Patterico's Pontifications

8/2/2014

It’s My Party And I’ll Cry If I Want To

Filed under: General — Dana @ 12:53 pm

[guest post by Dana]

It has been a crazy-awful week in the world: we are still in the middle of a massive border crisis, with no end in sight; we are being held hostage by an impotent Congress; we are witnessing the explosion between Israel and Palestine; we are helpless before a power-mad Russia on the loose, and we are now experiencing a bit of real uneasiness as Ebola makes its nasty presence known in America. You would think that as much as these weighty issues have captured and compelled our thoughts, how much more so for those in positions of power as they take every opportunity to keep the press – and us – fully informed of these unfolding critical events in our world. You know, because priorities

–Dana

106 Responses to “It’s My Party And I’ll Cry If I Want To”

  1. Our Narcissist-In-Chief!

    askeptic (efcf22)

  2. It’s always about President Selfie McStompyfoot!

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  3. someone has mommy issues

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  4. Can you really blame him for trying to find one person who is glad he is alive?

    gahrie (12cc0f)

  5. So he expects to be wished Happy Birthday three days before it’s time to do so? But then again its Obama.

    AZ Bob (34bb80)

  6. All thru each day, I Me Mine I Me Mine I Me Mine…

    Colonel Haiku (157532)

  7. The Ebola mess is ghastly, but keep in mind we are talking about 1,300 cases in an area which has 10 million people living therein. It’s not highly contagious; you have to be in physical contact with someone or with a surface on which they left sweat. The American citizen who contracted it had been taking care of his ill sister in Liberia.

    Art Deco (ee8de5)

  8. He needs to take his show on the road to a galaxy, far, far away

    Colonel Haiku (157532)

  9. what, me worry?

    Alfred E Obama (abd49e)

  10. in a world full of useless drones, he’s the class leader.

    redc1c4 (abd49e)

  11. This, in contrast, is what his predecessor said–you know the stupid ChimpyMcHilterHailiburton one:

    We have seen their kind before. They’re the heirs of all the murderous ideologies of the 20th century.

    The terrorists practice a fringe form of Islamic extremism that has been rejected by Muslim scholars and the vast majority of Muslim clerics; a fringe movement that perverts the peaceful teachings of Islam.

    The terrorists’ directive commands them to kill Christians and Jews, to kill all Americans and make no distinctions among military and civilians, including women and children.

    This group and its leader, a person named Osama bin Laden, are linked to many other organizations in different countries, including the Egyptian Islamic Jihad, the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan.

    There are thousands of these terrorists in more than 60 countries.
    …..
    I will not forget the wound to our country and those who inflicted it. I will not yield, I will not rest, I will not relent in waging this struggle for freedom and security for the American people.

    The course of this conflict is not known, yet its outcome is certain. Freedom and fear, justice and cruelty, have always been at war, and we know that God is not neutral between them.
    Fellow citizens, we’ll meet violence with patient justice, assured of the rightness of our cause and confident of the victories to come.

    In all that lies before us, may God grant us wisdom and may he watch over the United States of America.

    Thank you.

    If you want to see the difference between a narcissist and a non narcissist in office view the You Tube video of the speech and count the time W. used the word “we” as opposed to “I” and “my”.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wPuY5hI96U

    elissa (cacdc9)

  12. well that’s not nuanced or sophisticated, elissa, I swear we’re surrounded by idiots, knaves, and mountebanks

    narciso (ee1f88)

  13. they told me that if i voted for McLame and then Mittens, that thios country would be led by ignorant idiots who didn’t care about me or my country.

    i held my nose and voted for the useless RINOs anyway and, SURPRISE, the country is being led by an ignorant idiot who hates me and America.

    redc1c4 (abd49e)

  14. Here’s a link to the transcript of the YouTube video recommended by elissa. http://edition.cnn.com/2001/US/09/20/gen.bush.transcript/

    You’ll notice that Bush uses “we” and “our” continuously throughout the speech, except when he is expressing gratitude to people or groups. When he is thanking others he says me my and I, which is proper because that’s what a humble person should do. Thanks for the idea elissa. It’s refreshing to hear a president who isn’t a solipsist

    I thank the Congress for its leadership at such an important time.

    And on behalf of the American people, I thank the world for its outpouring of support.

    I’m so honored the British prime minister has crossed an ocean to show his unity with America.

    jack (ff1ca8)

  15. And thank you for linking the transcript of the Bush remarks, Jack. I thought I had succeeded in doing that up thread at the start of my comment, but the link apparently was no good (or maybe I did it wrong).

    elissa (cacdc9)

  16. The terrorists practice a fringe form of Islamic extremism that has been rejected by Muslim scholars and the vast majority of Muslim clerics; a fringe movement that perverts the peaceful teachings of Islam.

    That isn’t true, though.

    Milhouse (9d71c3)

  17. God help us.The lackluster president is a traitor and one who enjoys destroying a great society.
    I hope this turd does hard time.

    mg (31009b)

  18. i hate it when it’s his party and he cries if he wants to

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  19. The terrorists practice a fringe form of Islamic extremism that has been rejected by Muslim scholars and the vast majority of Muslim clerics; a fringe movement that perverts the peaceful teachings of Islam.

    What a crock of crap. This is a perfect example of telling the Big Lie then repeating it over and over till the weak of mind accept it as fact. I first read the Koran when I was about 23 and even then I realized it was a book of atrocities. The perverted view of Allah and the contorted morality for followers jumped off the pages. Since then I must have re-read it at least six times, each time trying to find some redeeming religious, social or moral value to the book. I could find none.

    The above quote from Bush along with all the minions who use that same distorted myopic view of the Religion of Death is a pathetic testament to how Political Correctness has destroyed the ability of reasonable people to think as well as speak out. The fact is the entire religion of Islam is at war with the United States, Israel and the West in general. The fact is Islam, by its own tenants, cannot exist nor coexist with Freedom, Liberty or any other religion. And the fact is there are only two things which can happen under Islam: Submission and conversion or Death, period. There is no such thing as a “ fringe form of Islamic extremism that has been rejected by Muslim scholars and the vast majority of Muslim clerics“. Muslims are either terrorist jihadist’s or their enablers. And those “Muslim scholars” and “Muslim clerics” Bush spoke of are their damn Leaders!

    Hoagie (4dfb34)

  20. yes, well one could not openly declare a war on Islam then,

    http://www.americanthinker.com/2014/08/three_ninnies_and_a_jackass_this_week_in_gaza.html

    narciso (ee1f88)

  21. Chicken Little squawks that the collapse in loans to the EU private sector gains pace, some banks are undercapitalized by 5 times and the worst are the German.

    Goldman on Japan:

    The greater-than-expected weakness in the consumption snapback signals significant downside risk to our forecast of 4.6% decline for Q2 real GDP (sequential annualized). While we expect lower imports, higher inventories, and other factors to support GDP to some extent, we see negative real GDP growth of around -6.5% as likely, based on the data currently available.

    And we already know that 4.0% forecast for Q2 in USofA is total crap.

    Here’s the empty pipeline:

    http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/BDIY:IND/chart

    Global recession babies.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  22. 17. “Hard time”.

    I’m pulling for hang time on a kinetic action surplus meathook.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  23. Well, narciso, with all the attacks on the United States from various Muslim sources, with all the killings, murders and beheadings of American citizens, and with all the blatant Acts of War and Declarations of War in the form of fatwa’s and jihad’s, we would be perfectly within our rights to declare war on Islam. But our pansy-assed leaders don’t have the stomach to declare war on a religion (even when that religion declares war on us) nor the balls to execute such a war. For some reason Islam gets a pass on justice and retribution regardless of how savage they behave and how many bodies they chalk up on our side. If the Presbyterians were killing Americans at this rate we’d have exterminated them by now.

    Look at what’s happening in Israel. Every time “a civilian” gets whacked the leftists around the world let loose a sad sigh for the loss of life. Really? How do you think a country wins a war? They win by killing more soldiers and civilians then the enemy. Nobody cried when we fire bombed Dresden or Hamburg and killed tens of thousands of Germans. They didn’t blink when the U.S. and Briton bombed the Germans day and night. Nor did they get squeamish when we fire bombed the paper houses of Tokyo and dropped two A-bombs on the Japanese. You think it’s coincidence that WWII was the last war we decisively won? I don’t. If you intend to win a war you must be prepared to kill everything of the enemy’s. Men, women, children, babies, the aged, pets, farm animals…everything until they surrender knowing they are beaten. When you do that you have an ally like Germany and Japan are today because they know what you will do to win. They know your resolve. When your country is run by people who are more concerned about contraception, abortion and gay marriage than the strength and security of the nation this is what we get. Mark my words, terrorists are crossing our boarder and sooner or later they will unleash a devastating attack on our civilian population just like they’ve done before. Then Pelosi, Kerry, Obama et al will be running around pointing fingers at everyone other than themselves when it was they who fiddled while the terrorists entered the country disguised as “poor illegal immigrant children”. Just to seed the country with future government dependents and therefore Democrat voters.

    Hoagie (4dfb34)

  24. The terrorists practice a fringe form of Islamic extremism that has been rejected by Muslim scholars and the vast majority of Muslim clerics; a fringe movement that perverts the peaceful teachings of Islam.

    That was a slight exaggeration on the part of Presdident Bush the Younger.

    It isn’t all Muslim scholars that reject it, and those that do reject it may only reject part of it, notably suicide bombings – because of the suicide aspect -; individual jihad (not led by a caliph); ruling Moslems to be out of Islam (and fair game for whatever); violations of truces; disloyalty to a non-Moslem regime where they are allowed to live peacefully; and murder of noncombatants, and prisoners.

    The jihadists sometimes get around some of these theological difficulties (especially the individual jihad problem) by lying about facts, and also claiming to be acting in self-defense. Of course, now there’s a caliph in Iraq, but no other parts of al Qaeda are loyal to him.

    And there may be a question about the vast majority.

    There is a very serious problem with Moslem clerics in Europe – the French government attempted to establish an official Moslem clergy, but they didn’t supervise them or screen them very much or at all, and the money coming from Saudi Arabia and other Gulf States prevails.

    Sammy Finkelman (db7fea)

  25. Hoagie (4dfb34) — 8/3/2014 @ 7:19 am

    Mark my words, terrorists are crossing our boarder

    I don’t think so. The coyotes pr smugglers do far better screening out of terrorsists than does the U.S. State Departmemt, because the consequences of making a mistake are far more serious to themto A State Department consular official, who, at most, may be reassigned, and terrorists groups won’t use this method to smuggle in operatives (except possibly for very high ranking people) because they do not trust their recruits not to just leave them, or to defect and inform. And most of tyhe people they can recruit don’t speak any European lanaguges.

    Terrorist groups are looking for U.S. and other NATO passport holders – but so far they have only used them for suicide bombings in Somalia and Syria. There is a problem with smuggling in explosives or training people how to make bombs.

    and sooner or later they will unleash a devastating attack on our civilian population just like they’ve done before.

    They’d need to make an alliance with the drug smugglers in Central America. Not impossible. – especially since Hezbollah has been working at this for some time.

    But the last time Iran tried this, the person became an informant – he already was – he was quiote happy to trade this information for immunity.

    The way to prevent thisd is to make sure that anyone who has this kind of information feelshe can benefit greatly by revealing it. He needs to feel confident.

    Sammy Finkelman (db7fea)

  26. 25. “The coyotes pr smugglers do far better screening out of terrorsists than does the U.S. State Departmemt”

    The stupid burns.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  27. I’m not up-to-date on the consequences of continued neutral ENSO conditions for Failifornia but the projected El Nino ain’t happenin’, or in the next year anyway.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-01/drought-goes-bad-catastrophic

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  28. it rained last night, just a little

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  29. in other news the californtards are seriously thinking about introducing a population of 300-400 grizzly bears into the “wild”

    please to know when you are eated that this is not personal:

    The grizzly’s fearsome reputation is well earned, especially in contrast to black bear behavior. But grizzly aggression toward humans isn’t personal and has an explanation based on evolution, wildlife biologists say.

    happyfeet (8ce051)

  30. Argentina is in default, again, Portugal’s second largest bank has crapped out, Turkey is buying oil with gold from Iran’s Kurdish separatists, China is floating military bases in the South China Sea gas fields, Japan is in full collapse, Ebola(that some schlemiel herein calls ‘not especially contagious’) is in CDC hands–you remember, the folks that exposed 75 of its people to Bacillus anthracis last month–war is breaking out all over.

    Good times. Glad we have things in the hands of nihilist dildos.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  31. “I don’t think so. The coyotes pr smugglers do far better screening out of terrorsists….”

    Mr. Sammy Finkelman, I did not say that coyotes or smugglers of any sort were bringing in the terrorists. I’m saying the terrorists are doing what the bad guys always do: They’re taking advantage of our porous boarder and lax enforcement to move operatives into the U.S., perhaps with papers and weapons too. I don’t think terrorists need coyotes to enter the U.S., at least the Boston bombers didn’t, and neither did the WTC plotters. I’m suggesting that since we refuse to secure the boarder for illegals perhaps, just perhaps mind you, terrorists find it just as easy to enter here as say a 10 year old unescorted kid. And I wouldn’t be at all surprised if the current crop of terrorists are on welfare and other state subsidies just like the Boston thugs and a few of the 9/11 clowns. After all, the Democrats are nothing if not accommodating.

    Hoagie (4dfb34)

  32. It has been a crazy-awful week in the world:

    Good times. Glad we have things in the hands of nihilist dildos.

    It does seem like a perfect storm.

    To add to and somewhat localize the sight of a Mount Everest of Crap and Crud looming on the horizon (or envision it as sort of a Mount Rushmore, but with only Obama’s face carved into the mountain), California is experiencing its worst drought in over 130 years. However, due to the amount of agriculture from the West Coast that this nation depends upon, raising that as merely one more problem to be aware of is not a totally local or provincial concern.

    Mark (2604a9)

  33. The fact is Islam, by its own tenants, cannot exist nor coexist with Freedom, Liberty or any other religion

    Islam has tenants?! How much rent do they pay?

    Milhouse (9d71c3)

  34. 29. Remember, one does not have to run faster than the grizzly. One just has to run faster than the abuela next to one.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  35. Tenets, sorry Milhouse. Between my bad spelling and the stuff that slips through spell-check I can’t win.

    Hoagie (4dfb34)

  36. Under the Koran, the jizya tax varies in accordance with ability to pay. Historically, it has varied from 20% to 80% from place to place.

    nk (dbc370)

  37. 33. Frankly, I have a terrible time with there, their and they’re.

    Glass houses, stones, whatevs.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  38. 36. And infidels, apostates and heretics don’t have that option.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  39. And the same could have been said about some Christian cults less than two centuries ago, Hoagie. The Inquisition was not abolished until 1834; the last auto da fe having been in 1826.

    nk (dbc370)

  40. Atheists are annoying and should move. Apostates and heretics are more fun to be around with, usually, than the “faithful”. They know some great “the bishop and the soiled dove” jokes.

    nk (dbc370)

  41. It was a different time. Youtube of Lesley Gore from 1965 His world is filled with Johnnys and Judys.

    I wonder what he feels about that Peace Prize now? Well, no, I don’t.

    htom (412a17)

  42. a reminder:
    Slavery still exists – in Islamic areas.
    I think we can drop references to the Inquisition at this point, it is also a “Godwin” moment.

    askeptic (efcf22)

  43. Argentina is in default, again, Portugal’s second largest bank has crapped out, Turkey is buying oil with gold from Iran’s Kurdish separatists, China is floating military bases in the South China Sea gas fields, Japan is in full collapse, Ebola(that some schlemiel herein calls ‘not especially contagious’) is in CDC hands–you remember, the folks that exposed 75 of its people to Bacillus anthracis last month–war is breaking out all over.

    Ebola is not especially contagious. It isn’t going to get anymore contagious if you call me a ‘schlmiel’.

    The bank in Portugal, Espirito Santo Financial Group, is about the size of Regions Bank. Their disappointed equity and bond holders are not going to bring down the world economy.

    Argentina has been in default for about 12 years now.

    Japan is not in ‘full collapse’ or even undergoing an economic contraction.

    Art Deco (ee8de5)

  44. (Gary — I was taught “They’re confusing their there here.” but doing — they ‘are, possession their, and location — there, may work better.)

    htom (412a17)

  45. 39. A distinction might be envisioned between cult and orthodox obligation.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  46. 43. Ebola

    Ebola virus is a class A bioterrorism agent, known to cause highly lethal hemorrhagic fever. The mortality rate can be as high as 90 percent. Because the Ebola virus is so hazardous, it is classified as a biosafety level 4 agent – the level assigned to the most dangerous agents known. Research using Ebola viruses requires facilities with the utmost levels of containment, strict controls on access, and highly trained personnel.

    https://www.bcm.edu/departments/molecular-virology-and-microbiology/ebola

    You, friend, are a loon.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  47. And also apostates and heretics versues iconoclasts and anti-clericals. The Greek Orthodox never had an inquisition. They let the (capitalized) Iconolaters and Iconocclasts beat each others’ heads out and attended Sunday services held by the winners. ;)

    nk (dbc370)

  48. There were no Magdeburgs, either.

    nk (dbc370)

  49. Of course, I’d defer to whatever MD thought, but I imagine Ebola’s greatest weakness as an agent of pandemic is that it kills so commonly and quickly.

    Nonetheless, living in proximity to a visa mill or open border is a threat.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  50. There’s still some discussion and research on whether the MERS virus is airborne. The issue is whether the genetic material found aerosolized is sufficient to cause infection.

    Having lived much longer with Yersina pestis we know that the inhaled agent is infectious and kills upwards of 80% of those contracting it via that vector.

    I cannot believe our study of the hemorrhagic fevers-Lassa, Marburg, Ebola–has progressed to the point of certainty in its manner of propagation. As the link says, the receptor by which it gains entry isn’t even identified.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  51. The gang is back together:

    http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-Sports/2014/08/02/Choom-Gang-Reunion

    Less the incarcerated, naturally.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  52. You, friend, are a loon.

    1. I’m not your friend.

    2. It looks that way to you because you haven’t been taking your thorazine and you fancy that Zerohedge is a reliable source.

    3. That an agent is a danger (due to it’s mortality rate &c.) does not mean it is especially contagious. AIDS had a known mortality rate of 100% ca. 1983. It was also difficult to catch.

    4. In a given six month period, around about 55,000 people, give or take, will shuffle off this mortal coil in those provinces in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea. That’s the baseline of misery in that part of the world. Ebola adds an increment to that (thus far shy of 800 deaths). Unfortunate, but it’s not the Spanish flu epidemic of 1918.

    Art Deco (ee8de5)

  53. 25. “The coyotes pr smugglers do far better screening out of terrorsists than does the U.S. State Departmemt”

    Surreal

    JD (2f5d3c)

  54. 53. Non sequitir.

    52. 1) Nothing gets by you.

    2) Correction, Goldman Sachs is the source, zerohedge the filter. You got a better source, cupcake?

    3) Ebola has an incubation period of 48 hours to two weeks, AIDS may take years, if at all, to develop following entry. AIDS is a retrovirus, present in bodily fluids, but needs immediate entry.
    Some diseases can be contracted via a single organism, others require thousands. Your analogy is extremely simplistic and has not demonstrated in anyway its veracity.

    4) The zoonotic hemorrhagic fevers are not endemic to Liberia and Sierra Leone, coastal countries that do not traffic locally in bushmeat as do Guinea and Zaire.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  55. Not non sequitur at all. Sorry about your reading comprehension issues.

    Art Deco (ee8de5)

  56. They should not have brought this germ deliberately into the United States. It was totally idiotic, and depends unwarrantedly on the intelligence and sense of responsibility of bedpan handlers and laundresses at Emory. On the other hand, Sherman is a hero of mine.

    nk (dbc370)

  57. 3. That an agent is a danger (due to it’s mortality rate &c.) does not mean it is especially contagious. AIDS had a known mortality rate of 100% ca. 1983. It was also difficult to catch.

    One reason why I’ve had more of a guarded response to Ebola is that its death rate in past instances of outbreak has never rocketed sky high as has occurred with the mortality rates of other diseases. But I’m assuming that won’t change too much even with the current situation.

    However, in the case of a person infected with microbes such as HIV, the question is are testing methods for those and results that show false negatives similar to or different from test results for Ebola?

    allafrica.com, July 31: The Heritage has reliably learnt that the Hospital Director of the Saint Joseph Catholic Hospital, a Catholic run hospital in Liberia, has been tested positive of the deadly Ebola virus. [T]he St. Joseph’s Catholic Hospital was established in 1963 by the Hospitable Order of the Brothers of St. John of God, with the headquarters in Madrid, Spain.

    Here in Liberia, the St. Joseph Hospital, which is one of the leading privately run hospitals in the country, is located in Congo Town, outside Monrovia. According to cogent information gathered by this paper, Rev. Brother Patrick Nshamdze, was tested positive after he supposedly came in contact with a patient who died from the virus.

    Our information divulged that on the 17th of this month, his specimen was taken and the result, which came on the next day (July 18), proved negative. Not being satisfied, the report further divulged, the ailing Catholic hospital director decided to seek further treatment abroad, but his trip was subjected to Ebola test. It was based on this that he did another test on Tuesday, July 29, 2014, which proved positive, contrary to the first test he underwent.

    ^ Talk about what’s like a head game for worried, if not frightened, people.

    A person goes in to get tested, fearful he or she is infected, then comes away relieved when results show he’s in the clear. But then a bit later on, he goes through the whole procedure all over again, but this time comes away with a very different diagnosis.

    Mark (2604a9)

  58. “39.And the same could have been said about some Christian cults less than two centuries ago, Hoagie.”

    Perhaps that’s true nk, but I’m not the type to give a contemporary faith a pass because in the not too distant past other religions have behaved badly. All kinds of religions have done all kinds of abominations all through history and I’m not saying any of them are perfect, but the rest of them other than the barbarians we call Muslims have denounced that behavior and no longer persecute people of other religions, or for that matter no religion. BTW, I wish the atheists would start treating Christians with the respect they seem to think Christians should treat them. But at least atheists don’t preach killing Christians, just shutting them up….for now.

    Hoagie (4dfb34)

  59. 56. “not airborne and all prior outbreaks have been stamped out”

    I think we can hang our hat on that. Brantley prolly had a taste for foxbat.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  60. BTW, a contraction of 6.9% over a quarter exceeds recessionary by 1.9%.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  61. No phobia regarding ebola, hantavirus, Marburg, MERS, SARS etc. All those viruses and more are already at the CDC, although they usually bring in vials of blood and swabs of goo, not the actual host.
    I found this funny though in the context of the Equator on a continent routinely described as sweltering:

    you have to be in physical contact with someone or with a surface on which they left sweat.

    Everyone panic!!!

    steveg (794291)

  62. Another phrase that goes with the word “sweltering” is “teeming with humanity”.

    steveg (794291)

  63. steveg (794291)

  64. steveg (794291)

  65. “The coyotes pr smugglers do far better screening out of terrorsists than does the U.S. State Departmemt”

    JD (2f5d3c) — 8/3/2014 @ 10:33 am

    Surreal

    The coyotes face life imprisonement and the destruction of their business. That they made an honest mistake is no defense. What has anybody in the State Department got to lose?

    They lack common sense, too.

    Sammy Finkelman (31cdef)

  66. Yes, Sammy. There are extraordinary quality control mechanisms on those that illegally smuggle people across the border.

    This one is definitely in your Top 5.

    JD (04dc17)

  67. “The coyotes pr smugglers do far better screening out of terrorsists than does the U.S. State Departmemt”

    Sammy – I understand most of the coyotes have “No Terrorists Allowed – Positively No Refunds” signs hanging in their store windows.

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  68. Coyotes don’t face life imprisonment. Hell, that’s a murder sentence not a smuggling sentence. And most of the time murderers don’t get life. And as far as “destruction of their business” goes….you really gotta be kidding, right? It’s not a business, it’s a crime. You make it sound like they’d loose their McDonald’s franchise.

    Hoagie (4dfb34)

  69. But… but… TB!!!

    Colonel Haiku (04174f)

  70. Airport staff tonight told of their fears of an Ebola outbreak after a passenger from Sierra Leone collapsed and died as she got off a plane at Gatwick.

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/ebola-terror-gatwick-passenger-collapses-3977051#ixzz39MwPgq1o
    Follow us: @DailyMirror on Twitter | DailyMirror on Facebook

    They don’t even know for sure if she died of Ebola, after all the lady was 72. But now they have to look up everyone on the plane and everyone who came in contact with everyone on the plane.

    Hoagie (4dfb34)

  71. I’m not afraid of Ebola, but if I was flying out of Sierra Leone and a lady barfed on me and then died? Hmmmm.
    Reminds me of when Condi Rice came to speak up here a couple years ago with no security to speak of and I’m in the front row of the bleachers and these two nigerian/african looking ladies in hijab roll in pushing walkers with the baskets on the front and the hand brakes. The baskets are covered with cloths… they stop right in front of me and start looking around… so I start thinking that I’m not scared, because the ladies look dignified and maybe they are here to see an accomplished woman speak and that is all… or I’ll be chunks and red mist… so I might as well enjoy as much of the speech as possible.
    Then they parked the walkers and sat down next to me and all was well.

    I’m betting that it isn’t ebola in london, but if I was there and she barfed on my shoes, i would let the hazmat guys have the shoes and walk through some bleach.
    How’d you like to be descending the stairs from the plane and have her barf down your back? Bad enough in normal circumstances, but in this case a minor freakout is to be expected

    steveg (794291)

  72. steveg – I’m not a big fan of people barfing on me whether they have the Ebola or not. YMMV.

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  73. I was on the Tube in London years ago when a commuter barfed on a sleeping rider. The barfee suddenly awoke, looked down at the puke on his shirt…and apologized to the rest of the carriage.

    Gazzer (e04ef7)

  74. My brother barfed from the second deck of a putrid wheezing diesel ferry (sorta like the one in that picture on the Congo, but on the Irrawaddy River in Asia) and hit a guy on the head, although to be fair most of it hit the motorbike.
    At the time it was considered odd to see many Americans, so the guy took it like a champ. We went down and helped him clean his bike
    Someone fished a bucket of water out of the river and dumped it on his head and we wondered if maybe the barf was the better deal…

    steveg (794291)

  75. Yikes.

    Gazzer (e04ef7)

  76. The proposed Emory caregivers:

    http://www.wctv.tv/home/headlines/How-US-Hospital-plans-to-keep-Ebola-Contained-269633871.html

    Clean-room isolation, head to toe gowning. Sub-micron respirators. Just like swine flu.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  77. Well Urkel has certainly convinced everyone that we are not exceptional:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-03/g-20-revolt-france-gets-positive-reception-challenge-us-bank-fines

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  78. A walk in the park. No word yet on the number of beds.

    http://legalinsurrection.com/2014/08/you-have-nothing-to-fear-from-ebola-but-fear-itself/

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  79. Perhaps it would have been better if Paul Tibbets had named his plane the “Ebola Gay”?

    askeptic (efcf22)

  80. Thanks for the barf stories, everybody.

    The Bishop, having finished what he went to the local house of ill repute for, is in the mood for conversation. He asks his companion of the hour, “How did you ever end up in a place like this, my child?” And she says, “Just lucky, I guess”.

    nk (dbc370)

  81. Brantly was being “transfused” in Monrovia with a blood serum from a 14 year-old survivor in hopes the latter’s antibodies would help–an entirely reasonable conjecture–and is “improving”.

    The medical journalists are providing a knee-jerk offensive against unreasoned fears in their eagerness to apply full-scale technological war against the enemy in Atlanta. Fine, but their arguments that Ebola is comparatively harmless are daft. This is not “chicken pox”.

    No one is worried about Brantly and his coworker.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  82. Speaking of pre-emptive strikes consider those against “impeachment” and coup d’etat:

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2014/08/is-barack-obama-plotting-a-coup.php

    The urban sheeple are no obstacle.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  83. Again, via Larwyn:

    http://americanthinker.com/blog/2014/08/the_obama_endgame_emerges.html

    Rollover Amerikkka, we’re not done with your white azz.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  84. Go to sleep my babies, the world is too awful to endure:

    http://www.steynonline.com/6499/darkness-falls

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  85. All the news that’s fit for somnolence.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-04/ebola-spins-out-control-latest-news-roundup

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  86. Yawn, I had chicken pox, mumps, rubella, german measles as a kid. All this panic is freaky.

    http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2014/08/04/Nigeria-confirms-doctor-as-2nd-Ebola-case

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  87. Former director of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins:

    http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-TV/2014/08/04/Dr-Ben-Carson-Mistake-to-Bring-Ebola-Patients-to-US

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  88. The reason Ebola has not become a pandemic, so far, is because where it has happened its carriers have died before they could walk far enough to give it to a lot of other people. Now, idiots gave it an airplane ticket. Everybody has been saying that except the idiots.

    nk (dbc370)

  89. 30K Somalian refugees in MN is workfare for tow truck drivers 6 mo. of the year.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  90. The reason Ebola has not become a pandemic, so far, is because where it has happened its carriers have died before they could walk far enough to give it to a lot of other people.

    Again, the people who contract the disease do so because they have been in close contact with someone contagious. It is not spread through airborne particles. You have 1,300 cases reported in an area with 8.5 million people living in it. It is not spread very readily.

    Art Deco (ee8de5)

  91. “I’m not afraid of Ebola, but if I was flying out of Sierra Leone and a lady barfed on me and then died? Hmmmm.”

    She got sick on an airplane, which people do. She was 72 years old. She was not hemorrhaging. The authorities have already announced that she was not infected with Ebola.

    Art Deco (ee8de5)

  92. The discoverer of the virus says not to worry too much. There are enough real problems in the world; we should not encourage more fear. Just as we deride those “concerned scientists” who are constantly warning people about “poisons” in this and that, and global warming or cooling or stagnation (whichever fits the latest data), and the incredible dangers of this or that technology, we should be wary of pandering to those who panic-monger about every disease that comes along. Some people just get off on frightening others; let them tell ghost stories or work in haunted houses and leave normal people alone.

    Milhouse (9d71c3)

  93. “You have 1,300 cases reported in an area with 8.5 million people living in it.”

    Art Deco – The outbreaks are usually confined to rural areas which the affected countries attempt to quarantine. This year, however, people have carried the disease to major urban areas in West Africa and we will have to wait to see if it spreads.

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  94. You had a Liberian-American who died in Lagos, Nigeria last month from Ebola after getting ill flying into the country. The passengers on the plane were not quarantined. The doctor who treated the man has now contracted Ebola. The population of Lagos is 17.5 million.

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  95. You had a Liberian-American who died in Lagos, Nigeria last month from Ebola after getting ill flying into the country. The passengers on the plane were not quarantined. The doctor who treated the man has now contracted Ebola. The population of Lagos is 17.5 million.

    Which proves exactly that it’s not very contagious. Nobody else on the plane got sick, nobody else in Lagos caught it from this person, only the doctor who had direct contact with his body fluids, and may have neglected the standard precautions, has got it.

    Milhouse (9d71c3)

  96. “Which proves exactly that it’s not very contagious.”

    Milhouse – Bullcrap. It proves exactly nothing yet.

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  97. Hmmm, I didn’t realize there was an Ebola thread.

    I have never treated a person with Ebola, but I have been in direct email contact with US missionaries caught in the middle of the last outbreak in Uganda a few years ago, as well as hanging out with ID folks and being in on discussions about readiness for bioterrorism.
    Right now I am listening to Frank Gaffney talk on Hewitt about the risk of a solar flare frying our electrical grid. I think that is a bigger real concern than an Ebola outbreak in the US.

    Ebola is contagious, but not “highly” contagious like influenza, the common cold, or chickenpox. If you want to worry about a bad bug getting out of containment of a US facility, worry about people working on the 1918 flu virus and other such things.

    Ebola has always been contained by identifying contacts and isolating those who are sick. Even if there is a break of containment for some reason at Emory, I would expect the outbreak to be contained because of general hygiene and the resources available.
    The bigger threat to the US is if someone boards a plane and gets in without anyone knowing about it. I think even that would be contained with minimum spread.
    Now, if you want to ask whether all hell can break out in Monrovia, Lagos, or any one of another one of dozens of heavily populated areas with crowding, poor hygiene, and already overwhelmed medical system, I think there is reason to be very concerned.

    I don’t know if any US medical personnel have ever contracted Ebola before. Typically it is Doctors Without Borders that does Ebola outbreak care, and I think they are more heavily European. I believe this outbreak in Liberia is the first time someone else has been in charge (Samaritan’s Purse), in order to allow MSF (Medecin’ sin frontiers or whatever) to focus their overextended resources in Sierra Leone and Guinea.

    I think the effort to bring them back to the US is a combination of human concern and scientific curiosity, I see no reason to suspect anything other than that.
    There are already enough disasters in the making in full view to worry about. I would not mock anyone who is worried about “what if” with Ebola, but getting too worked up about it will get you catalogued as a moon-bat, including by me.

    I am disappointed that Dr. Carson came out publicly against it. I guess he is not perfect, either.

    MD in Philly (f9371b)

  98. The reason it has never been a major pandemic so far is that it usually occurs in isolated areas where people are exposed to the virus which is carried by some form of wildlife (I guess now they are thinking some bat species are involved). Typically someone gets sick and a few are exposed, including health care workers, before it is recognized for what it is (rather than malaria or other reasons for high fevers and being sick). Then people are tracked down and quarantined, and the outbreak burns out.
    This time with people infected in more populous areas I think there is a real chance for a nightmare scenario, perhaps spreading throughout much of Africa, as people flee areas such as Monrovia (and Lagos, if there is a wider spread than the one additional victim identified so far). Yes, Lagos could turn into hell on earth, Atlanta, not so much.

    MD in Philly (f9371b)

  99. I haven’t read the 99 previous comments, but just a thought here:

    We’ve all been so busy that our birthdays have taken a backseat to whatever else is going on in our lives – school, work, family, emergencies that come up, etc. None of our working jobs or school work is as important as being the President of the United States.

    I’m not saying that the guy should never celebrate a birthday, but wouldn’t the normal-person reaction be to schedule a quiet meal with Michelle that night and otherwise, put the hammer down and get done what needs to get done?

    bridget (37b281)

  100. Ebola open thread is up.

    Which is one of the stranger open threads…

    Dana (4dbf62)

  101. “Which proves exactly that it’s not very contagious.”

    Milhouse – The above is a completely meaningless statement without some frame of reference which you neglect to provide. See MD in Philly’s comments 100 and 101 for additional information and note that we both have referenced prior outbreaks as being in primarily rural areas. The current outbreak has hit the capital of both Sierra Leone and Liberia, although that is not a commentary on how contagious the disease is.

    A simple yes or no question helps answer that. Do you believe it is responsible for airlines, health authorities and airport authorities to knowingly allow people diagnosed with Ebola to travel by air commercially with other passengers without taking stringent precautions?

    The Liberian-American who died from Ebola in Lagos landed on 7/21 and died on 7/25. The other passengers were not detained or quarantined. Contrary to your assertion, I have read nothing which confirms authorities have been able to track down all the other passengers and that they remain Ebola free to this date, which given the incubation period would now start to become meaningful.

    There is a reason health care professionals quarantine people with Ebola – it is to stop the spread of contagion. Before it is detected and diagnosed, however, how many people can be infected by a person going about their daily routine by a disease that can be passed along through sweat or other bodily fluids, especially in a crowded urban setting?

    daleyrocks (bf33e9)

  102. “not “highly” contagious like influenza”

    How much of the difference in contagion follows from influenza being a respiratory disease chronically aerosolizing virions?

    “the risk of a solar flare frying our electrical grid”

    While the risk seems greatest following Solar cycle maximum, e.g., 1859, as at present, the current cycle is very weak–weakest in more than a century–and the next likely weaker still.

    An EMP strike, OTOH, is very likely over that timeframe.

    gary gulrud (46ca75)

  103. A simple yes or no question helps answer that. Do you believe it is responsible for airlines, health authorities and airport authorities to knowingly allow people diagnosed with Ebola to travel by air commercially with other passengers without taking stringent precautions?

    Without taking any precautions, no, of course not, but those precautions don’t have to be all that stringent. As I linked to above, one of the doctors who first discovered the virus, and has been studying it all his career, says he would have no objection to sitting on a train next to someone who was infected. If I were an airline exec having to decide whether to allow an infected person on board, I’d probably want the patient in a window seat with the two seats next to him empty, and the row in front of him empty as well, just in case he vomits. And when he got off the plane I’d want those two rows disinfected. But that’s just my completely uneducated guess. In any case, what indication do you have that any airline is allowing such passengers without appropriate precautions?

    The Liberian-American who died from Ebola in Lagos landed on 7/21 and died on 7/25. The other passengers were not detained or quarantined. Contrary to your assertion, I have read nothing which confirms authorities have been able to track down all the other passengers and that they remain Ebola free to this date, which given the incubation period would now start to become meaningful.

    I think if any passenger on the plane caught it from him we’d have heard of it by now. The lack of such reports indicates that it didn’t happen.

    There is a reason health care professionals quarantine people with Ebola – it is to stop the spread of contagion. Before it is detected and diagnosed, however, how many people can be infected by a person going about their daily routine by a disease that can be passed along through sweat or other bodily fluids, especially in a crowded urban setting?

    Quarantine is wise, but in the normal course of events how many people come in direct contact with your bodily fluids, into an open wound or mucous membrane, on a daily basis? Not too many, I’d think. You have no problem with airlines carrying people with AIDS, do you? Or with working with them, socialising with them, having them walking in the street? We got used to that in the ’90s, and stopped thinking much of it, once we realised just how difficult it was to catch. Ebola isn’t as hard to catch as AIDS, but it’s far closer to that than to the diseases we usually worry about.

    Milhouse (9d71c3)


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