Patterico's Pontifications

7/12/2015

Public School Principals Now Wearing Body Cameras

Filed under: General — Dana @ 11:31 am

[guest post by Dana]

As an increasing number of police officers nationwide now wear body cameras while on duty, public school principals in Iowa are also adopting usage of the small clip-on devices:

Burlington Community School District in southeastern Iowa is taking the unusual step of recording parent and student interactions with administrators — a move district officials say will protect both sides.

“It’s personal accountability,” Superintendent Pat Coen told The Des Moines Register. “Did we treat this person with dignity, honor and respect? And if we didn’t, why didn’t we?”

Coen also drew from his experience overseas in the Iowa Army National Guard where soldiers wore helmet cameras:

“You always knew that if you messed up, the whole world got to see you mess up,” Coen said. “It wasn’t so much about catching the other guy, but collecting how we did on the operation and how can we do it better.”

The cameras cost the district $85 each and are capable of recording a date and time stamp and can be turned on and off by the wearer.

However, some disagree with the adoption of the cameras and see it as going a step too far:

Ken Trump of the National School Safety and Security Services called it a “substantial overreach” by school leaders, one he wouldn’t want to see replicated in other districts.

“They’re not in the dark alleys of local streets on the midnight shift,” said Trump, president of the Ohio-based consulting firm. “They’re in school with children.”

He is also concerned about the legal question of private conversations being recorded.

Others see the move as a protection for both administrators and students:

Principal Mark Yeoman of Aldo Leopold Middle School said he was wrongly accused of kicking a student.

A parent had complained about the Burlington school leader’s behavior after he used de-escalation strategies to try to calm down a student. The incident was caught on a school camera, which Yeoman said he reviewed and later showed to the parent.

“They didn’t have to take my word over the child’s word. They were able to see it,” Yeomen said.

Yeoman would like to see even further use of cameras by monitoring students in hallways and in the lunchroom along with monitoring conversations with students and parents.

Over at The Atlantic, in light of several commenters supporting the use of the cameras, Conor Friedersdorf argues that it’s one thing when U.S. soldiers and police officers wear body cameras because they are protecting against deadly outcomes in real life and death situations, thus the benefits outweigh the cost. However, given that the stakes in public schools are typically not as high, the use of them in such a setting is not justified:

These responses illustrate the seductive power of mass surveillance: Before it is adopted, many succumb to the illusion that transparency can solve previously intractable problems. That belief is seldom vindicated. It may be that a school with an unusually severe bullying problem, for example, or rival gangs that are routinely having violent conflicts in the halls might benefit, overall, from transparency. (Though technology in the hands of incompetent administrators is likely to be used incompetently.)

It seems that most American schools, however, lack the levels of danger and crime that would justify relying on body cameras. And the effect of transparency in their hallways and classrooms could more likely divide than unite the communities they serve. Helicopter parents would perhaps constantly second-guess every perceived slight to their children. Administrators and teachers could cease behaving like normal humans and alter their behavior to minimize their chance of being criticized. Students could even cease having normal relationships with teachers and administrators. Maybe adolescents would find humiliations and trivial misbehavior recorded.

In all sorts of ways, the costs of surveillance would probably outweigh the benefits. And that’s why the seemingly inexorable creep of this technology should be resisted—not accepted.

–Dana

89 Responses to “Public School Principals Now Wearing Body Cameras”

  1. Hello.

    Dana (86e864)

  2. like failmerica’s teachertrash needs more help dehumanizing themselves

    happyfeet (831175)

  3. If I were forced to teach common core – I’d strap one on too

    EPWJ (cce27a)

  4. looks like whataburger is choosing its customers very very carefully these days

    losers

    happyfeet (831175)

  5. He is also concerned about the legal question of private conversations being recorded.

    Agents of the State do not have “private conversations” at when doing their jobs.

    askeptic (efcf22)

  6. He is also concerned about the legal question of private conversations being recorded.

    Agents of the State do not have “private
    conversations” at when doing their jobs.

    Um, yes, they certainly do. Ask Patterico.

    Principals certainly need to have private conversations with students, in the course of their jobs. But that’s why the cams come with an off switch.

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  7. How is it that Wataburger can deny people their 2nd Amendment rights but a baker is driven from business for supposedly denying a couple lesbians their rights? Damn, I happen to like Wataburger. Well, no more for me. What could possibly motivate a company to announce stupid political crap like Wataburger and Macy’s have done. If they just shut up and mind their own business they’d be much better off. Now they’ve made enemies of half their customers. What stupidity.

    Rev. Barack Hussein Hoagie (f4eb27)

  8. My goodness Mr. Reverend

    cognitive do you take dissonance to be your lawfully married…. spouse

    happyfeet (831175)

  9. However, some disagree with the adoption of the cameras and see it as going a step too far:

    Merely another manifestation of a culture where growing numbers of parents are reportedly taking the side of their children instead of the adults (ie, people employed by a school) when students have been reprimanded by teachers or principals.

    Mark (aa035f)

  10. How is it that Wataburger can deny people their 2nd Amendment rights

    They are doing no such thing. Nothing in the second amendment says you have to let people carry guns on your property. Nor is there any law forbidding discrimination against gun-carriers. If they don’t want gun-carriers to buy their burgers, that’s their choice, and they will have to get along without that income.

    but a baker is driven from business for supposedly denying a couple lesbians their rights?

    Because in Oregon discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is illegal. In Texas it isn’t, so Wataburger could refuse to serve gay people too, if it liked, except in cities that have banned such discrimination. Texas could ban discrimination against gun-carriers, but it’s unlikely to do so, for the same reason that it’s unlikely to expand its anti-discrimination laws in any other way.

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  11. Somebody recently had a quote from a Roman statesman about having more laws is reflective of a more lawless society, same for monitoring, I guess.
    Obligatory for the thread:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpSNWkYTYNI

    MD in Philly (f9371b)

  12. Milhouse (a04cc3) — 7/12/2015 @ 12:34 pm

    So, it would be permissible and accepted that the Principal would/could turn the camera off when he/she is propositioning a student?

    askeptic (efcf22)

  13. I guess “they” decided to escape Big Brother by becoming him.

    MD in Philly (f9371b)

  14. dang, find myself agreeing with a writer from The Atlantic .

    seriously, isn’t it a valid point that mass surveillance is not the way we want to go?
    Do we really want to live like the neanderthals in “Hominoids” ?

    re #10: Milhouse, i think you might want to rephrase what the Oregon law is.

    seeRpea (187ee2)

  15. They should also have no problem with students and parents wearing body cameras when interacting with administrators.

    Kevin M (25bbee)

  16. 15- In today’s world, that should be considered di rigueur.

    askeptic (efcf22)

  17. 15- In today’s world, that should be considered di rigueur.

    askeptic (efcf22)

  18. If I ever go walking with a gun (unlikely), I’ll wear one too. Where did they get them for $85.00? The one I’m thinking of getting is around #130.00.

    nk (dbc370)

  19. So, it would be permissible and accepted that the Principal would/could turn the camera off when he/she is propositioning a student?

    Um, no, it’s not permissible or accepted for a principal to do anything, or to refrain from doing anything, while propositioning a student. But it would obviously be accepted and expected for the camera to be turned off when having a confidential conversation with a student in the course of the principal’s duties, as every principal needs to do from time to time.

    Do we really want to live like the neanderthals in “Hominoids” ?

    Another Rob Sawyer fan. Rob’s the rare leftist who can (sometimes)
    understand a conservative point of view and treat it fairly, but he’s fundamentally a leftist. I wouldn’t want to live that way, but if David Brin is right a future generation might not see a problem with it, just as our ancestors 500 years ago would not have seen a problem with it.

    re #10: Milhouse, i think you might want to rephrase what the Oregon law is.

    Why?

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  20. If I were a male teacher I would buy my own.

    Mike K (90dfdc)

  21. nk, check these guys out, they might have something that fits your needs/wallet…..

    askeptic (efcf22)

  22. They are doing no such thing.

    Yes, they are Milhouse. Wataburger is denying a citizen the right to carry on their property. They may be able by law to do so but it’s still forcing a customer to choose the free exercise of their rights or non entry to Wataburger.

    Nothing in the second amendment says you have to let people carry guns on your property.

    Now isn’t that silly? There is nothing in the 2nd amendment that says you don’t have to let them carry guns either. Sometimes I think you argue just to hear yourself type.

    Rev. Barack Hussein Hoagie (f4eb27)

  23. When I taught college courses I assumed, and behaved as if, 50 cameras were on me at all times. Because they were.

    And no student was going to record anything unless it worked to my disadvantage. So when students would make things up to complain about, as virtually always happens, there was never any video or audio evidence and I would always point that out: if I am as bad as this person says I am, and this person or any other can record me without my knowledge at any time, then why did no one ever do so?

    It wasn’t a bullet-proof argument, but it got me through until I didn’t have to teach any more.

    Gabriel Hanna (10a7c3)

  24. Given that any adult accused of doing anything untoward to a child is guilty as charged before the first words of defense can be uttered, this is an entirely rational and intelligent response.

    We do not have the backs of anyone in the schools. It is never the parents fault and the special snowflakes are essentially immune from examination. Like sooooo many have said when objections to video surveillance are raised, “What are you afraid of if you don’t do anything wrong?”

    Having video evidence of any given interaction ensures that an innocent principal or teacher or janitor or whatever can prove it. Good for them.

    This all does beg a question. Why aren’t all schools wired to the teeth as a matter of course? It’s about the saaaaaaaaafety of our chilllllllldren, isn’t it? Hahahahahahaha.

    The pushback is not about academic concerns about privacy. Nuh uh. They are all about the potential that we will see just what really does go on. I promise you our society does not want to deal with that headache. Ostriches all.

    Ed from SFV (3400a5)

  25. it’s a bad precedent hear me now belieber me later

    happyfeet (831175)

  26. I imagine that the Texans carrying AR16s into restaurants, just because they could, might have harmed their own cause. In general, rules happen because someone was an ahole in their absence.

    Kevin M (25bbee)

  27. dad never went into luby’s without his gun

    him and everybody else

    pikachus munch peaceably on their tasty fish sticks only cause rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf

    this is what i learned that the sleazy progressive whataburger sluts did not

    happyfeet (831175)

  28. 26. imagine that the Texans carrying AR16s into restaurants, just because they could, might have harmed their own cause. In general, rules happen because someone was an ahole in their absence.

    Kevin M (25bbee) — 7/12/2015 @ 4:21 pm

    Most Texans who want this Jim Crow law repealed are royally pissed at these clowns.

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  29. What is an “AR16″?

    askeptic (efcf22)

  30. I’m going to be a movie camera for halloween.
    With a film at 11.

    mg (31009b)

  31. AR stands for Armalite Rifle

    unlike the K-Y in Johnson & Johnson’s K-Y jelly

    which doesn’t stand for anything

    not a goddamn thing

    happyfeet (831175)

  32. “What is an “AR16″?”

    A cross between an M16 and an AR15 in somebody’s mind.

    Mike K (90dfdc)

  33. It’s Whataburger, not Wataburger, and it makes a great burger. Time will tell but management may change this policy in some regions if it gets hit with a boycott, as I think it may. Burger chain profit margins are too thin to let that continue.

    DRJ (1dff03)

  34. MD in Philly (f9371b) — 7/12/2015 @ 1:03 pm
    That’s right, doc. G.K. Chesterton once remarked ( I paraphrase): “If man will not be governed by ten laws, he will be governed by ten thousand laws.

    felipe (56556d)

  35. waterburger lol

    happyfeet (831175)

  36. @ Mike K: My thought exactly: For self-defense. And I’d download the backups daily, and preserve them until after all potential criminal and civil statutes of limitations had run. Maybe forever.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  37. Anyone who has a conversation with me, or interacts with me, in any setting, has no legitimate expectation of privacy from me. If my eyeballs can see it and my ears can hear it, I’m entitled to document it.

    Beldar (fa637a)

  38. 37. Anyone who has a conversation with me, or interacts with me, in any setting, has no legitimate expectation of privacy from me. If my eyeballs can see it and my ears can hear it, I’m entitled to document it.

    Beldar (fa637a) — 7/12/2015 @ 6:37 pm

    1) the literal definition of overt versus covert
    2)why I knew the administration was lying about Benghazi as we don’t hide consulates
    3)I just did five burpees which means
    a)not bad for a 52y.o. guy
    b)kill me now

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  39. This whole endeavor begs any number of questions:

    * If can parents request to see video recordings of their kids at any time?
    * Are they informed when their child is being, or will be recorded?
    * What, if any right, does the school have to use the recordings to support discipline of suspension and/or expulsion?
    * Will parents be informed that these recordings will become part of their student’s permanent record and as such, they are legally able to have copies made of the recordings just as would with any other item in their student’s file?
    * Can a parent said recording(s) in any court proceeding that might result, whether charges against their student or against the teacher/principal?
    * Also, given that students have a right to a reasonable expectation of privacy at school, who is going to be monitoring any violations?
    * If students are minors, will parents have to sign off and give their permission for their student to be recorded (just like they would if their student wants to ride a bike to school or stay for after-school programs)?

    Dana (86e864)

  40. Should be: Can parents request to see video recordings of their kids at any time?

    Dana (86e864)

  41. It’s Whataburger, not Wataburger, and it makes a great burger. Time will tell but management may change this policy in some regions if it gets hit with a boycott, as I think it may. Burger chain profit margins are too thin to let that continue.
    It may make a difference in the final result that Whataburger is prohibiting only open carry. The CEO statement says holders of CCW licenses are welcome to bring their guns as long as they are not openly displayed. They are not aiming for a gun free zone.

    kishnevi (91d5c6)

  42. It wasn’t legal to have open carry in Texas in the past, but it will be in January 2016. Until then, the only legal way for non-LEO to carry a gun is with a concealed carry permit. As the name implies, concealed carry means you can’t see any gun. Thus, Whataburger wants to continue the appearance of a gun free zone. Whataburger has the right to make the rules for its restaurants but I suspect this won’t sit well with some Texans, while others will like it. It will likely vary depending on the location of the store.

    It’s not easy being in business these days.

    DRJ (1dff03)

  43. preserve them until after all potential criminal and civil statutes of limitations had run. Maybe forever.

    When I was still doing surgery, laparoscopic surgery allowed us to videotape the operation. I taped all my cases and kept the tapes for 30 days to be sure there was no post-op problem, then I offered the tape to the patient. If they did not want it, about 1/3, I kept them. Before I retired I did about 1500 laparoscopic cases and had about 500 tapes. Since then, hospitals on advice of their attorneys I’m told, have banned taping which I think is really stupid.

    Early in our experience, about 1988, a little kid took the tape of his appendectomy to school to share.

    Mike K (90dfdc)

  44. Also, a cardiac surgeon of my acquaintance taped the consent interview with the family on every case. He told me that he had had people deny being told something even when it was on the tape. Selective hearing, no doubt.

    Mike K (90dfdc)

  45. Body cams are not even necessarily a good idea for cops.

    For instance: cop pulls over teen drivers for a minor violation. The kid or a friend has a beer can, but none are drunk, or perhaps there is a half a joint visible in the ashtray, even though there was no evidence the driver was impaired in any way.

    Before the body cam, an officer might dump the beer or crumble the joint in the ditch, admonish the kids, and let them go with a stern warning he’d be watching for them. With the cam, he has little choice but to run them in, or face accusations.

    Estragon (ada867)

  46. When I make scrambled eggs sometimes a little bit of eggshell cracks off and it’s very hard to fish out and sometimes I don’t even see it and then I get a forkful of egg that crunches.

    nk (dbc370)

  47. I suspect one beneficiary of the open-carry law is the concealed carry guy whose weapon prints inadvertently.

    Richard Aubrey (f6d8de)

  48. AR16 is a typo. Sorry. If you hadn’t noticed, I do that a lot. But feel free to make fun of it rather than deal with the fact that only jerks take rifles into restaurants.

    Kevin M (25bbee)

  49. I’m thinking that if Jesus was asked about this, He would give some return question or semi-tangential response to the effect of saying,
    “Do you people realize how messed up your society has become? Become a virtuous people and this won’t be an issue, stay on course of being self-centered, vengeful, and greedy and you’ll need more than body-cams.”

    There will soon be a whole new industry of manipulating body-cam data.

    MD in Philly (f9371b)

  50. Never apologize, Kevin, it’s a sign of weakness. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ArmaLite_AR-16

    Everybody and his mother has read a couple of gun magazines and is all of a sudden an expert. The AR-15 was a marketing label at some point of the military-style semi-auto fad starting in the early ’80s. The military called it the M16 and now it’s the M4. And can you tell me why the new Camaros have the Firebird hood? It’s very confusing until you see the emblem.

    nk (dbc370)

  51. Ok, “Colt AR-15″ is the registered trademark of the civilian, semi-auto version of the M16, marketed by Colt in 1963.

    nk (dbc370)

  52. As long as it’s a voluntary thing (peer pressure alone will probably push for full acceptance, granted), it’s not an unreasonable idea. I personally would want it, given today’s female victimization culture — some young girl gets it into her head to make a false accusation against an official she doesn’t like, and boom, that person is in deep doo-doo unless they have lots and lots of fans in both the school and the admin. The girl’s accusation is going to be taken as 100% valid and it will be up to the official to prove their innocence — which is going to be virtually impossible without a camera.

    Having individuals acting in an official capacity monitored is not a bad idea in and of itself.

    And as long as students are aware of the monitoring there should be no reasonable concern with the possibility of “private” conversations being recorded — esp. if they aren’t shared outside the official’s “personal domain of significant interests” (there’s a term that probably should become the etiquette for this… anything recorded that does not need to be revealed to others for personal protection/liability needs should not be. And scanning through inadvertently recorded stuff for “gossipy” details should also be discouraged)

    IGotBupkis, "Si tacuisses, philosophus mansisses." (225d0d)

  53. How long until average people find it necessary to record everything? Wouldn’t it be better to, I dunno, stop with the legal escalations?

    Kevin M (25bbee)

  54. And can you tell me why the new Camaros have the Firebird hood?

    Because there are no new Firebirds?

    Kevin M (25bbee)

  55. Trans Am, whatever. See?

    nk (dbc370)

  56. Of course you realize that like emails, incriminating tapes will be “disappeared” if need be.( See Clinton, Hillary and Lerner, Lois.)

    But like the fake cop sitting in the otherwise empty police car along the highway, the presence of a clip- on body camera may slow some people down or cause them to reconsider their behavior.

    elissa (1fa22f)

  57. They are doing no such thing.

    Yes, they are Milhouse. Wataburger is denying a citizen the right to carry on their property.

    Nobody has a right to carry on someone else’s property without the owner’s permission. While you are a guest in someone’s home you have no more right to carry a gun than you do to smoke or to criticize his taste in furniture. The only right you retain when you are on private property is the right to leave unmolested.

    Nothing in the second amendment says you have to let people carry guns on your property.

    Now isn’t that silly? There is nothing in the 2nd amendment that says you don’t have to let them carry guns either.

    You’re the one claiming Whataburger is “denying people their 2nd Amendment rights”; the onus is on you to show how the 2nd amendment gives people such a right. I don’t need any proof that you don’t have to let people do things on your property; that is the default state.

    Sometimes I think you argue just to hear yourself type.

    Again with the personal attacks? Maybe you should look in the mirror, since you are the one being illogical and untruthful.

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  58. I imagine that the Texans carrying AR16s into restaurants, just because they could, might have harmed their own cause.

    On the contrary, they’re what pushed the legislature to legalize open carry.

    Most Texans who want this Jim Crow law repealed are royally pissed at these clowns.

    What Jim Crow law?

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  59. The girl’s accusation is going to be taken as 100% valid and it will be up to the official to prove their innocence — which is going to be virtually impossible without a camera.

    What is a good indicator of the current culture is the fact that “mattress girl” made her own porno film to try to establish her rape story.

    Mike K (90dfdc)

  60. Well, Whataburger HQ can make a policy, but will the stores enforce it? If someone shows up with cash in hand and gun in holster, will the store manager really tell them to take their money somewhere else? Or offer them an apron to conceal that nasty gun from sight?

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  61. The real benefit of open carry being legal is that if someone’s shirt should God forbid ride up and reveal the holster underneath it, or if it should get wet and the holster become visible, and some hoplophobic person has a fit and calls 911, the police can tell them to get over it and not bother the person who is not threatening them in any way.

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  62. Milhouse at 58

    From the original link supplied by Mr. Feets.

    Atkinson’s letter comes one month after Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signed a bill that made it legal to carry handguns openly on the streets of the nation’s second most-populous state, ending a prohibition dating back to the post-Civil War era that disarmed former Confederate soldiers and freed slaves.

    kishnevi (870883)

  63. @58, blacks couldn’t carry guns. It wasn’t an issue before the civil war.

    Is this hard to figure out?

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  64. Long guns could be carried openly and without a permit for a pretty long while now. The new open carry law is for handguns.

    nk (dbc370)

  65. When those Comanches come charging down Main Street, you need a lot of firepower and a mid-size concealable pistol just won’t carry the day.

    nk (dbc370)

  66. Most Texans who want this Jim Crow law repealed are royally pissed at these clowns.

    What Jim Crow law?

    @58, blacks couldn’t carry guns.

    1. It’s already been repealed. So what do you mean about Texans who want it repealed, and why are they pissed off at those who’ve been making a show of open carry?

    2. It wasn’t a Jim Crow law; it applied equally to blacks and whites, as the article says, “a prohibition dating back to the post-Civil War era that disarmed former Confederate soldiers and freed slaves.” Also, Jim Crow laws generally come from the “progressive” era, not the post-Civil-War era. (Yet another way in which the “Progressives” ruined the halfway-decent America they found.)

    Milhouse (7d5ad7)

  67. @66, oh, ok.

    Now that we’ve disposed of the left overs of Jim Crow and the symbolism of the Confederacy, I wish to ask a more daring question. What of the swastika?

    It’s not as an open and shut question as one would think. The Nazis didn’t invent it. It was an ancient symbol of good luck that the appropriated.

    A Jewish student at George Washington University ran up against this.

    http://reason.com/blog/2015/04/28/gwu-student-suspended-investigated-for-a

    …What did this Jewish student do to get himself kicked out of classes and trigger an anti-Jewish hate crime kerfuffle? He tried to start a conversation about the swastika, which actually predates German Nazism and is a symbol of good luck in other cultures. He placed an Indian swastika on a campus bulletin board, and remained nearby to talk about the image with members of his residence hall…

    Actually the swastika is a symbol of good luck even in our culture, to the degree it hasn’t been wiped out. You’ll find it on Anglo Saxon swords and 1930s Army fighter biplanes.

    In other countries, especially in Asia, you’ll see it on maps as the designator for Buddhist temples. And they’re totally dumbfounded to hear it’s outlawed as a symbol of hate in other places.

    It always seemed a form of surrender to let the Nazis have the final say about the swastika. It was never theirs.

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  68. I was shopping online for necessities.

    http://himalayan-imports.com/khuk1.html

    It’s a wheel. And the swastika, I was taught, was a shorthand symbol for a sun wheel.

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  69. Just so you know, Milhouse there were other laws that disarmed former Confederates.

    http://www.pope-young.org/information/heritage.asp

    …At the conclusion of the Civil War in 1865, two Confederate soldiers-brothers Will and Maurice Thompson-returned to their homeland of northern Georgia.The arduous journey on foot was complicated and slowed by Maurice’s wounds (shot in the chest a year prior). Like much of the rest of Georgia, they found their old family plantation destroyed and in ruins. Without means to make a livelihood, stripped of their rights to own firearms by government regulation, and with Maurice advised by doctors to live in the open air for the benefit of his permanently injured lung, the brothers took to the woods. They turned to the bow and arrow as their means of survival…

    I suppose my affection for the bow and arrow makes me a racist.

    Sigh.

    I can hardly wait until the SJWs get around to the sling shot.

    Point being the Texas law was not necessary for that purpose.

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  70. Also, I want to go on record early to nominate Islam as THE world’s easiest religion to hijack.

    Funny how that is.

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  71. The Burlington school district is in Iowa, which is a single-party consent state (I just started doing process service as a part-time job). If the principal wants to record his conversations, that’s between him & the school district. I don’t forsee a problem unless he starts using the video for any use other than administrative self-defense.

    Russ from Winterset (4335ca)

  72. It always seemed a form of surrender to let the Nazis have the final say about the swastika. It was never theirs.

    I agree. It depends on the context, of course. When a swastika is spray-painted on a wall, it wasn’t the work of a Jain spreading goodwill. And so long as we still have survivors we must be sensitive to their feelings. But it’s also necessary to educate ignorant people about it.

    Milhouse (7d5ad7)

  73. Just so you know, Milhouse there were other laws that disarmed former Confederates.

    Yes, and this was one of them. It long predates the Jim Crow era. In any case, though, it’s gone, and good riddance, so I didn’t understand you to be referring to it.

    Milhouse (7d5ad7)

  74. Also, I want to go on record early to nominate Islam as THE world’s easiest religion to hijack.

    I don’t know. Paul found it was very easy to hijack Christianity. And ISIS and the Wahabis aren’t hijacking Islam, they’re bringing it back to its blood-soaked roots.

    Milhouse (7d5ad7)

  75. 73. …It long predates the Jim Crow era. In any case, though, it’s gone, and good riddance, so I didn’t understand you to be referring to it.

    Milhouse (7d5ad7) — 7/13/2015 @ 12:24 pm

    I’m curious when you start your clock.

    Considering I start my Jim Crow clock during reconstruction I don’t see how an 1873 law can “long predate” it.

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  76. Here’s a US Army biplane from what appears to be the 1920s proudly displaying the swastika.

    http://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/media/images/78463000/jpg/_78463616_aircraft624.jpg

    How could you know then that some ancient, benign symbol was going to later be the emblem of evil?

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  77. Considering I start my Jim Crow clock during reconstruction I don’t see how an 1873 law can “long predate” it.

    Surely after reconstruction, at the earliest. But I usually think of Jim Crow as a “Progressive” policy.

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  78. How could you know then that some ancient, benign symbol was going to later be the emblem of evil?

    And how can you know now what symbol some future evil might adopt?

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  79. The Nazi Party, with the swastika as its symbol, was founded in 1920. Who is flying that biplane? Charles Lindbergh?

    nk (dbc370)

  80. @78 that’s kinda the point.

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  81. @79, and Hitler was jailed when?

    I’m not thinking that everybody had our 21st century sensibilities all worked out by 1925 or 1928.

    That the swastika was now and forever the symbol of a genocide that, by the way, hadn’t started yet.

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  82. swastikas are stale

    we need a new genocide symbol for what obama wants to do on israel with his persian butt buddy friends

    we should have a contest

    happyfeet (831175)

  83. Just so you know Mr. feets I did seven burpees tonight.

    Not the half a$$ed kind. Seven good burpees. I did a couple of the half a$$ed kind and was sort of ashamed.

    I think America’s need to do burpees is directly proportional to Prom Queen’s need to open embassies in Havana.

    Steve57 (4c9797)

  84. you’re a campion

    i’m a morning guy but when I get home and I can’t do crossfit-type movements at all

    Cuba smells like pee

    happyfeet (831175)

  85. oopsers I mean *champion*

    happyfeet (831175)

  86. u can tell the sleeper pills are already hitting

    happyfeet (831175)

  87. @78 that’s kinda the point.

    Yes, I know. I’m vigorously agreeing with you.

    Milhouse (a04cc3)

  88. I work in this district as teacher and I can say this is only being done for liability reasons, and when the first email came out it was going be turned all time but when we started asking about public records requests and how this would effect evaluations it got pared down in a hurry. Its going to be a giant mess once the lawyers get involved.

    And that $85 dollars number is just the cost per unit we have seen no data on how many are getting bought how long data will be storied or how much data storage will cost.

    no one (0956e9)

  89. When you click on the picture in the article and zoom in, you can see it’s a Scorpion camera. Click on the hyperlink in the article and it takes you to the scorpion website, where you can buy a camera for $95. When you search for Scorpion on Amazon you find a similar camera for $45. It’s likely that they’re both made in china in the same factory anyhow.
    2GB SD card, 2 hr max battery life. Even if you buy a bunch, it seems like a better deal than the $25 and $55 /mo solutions by Vievu for cops. Or, buy a laptop for $189 (Win8.1 w/ Bing), swing it around and point the webcam at the classroom – no data to move, plugged in all day, take it home until you need it in court. Encode camera output into a video with free Microsoft Expressions Encoder, adding the webcam as a live source. 640×480 ought to be good enough since identities won’t be in dispute, just allegations of physical contact. Audio hardly affects file size. Use autohotkey to script and automate, and schedule, if desired. I wouldn’t step into a classroom without it.

    A teacher (a67b77)


Powered by WordPress.

Page loaded in: 0.3379 secs.