fact she isn’t proves the real privilege in America isn’t white it’s leftist.

    Rev.Hoagie® (6bbda7)

  158. Why is it that lefties and the media are so upset about the words Trump used 11 years ago but they are a-okay with adult men using the ladies room with your wives and daughters?

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  159. @153

    Just going to ignore the second part of my comment, that the reactors were never completed?

    Davethulhu (6a4a84)

  160. Do you have a specific objection to the CFPB? In what way you believe that they’re partisan?

    I do.

    1. They are not subject to congressional budget control. This is unique.

    2. Their regulations are not subject to Presidential review. This is unique.

    3. They claim that the president has no power over their personnel. This is unique.

    4. All in all, they claim to not be neither an executive nor a legislative agency, but something wholly independent and uncontrolled by the political branches. Not only is this unique, but it’s very very dangerous.

    The agency is fundamentally unconstitutional in form and power and the courts ought to say so.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  161. Actually the Wiemar Republic was responsible for the gun control laws in force in the 30s. The Nazis actually loosened them slightly in favor of their own members and allies.

    The line that German gun control helped bring on the Holocaust does peeve me slightly. The vast majority of German Jews initially got out, although a high percentage only went to France, Poland,etc and got caught by the Nazi conquest. It’s the gun laws of Poland and the Soviet Union and other countries that determined what guns were available to Jews when the Germans arrived. I have no idea of what the relevant laws were in Poland, France, Hungary,etc–and I assume, but don’t actually know, that Stalin was fairly restrictive.

    kishnevi (91d450)

  162. @165

    So, no specific example?

    Davethulhu (6a4a84)

  163. Just going to ignore the second part of my comment, that the reactors were never completed?

    The North Koreans have reactors, and they were loaded with fuel and have been operating for two decades. Where do you suppose they got this material? Fairies?

    Kevin M (752a26)

  164. I hear Melania Trump 86’d the Mao Christmas ornament from the last communist administration. I’m sorry, they weren’t communists, everybody has Mao ornaments.

    Rev.Hoagie® (6bbda7)

  165. Just like hate speech laws were a big thing in weimar, this allowed goebbels Hitler it al a stage. Constricting human behavior in any significant way is a tricky thing. Yes Stalin didn’t want the people to have any check on his power, what the pilsudski regime though on this is a little less clear.

    narciso (d1f714)

  166. Remember what happened to this swamp denizen:

    narciso (d1f714) — 11/28/2017 @ 6:45 pm

    Swamp and Tundra don’t mix. My friend’s brother died in a plane crash hunting Dall Sheep in Alaska.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  167. THe reactors the Soviets and the west gave the Norks were never completed to be funttioning power reactors. However, the facility at Yongbyon has been repeatedly expanded in secrecy with indigenous copies of provided technology and now produces weapons-grade plutonium and uranium. It’s not all that hard once you have the basic technology and the raw materials. And the willingness to tell the world to frack off.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  168. Actually the Wiemar Republic was responsible for the gun control laws in force in the 30s. The Nazis actually loosened them slightly in favor of their own members and allies.


    kishnevi (91d450) — 11/28/2017 @ 7:01 pm

    In America that’s called “May Issue”.

    A gun control law restricting the purchase of guns would affect me, but not a law restricting the owning of guns, IYKWIMAITYD.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  169. Re #170. I don’t know if you’ve ever been to war kishnevi, but in my experience guns are quite readily available in areas at war. I know one couldn’t turn around without having a gun available in Vietnam so I’m sure they were all over the place in Poland, France, Hungry etc. I’m also sure that like Vietnam it was “illegal” for certain people to possess them. Refer to sentence one.

    Rev.Hoagie® (6bbda7)

  170. @176

    So would you say that “Clinton gifted them their nuclear reactors.” is a true or false statement.

    Davethulhu (6a4a84)

  171. Talking of hyperpartisanship, what can you say about the insistence of the press to call the North Korean situation “a challenge to Trump” as if H-bombs and ICBMs are just political postures?

    Kevin M (752a26)

  172. So would you say that “Clinton gifted them their nuclear reactors.” is a true or false statement.

    I didn’t say it, and I would not have phrased it that way. What I would have said is that, after it was clear that the Norks were cheating and diverting material in what could only be a bombs program, Clinton balked at doing something about it. Jimmy Carter “helped” by going to NK and bringing back “peace in our time.”

    Kevin M (752a26)

  173. 158. The realistic Dana (ecab7a) — 11/28/2017 @ 6:52 pm

    Where does Mr Moore go, if he isn’t happy with GOP-sponsored legislation, to the Democrats?

    He just votes no on many things, like the Democrats, but claiming problems from the opposite point of view with the bill.

    And the last thing he’d want to do is piss off the Majority Leader enough to get an expulsion motion started.

    Well, no, McConnell isn’t going to bargain about that.

    They’ll be an ethics investigation right from the start – and Gloria Allred will get what she claims she wants. Except that the Democrats will kind of sabotage it. Saying a lot of things aren’t
    necessary, meanwhile hitting the Republicans for needing to investigate, or going down blind alleys.

    It’ll be kind of like the investigation of Trump and Russia in the House of Representatives. Committee conflicts. Failure to support subpoenas.

    And nobody will dare ask much how the Washington Post found out about four woen who never contacted them, unless there’s some kind of abreak.

    Now a lot depends on what is the truth.

    He won’t be great, not at all, but he’d still be better than a Democrat.

    From a legislative point of point of view, if you favor the Republicans mostly.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  174. Warren should be punished and forced to pay for her fraud and the fact she isn’t proves the real privilege in America isn’t white it’s leftist.

    Rev.Hoagie® (6bbda7) — 11/28/2017 @ 7:01 pm

    I’m just saying anyone who touts reincarnation says they were Cleopatra or Alexander the Great not Hitler or Custer.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  175. Clinton did accept an agreement to refuel their reactors, but neither side lived up to the deal. Instead it was a cynical ploy by Bill Clinton to avoid having to go to war.

    BTW, I blame W just as much for doing the same damn thing. And I blame Obama for continuing it. So, no, I don’t have a political axe to grind here, except to note that there is no more road left for can-kicking. And I despise those who would make this political.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  176. Trump said “Nothing has changed. nothing ahas changed.”

    And that is probably true.

    They already anticipated this, even if there was a little hope that north Korea would not do any moro testing.

    Trump didn’t threaten North Korea. that means he means business. Although maybe not in December. In the meantime they worked with South Korea to doa test, to remind Kim that he really doesn’t have military superiority.

    His soldiers have giant worms in their bellies, and tuberculosis, and other infections, and he doesn’t notice.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  177. There was a reason, even betrand Russell was for preemptive way with Russia until around 1949, after that retaliation became prohibitive.

    narciso (d1f714)

  178. Their weapons work. Somewhat. But as a unit, the North Korean military could fall apart faster than you think. Maybe not fast enough not to kill and injure many people.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  179. Jimmy Carter never completed nuclear power school. His dad died and he retired his commission. He and Bannon were both surface warfare officers.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  180. @159/172. The fingerprints of ex-pat Rooskies and Chinese pass-thru tech are all over those birds. The engine cluster alone is classic ‘old-style’ CCCP design. But it works. Reliability and systems integration are clearly improving, too. A 2800 miles trajectory up and down is a significant profile but suggests a very light/dummy payload. Perfecting a heavier, survivable and accurate reentry package remains to be seen– but it’s likely close to being flight-tested and the spooks know it.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  181. @185 I’m not going to claim I have an answer. North Korea is basically a hostage situation (the hostage being South Korea). I suspect that NK would be paralyzed in the event of a decapitating strike, but nothing happens if I’m wrong.

    Davethulhu (6a4a84)

  182. Each independent agency is subject to congressional oversight and budget control. Every independent agency is subject to executive control. Some commissioners have terms set by law (and some are just maximum terms), but most serve at the president’s pleasure (e.g. CIA).

    Only the Federal Reserve has special status as it was judged necessary to set the bank apart from politics.

    The CFPB has no such necessity and placing it inside the Federal Reserve was an act of political hooliganism. Even so, to tell the president he cannot appoint officials within it is far beyond what event the federal reserve can say.

    The agency is unconstitutional, standing aloof from the established branches of government and ought to be struck down in toto.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  183. His soldiers have giant worms in their bellies, and tuberculosis, and other infections, and he doesn’t notice.

    Much like the phantom divisions Hitler was ordering around at the end.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  184. I’m also sure that like Vietnam it was “illegal” for certain people to possess them. Refer to sentence one.

    Rev.Hoagie® (6bbda7) — 11/28/2017 @ 7:14 pm

    Before 9/11 passengers didn’t generally tackle “hijackers”.

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  185. There’s a lawsuit actually challenging the whole set-up of the CFPB working its way through the courts. It’s probably not doing too much except at the margins, but that may be because of the precariousness of the situation. They are against payday loans, I think. We don’t have them in New York and we don’t miss them. One solution at least for thse in the military, is to allow them to accept pay in advance and kill all these loans.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  186. We get some notion. Here:
    https://missilethreat.csis.org/country/dprk/

    But how effective are their conventional forces they havdnt fought a major conflict in neatly 70 years

    narciso (d1f714)

  187. We created a federal Department of Education, yet our students are more poorly educated now than they were before the feds got so involved in education.

    Not true.

    In 1978 (the year before the Department of Education was created, for math) and 1980 (for reading) the National Assessment Score averages for 17 year-olds were:

    Reading: 285
    Math: 300

    In the most recent years available on the National Center for Education Statistics website (2012 for math and 2016 for reading), the averages were:

    Reading: 287
    Math: 306

    Data from here, although you have to navigate through several forms to specify what to display.

    These tests are designed to measure long-term trends by testing unvarying basic skills.

    Federal funding for elementary and secondary school education is small fraction (8%) of the nationwide total (that 8% includes school lunches too, so classroom spending is even less), and much of it is directed at serving special-needs students and/or areas where there are gaps in local funding, teacher recruitment, etc.

    we could return the Department of Energy nuclear functions to Defense and get rid of the rest

    So no more basic physics research? Shut down all our national laboratories that aren’t directly involved in making nuclear weapons?

    The sums you are talking about fiscally inconsequential ($5.4B for the entire DoE Office of Science, out of a $3.65T budget, which supports about half a dozen national laboratories and thousands of STEM graduate students), and the costs of simply ending an multiple fields of basic research would be immeasurable (there is also funding from the National Science Foundation, but presumably you Luddites want to shut that down too).

    The idea that you can reduce the budget in a fiscally significant way by cutting non-defense discretionary spending is just stupid. If you zeroed out non-defense discretionary spending COMPLETELY, the budget would still not quite balance.

    The lowest federal spending, as a percentage of GDP, in the last 50 years was FY2000 (17.9%). In FY2016, spending was 20.9% of GDP.

    Where does the 3% difference come from:

    +4.2% Social Security, Medicare and other health-care spending
    +0.3% Defense
    -1.5% Everything else

    Non-defense discretionary spending is already significantly (by 1.5% of GDP) smaller than in the year with the lowest level of spending in the last 50 years.

    (In FY2017, spending fell further, in relation to GDP, to 20.4%, I believe)

    Dave (445e97)

  188. Most Jewish armed resistance took place after 1942, as a desperate effort, after it became clear to those who resisted that the Nazis had murdered most of their families and their coreligionists. Despite great obstacles (such as lack of armaments and training, conducting operations in a hostile zone, reluctance to leave families behind, and the ever-present Nazi terror), many Jews throughout German-occupied Europe attempted armed resistance against the Germans. Source

    Pinandpuller (16b0b5)

  189. There are two types of independent agencies: those run by boards or commissions, and those run by a director. Directors serve at the pleasure of the President and can be fired at will. Commissioners or board members serve generally staggered terms and can only be removed for cause. As they leave or finish their terms the president can appoint new members. Many agencies respect the change in government and commissioners will resign if asked by a new president. The FCC is one example.

    In the case of the CFPB, there is a single director who is made immune to presidential firing. This separates the SFPB from every other independent agency. These agencies were carefully crafted, and are the subject of numerous court cases defining the separation of powers.

    The CFPB stands apart and the insistence of the agency that President Trump cannot name the acting director will lead to a court case it is unlikely to win. Hopefully it is totally dismantled, as it seems hard for the court to “fix” the structural problems left by its very maculate structure.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  190. Yes but past sir umstance made dome peoples less skeptical of Hitler’s designs after all they had signed a great with Germany, in the broader caucuses not merely the Ukraine, Stalin had made the Germans serum like a possible alternative

    narciso (d1f714)

  191. The real problem with the D of Ed is that it is a sinecure for education bureaucrats and it forces every state and local school board and every college and university, public or private, to bureaucrat-up in order to deal with the endless data requests and other tommyrot coming from DC. As is usual with federal support and funding, most of the money goes to manage compliance and obsequiousness of the part of the recipient.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  192. They are against payday loans, I think. We don’t have them in New York and we don’t miss them.

    I’m gonna guess you’ve never been short the rent money or the car payment and had to raise it in a day. If you had, and needed some kind of loan like this, I’d say you’d probably miss it.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  193. Circuit.stance, add to that the stance of nationalist movements like on in tube Ukraine, the mustache in Croatia. The national democrats in Poland who thought the.srlves as kindred with their vsrman. New neighbors

    narciso (d1f714)

  194. Even so, to tell the president he cannot appoint officials within it is far beyond what event the federal reserve can say.

    Nobody has ever disputed that President Snowflake can nominate a replacement director.

    The lawfare is over who acts as director until Trump’s nominee is confirmed. IANAL, and I take no position on who has the law on their side here, but the wording of the act creating the agency certainly seems consistent with the deputy director taking over when there is no director.

    I do wonder, frankly, why this has turned into World War Three. If it is so vitally important, the Senate could presumably rush through a confirmation by the end of the year. Worst case, Trump’s nominee is confirmed sometime in early January.

    Each independent agency is subject to congressional oversight and budget control. Every independent agency is subject to executive control. Some commissioners have terms set by law (and some are just maximum terms), but most serve at the president’s pleasure (e.g. CIA).

    Congress is a co-equal branch of government, granted pride of place in Article I, and they get to write the laws. The president is subject to those laws, and in fact he is bound to faithfully execute them *exactly* as enacted, whether he agrees with them or not.

    The constitution says nothing about any agencies or cabinet level offices – they are ALL purely creations of congress, and since congress decides what the law is, they can create them in whatever way seems best, within the essentially limitless bounds allowed (in this case) by the constitution.

    In other words, in the case of agencies created by congress, the President has executive power, but congress can specify – as precisely as they care to – what that executive power is in relation to any particular agency.

    Article II, Section 2, Paragraph 2 explicitly allows Congress to delegate the appointment of certain officers by law:

    [The President] … shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.

    (emphasis added)

    Dave (445e97)

  195. The real problem with the D of Ed is that it is a sinecure for education bureaucrats and it forces every state and local school board and every college and university, public or private, to bureaucrat-up in order to deal with the endless data requests and other tommyrot coming from DC. As is usual with federal support and funding, most of the money goes to manage compliance and obsequiousness of the part of the recipient.

    That’s completely untrue. Nearly all of the DoEd budget is granted or loaned to students, or granted to school districts.

    According to the 2017 report by Betsy DeVos, outlays broke down like this:

    77.4% Credit Programs (student loans)
    21.6% Grants
    …7.9% Pell Grants
    …4.5% Grants to local education agencies
    …3.7% Individuals with Disabilities Act grants
    …5.5% Other grants
    0.8% Contractual Services
    0.2% Personnel Compensation and Benefits

    According to Betsy DeVos’ website, DoEd has the third largest budget of 15 cabinet-level agencies, and the smallest staff.

    The Financial Statement says that 0.2% of their budget goes for Compensation and Benefits.

    Dave (445e97)

  196. It is so funny, as the suit over the CFPB cannot fail to put a spotlight on the irregularities in the agency’s charter. I could not design a better test case for destroying the agency utterly, much as INS vs Chadha destroyed the legislative veto, and for similar reasons.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  197. The compliance costs to the institutions receiving those grants, directly or indirectly, are not part of the D of Ed budget. Every college official who is honest in his assessment will tell you that the SOLE reason for the incredible bureaucratic explosion at the nation’s colleges is due to requirements placed on them by the D of Ed though one program or another.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  198. The most conspicuous change I have seen over my years at Pomona College is that the number of administrators has ballooned. When I arrived in 1990, the catalog named 56 persons as members of the administration, 180 faculty members, and 1,487 students.

    Cut to 2016. The catalog is no longer printed in hard copy. Everything is on the web, accessed through something called a “portal.” Pomona College now has, by my careful count, 271 administrators. The number of faculty is 186, and the number of students has increased to 1,640.

    The Dean of Students Office has gone from six persons in 1990 to sixty-five in 2016, not counting administrative assistants. The Office of Development, which formerly included Alumni Affairs, counted sixteen persons; now those renamed offices tally forty-seven persons. A few years ago Pomona created a new position, Chief Communications Officer; there are twenty-two persons working for the CCO—yes, we now have twenty-three people working for Pomona’s PR!

    Summary overview: the number of students has increased 12 percent; the number of faculty has increased 3 percent; the number of administrators has increased 384 percent; and tuition has increased 253 percent.

    Some attribute the mushrooming of administrative positions to an onslaught of federal regulation (e.g., Clery Act, VAWA, ADA, FERPA, Title IV, Title IX) and increased scrutiny by accrediting agencies.

    https://www.jamesgmartin.center/2017/11/somewhere-jeremiad-eulogy/

    Kevin M (752a26)

  199. @197. ‘Course, pinning NK in w/an arc of new toys; bright, shiny, multi-billion dollar state-of-the-art ABM systems on land and sea would be a delightfully welcomed ‘boom’ to the likes of United Technologies, Lockheed-Martin and assorted DoD contractors and sub-contractors ever-hungry for $$$. NK’s motives appear more about basic regime preservation. So it may be w/the MIC as well.

    DCSCA (797bc0)

  200. Congress may not create agencies that are immune to control by future Congresses. The CFPB is not subject to congressional oversight or budgetary control;. It is set up as a personal fiefdom. The Obama-Pelosi era (thankfully only two short years) created at least two such terrible agencies. In the other one, the Independent Payment Advisory Board, which could dictate to Congress, the Pelosi Congress’ legislation was so unconstitutional that it included a section that expressly forbade its own repeal by a later Congress.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  201. Anyone who analyzes the NK situation in terms of containment is totally missing the point. It’s about “can you sign a treaty renouncing nuclear ambitions in order to get nuclear power plants, then cheat and build bombs?”

    There are only 4 countries on earth that did not sign the treaty (Three of them did not sign because they intended to get, or had, nuclear weapons (Israel, India and Pakistan), and the fourth, South Sudan, did not exist at the time). It is the cornerstone of nuclear diplomacy and if it falls, the world becomes a VERY dangerous place.

    The North Korean situation is directly applicable to Iran, which is waiting to see how it breaks. Following that no less than 10 countries would have nuclear weapons by 2025. If you think that’s OK, consider Falklands II with a nuclear-armed Argentina, or Saudi Arabia and its Wahabists having the bomb. I’m not sure I even want to see a nuclear-armed Japan. We haven’t always been friends.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  202. Dave–

    Go read INS vs Chadha (1983)to see what happens when Congress tries to set limits on the Executive and executive agencies.

    Kevin M (752a26)

  203. Every college official who is honest in his assessment will tell you that the SOLE reason for the incredible bureaucratic explosion at the nation’s colleges is due to requirements placed on them by the D of Ed though one program or another.

    You’re just making stuff up at this point.

    I have worked in the largest public university system in the country for over 20 years, and there is no “bureaucratic explosion”. DoEd makes up less than 2% of my university’s grants. See the table on page 22.

    Obviously, when the government (or anyone else) doles out money there has to be a paper-trail to document that the money is used as intended. If there weren’t, you would be citing *that* as a reason to defund everything…

    At my campus, there is one office of about 30 people that handles compliance and administration for ALL the funding agencies and ALL the departments on campus. Almost half of them deal with stuff related to certification for experiments involving animal or human subjects; compared to that legal minefield, routine bookkeeping and statistical reporting is trivial.

    So that is roughly 30 people administering the $378M in research grants from all sources that the campus received last year.

    Our department has one multi-year DoEd grant that supports a half-dozen or so graduate students; I’d be surprised if compliance/reporting costs were more than 1% of the budget.

    Dave (445e97)

  204. Summary overview: the number of students has increased 12 percent; the number of faculty has increased 3 percent; the number of administrators has increased 384 percent; and tuition has increased 253 percent.

    Among the many obvious explanations: the list of staff in the hard-printed 1990 catalog he uses for a baseline was incomplete, whereas the modern-day website can be live-updated from a database; part-time staffing (more names does not necessarily imply more FTE), and (almost certainly) different definitions of what constitutes “administrators”.

    None of the specific examples he cites (Dean of Students, Development and Communications) would be connected to grant administration in any way, so that already kind of shoots the theory out of the water.

    Moreover, Pomona is a 4-year college, not a research university, so they don’t even do research grants. Their financial statement lists a laughable total of $2M in federal grants for the most recent year. So, yeah, that 1% (barely) of their annual revenue MUST HAVE BEEN the reason their staff size allegedly tripled.

    And finally, the “Administration” page he talks about lists 82 names, plus 2 or 3 vacant positions, not 271. 10 of those are for Claremont College, which has some kind of association with Pomona that may or may not have existed 27 years ago. If he counted the Trustees, that is just deception, because the Trustees have absolutely nothing to do with the day-to-day operations of the school.

    Better luck next time!

    Dave (445e97)

  205. Dave’s a state employee in the university system. That explains so much.

    NJRob (b00189)

  206. Dave’s a state employee in the university system. That explains so much.

    Ooh, Rob hates education too! Why am I not surprised?

    Dave (445e97)

  207. Breaking News:

    Matt Lauer fired by NBC over “detailed” sexual harassment complaint filed against him by a colleague on Monday night.

    So it took them a little more then 24 hours to determine it was a firing offense.

    I’m guessing some emails/text messages/weiner shots were in the package of material provided.

    LOL.

    shipwreckedcrew (56b591)

  208. “I can’t understand why the CFPB employees don’t support the party that wants to shut them down.”

    You applaud the cycle of funding of one party by an agency that party has filled with its own partisans and has made answerable to no one?

    Oh wait, I forget. This is Obama-level balance and transparency.

    harkin (00236c)

  209. Our peripatetic stalker Ben, is a fmr denizen of the Claremont colony, the illustrious credentialed fool Conor f of the Atlantic is a mere product of same

    narciso (d1f714)

  210. 193. Kevin M (752a26) — 11/28/2017 @ 7:33 pm

    Each independent agency is subject to congressional oversight and budget control…. Some commissioners have terms set by law (and some are just maximum terms),

    This one has a term, but unlike other federal commissions, there is only one member. What they attempted to do here is to set up a dynastic succession, where every head of the CFPB appointed his successor, like the King of Saudi Arabia, or like, de facto, the Mexican President used to be, subject only to a successful nomination by the President and confirmation by the Senate of somebody else.

    And, I’m not sure they made the claim, but somebody wrote this, this could extend beyond the expiration of the director next June, so that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau might be governed by an unending succession of acting directors with its own guaranteed source of income just so long as the Senate did not confirm a new one. (This sort of reminds me of the old “Reserve Clause” in baseball, which technically only applied for one year.)

    Control might switch parties any time the President and the Senate were of the same party, and then stay with that party maybe for ten years or longer, if the party balance between the president and the Senate worked outright. If they were of the same party as the director, the president might wait until near the end of his term to give the director a five year unchallengeable period of timeto rule.

    The agency is unconstitutional, standing aloof from the established branches of government and ought to be struck down in toto.

    The agency does not have all that much power, beyond the ability to force financial disclosure, except that according to the way I understand a column in the Wall Street Journal by Holman W. Jenkins today, it created a slush fund for the employment of activists through litigation.

    When this was created, members of Congress knew of some of the plans, so they excluded auto dealers from regulation. Now you know auto dealers give everyone a different rate, and the rate someone actually gets depends on their sophistication, or, inevitably, initially perceived sophistication.

    This does in fact statistically work against blacks and women because the auto salesman may start off with a perception that (not so young) white males are more sophisticated even if they actually aren’t. This is important because it was the lever to use to extract money. The key to the whole thing.

    Now the CFPB couldn’t sue auto dealers. It had no power over them. They could sue the banks for racial discrimination in lending. Problem: Auto dealers were forbidden to collect and reveal to the banks racial data on its customers. I think furthermore, the banks charged a set interest rate according to some credit formula, but they allowed auto dealers to charge the customer more than the bank did.

    OK. So Cordray sued on the grounds of disparate impact. Really a bad theory. Problem: How were the bans supposed to know to whom they were supposed to refund some money? They didn’t know who was black or white. Solution: Use Bayesian Improved Surname Geocoding. Something, I don’t know maybe used by the Census Bureau. This looks at names and zip codes. Jenkins notes this actually overestimates the percentage of blacks. he didn’t say who actually uses this.

    But now the key part: A lawsuit settlement when you settle a lawsuit you don’t have to explain why you are giving away money and to whom.

    So Richard Cordray, sole ruler of the CFPB, negotiated settlements that had some money distributed to activist groups whom Cordray selected. (other money went to lawyers and random individuals) He was able extort these settlements because he could hold up approvals from other federal agencies for things the banks wanted to do. That was another power of the CFPB. Its consent was necessary for banks to do certain other things. He had to give them a clean bill of health.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  211. This one has a term, but unlike other federal commissions, there is only one member. What they attempted to do here is to set up a dynastic succession, where every head of the CFPB appointed his successor,

    Why do you say stuff like this which is transparently false?

    Nobody denies that Trump has the power to appoint a permanent replacement for the director, who would take office after confirmation by the senate.

    Dave (445e97)

  212. Solution: Use Bayesian Improved Surname Geocoding. Something, I don’t know maybe used by the Census Bureau. This looks at names and zip codes. Jenkins notes this actually overestimates the percentage of blacks. he didn’t say who actually uses this.

    That overestimation may be more prevalent south of the Mason-Dixon line (or Interstate 70) for the fact whites with “early presidential” surnames (Washington, Jefferson, Jackson) are much more prevelant south than north.

    urbanleftbehind (5eecdb)

  213. This one has a term, but unlike other federal commissions, there is only one member. What they attempted to do here is to set up a dynastic succession, where every head of the CFPB appointed his successor,

    Dave (445e97) — 11/29/2017 @ 7:58 am

    Why do you say stuff like this which is transparently false?

    Nobody denies that Trump has the power to appoint a permanent replacement for the director, who would take office after confirmation by the senate.

    No, the point is if the Senate failed to confirm a successor, you could get a dynastic succession. Now it is true, that with 51 Republican Senators, and the filibuster rule for nominations abolished, Mitch McConnell could get a confirmation through, an this wouldn’t happen now.

    I said that because I read that somewhere, but it is true, it is not realistic right now.

    If anything, control could semi-permanently pass into the hands of the Republicans, starting in 2018.. (unless the courts, or Congress, change something, or Trump wins his court case, which would eliminate the possibility of an unending succession of acting directors, so long as the president and the Senate remain of opposite parties.)

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  214. By the way, even the name of the Consumer Financial Protection Board is a lie meant to mislead the public.

    It’s not a board .

    It’s one person.

    It would better be called the Consumer Financial Protection Czardom, and Richard Cordray (or whoever) the Consumer Financial Protection Czar.

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  215. I am hearing the same thing over and over on Lauer, Conyers, etc. And that is that people knew about these transgressions but no one spoke up. The people that knew but kept mute were those in the media.

    AZ Bob (f60c80)

  216. 229. AZ Bob (f60c80) — 11/29/2017 @ 9:12 am

    I am hearing the same thing over and over on Lauer, Conyers, etc. And that is that people knew about these transgressions but no one spoke up. The people that knew but kept mute were those in the media.

    Even when they did mention it in passing, nobody paid attention. No fire alarm bells rang. There was no Twitter storm. It didn’t go viral. Maybe nobody watches Bravo.

    In 2012, Katie Couric, who hosted the TODAY show from 1991 to 2006, and overlapped woth Matt Lauer from 1994 on, was interviewed on the Bravo network. She was asked what the most annoying thing about Matt laeur. She replied that he pinches me on a?? a lot.

    http://www.tmz.com/2017/11/29/katie-couric-today-show-matt-lauer-sexual-harassment-allegations/

    Sammy Finkelman (54fd00)

  217. Sammy.

    Jane Pauley and Bryant Humble to 1999

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  218. Gumble.

    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab)

  219. 231 232. What?

    Sammy Finkelman (02a146)

  220. I have probably lied to FBI. Or their surrogates.

    Try making it through one of their Life Style polygraphs. I was “evasive.:

    Steve57 (0b1dac)

  221. Gumble.
    Admiral Ben burn (b3d5ab) — 11/29/2017 @ 11:17 am

    Harroomph!!

    Steve57 (0b1dac)

  222. I have probably lied to FBI. Or their surrogates.

    that’s a job well done Mr. 57

    they’re so sleazy and they try to get all up in your bidness

    happyfeet (28a91b)

  223. I got out of the business in 2005. I was getting divorced and, duhh! I had a brazillian connections to foreign nationals. Which NCIS specifically told me they didn’t want to hear about because in Japan they’d be doing nothing except.

    Then I met AFOSI. Who the f*** was I supposed to know other than Japanese girls?

    America, you secrets are safe with me.

    Steve57 (0b1dac)

  224. I got off base once in a while, and knew the local language.

    Steve57 (0b1dac)

  225. so dirty FBI pervert Peter Strzok was having an extramarital affair with a hot-to-trot FBI sleazer named Lisa Page

    and it was so good

    they were both all up into stinkypig’s campaign and when President Trump defeated her they put on some pussyhats they bought at the FBI canteen and joined the #resistance

    ikes!

    this proved to be embarrassing for Herr Mueller, but why is this news all coming out today?

    I wonder if the stinky FBI has a huge Harvey problem coming and Herr Mueller wants to inoculate his petty little investigation from the fallout

    happyfeet (28a91b)


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