Patterico's Pontifications

3/25/2015

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl To Face Charges (Added: Administration Comments On Bergdahl)

Filed under: General — Dana @ 8:11 pm



[guest post by Dana]

The Army is charging Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl with desertion and “misbehavior before the enemy”:

The charges were announced by the service at Fort Bragg, N.C., hours after the 28-year-old was handed a charge sheet, according to one of his attorneys. Bergdahl will next face a preliminary Article 32 hearing, which is frequently compared to a grand jury proceeding in civilian court.

If convicted, he faces the possibility of life in prison.

The Army’s decision comes after nearly 10 months of debate about whether Bergdahl should face charges and about the circumstances of his recovery. Critics — and an independent review by the Government Accountability Office — said President Obama broke the law in authorizing the release of five Taliban detainees held by the United States in exchange for Bergdahl without consulting Congress. Others have insisted that Washington had a responsibility to bring Bergdahl home by any means necessary.

As you recall, in 2014, the administration released five high-risk and dangerous Taliban leaders in exchange for Bergdahl.

The five Taliban leaders have been living the good life in an exclusive neighborhood in Doha, Qatar with their families as part of the agreement with the United States. They are to remain there for one year.

Sadly for us, not all five are happy with their lot in life:

Reports are circulating among senior Taliban commanders that at least two of them are eager to leave Qatar and return to the war zone. The reunion could get ugly. One of the reputed malcontents, Mullah Fazl Akhund, was head of the Taliban regime’s army until his capture during the 2001 U.S.-led invasion. Senior Taliban members say he’s convinced he should lead the insurgency. He regards Mullah Akhtar Muhammad Mansour, the current chief of the group’s ruling council, as a usurper. One senior commander says members of Mansour’s circle, trying to head off a power struggle, have warned Western intelligence that Fazl is likely to join ISIS if he’s allowed to leave Qatar.

For some reason, tonight when the major broadcast networks were reporting on the Bergdahl charges, they chose not to mention that back in June, 2014, Susan Rice insisted that Bergdahl “served with honor and distinction” and told Americans not to worry about the five Taliban members being a threat to the Unite States:

“assurances relating to the movement, the activities, the monitoring of those detainees [released in exchange for Bergdahl] give us confidence that they cannot and, in all likelihood, will not pose a significant risk to the United States. And that it is in our national interests that this transfer had been made.”

(Formal apologies should be offered immediately to Bergdahl’s fellow soldiers who were accused of lying and being psychopaths when they claimed Bergdahl had deserted. The White House should go first, leading by example.)

ADDED: Megyn Kelly asked Jen Psaki tonight whether the Bergdahl exchange had been worth it:

“Was it worth it? Absolutely,” Jen Psaki told Megyn Kelly on “The Kelly File.” “We have a commitment to our men and women serving in the military, defending our national security every day, that we’re going to do everything to bring them home if we can, and that’s what we did in this case.”

I was disappointed that Kelly did not point-blank ask Psaki when Bergdahl’s fellow soldiers can expect an apology from the White House for smearing them. I hope in the next few days we see media outlets boldly put the question to the White House. After all, don’t those who really do “serve with honor and distinction” deserve that respect from their Commander in Chief?

–Dana

53 Responses to “Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl To Face Charges (Added: Administration Comments On Bergdahl)”

  1. Hello.

    Dana (86e864)

  2. He just went out to catch some fresh air

    steveg (794291)

  3. I can’t help but wonder whether Ms. Rice just doesn’t wash her hair or do those straightening chemicals render it board stiff.

    DNF (8028c5)

  4. Given Bergdahl is now charged with desertion, what constitutes serving the country “with honor and distinction” in Susan Rice’s mind?

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  5. On loudmouth talk radio today (what other kind is there, both left and right) I heard Susan Rice described as the most incompetent civil servant in the history of the United States. They didn’t mention that she’s a danged good liar–or at least aspires to be a successful bold faced liar.

    They also said that Susan Rice was so far divorced from reality, that reality should be paying her alimony.

    Other than that, they thought she was a peach of a person.

    Skeptical Voter (3f753e)

  6. I’ve added psychopaths to the list of what Bergdahl’s fellow soldiers had been labeled…

    Dana (86e864)

  7. 4. Given Bergdahl is now charged with desertion, what constitutes serving the country “with honor and distinction” in Susan Rice’s mind?

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0) — 3/25/2015 @ 8:30 pm

    All I know is, I spent 20 years not doing it.

    Steve57 (99eaf2)

  8. I recall the PotUS doing a ‘spike the football’ ceremony at the Rose Garden when the deserter was back and the MSM types (yes, them) reacting “Are you freaking out of your mind?”

    The PotUS is not going to hear about the courtmartial for awhile yet, he is too busy ducking the head of NATO.

    seeRpea (c1462d)

  9. “[L]ong on psychopaths and short on leadership.” That’s a pretty fair description of the Obama presidency.

    nk (dbc370)

  10. Come on, guys. You know when she said “served with honor and distinction” she meant reality was that he “served with dishonor and without distinction”.

    And of course the man with the Minus Touch is ducking, lest he hear more bad news before it hits the newspapers.

    htom (4ca1fa)

  11. ADDED: Megyn Kelly asked Jen Psaki tonight whether the Bergdahl exchange had been worth it:

    “Was it worth it? Absolutely,” Jen Psaki told Megyn Kelly on “The Kelly File.” “We have a commitment to our men and women serving in the military, defending our national security every day, that we’re going to do everything to bring them home if we can, and that’s what we did in this case.”

    I was disappointed that Kelly did not point-blank ask Psaki when Bergdahl’s fellow soldiers can expect an apology from the White House for smearing them. I hope in the next few days we see media outlets boldly put the question to the White House. After all, don’t those who really do “serve with honor and distinction” deserve that respect from their Commander in Chief?

    Dana (86e864)

  12. WH instructions to military personnel attending official parties:

    To Serve with Honor and Distinction: Be on time, wear white gloves of course, neatly pressed uniform, place towel in crook of right elbow, balance serving tray on right hand, load drinks on tray with left hand, discretely wind through crowd offering glasses, retrieve empty glasses, repeat until party is over. If you’re still sober, then you’ve done the deed with distinction, and if you don’t steal the silverware, then we can add honor to appellation.

    bobathome (ef0d3a)

  13. i find myself in the strange position of agreeing with the NYT, who said there was little support for seeing the traitor do much prison time.

    redc1c4 (b340a6)

  14. After all, don’t those who really do “serve with honor and distinction” deserve that respect from their Commander in Chief?

    Yes.

    Don’t hold you breath waiting for this White House to do the right thing.

    Bill M (906260)

  15. Since freaking when is desertion in an area of frequent battles with the enemy not punishable by death?

    My reading of the UCMJ says it absolutely is applicable.

    Can a court override a prosecution charging and/or sentencing recommendation? I can totally see an Obama JAG office refusing to prefer the precise charges which do trigger a potential death penalty. Can anyone in here speak to this?

    Ed from SFV (3400a5)

  16. The fat dope at fox will tell Kelly what to say and when. How cable news holds it’s viewers is beyond me.

    mg (31009b)

  17. 16. Why? Options in life can become severely restricted at points.

    DNF (8028c5)

  18. 15. One gloss heard on the aforementioned Fox was we never declared war on the Taliban activating the death penalty.

    DNF (8028c5)

  19. #15:

    I am a Marine Corps Judge Advocate and have some time as a trial counsel (what we in the Military call prosecutors).

    Here’s the deal; desertion in a time of war CAN be punishable by death but the charge sheet must so state. Therefore, without the “death” penalty language on the charge sheet, the maximum punishment reverts to life in prison.

    A court, military judge, or the members (what we call jurors) cannot override this. It is a command decision by the commanding general who convened the court martial.

    Ryan (60001b)

  20. it wasn’t a serious military endeavor he deserted from just afghanistan so life in prison seems kind of excessive

    happyfeet (831175)

  21. The fat dope at fox will tell [Megyn] Kelly what to say and when. How cable news holds it’s viewers is beyond me.

    mg (31009b) — 3/26/2015 @ 2:35 am

    Better get an eye exam, mg… how this particular cable news show holds its viewers is fairly obvious!

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  22. Do not care Col. – Lawyers with boobs doing a gig for money turned me off years ago.
    Which channel wears the highest and tightest skirts? I love the female body, but I don’t need it with my news.
    Long live radio.

    mg (31009b)

  23. megyn kelly has a no-nonsense attitude and smartness in her head

    that said, cable news is a sadness

    happyfeet (831175)

  24. the military pretty much HAS to prosecute the deserter.

    regular GI’s that siply go AWOL routinely get the book thrown at them, to include a Big Chicken Dinner.

    if they don’t prosecute this scum bag, and give him a fairly steep sentence, the next GI to face heavy penalties for AWOL/UA/what ever they are calling it today can have his defense lawyer argue that his offense was less than Bowe’s, and he got off, so how can you throw the book at my client? the court wouldn’t have much of a response to that other than “yeah, you have a point.” and that would be it for punishing such violations. if there isn’t a price for not showing up, people won’t.

    i ran this scenario by a buy i served with, who is a lawyer IRL, and who retired as a full bird. he agreed with me and said that if he was a defense lawyer in such a case, would make that very argument.

    i’m sure Obola doesn’t want him tried, let alone convicted, but he can only ignore reality so much.

    redc1c4 (cf3b04)

  25. I was disappointed that Kelly did not point-blank ask Psaki when Bergdahl’s fellow soldiers can expect an apology from the White House for smearing them. I hope in the next few days we see media outlets boldly put the question to the White House. After all, don’t those who really do “serve with honor and distinction” deserve that respect from their Commander in Chief?
    Dana (86e864) — 3/25/2015 @ 9:34 pm

    Or that she did not ask point blank when would the 5 soldiers killed looking for Bergdahl be given their freedom like the 5 Taliban were.

    We know the father of one of them. It is sad this has to come up repeatedly for them to deal with.

    MD in Philly (not in Philly at the moment) (deca84)

  26. Ryan @ 19,

    What do you think about the likelihood of an honorable discharge based on this from the NYT?

    But it still remains uncertain whether Sergeant Bergdahl will be court-martialed, the Defense Department official said.

    Another question is whether the Army will give Sergeant Bergdahl an honorable discharge if he is found guilty of desertion. For members of the military, an honorable discharge is no small matter, and not getting one can hinder not only a veteran’s job prospects, but the entirety of how a service memberlook back on his or her career.

    Dana (86e864)

  27. Remember when the press was trying to get George Bush to admit he’d made some mistakes? Whatever happened to those guys?

    Joe Miller (64cdc0)

  28. On Fox & Friends Early this morning, they said that there was no plea bargain being considered, whch means that there will be a plea bargain considered. SGT Bergdahl will have an Article 32 hearing, to determine if he will face a court martial.

    Best guess? He will be separated from the Army, with a less-than-honorable discharge, and forfeture of benefits, but no time n the stockade. They have to do something to him, but the last thing that the civilian leadership want is for this case to linger, and this gets it over and done with, quickly.

    The serious Dana (f6a568)

  29. But it still remains uncertain whether Sergeant Bergdahl will be court-martialed, the Defense Department official said.

    Oh, hell, the US military (along with other federal agencies, particularly the IRS or EPA) is still determining whether a special day should be set aside to honor Nidal Hassan. Actually, such a scenario is no more repulsive than a special day to honor the guy now in the White House.

    The US entered its twilight years starting around November 2008, and, American voters, your wisdom and great decisionmaking skills will be long remembered.

    Mark (c160ec)

  30. Anybody who thinks Megyn Kelly presses the elevator button without a script …. Intelligence and insight are not the ahem assets she brought to her ahem position at Fox.

    nk (9faaca)

  31. … and this gets it over and done with, quickly.

    So would a bullet and I am available.

    Hoagie (58a3ec)

  32. A former Army soldier volunteered:

    … and this gets it over and done with, quickly.

    So would a bullet and I am available.

    Dear Mr Hoagie:

    The Department of the Army thanks you for your interest in this case, and appreciates your willingness to serve in the capacity offered.

    However, the Department believes that it would be in the better interests of all concerned if we simply allowed SGT Bergdahl to be separated from the Army, where, as a civilian, he can pursue his dreams of running for Congress as a Democrat.

    Sincerely, General Raymond T. Odierno, USA

    General Raymond T. Odierno, Chief of Staff, Unted States Army (f6a568)

  33. My daughter has to do a presentation on the biography of a notable American. She picked … Chris Kyle, and is reading American Sniper. I was not consulted, honest. It was her own decision. Yesss!

    nk (9faaca)

  34. “Anybody who thinks Megyn Kelly presses the elevator button without a script …. Intelligence and insight are not the ahem assets she brought to her ahem position at Fox.”

    – nk

    What? No. Megyn Kelly is far from my favorite person in the world, but she strikes me as pretty intelligent.

    Leviticus (f9a067)

  35. Well General, even with a dishonorable discharge he’d be one of the few Democrats in Congress who served. However, his character would fit right in with that of the party.

    Hoagie (58a3ec)

  36. Greetings:

    For a while now, the “Leave No Man Behind” (LNMB) concept has been a bit of a burr under my cerebral saddle. It seems to have a great deal of resonance, especially with military and former military webizens. Recently, I re-read Mark Bowden’s “Black Hawk Down” about the “Battle of the Black Sea” in Mogadishu, Somalia in the early part of President Clinton’s first term and that reading brought forward in what’s left of my mind a concern about what’s involved in that concept and its implications for today’s soldiers.

    Admittedly, it has been a long time since my military service. That was back when the draft didn’t have anything to do with ventilation. So, I have no direct experience of today’s volunteer military. But, be that as it may, I am concerned that LNMB seems to be progressing from a mantra to something approaching a fetish and I worry about its impact on our troops.

    When I went off to see what kind of an infantryman I could be, dying wasn’t my largest fear. My father had survived his infantry stint in WW II and I fancied myself as good a man as he. And, as a twenty year old, my sense of mortality was in its earliest stage of development. My greatest fear, by far, was being crippled. Secondarily, it was failing in my duties. Subsequently, when I became a squad leader, which was somewhat after I was made a squad leader, I bumped up against the LNMB concept big time. And it’s the resonance of that emotional experience that has me concerned.

    Even at the mantra end of the spectrum, LNMB seems so terse as to be almost mindless. I have to wonder if there is some super-secret calculus that I failed to apprehend. I mean, are our troops all committed to dying lest one get left behind? While “Black Hawk Down” may be the exception rather than the rule, my take on it is that its “Lost Convoy” is an adequate example as to how very wrong military thinking can go when it is overly influenced by such thinking.

    (For those unfamiliar with “Black Hawk Down”, the “Lost Convoy” was supposed to remove the American soldiers from Mogadishu after their raid. When the first Black Hawk was shot down, the convoy was diverted to the crash site and was exposed to heavy enemy fire while trying to follow radio directions. It ended up returning to base without ever reaching the crash site but with very heavy casualties.)

    At the other end of the spectrum and in spite of all the technology, efforts, and bravery, American soldiers were tragically left behind at the second helicopter crash site.

    Thus the crux of my concern, has LNMB become some kind of unit macho fetish as opposed to say, and this will sound trite, an organizational goal? Has it become a too easy answer to too difficult problems? Are we setting our soldiers up for failure or worse by allowing LNMB too much of their and their superiors mindshare. Hopefully, nobody wants to leave anyone behind but isn’t more complex thinking better than relying on slogans?

    11B40 (844d04)

  37. I’d almost bet on no time in the stockade, but would insist on a dishonorable discharge, reduction in rank to E-1 and forfeiture of all pay. Anything less than that is simply unacceptable to this (and I suspect most other) veterans. If there was justice in the world, the apparent circumstances of Bergdahl’s ‘disappearance’ would warrant a much more severe punishment. (Drawing and Quartering comes to mind fleetingly but hanging is cleaner and just as effective.) Remember, at least five better men lost their lives unnecessarily while hunting for him.

    A dishonorable is equivalent to a felony in the civilian world and is a stain he would carry for the rest of his miserable life (though somehow I doubt he has the moral scruples for it to bother him much).

    Bill M (906260)

  38. Somebody grew a pair? He should’ve been tossed in the brig as soon as they got their hands on him, quickly tried and duly shot for cowardice and desertion under fire.

    But that’s just my opinion.

    mojo (a3d457)

  39. Damn sure is, 11B40.

    Hoagie (58a3ec)

  40. In the old days if they sent me to get him I would have tried like hell to get his lifeless body back. But most likely not.

    Hoagie (58a3ec)

  41. Is he going by “Chelsea” now?

    Jack Klompus (b76262)

  42. I had forgotten about this.

    Dana (87306f)

  43. Dana @26:

    If he’s convicted at a general court-martial (GCM) he could get a dishonorable discharge, the most severe discharge an enlisted service member may receive. But, it still remains to be seen if the case goes to GCM.

    The first step is the military’s Article 32 procedure (comparable, but not really similar, to civilian grand juries). At the Article 32, the preliminary hearing officer will make a recommendation to the convening authority (the general brining the charges) as to how best to dispose of the case. He could recommend to go forward with a GCM all the way down to do nothing at all.

    In all likelihood, I could see this case getting a plea deal where the Sgt agrees to plead guilty, gets very little time in the brig, and leaves with either an other than honorable discharge or a bad conduct discharge (but not a dishonorable discharge).

    I don’t see an honorable discharge. That’s just my prediction though.

    Ryan (f63f4e)

  44. 11B40 wrote:

    Thus the crux of my concern, has LNMB become some kind of unit macho fetish as opposed to say, and this will sound trite, an organizational goal? Has it become a too easy answer to too difficult problems? Are we setting our soldiers up for failure or worse by allowing LNMB too much of their and their superiors mindshare. Hopefully, nobody wants to leave anyone behind but isn’t more complex thinking better than relying on slogans?

    Part of this is due to the loss of “honorable” enemies: we expected even Japan and Germany to return prisoners of war after the war was over, as we intended to return captured enemy soldiers.

    That’s all changed: we have no expectations now of the war against the Islamists to ever be over, and no hope that there will be an end to the hostilities in which POWs would be returned. With President Obama having set up a timetable for withdrawal — something that has now changed — was there any realistic hope that the Taliban would have released American prisoners held?

    The historian Dana (f6a568)

  45. I had forgotten about this.
    Dana (87306f) — 3/26/2015 @ 9:25 am
    Once Bergdahl was released from captivity at least some of those who had firsthand knowledge believed they were no longer under any kind of confidentiality commitment. Some of them, apparently on their own initiative, messaged the widow of my friend’s son on her Facebook page and gave details about his death that were never previously disclosed to the family. He was killed on an assignment specifically to follow a lead on where Bergdahl was being held captive. Whether it was a trap was not determined. The whole countryside, friend and foe, knew that the US wanted to track him down.

    MD in Philly (not in Philly at the moment) (deca84)

  46. 11B40- that is something I’ve wondered about. We’ve fought for decades now with total air superiority, huge advantages in technology and firepower.
    Sooner or later “no man left behind” is going to bump up against an adversary that can shoot down gunships, helicopters, stealth fighters, cripple an aircraft carrier, blind gps and tracking satellites.
    Wasting NMLB on a deserter puts ideological piss stains the sacrifice, courage, and honor of all who have answered the call to rescue Americans who were on the verge of being overrun and captured.

    steveg (794291)

  47. Our steaming pile wants the Jooos to pay for their insolence:

    http://israelmatzav.blogspot.com/2015/03/obamas-revenge-continues-exposes.html?m=1

    Somehow I get the feeiing more than Yids will cook.

    DNF (8028c5)

  48. Greetings, The historian Dana (f6a568): ( #44 @ 3/26/2015 @ 10:02 am )

    Certainly, part of the current LNMB calculus involves the differing approaches of say the Geneva Conventions versus the Islamic Conventions of Koran and Haddiths. But I tend to see these as somewhat beyond the control of those on the tactical terrain. Our Muslim brothers and sisters will not be rejecting the latter anytime soon nor speaking out against them or any other Muslim perpetrated atrocities in any big way. Their twigs are bent and their trees are grown.

    My concern is with what we currently have for an officer class in our military these days. They seem all to willing to hold up the “social justice” torch as opposed to, as we used to say in the infantry, “close with and destroy the enemy”. I have a hard time extending any level of trust to leadership that seems way too facile in following whatever nonsense comes out of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. I can’t recall any flag or general officer resigning over our military being “fundamentally transformed”. Instead, they come forth to demonstrate their breast-beating and genuflecting abilities that I associate more with my altar boy days than my military ones.

    The LNMB provided a card for President Obama to use and, in essence, he turned a military tradition against his own military. As LNMB precludes any significant cost-benefit analysis, it can easily become a danger to our military personnel.

    11B40 (844d04)

  49. My two cents on Bergdahl’s future. I can see the Army sentencing him to prison, perhaps for a long stretch, and giving him a dishonorable discharge.

    I would like to draw your attention to the case of Charles Robert Jenkins. He deserted from his unite while on patrol on the DMZ in 1965. Then spent nearly 40 years in NORK h3ll regretting his decision. He finally made it to Japan (he had married a Japanese woman the NORKs had kidnapped to train spies to speak the language; consequently he was able to get permanent residency in Japan) and turned himself in at Camp Zama and pled guilty to desertion and aiding the enemy.

    He only got sentenced 30 days confinement (and was released a few days early for good behavior). But he was reduced in rank to E-1, forfeited all pay and benefits, and was given a dishonorable discharge.

    The similarities between the Jenkins case and the Bergdahl case are many. The differences are also significant. Nobody got killed looking for Jenkins, our preezy didn’t return any enemy combatants to the battlefield, nobody paid a ransom for Jenkins (yes, our government did pay a ransom of several million dollars for Bergdahl), and perhaps most importantly Jenkins came back in on his own and actually wanted to pay his debt. He said defecting to the NORKs was the worst mistake of his life, and he wanted to correct his mistake.

    I don’t see the Army being more favorably disposed toward Bergdahl then Jenkins. President Prom Queen, though, is a different story as he is traitorous scum and pure evil.

    No, I’m not exaggerating.

    http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/193175#.VRRe2BjV_-g

    US Declassifies Document Revealing Israel’s Nuclear Program

    Obama revenge for Netanyahu’s Congress talk? 1987 report on Israel’s top secret nuclear program released in unprecedented move.

    …But by publishing the declassified document from 1987, the US reportedly breached the silent agreement to keep quiet on Israel’s nuclear powers for the first time ever, detailing the nuclear program in great depth.

    The timing of the revelation is highly suspect, given that it came as tensions spiraled out of control between Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and US President Barack Obama ahead of Netanyahu’s March 3 address in Congress, in which he warned against the dangers of Iran’s nuclear program and how the deal being formed on that program leaves the Islamic regime with nuclear breakout capabilities.

    Another highly suspicious aspect of the document is that while the Pentagon saw fit to declassify sections on Israel’s sensitive nuclear program, it kept sections on Italy, France, West Germany and other NATO countries classified, with those sections blocked out in the document…

    When the Gazans vote Hamas into power we have to respect the will of the voters, the left lectures us. When the Egyptians vote for the Muslim Brotherhood, same thing. When Ahmadinejad got elected Mean Girl didn’t even wait for the gunfire in Tehran to stop before giving him a wet, sloppy congratulations.

    But the Israeli voters don’t get the same respect. Because this time the voters elected a leader who actually loves America. Obama only approves of leaders who hate America.

    So I can totally see Tiger Beat pardoning the deserter.

    Another way this could play out is if Obama has learned from experience. A couple of years ago he shot his mouth off about how the military was being too lenient about sex offenders and they needed to start making examples of people by putting them away for a long time. So a Navy judge tossed out the charges against a couple of Sailors who were on trial for sexual assault. Because the Commander-in-Chief had convicted these guys in public before they even had their day in court, which constitutes undue command influence. The judge said that since the CinC had essentially ordered a jury of their peers to produce a certain outcome they couldn’t get a fair trial.

    So I can see Tiger Beat indulging in some reverse psychology and start making speeches about how the Army needs to convict Bergdahl and send him to prison for life. Then Bergdahl walks while Obama can claim he’s not soft on deserters.

    I’m leaning towards pardon, though, as when this small, petty, thin-skinned narcissist dislikes people he wants to them then to know it. Like when he pretends to be scratching an itch when he’s flipping someone the bird, or when he gives a speech to a captive audience and proceeds to insult Supreme Court justices or GOP congresscritters knowing they can’t talk back.

    So a pardon would make it clear to veterans just how much disdain he has for them.

    Steve57 (99eaf2)

  50. 48. …I have a hard time extending any level of trust to leadership that seems way too facile in following whatever nonsense comes out of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. I can’t recall any flag or general officer resigning over our military being “fundamentally transformed”. Instead, they come forth to demonstrate their breast-beating and genuflecting abilities that I associate more with my altar boy days than my military ones…

    11B40 (844d04) — 3/26/2015 @ 2:12 pm

    I have a little more confidence in the Army doing the right thing, apparently. Not because I think more highly of the leadership then you. But in my experience military/naval judges don’t like people coming into their courtroom and telling them how to do their jobs.

    The Navy judge taking a slap at Obama and dismissing the charges against those Sailors is a case in point.

    Steve57 (99eaf2)

  51. Anybody who thinks Megyn Kelly presses the elevator button without a script …. Intelligence and insight are not the ahem assets she brought to her ahem position at Fox.

    nk (9faaca) — 3/26/2015 @ 7:48 am

    If I was riding that elevator, I could press that button for her, as I stood with my back against the back wall of that elevator… with my arms at my sides. Because Megyn!!!

    Colonel Haiku (2601c0)

  52. DNF, sorry, I didn’t see you had already linked to that article.

    Since the topic under discussion is treasonous backstabbing Blue Falcons, let me round out the picture with another link.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/the-most-striking-aspect-of-the-israeli-spying-leak-2015-3

    A blockbuster Wall Street Journal story published on March 23 contains concrete revelations about a spying operation between two close allies. It’s just not the one that showed up in the headline…

    The White House discovered the operation, in fact, when U.S. intelligence agencies spying on Israel intercepted communications among Israeli officials that carried details the U.S. believed could have come only from access to the confidential talks, officials briefed on the matter said.

    So US officials disclosed a confidential counter-intelligence operation against an ally in order to float a factually vague accusation that that ally was in fact spying on them…

    As I said, Obama is just evil. In order to defame and demonize Israel because how dare they reelect Netanyahu against Tiger Beat’s divine wishes, they exposed US national security information.

    It’s hard to count the ways this is criminal behavior by this administration. They think it’s just fine to betray the country just to score points against Israel. And they didn’t even make the case, as Israel has other means to learn about the details of the nuclear talks. There are other sources for that information. The only detail they confirmed is that we spy on our allies.

    The whole Freshman Dorm needs to be sent to prison. This is just the latest in a long series of betrayals.

    Steve57 (99eaf2)

  53. It appears that even Democrats in Congress are getting sick and tired of Prom Queen’s antics.

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2015/03/house-prepares-to-join-senate-on-iran.php

    The White House tried to demonize 47 Senate Republicans as traitors because they wrote an open letter explaining the important role that the Senate plays in any binding treaty. It looks as though the “traitor” list is about to get much longer, as a bipartisan group of over 300 Congressmen are preparing a letter of their own, reminding President Obama of the role that Congress must play in any meaningful agreement with Iran:

    …Represenative Eliot Engel of New York, the ranking Democrat on the committee, said he and Republican Chairman Ed Royce of California were sending a letter to President Barack Obama expressing their concerns about what needs to be in an Iran nuclear deal.

    A draft of the letter emphasizes that permanent sanctions relief, which Iran has repeatedly requested during the Geneva negotiations, would require new legislation.

    “In reviewing such an agreement, Congress must be convinced that its terms foreclose any pathway to a bomb,” the lawmakers wrote, adding that “Iran’s role in fomenting instability in the region … demonstrates the risks of negotiating with a partner we cannot trust…”

    No wonder Obama is PO’d at Israel. The information the Israelis passed on to Congress about how awful the deal the Resident-Assistant-in-Chief is making with Iran seems to have had the desired effect. 367 congresscritters (including 129 Democrats) have signed onto the House version of the Cotton letter. And the deal they’re trying to stop is truly awful. Iran has stonewalled on providing any information on 11 out of a list of 12 “partial military dimensions” of their nuclear program. The name is a bit misleading as it baselines all of Iran’s nuclear programs. And without that baseline there can be no verification that they’re complying with any agreement.

    Obama is preparing to drop the demand that they provide that information before they get any sanctions relief. So somehow he imagines that the Iranians would come clean about their programs when they aren’t under the pressure of sanctions when they won’t come clean when sanctions are in place. Or he thinks we’re stupid enough to fall for that story. He’s also getting ready to drop the demand that Iran closes its underground enrichment facility at Fordow. Last Summer the Iranians said they’d meet the US halfway and close the site but then reopen it as a research facility where no enrichment would take place. All hailed that as evidence that the Iranians were negotiating in good faith, and thus were worthwhile negotiating partners. The Iranians have withdrawn that concession and are saying they will refuse to close their hardened, impervious to airstrikes facility or stop enriching uranium their, and the Obama administration knew that was the case, but they were still misleading Congress that their demands over the PMDs and the closing of Fordow were their “red lines” (yeah, I know; when anyone working for Prom Queen starts talking about the administration’s “red lines” your BS meter should indicate off the scale).

    That’s actually the word a Democrat used when Deputy Secretary of State Tony Blinken he testified before the House Foreign Affairs Committee last week. Misleading. Which I suppose is as close as a congresscritter can get to calling an administration official a damned liar per the rules of fake civility they operate under.

    As much as I would like to see Bergdahl go to prison for a long time for betraying his country, he’s not half the traitor that Obama is.

    Hopefully the reporting during his trial will remind people of that.

    Steve57 (011eda)


Powered by WordPress.

Page loaded in: 0.4758 secs.