Patterico's Pontifications

10/17/2015

Trump Evades Further Questioning on 9/11 Happening Under Bush

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 12:47 pm



This story has sparked a lively debate at Hot Air Headlines, and I thought readers here might enjoy it. The other day, The Donald made a big point of reminding us that 9/11 happened on George Bush’s watch. Now, reporters are predictably trying to keep the issue alive — and apparently, Mr. Tell-It-Like-It-Is is dodging the question:

Trump regularly speaks with reporters at campaign events and often takes multiple questions in an impromptu manner, making his silence Friday all the more noticeable.

When asked by CNN after a rally at a local high school here if he thought the attacks were George W. Bush’s fault, Trump, after pausing to listen to the question, walked away.

Minutes later, he again declined to say anything when asked to react to Bush’s response on Twitter, ignoring at least half a dozen questions on the matter before driving away in his motorcade. He did respond to questions about the crowd size at his campaign event Friday and why he was campaigning in Massachusetts.

Discuss.

82 Responses to “Trump Evades Further Questioning on 9/11 Happening Under Bush”

  1. Ding.

    Patterico (fecd9b)

  2. “Trump knows he can beat Jeb and benefits from a divided establishment field. *Trump wants Jeb to stay in the race.* Jeb’s position is dour: mediocre fundraising, cutting costs and salaries, poor polling. There’s a real chance Jeb drops out after the debate… Trump is challenging Jeb’s honor and masculinity, goading him to stay in the race. Which is ultimately to Trump’s benefit.” – John Durant

    scrutineer (b7d257)

  3. The 9/11 attack did happen during GWB’s presidency, that’s an indisputable fact, and Bush acted appropriately in response, which is also indisputable. The real queston today is not who was in the Oval Office at the time of the attack, but who was in the Oval Office when the safeguards which would have prevented the attack were circumvented.

    That President’s name is Bill Clinton, and the Deputy AG was Jamie Gorelach. She built the ‘firewall’ which prevented the investigative agency of the government from disclosing to the lawr enforcement agency of government that Islamic terrorists were already in the US and training to fly passenger jets into the Twin Towers.

    Our intelligence services had conclusive advance warning which would have prevented the loss of 3000 American lives, but because of Bill Clinton’s corruption and Jamie Gorelach’s treachery the terrorists were allowed a free hand to murder Americans wholesale.

    He’s the dirty bastard who set the atrocity in motion, and she’s the filthy murdering bitch who paved the road to hell.

    ropelight (36e1be)

  4. How about “taking seriously anything that comes out of Mr. Trump’s mouth as an indication of something specific he will do in office is about as clever as trying to design a moon rocket out of the random typing produced by a hundred stoned chimps in a room full of typewriters”? That’s been my mindset about Trump all along.

    M. Scott Eiland (1edade)

  5. for manhattan trash like Mr. The Donald them attacks on September 11 hit kinda close to home I think

    happyfeet (831175)

  6. It’s disconcerting that this nation has to deal with both a Donald Trump and a Jeb Bush in 2016, and, at the same time, has an electorate I have so little faith in (because it may repeat its idiocy of 2008 and 2012) that garbage on the left like Hillary, etc, receive more serious consideration than they deserve.

    Sad how it has come down to this in 21st century America.

    Mark (f713e4)

  7. Megyn Kelly discussed this with Krauthammer last night, in his second appearance on her show, and he said that this whole thing was intentional on the part of Trump. It came across as a throw away line at the time, but it was carefully constructed to keep Trump as a focal point for media attention, while not being so outrageous as to require a retraction. As, we have seen, this tactic has the benefit that it sidetracks whatever narrative the other candidates are propounding.

    It also has the benefit of reminding the American public that bad stuff has happened to us even when we are quietly minding our own business. Something that the progressives would rather forget.

    Carrying this line of thought a bit further, if 9-11 was the response to a relatively passive U. S. presence in the middle east following 8 years of Clinton mismanagement, one custodian accidentally killed in a bombing of an Aspirin factory in the Sudan, then what should be considered as the likely response to 7 years of feckless mismanagement characterized by drone attacks and a substantially greater U. S. presence. Admittedly the administration’s effort have amounted to little more than sending our foreign service officers to their deaths, or equipping our only real ally in Iraq, the Kurds, with MREs and unarmored personnel carriers, but our bombing and drone attacks have killed many, which will not be forgotten. Proportionally, we should expect something much greater than 9-11.

    BobStewartatHome (a52abe)

  8. …Bush acted appropriately in response, which is also indisputable.

    The Afghanistan invasion was indisputably appropriate. The rest of the “war on terror” is questionable.

    – The Iraq war turned out to be a mistake.
    – The creation of DHS was arguably a bad idea.
    – TSA’s “Security Theater” is a never-ending joke.
    – NSA’s collection of telephone metadata is creepy and illegitimate.
    – NSA’s apparent mass recording of phone calls is even worse.

    scrutineer (b7d257)

  9. ISIS owes it to food stamp not to do the dirty bombs til he leaves office

    he deserves that much for all he’s done for them I think

    happyfeet (831175)

  10. scrutineer (b7d257) — 10/17/2015 @ 1:53 pm

    Iraq did have the weapons of mass destruction that we went there to remove. We did destroy what was left in Iraq and Iraq managed to ship others into Syria. There is so much that Bush just let people believe about Iraq, but the truth is no where near what the media has told the American people.

    Freedom Costs (949a0b)

  11. scrutineer. The Iraq situation had turned out so well that Obama and Biden were saying, in 2010-2011, that it would be a significant achievement of THEIR administration. Then, according to dem/lib/left/prog plans, they threw away that for which men had died. If I had thought a dem wold be elected in time to throw it away, I would probably have opposed it.

    Richard Aubrey (472a6f)

  12. This was inartful. Think many people in retrospect wonder how Bush Jr. let the Saudis off the hook. And wonder why he was so hellbent on a war with Iraq. Think of Bush as a well-intentioned but flawed president. And it’s not the worst thing in the world to put some distance between Trump and Bush Jr.

    Bugg (fa64ec)

  13. yes, that was a poor choice of words, although what makes Afghanistan so special, it’s where UBL went the Sudanese kicked him out, nowadays he would go to Syria, or Libya

    narciso (ee1f88)

  14. The Iraq situation had turned out so well that Obama and Biden were saying, in 2010-2011, that it would be a significant achievement of THEIR administration.

    Yes, Obama and Biden said ridiculous things to justify abandoning Iraq.

    One principle of conservative governance is that any major policy which can’t survive management by the opposite party is doomed, and therefore a mistake. You need at least a rough consensus to make long term (multi-administration) plans work, and there was no such consensus for the U.S. to spend a decade+ nation-building in Iraq. Democrats predictably quit as soon as they could.

    scrutineer (b7d257)

  15. they were on the side of the predecessors of the islamic state, from the getgo, and the Taliban not long after that,

    narciso (ee1f88)

  16. remember how they called chalabi an iranian agent, whereas they let a real one in Maliki in charge for eight years,

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/07/15/hassan-nemazee-democratic_n_647602.html

    narciso (ee1f88)

  17. Number 9. Number 9. Number 9
    happyfeet – agreed.

    mg (31009b)

  18. In addition to Jamie Gorelach’s ‘firewalls’, there was Clinton’s handling of the first World Trade Center bombing as “lawfare” rather than warfare. By treating the enemy as criminal defendants rather than combatants, the enemy was able, through discovery, to determine exactly how we had penetrated their communication and they subsequently changed them to make it harder to eavesdrop on them in the future.

    Mike (88372b)

  19. Bush put in moronic rules of engagement. Either fight a war, blow them and their crap up, or don’t go. Rubble don’t cause trouble.

    Bush pretended “Islam is peace”.

    Bush indulged the Saudis and let a mess go home without being interviewed.

    Bush did NOTHING to stop Islamic immigration and much to help it.

    Bush’s 2nd inaugural may be the single most insane policy statement made by any president not named Obama.

    Bugg (fa64ec)

  20. the former had a lot to do with Grover Norquist and his courting of Alamoudi, the latter the advice of Baker and Scowcroft, paid up members of the Saudi lobby, a generation back they thought
    ‘Saddam was someone we could do business with’

    narciso (ee1f88)

  21. I’ve said it before: when Democrats told me that we would lose the war in Iraq,I thought it was a prediction; but it was a promise.

    Pious Agnostic (4e1a81)

  22. 14. scrutineer (b7d257) — 10/17/2015 @ 3:32 pm

    One principle of conservative governance is that any major policy which can’t survive management by the opposite party is doomed, and therefore a mistake.

    In that case you must overspend on the defense budget, so it can survive cutbacks by a future president and congress, and seek quick successes in military operations, even that’s not actually the wisest policy.

    The Bush policy in Iraq actually continued through about 2011. His big mistake was assuming the only opposition would come from Saddam Hussein’s Ba’ath Party, and its remants and could only get weaker with time.

    Sammy Finkelman (6c2cdd)

  23. It kinda falls into the same “way out there” genre as his comment about McCain, i.e., “I like people who weren’t captured.” In each case Trump forces a close up encounter with a harsh reality. And PR-wise Trump has built-in cover, because to a large extent truth is a defense.

    G Joubert (0399e8)

  24. It wasn’t just the first bombing of The World Trade Center that Clinton failed to properly respond to, it was the Khobar Towers, the bombings of US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, the bombing of the USS Cole.

    Then add to that the Bush v. Gore fiasco which had a VP –Al Gore challenging the vote of every serviceman serving overseas voting by absentee ballots in Florida wether they officers, or enlisted, black or white, female or male –Al Gore knew one thing –the US military was not voting Democrat.

    The handing over of the Oval Office was done with such immaturity by The Clintons that they even removed the letter “W” from the computer keyboards , only God knows what else they did to hinder the next administration.

    In an effort to facilitate the transition,Bush left a Democrat in control of the CIA, George Tenet –who advises him that finding WMD in Iraq will be a slam dunk. Well after Bush leaves office the NYT writes an article that there was WMD found in Iraq and that Bush decided not to tell people so that the Veterans Administration would not have to pay the healthcare bills of vets exposed to the WMD.

    Then there is that nagging question–why would Sandy Burger risk prison and disgrace to smuggle out original first source materials? Burger had been appointed as Clinton’s representative to The 9/11 Commission and had access to documents alone for four months before the archive officers had the guts to confront him. During Sandy’s visits he was particularly interested in the materials from Joe Wilson’s office.

    Danube River Guide (76b104)

  25. well the materials was the afteraction report of the capture of Ahmed Ressam, the Millenium bomber, who intended to target Los Angeles, as at least two subsequent plots against the Library Tower, the notes to this document indicated the status of AQ operatives in this country,

    re WMDs, even the BND, who had stewardship of curveball, the DGSE, who had contacts with the late Drumheller, and the still living Murray, who forwarded intelligence to Hillary, via Sid Blumenthal, and the Russian SVR, all believed such weapons were likely,

    narciso (ee1f88)

  26. Gorelach?! WTH did that name come from? I assume you’re talking about Jamie Gorelick.

    Milhouse (8489b1)

  27. forms, as of a short while ago, she was on the board of Amazon,

    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1118214/posts

    narciso (ee1f88)

  28. narciso

    The media keeps missing the part of Gowdy’s letter to Elijah Cunningham where Gowdy refers to an email from March 2011 that Sidney Blumenthal wrote to Hillary where Blumenthal reveals a contact of his that currently Works at CIA told them about human intelligence sources.

    A yahoo article basically made the assumption that Blumenthal’s source was Drumheller, but Drumheller retired from the CIA in 2005.

    Danube River Guide (76b104)

  29. well this piece started the ball rolling, included therein is possibly the uncovered Company asset,

    https://www.propublica.org/article/private-emails-reveal-ex-clinton-aides-secret-spy-network

    Drumheller as fmr?? Western Europe Division chief, still had long standing contacts with the afore mentioned agencies, he in turn was a consultant to CBS News going back to the time he was on 60 minutes, as such he had influence on reports like Lara Logan’s expose,

    narciso (ee1f88)

  30. this was the most recent update,

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/member-clintons-secret-spy-network-worked-cbs-news-helped-shape-benghazi-coverage_1034186.html

    Stephen Grey, who was fed much of the rendition story, admits several German and American officials, out right lied about who ‘curveball’ was and how they handled him,

    narciso (ee1f88)

  31. There is no point to mentioning it if it was not intended to cast blame for political gain.

    Estragon (ada867)

  32. This morning at 9am on FOX News Sunday Chris Wallace airs his interview with Donald Trump. In an advance tease Wallace says Trump doubles down on his statement and goes on to explain what he means and why.

    PS: Thanks Milhouse for correcting my misspelling of Jamie Gorelick’s name.

    ropelight (923c8f)

  33. Trump says his statement was in response to Jeb Bush’s claim that his brother “kept us safe.” Trump says that since he’s very tough on illegal immigration and on those who overstay visas there’s a good chance that if Trump was president the 9/11 perps might not have been in the country. 3000 Americans died and that can’t be used as an example of “keeping us safe.”

    ropelight (923c8f)

  34. bush’s instinct was to oppose the creation of the Department of Homeland Security

    I kinda doubt this would’ve been a Mr. The Donald’s instinct if he had been president at the time

    happyfeet (831175)

  35. I would assume just the opposite. Trump wants to cut government spending. The creation of a new federal Departments is outrageously expensive and often so ineffective as to exacerbate the very problems they were designed to address.

    ropelight (923c8f)

  36. ok then that’s a point in Mr. The Donald’s favor i guess

    but i think he might could get more knowledge out of saying the monstrously incompetent fascist Department of Homeland Security was created on Bush’s watch than he does with his observation about the attacks

    happyfeet (831175)

  37. ?

    knowledge = mileage

    and that should be incompetent *and* fascist

    happyfeet (831175)

  38. bush’s instinct was to oppose the creation of the Department of Homeland Security

    Bush’s instinct was to oppose that thing he did, like arguing McCain-Feingold is unconstitutional and then signing it into law.

    I had a leftist prof in law school who said Reagan was the last president to take the Constitution seriously. Sounds right to me.

    scrutineer (b7d257)

  39. Trump says that since he’s very tough on illegal immigration and on those who overstay visas there’s a good chance that if Trump was president the 9/11 perps might not have been in the country.

    The Bush post-9/11 policy on national security + immigration:

    “We need muslims in USA for great diversity
    but they’re scary so we need to spy on them
    but we mustn’t profile so we have to spy on
    everyone.” – Duck

    scrutineer (b7d257)

  40. you’re my new favorite commenter

    happyfeet (831175)

  41. I wonder if Trump would be willing to go into every mosque and search for unauthorized personnel and bomb making equipment?

    mg (31009b)

  42. Comey is the one who ‘had an attack of the vapors’ on the day, before the trains blew in Madrid, this is one of the reasons he was selected as director, as payback,

    narciso (ee1f88)

  43. http://townhall.com/columnists/katiekieffer/2015/10/19/gop-elites-secret-plan-to-expel-donald-trump-and-ben-carson-n2067142
    Never in my life did I think the establishment GOP hated hard working Americans.
    Man, am I stupid and gullible.

    mg (31009b)

  44. Pat this is important: Donald Trump publicly refused to defend the U.S. constitution over Sharia Law. I suspect it’s the (ME) petrodollars talking. Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSH-4OSAA-0

    Tony (ff2fe4)

  45. I’m of two minds on Trumps ability to win should he be nominated.

    On one hand I see him as a very easy target for Hillary. First of all it would be easy to get soccer moms to turn against him because of his history of insulting women, especially if he went after Hillary in an aggressive way. Second, they’d do a Romney on him and go over his business record with a fine toothed comb and pass anything negative they find to their many media friends to amplify (and they wouldn’t necessarily need to distort anything, unlike with Romney). Third, they’d portray him as a double talker who lacks credibility and hasn’t given a lot of thought to the issues, which would have the benefit of being accurate.

    His two main strengths are his willingness to be blunt and not allow himself to be a punching bag, and he isn’t a typical Republican, which could attract some voters who don’t like Republicans.

    Whether his strengths would ultimately outweigh his weaknesses is unclear but I’m leaning to him ultimately falling apart in the face of the Democrat/media onslaught.

    Gerald A (5dca03)

  46. a campaign what pits a filthy rich socialist against a filthy rich capitalist might be exactly what failmerica needs right now

    happyfeet (a037ad)

  47. well he’s a known quantity, for good or ill, yes he sold some property, namely his yacht, which used to belong to Khashoggi, to Prince Talal, who is himself divesting of assets,

    narciso (ee1f88)

  48. Another potentially huge problem for Trump in the general is that many conservatives who focus on the social issues might abandon him. They might be willing to overlook his lack of socially conservative instincts if they thought he’d nominate strict constructionist judges, but I don’t see any evidence that he wants to do that – if anything just the opposite. I don’t perceive that he has any interest whatsoever in returning the nation to constitutional principles. In fact I don’t know that I would end up voting for him, in large part for that reason.

    Gerald A (5dca03)

  49. I’m not absolutely sure how much of an ally the kingdom really is,

    http://pjmedia.com/richardfernandez/2015/10/18/the-syrian-offensive/

    narciso (ee1f88)

  50. bush’s instinct was to oppose the creation of the Department of Homeland Security

    Bush’s instinct was to oppose that thing he did,

    Yes. He did it anyway because the Democrats insisted on it; it was part of the price he paid to get them on board for the war, not just against al Qaeda but against the whole terrorist network that it was involved in. Letting Ted Kennedy write Medicare Part D and No Child Left Behind was more of that price, which is why they didn’t turn out as he had planned.

    Milhouse (8489b1)

  51. I would assume just the opposite. Trump wants to cut government spending. The creation of a new federal Departments is outrageously expensive and often so ineffective as to exacerbate the very problems they were designed to address.

    We know that, but does he? His instinct as a businessman rather than a politician would be to centralize control of security. In the private sector that makes sense; in the public sector it doesn’t. This is a major problem when businesspeople think they can run a government; they just don’t work the same way, and they can’t be made to work the same way, because their inherent natures are different.

    Milhouse (8489b1)

  52. Another term for fascism is “the corporate state”.

    nk (dbc370)

  53. a campaign what pits a filthy rich socialist against a filthy rich capitalist might be exactly what failmerica needs right now

    Yeah, but Trump’s not a capitalist, he’s at best a mercantilist. He believes in using government power to make money for some people at other people’s expense, which is exactly what socialists believe too; the only difference between them is which people should be on each side of that divide.

    Milhouse (8489b1)

  54. Another term for fascism is “the corporate state”.

    A much misused term. It has nothing to do with corporations as in companies, commercial enterprises. It means a state that considers the whole nation as one body, with all the different parts playing their appropriate roles in the interest of the whole, all at the direction of the brain, i.e. il Duce, der Führer, the Commander in Chief.

    Milhouse (8489b1)

  55. corporatism as in Vargas’s Brazil, Mubarak’s Egypt and a host of other examples,

    narciso (ee1f88)

  56. Same organizational model. A CEO and a hierarchy of managers.

    nk (dbc370)

  57. Fascism is the de facto or de jure fusion of corporations and the gummint. The de jure version is known as communism.

    Gerald A (5dca03)

  58. This guy is the Republican forerunner for presidential nominee, and a racist Communist is the leading Democratic candidate.

    RIP America.

    CrustyB (69f730)

  59. there are more complex question, like how did this fellow, remain at large for so long:

    http://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2015/10/jihadists-claim-senior-al-qaeda-strategist-killed-in-syria.php

    focusing on the man, at the expense of the network, is the cardinal flaw,

    narciso (ee1f88)

  60. narciso

    Just catching up, off to follow your links. thanks.

    Danube River Guide (76b104)

  61. Whoa, wait a minute. You mean that Trump mouthed off like a clueless idiot and actively dodged follow-up questions about it? Next thing you’ll try to tell me is that you’re shocked to find gambling going on at Rick’s.

    If Trump has a bone to pick about 9/11, he might want to talk about how al Qaeda was treated with kid gloves throughout the ’90s and how the White House repeatedly failed to do anything substantial (including passing up numerous chances to get Bin Laden). Hmm, now, who was president during that particular time period? Why, yes, it was Bill Clinton, a close personal friend of… Donald Trump. Gee, what a coincidence that a guy who out RINO’s Jeb wouldn’t want to say anything critical of his buddies, the Clintons. Ah, but that must prove Trump’s the biggest conservative in the race… just like his lifelong support for Democratic candidates and causes, his unwavering support for single payer, his insults towards POWs, his thin-skinned whining about being asked tough questions, and his flip flops on immigration.

    tops116 (d094f8)

  62. narciso

    Holy cripes your second link is illuminating.

    Had no idea how much Drumheller had his fingers in Clinton’s Benghazi and CBS’s pie.

    Plus the fact that George Tenet spent a considerable amount of time trying to tear Drumheller down.

    Drumheller was probably in with Blumenthal earlier than what is known.

    Danube River Guide (76b104)

  63. It reads like good spy fiction, doesn’t it, yet the press seems more interested in Kardashian fare.

    narciso (ee1f88)

  64. And then you have the head of the Saudi lobby organize the Plame peanut gallery, aka vips.

    narciso (ee1f88)

  65. Sid goes back to 2003 on this matter, he started out partnering with Phillip agee.

    narciso (ee1f88)

  66. I’ve always found the media’s lack of curiosity about Benghazi–unnatural. Yes, The Daily Mail is near unreadable.

    Danube River Guide (76b104)

  67. Phillip Agee? Off to the googles…..

    Sid makes me literally ill.

    Danube River Guide (76b104)

  68. Remind me again how many State Department officials GWB disciplined for signing off on the hijackers’ visas?
    Remind me again how many immigration officials he disciplined for losing track of them?
    Remind me again how many intelligence officials he disciplined for dropping the ball on 9/11?

    GWB has this coming, has had it coming for over a decade.

    DaveP. (a0aed1)

  69. I’m still looking at the wiki,–but surprise, surprise! —another dead CIA fellow.

    Danube River Guide (76b104)

  70. From the wiki: Russian exile Oleg Kalugin, former head of the KGB’s Counterintelligence Directorate, claimed that in 1973 Agee approached the KGB’s resident in Mexico City and offered a “treasure trove of information”. According to Kalugin, the KGB was too suspicious to accept his offer.

    Niiiiiiiice.

    Wow, I actually need a shower.

    Danube River Guide (76b104)

  71. Agee was the snowden and Ames of his era, re mitrokhin.

    narciso (ee1f88)

  72. Remind me again how many State Department officials GWB disciplined for signing off on the hijackers’ visas?
    Remind me again how many immigration officials he disciplined for losing track of them?
    Remind me again how many intelligence officials he disciplined for dropping the ball on 9/11?

    GWB has this coming, has had it coming for over a decade.

    DaveP. (a0aed1) — 10/19/2015 @ 11:56 am

    Are those questions supposed to validate Trump’s groundless claim that Bush allowed 9/11 to happen?

    Gerald A (5dca03)

  73. Porter eventually purged many of these people in 2004-5, many came back when he resigned.

    narciso (ee1f88)

  74. Porter Goss?

    Speaking of Snowden and his comrade Greenwald –lately they are trying to get information for Snowden’s hosts on our capabilities.

    Danube River Guide (76b104)

  75. Of course one can’t forget Paul pillar’s long category of error from denying that aq could order a strike to the 2007 nie that absolved Iran.

    narciso (ee1f88)

  76. Remind me again how many State Department officials GWB disciplined for signing off on the hijackers’ visas?

    Was there a reason they shouldn’t have had visas?

    Remind me again how many immigration officials he disciplined for losing track of them?

    Remind me how they could possibly have kept track of them. Tell me what methods exist in the USA for tracking people’s movements, and how they are used. I suppose there are no wanted people in America, because as soon as an arrest warrant is issued for someone the police know where they are and pick them up.

    Milhouse (8489b1)


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