Patterico's Pontifications

1/1/2014

New NYC Mayor: No More Horse-Drawn Carriage Rides in Central Park

Filed under: General — Patterico @ 2:22 pm

As if Bloomberg wasn’t a big enough doofus:

New York City Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio said that one of his first acts after taking office this week will be to ban horse-drawn carriages in Central Park.

Speaking at a news conference Monday, de Blasio said it was inhumane to expose the horses to the city’s dangerous streets.

“We are going to quickly and aggressively move to make horse carriages no longer a part of the landscape in New York City,” de Blasio said, according to NBC New York. “They are not humane. … It’s over.”

Screen Shot 2014-01-01 at 2.23.45 PM
So long: if New York’s new mayor gets his way, this will be a thing of the past

One carriage and horse owner, who asked only to be identified as Robert, told NBC News on Monday that the carriage ride is iconic to the city.

“People expect us to be here,” he said. “It’s like taking away the Empire State Building. It’s the same as taking the (Christmas) tree from Rock Center.”

If I were in New York right now, I would take a nice long horse carriage ride through Central Park. While drinking a Big Gulp.

194 Comments

  1. Because the Humane Society cares so much about the health and welfare of equines, the Hansom Cabs and Carriages will be replaced by Rickshaws and Pedi-Cabs – elites like Hizz Honor will rate a Sedan-Chair.

    Comment by askeptic (2bb434) — 1/1/2014 @ 2:39 pm

  2. “If I were in New York right now, I would take a nice long horse carriage ride through Central Park. While drinking a Big Gulp.”

    And smoking a cigar or cigarette.

    Comment by daleyrocks (bf33e9) — 1/1/2014 @ 2:41 pm

  3. Someone please harness Hizzoner and have him draw the carriages through Central Park. Might help with his poor attitude.

    Comment by Chris (59349e) — 1/1/2014 @ 2:54 pm

  4. People indeed were taking horse drawn rides because they thought it was going to end. This was a campaign promise.

    The only thing holding it up is that he has to find alternative jobs for the drivers since he was endorsed by the horse driver’s union. (one of unions in the coalition of 33 Teamster’s union locals that endorsed him is the horse carriage drivers)

    He proposed replacing them with old model early-Twentieth-century-looking electric cars. Joe Lhota also agreed that they should go. He thought the electric cars ridiculous. I forgot what his replacement proposal was. (It seems like he wanted to let them keep the carriage part, but just add batteries and motors.)

    In both cases they would still take people into Central Park.

    The New York Daily News criticized both of them:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/greeting-dead-horse-article-1.1500736

    The result of doing this is that most of the horses will be killed, although the proponents of this say the animals should be retired. It would cost about half a million dollars a year, if you could find someone to put up he money.

    Since there is already a homeless horse crisis which sends 90,000 to 100,000 thoroughbreds to Canada or Mexico to be slaughtered for food, money to take care of these horses would most likely be taken away from other horses.

    Mayor de Blasio can’t do this on his again. He needs the City Council to pass a law. But he expects to control the City Council, including its agenda. He intervened in the selection process for the Speaker snd his candidate declared victory. Governor Andrew Cuomo is reported to be interested in preventing that and getting the person who seems to be second the job.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (652c5b) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:12 pm

  5. Well, it’s not like I was going to go there before, but another stone in the already sunk ship.

    Comment by htom (412a17) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:15 pm

  6. I hope this idiot mayor isn’t going to make people take less seriously the people who complain about actual inhumane treatment of animals. I worry that he’s going to sully a good cause by virtue of his association with it.

    Comment by Alan (550092) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:19 pm

  7. What’s next? Is de Blasio going to start an anti-Amish campaign like Bloomberg had his anti-gun campaign?

    I can hardly wait for this clown to target the Iditarod. Was another of his campaign promises to take down the monument to Balto in Central Park, since it’s obviously a monument to animal cruelty?

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:30 pm

  8. They were dumb enough to elect him; let ‘em live with it. I hope the carriage drivers are very understanding about the loss of their jobs. Jeez, what’s wrong with the water in NYC? Does it make them stupid or something?

    Comment by Bill M (c8f413) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:34 pm

  9. when this island of misfit whoresluts get bombed again I’m not shedding no tears, personally

    even if Tom Hanks himself does an Evocative Cinematic Portrayal

    Comment by happyfeet (8ce051) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:40 pm

  10. I didn’t pay a ton of attention to the NYC mayoral race except for Carlos danger. But I don’t recall this carriage horse thing being part of DeBlasio’s election platform. Was it ever mentioned?

    Comment by elissa (2e35d8) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:40 pm

  11. To be fair, this isn’t a surprise; the voters of the city voted for him knowing that this was coming.

    I’m not in favor of this particular ban, but it’s not a terribly big deal either way – there are only a small handful of these, they’re not used for ordinary transportation, and they’re *incredibly* expensive.

    I’m sure there will be other, more important things to get outraged about. :)

    Comment by aphrael (a06399) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:40 pm

  12. Elissa, yes. Both Sammy and I remember this being mentioned during the campaign.

    Comment by aphrael (a06399) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:41 pm

  13. Why does New York City even have an office of Little King of Everything?

    Comment by Kevin M (536c5d) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:41 pm

  14. because they’re fascists Mr. Kevin

    it’s because they’re fascists

    Comment by happyfeet (8ce051) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:47 pm

  15. Comment by aphrael (a06399) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:40 pm

    Most things pegged to tourists are a bit over-priced.

    Comment by askeptic (2bb434) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:47 pm

  16. Yes, aphrael, I’m certain that de Blasio is starting small will go onto bigger and better outrages. That’s why it’s important to stop this sort of nonsense while it’s still small beer.

    I sure wish somebody would hold him accountable for his sweeping pronouncements about how using these particular horses for what they’re bred to do, pulling carriages, is cruel and inhumane.

    Certainly it’s less dangerous work than the work to which the horses of the NYPD mounted unit are subject.

    In the wake of the London riots, the NYPD Disorder Control Unit held a “mobilization exercise” on Randall’s Island on Friday to rehearse its response should out-of-control riots break out here, Metro has learned.

    Approximately 180 police officers total from each borough’s task force, including the horseback and aviation units, came out for the drill, according to police.
    - See more at: http://www.metro.us/newyork/news/local/2011/08/14/nypd-riot-units-conduct-drills/#sthash.LhHHvn00.dpuf

    Why does de Blasio think it’s cruel to let horses pull carriages but OK for the city to use horses for crowd control (the primary purpose for mounted police units worldwide)?

    When is the last time someone threw rocks or molotov cocktails at a carriage horse?

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:55 pm

  17. The de Blasio way: Zero horses but tons of horse shit.

    Comment by Kevin Stafford (9d942e) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:02 pm

  18. Just a reminder of the kind of working conditions police horses are subject to during London style riots:

    http://www.thefreelibrary.com/IT+WAS+SHEER+HELL%3b+47+police%2c+26+horses+injured+in+Millwall+riot.-a085418789

    IT WAS SHEER HELL; 47 police, 26 horses injured in Millwall riot.

    …In disgraceful violence recalling the worst days of soccer hooliganism, officers were pelted for more than an hour with paving stones, bricks, flares and thunderflashes. Two cars were set on fire and a children’s playground trashed for ammunition.

    Forty seven officers were hurt with nine needing hospital treatment for injuries including broken limbs.

    One officer hit by flying concrete needed seven stitches in his face. Twenty six of 34 horses on duty were also hurt. Seven people were arrested.

    …One police horse, named Alamein, suffered serious injuries when a thunderflash exploded beneath the eight-year-old mount.

    The frightened animal reared and came smashing down through a car, severing an artery in its leg. It needed life-saving treatment from specialist vets but should make a full recovery.

    They’d be better off as carriage horses in Central Park.

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:07 pm

  19. don’t the piggie fascist can’t-shoot-straight NYPD copsluts use horses all the time?

    Comment by happyfeet (8ce051) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:14 pm

  20. I don’t much mind the majority of New York City voters electing idiots like this, no more than I mind the other blue-state coastal enclaves east and west.

    It’s when they insist on messing with me that I mind it.

    The best belly-laugh I’ve had so far in 2014 was when I tried to imagine how well this sort of dictat would go over in Texas. Even Austin isn’t that crazy.

    Comment by Beldar (8ff56a) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:16 pm

  21. Comment by Beldar (8ff56a) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:16 pm

    I think something that Heinlein said applies.

    Comment by askeptic (2bb434) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:23 pm

  22. Too much of Heinlein is beginning to look like history.

    Comment by htom (412a17) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:27 pm

  23. We’re deep in the ‘Crazy Years’, although DeBlasio is like something out of the Dark Knight Rises.

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:31 pm

  24. Billy Jeff and DeBlasio lost the FDR Bible used in the swearing in. It was located a few hours later. Really, who knew commies even use a Bible?

    http://nypost.com/2014/01/01/historic-bible-goes-missing-after-de-blasio-swearing-in/

    Comment by elissa (2e35d8) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:38 pm

  25. “lost” shows how much reverence they have for it – as the book it is, and who it was owned by.
    I imagine that it was “found” by someone who has actually read it.

    Comment by askeptic (2bb434) — 1/1/2014 @ 4:45 pm

  26. Oh, brother. Contemporary humanism and do-gooderism knows no boundaries.

    I’m sure de Blasio, as a typical leftist, sheds big tears for animals but remains a steadfast devotee of women interested in dumping their fetus (perhaps one even as old as 8 months in the womb) always having quick, easy, inexpensive access to abortions.

    I was speaking with some relatives today — who aren’t even goofball liberals, btw — and they were describing how because keeping killer whales in captivity is such a cruel act, that the public should start boycotting Sea World. They also implied that zoos should send their animals back into the wild and be closed down.

    I bit my lip in wanting to tell them that such sentiment isn’t necessarily a reflection of people’s or society’s decency or sophistication, because no less than Adolph Hitler was a vegan who, along with his Third Reich, enacted legislation to promote animal rights.

    Comment by Mark (58ea35) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:08 pm

  27. Elissa @ 23 Billy Jeff and DeBlasio lost the FDR Bible used in the swearing in. It was located a few hours later.

    Bill Clinton first mentioned that this Bible was being used, and then felt compelled to add that that was justified or appropriate.

    Bill Clinton apparently wrote the whole swearing in text himself. He didn’t include, unlike with the two other officeholders – Comptroller Scott Stringer, and Public Advocate Letitia James – swearing to uphold the constitution of the State of New York and the New York City Charter, but only the United States Constitution, and I think there was more missing too.

    At his real swearing in last night, at his home on 11th Street in Park Slope, Bill de Blasio was sworn in by New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman (whom I may have said Barack Obama becoming president was like him becoming president – he had about the same prominence as Obama several years ago – he was also a state Senator looking for higher office) de Blasio had to pay a tax registration fee of $9 to officially become mayor.

    He stuffed a wad of bills into the hands of City Clerk Matt McSweeney, who walked off without bothering to count the money. Bill de Blasio then went to a local bar with his family.

    That swearing in was originally supposed to be closed to the general public, but de Blasio relented and allowed a 2-person press pool, consisting of one Associated Press reporter and one television reporter to witness the event, and it was also live-streamed over the Internet. Di Blasio had said he didn’t want11th Street clogged with press vehicles, but it was cordoned off anyway, and people couldn’t get in or out.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (652c5b) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:18 pm

  28. Comment by Mark (58ea35) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:08 pm

    no less than Adolph Hitler was a vegan

    I think that was because of his health notions.

    who, along with his Third Reich, enacted legislation to promote animal rights.

    Some of that was just anti-semitism, of course (prohibiting Kosher slaughtering)

    If there was more, that was because the Nazis did not believe in right and wrong, but they did believe in sentimentality.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (652c5b) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:21 pm

  29. In another swearing in blunder, Public Advocate Letitia James was being sworn in by someone and was repeating words.

    Then he said “I conclude”

    And she said “I conclude”

    Maybe there was some quick talk, and she said:

    “Oh, you conclude.”

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (652c5b) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:24 pm

  30. 11. Comment by aphrael (a06399) — 1/1/2014 @ 3:40 pm

    I’m sure there will be other, more important things to get outraged about.

    I think de Blasio is trying to avoid that. I think this looks to him like a (bad) campaign promise he can fulfill without getting too many people upset.

    I think he’s really scared about crime, and when it comeS labor negotiations, he appointed two people who did the job for Koch. He;s against every kind of school reform but probably still hopes to get good results.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (652c5b) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:27 pm

  31. the Nazis did not believe in right and wrong, but they did believe in sentimentality.

    Sammy, that’s an astute observation that is even more applicable in today’s era.

    BTW, if I wished ill will on your home city, I’d be totally happy about the thought of de Blasio being as liberal as possible — being leftwing to his heart’s content — and having tremendous impact on every aspect of New York City.

    Comment by Mark (58ea35) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:39 pm

  32. Mark, it will be interesting to see how much of his agenda is rejected, or just stone-walled, by the City Council.

    Comment by askeptic (2bb434) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:47 pm

  33. Well, if it costs a lot, and only a few people do it, then there is nothing wrong with flexing your fascist muscles a bit.

    Comment by JD (5c1832) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:49 pm

  34. Some New Yorkers will lose their livelihood you say? They drive horse-drawn carriages you say? Their union endorsed de Blasio you say? I’ll have an orange soda, please.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:50 pm

  35. I think if there was ever any doubt after Bloomberg, the election of this abject nimrod to as much as dog catcher is proof that residents of NYC are total morons.

    Comment by Igotbupkis, "Not At Home For The Holidays" (155353) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:52 pm

  36. Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:50 pm

    Would you like buttered popcorn with that soda?

    Comment by askeptic (2bb434) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:53 pm

  37. If this were to occur in Chicago Illinois, we’d be pretty certain that the threat would quietly go away once the carriage owners and the drivers’ union had made the required “political contributions”, BTW. Does de Blassio have more campaign debt than he figured and is squeezing the owners, the drivers, and the hippies, for more “support” do you think?

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:56 pm

  38. I hope this idiot mayor isn’t going to make people take less seriously the people who complain about actual inhumane treatment of animals. I worry that he’s going to sully a good cause by virtue of his association with it.

    That you actually imagine PETA has not irredeemably sullied the name of this cause is amble reason for endless mirth in itself.

    You probably think “racism” as a claim still means something, too…?

    Comment by Igotbupkis, "Not At Home For The Holidays" (155353) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:56 pm

  39. 36- nk, I think what you posit is a reasonable assumption – even though the “Carriage Driver’s Union” did endorse BDB for Mayor during the campaign.

    Comment by askeptic (2bb434) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:58 pm

  40. it’s because they’re fascists

    Actually, it’s because they are leftists.

    Similar meaning, but it’s simply not true that all fascists are leftists: It is demonstrably true that almost all leftists are fascists, to the extent of presumption until proven otherwise…

    Comment by Igotbupkis, "Not At Home For The Holidays" (155353) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:59 pm

  41. all i know is they hate freedom and individual liberty

    and they whine a lot

    Comment by happyfeet (8ce051) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:01 pm

  42. I vote we send in Snake Plisskin.

    Comment by Kevin M (536c5d) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:06 pm

  43. Too much of Heinlein is beginning to look like history.

    LOL, RAH wrote of “The Crazy Years” in his collected omnibus The Past Though Tomorrow… in it, he describes, in the mid 1970s (in a story written in the 40s) a headline about a man who ascribed to the health benefits of eating dirt.

    In 1975, I encountered (still have it somewhere, as a matter of fact) a newspaper article of someone describing… yes, you guessed itthe health benefits of eating dirt.

    The man was amazing in his prescience.

    Welcome to The Crazy Years.

    Comment by Igotbupkis, "Not At Home For The Holidays" (155353) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:11 pm

  44. Bloomberg wanted a hobby now that his businesses were essentially running themselves. An ordinary person would have bought an HO train set for his basement. Bloomberg bought an ant farm New York City, at about the same proportion of his disposable income as an ordinary person’s HO set (the NYT estimates he spent about $650 million).

    De Blassio is a different animal. A small-time New York City politician, married to another small-time New York City political hack, and an Italian to boot, without Bloomberg’s integrity … errm … lack of financial worry. He has to know he got elected only because of Carlos Danger and his reelection is a longshot. He is going to loot the city blind and raze it to ruins.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:28 pm

  45. Love it..

    With all the absolute sensitivity, prescience, ability to unify, and just be so fun and cool; this is your first act as Mayor of one of the top 5 cities on earth……

    Keep it going Blasi, ya strunz

    Comment by Angelo (3f723c) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:30 pm

  46. He knows he’ll be spewing enough horse sh*t to cover the city.

    Comment by Colonel Haiku (3713fd) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:47 pm

  47. Aside. I thought Heinlein was the cat’s pajamas for a long time. I read everything by him, until he made it clear that it was all about him wanting to have sex with his mother. A family friend gave us a copy of Red Planet for my daughter. We don’t much censor her reading at the best of times and there’s no special reason not to let her read this book, but in the back of my head is that everything by Heinlein must be questioned as mental pollution. She hasn’t read it yet and maybe it’ll stay lost in the pile. She got Harry Potter 7 for Christmas.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:48 pm

  48. If de Blasio has several terms we could perhaps see NYC become bankrupt again. If that happens hopefully it won’t be bailed out again. Last time NY State bailed it out.

    Comment by Gerald A (bfbd30) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:51 pm

  49. a prospect of one term is bad enough;

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2014/01/the-new-york-times-misleads-on-economics-too.php

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:57 pm

  50. Does anyone here remember the ’70s? I do. NYC was a deplorable pit of crime and poverty. I think there was this kind of famous movie, or maybe a hundred or so, about just how terrible it was. It didn’t get better until the ’90s.

    It will be interesting to see if the lefty gentry allows the city to degenerate to the sewer it was before.

    Nobody enjoys being mugged — especially privileged lefty white people. It’s unbecoming and messy to explain.

    Comment by Ag80 (eb6ffa) — 1/1/2014 @ 7:18 pm

  51. Deathwish, notably, probably the Warriors, Escape from New York, extrapolated the 70s into the future,

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/1/2014 @ 7:22 pm

  52. Gloria. The most realistic portrayal of New Yorkers, i.e., surly, foul-mouthed, a-holes.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 7:33 pm

  53. That’s kind of obscure, don’cha think.

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/1/2014 @ 7:38 pm

  54. I prefer “a rare gem for the connoisseur”. Gena Rowlands was one hot mama. (See, Haiku, I do like some blondes.)

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 7:54 pm

  55. Maybe it’s petty of me, but I get a bit irked when meat-eaters get on their high horse (sorry for the pun) about animal rights. In May, de Blasio stated that his kids are vegetarians but he is not.

    Sorry, but if you actually care about animals, you’ll make actual sacrifices yourself, rather than harassing business owners or borrowing virtue from other people.

    (This is not to imply that omnivores hate animals, but it is to point out that the best place to start with improving animal welfare is with your own treatment of animals.)

    Comment by bridget (37b281) — 1/1/2014 @ 8:05 pm

  56. Well, if it costs a lot, and only a few people do it, then there is nothing wrong with flexing your fascist muscles a bit.

    Comment by JD (5c1832) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:49 pm

    First they came for the e-cigarettes, but I didn’t speak up because I don’t use e-cigarettes.

    Then they came for the carriage horses, but I didn’t speak up because only a few people make their living giving paying customers carriage rides and I’m not one of them…

    Actually, I did speak up. Back when Nanny Bloomberg was banning salt, large sodas, and his NYPD was sending out confiscation notices to the few gun owners left in the city after the state passed its barbarous NYSafe act.

    But this is apparently how New Yorkers want to live. We really should build a fence around it to confine the the contagion.

    33. Some New Yorkers will lose their livelihood you say? They drive horse-drawn carriages you say? Their union endorsed de Blasio you say? I’ll have an orange soda, please.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 5:50 pm

    Other than the horses which will likely end up in slaughterhouses across the border I don’t feel badly for anyone in this fiasco.

    One option would be to sell the carriage horses to other carriage horse operators. NYC isn’t the only place in the country where you can hire a horse drawn carriage. It’s a nice way to see the gas lamp district in Sandy Eggo.

    But I’m sure the fascisti who are cooking this up as an animal rights issue won’t allow that.

    http://news.yahoo.com/amish-buggy-horse-killed-drive-shooting-pennsylvania-173741682.html

    It was probably an animal cruelty officer from NYC trying to put a stop to the unthinkable inhumanity of horses pulling people around in carriages. Given how well these people shoot, I’d expect them to hit the horse if they aimed at the people in the buggy.

    It’s only a matter of time before the new city administration starts its anti-Amish campaign.

    http://www.horseracing.com/types-of-horse-racing/endurance/

    Shhh! Don’t tell de Blasio that people ride horses in 100 mile marathons.

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/1/2014 @ 8:16 pm

  57. My daughter was a horsy girl for a time. The horses at the riding stables and ranches we went to were “old ladies” well past their prime being given a reason to continue to live. Eh. Everything dies.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 8:22 pm

  58. nk- RAH may have wanted to have sex with his mother (a common occurrence, what was uncommon was that he had one of his characters eventually do so, as well as having children by any number of his descendants) but neither is a reason not to read his books. Other authors display considerably less common desires. (Whether or not the desire to have sexual relations with a parent is either good or normal I’m not sure, and it doesn’t much matter.)

    Comment by htom (412a17) — 1/1/2014 @ 9:50 pm

  59. If I may, I have a suggestion for where to dispose of the existing manure…

    Comment by a10pilot (f71b4f) — 1/1/2014 @ 10:14 pm

  60. “… inhumane to expose the horses to the city’s dangerous streets.”

    Exposing humans to the city’s dangerous streets is just fine, however.

    Keep up the good work deblasio.

    Comment by Tom (bea0bc) — 1/1/2014 @ 10:33 pm

  61. 59. “… inhumane to expose the horses to the city’s dangerous streets.”

    Exposing humans to the city’s dangerous streets is just fine, however.

    Keep up the good work deblasio.

    Comment by Tom (bea0bc) — 1/1/2014 @ 10:33 pm

    If you summed up his wacky ideas on crime and policing, he plans on making the city’s streets even more dangerous. And then expose NYPD police horses to the increased danger he creates.

    ?!?!?!?

    De Blasio said he will seek to replace the horse-drawn carriages with alternatives, such as antique-style electric cars, according to the New York Daily News.

    Pure genius. Tourists will flock to Central Park for the chance to be overcharged by some Teamster to be driven around in the back of a re-styled golf cart.

    Enjoy your new mayor, New Yorkers.

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/1/2014 @ 10:52 pm

  62. It’s contagious. Restrictionitis. Incurable.

    Comment by Peter (371d15) — 1/2/2014 @ 2:45 am

  63. The people of New York knew what they wanted, and deserve to get it good and hard.

    Comment by Jeff Weimer (bb9480) — 1/2/2014 @ 6:09 am

  64. 57.nk- RAH may have wanted to have sex with his mother (a common occurrence, what was uncommon was that he had one of his characters eventually do so, as well as having children by any number of his descendants) but neither is a reason not to read his books. Other authors display considerably less common desires. (Whether or not the desire to have sexual relations with a parent is either good or normal I’m not sure, and it doesn’t much matter.)

    Comment by htom (412a17) — 1/1/2014 @ 9:50 pm

    It’s one thing for an adult to read the entire body-of-work; quite another for an impressionable youngster like nk’s daughter. I believe nk is correct to be concerned; Heinlein is such an engaging writer, and so much of what his protagonists say [when *not* discussing sex] is true, that he can make the most outrageous things seem “right,” for the unwary reader.

    If nk were looking for advice (ha!), I would suggest encouraging his daughter to read the “juveniles,” and *discuss* with her why some of the other works are not approriate for her now.

    Comment by TG (71074c) — 1/2/2014 @ 7:12 am

  65. (Whether or not the desire to have sexual relations with a parent is either good or normal I’m not sure, and it doesn’t much matter.)

    That certainly is a healthy dose of the ethos of don’t judge, don’t judge! Kum-ba-ya, kum-ba-ya. You’re okay, I’m okay.

    Moral equivalency gone berserk, and hello, Nidal Hasan!

    BTW, New York City’s new mayor is not just symbolic of a person in love with dyed-in-the-wool liberalism, including animal rights going off the deep end. He, by way of his wife — a self-described lesbian — is symbolic of how much free will and free choice (good or bad) is a part of human behavior.

    Comment by Mark (58ea35) — 1/2/2014 @ 7:22 am

  66. Power to teh horses!
    Power to teh horses!
    Power to teh horses!
    Power to teh horses, ride on!

    Comment by Colonel Haiku (9b1d34) — 1/2/2014 @ 7:57 am

  67. All those animal rights folks worrying about the poor cougars have done it in the Los Angeles suburb of Glendale. We’ve had 3 dogs killed by mountain lions in just the last 12 months–the last one was Monday night. Two of the three dogs were 80 pound plus Labrador retrievers. I’ve got a particular interest in this since I have lived in a home in the brushline in Glendale for a long time. The lions weren’t here when I bought my home almost 40 years ago. In short–I was here first.

    3 lions in the Verdugo Hills –behind Glendale and Burbank; one lion in Griffith Park. Thank you eco-wackos.

    The Children’s Cove down in La Jolla–a swimming place for kiddies from at least the 1940′s through the early 80′s is now a seal cesspool with the beach fenced off so humans can’t “disturb the seals”. The smell is so bad that lawsuits have been filed by an adjoining restaurant and local residents. Nothing like the smell of seal poop to enhance dining pleasure.
    Not to mention the increase in great white sharks attracted by the seals.

    The New York City carriage horses are headed for the glue factory where, presumably, they’ll be disposed of “in a human way”.

    And Bridget–re proper treatment of animals? I’ve had well cared for pets all my life. I’ve also raised chickens and beef cattle. All of them were disposed of in a “humane way” and after their deaths, I treated them with appropriate amounts of salt and pepper. Meat does not arrive Cargo Cult style wrapped in plastic and deposited in meat counters in supermarkets. It comes from living, breathing, eating and pooping birds, sheep, goats and cattle.

    Comment by Comanche Voter (bd140e) — 1/2/2014 @ 7:59 am

  68. Oops–as to the New York City dobbins being disposed of in a “human” way—should have said “humane way”. But on second thought the first statement may have been accurate. These horses got a death sentence because of DiBlasio.

    Comment by Comanche Voter (bd140e) — 1/2/2014 @ 8:01 am

  69. Now that those poor horses have been freed from their horrific working conditions will the mayor liberate the city’s doormen?

    Comment by crazy (d60cb0) — 1/2/2014 @ 8:28 am

  70. I remember an LAT editorial that said we should do away with valet parking because it was exploitative of the workers! And we should park our own cars and walk. LOL. That’s right, take away their living to “help” them!

    Comment by Patricia (be0117) — 1/2/2014 @ 8:31 am

  71. 43. Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:28 pm

    Bloomberg wanted a hobby now that his businesses were essentially running themselves. An ordinary person would have bought an HO train set for his basement. Bloomberg bought an ant farm New York City,

    Bloomberg had this idea that he was going to do public service – like there was no politics involved.

    I wouldn’t knock it too much. He saved the legacy of Giuliani and prevented New York City from going downhill. I don’t know how successful Herman Badillo would have been in the mayoral race. Most likely not too good. It’s very hard for an

    Republican

    independent candidate to get any traction.

    Bloomberg maybe won because of September 11 2001 -possibly it got him Giuliani’s endorsement. This time Bloomberg did not endorse anyone.

    And Bloomberg might have even seemed a bit appropriate for the job in 2001.

    He became with time, and the advice of consultants, half good with people.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (652c5b) — 1/2/2014 @ 8:44 am

  72. De Blassio is a different animal. A small-time New York City politician, married to another small-time New York City political hack, and an Italian to boot,

    Half-Italian. His father was of 19th century German background. He became an alcoholic and he and his wife separated. de Blasio kept a number of secrets that didn’t come out till this year, one of them being that his father, ill with cancer, had committed suicide in 1979, a half a year or more before they thoughthe might die. He also changed his name three times. It was originally Warren Wilhelm (Wilhelm was his father’s last name)

    de Blasio mentioned some relatives from Italy were at his inaguaration. You would not know he was not 100% Italian.

    We also didn’t find out that his wife used to be a lesbian, so much so, she had written a magazine article about it about a dozen years before they met. He brought her close to him.

    He has to know he got elected only because of Carlos Danger

    That was one of the factors. The real reason was that he was the last Not Romney not Christine Quinn standing when the bell rang on September 10 for the Democratic primary.

    He also made deals, and made sure that blacks and everybody else knew his family was black. So they didn’t vote for Bill Thompson, whom a lot of blacks didn’t realize was black.

    and his reelection is a longshot.

    I think he feels – maybe not that it is a longshot, but that he is much more vulnerable than a lot of people might be given to think.

    He is going to loot the city blind

    Too many prosecutors running around. It won’t happen.

    and raze it to ruins.

    I think he wants to get re-elected. He made a BIG STATEMENT in his inaugural address about he meant what he said in his campaign about two cities, and he is going to keep his campaign pldeges. It is impossible really, since that idea is incoherent. He just wants to appear to be keeping them – there isn’t really anything to keep. He pledged to < reform stop and frsik by the way. Unless he destroys policing, it’s a total nothing.

    He does have this thing about pre-K education. he whole thing is a scam, because it doesn’t even cost that much money and other factors, positive and negative, will overwhelm any effect it has on the budget. It’s just an excuse to raise taxes a little bit to make it easier to pay municipal workees more. But he can’t pay too much more and he can’t really do retroactive pay. He could diminish services but that’s where his re-election comes into play, so he won’t. His appointee of Koch labor negotiators shows his. He wants them to come up with some magic.

    He’ll just try to satisfy all the people he made bad campaign promises to while at the same time doing as little harm as possible.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (652c5b) — 1/2/2014 @ 8:53 am

  73. A good preacher may get off into the weeds no and then, but the good ones are exhorting you to live your best. They are not trying to control you, they aren’t going into your bathroom medicine cabinet, they don’t want to be in your bedroom or in your gun safe.
    They stand outside and speak in to you and you can do with that advice at the level of your own soul.

    Democrats want in to every crevice of our lives.
    Someone should do a reenactment of the old wells fargo running from indians complete with old winchesters right down the middle of the park trailing a banner that reads F*** Off

    Comment by steveg (794291) — 1/2/2014 @ 9:05 am

  74. And the speakers talked over and over again yesterday about not closing hospitals, which is an impossibility.

    Now the reason for the hospital closings is this: Hospitals charge a great deal for a patient being there each day. This is, in reality, a profit making charge, or a cross-subsidy, the same way that an Emergency Room is. Or an airline ticket.

    Starting around 1983 – even earlier actually with PSROs – there was a big movement to reduce the number of days people spent in hospitals. But in 1983, they started with these DRGs.

    For two or three years or so, in the mid-1980s, it cut medical costs.

    Then the hospitals figured a way around it. They could bill for outpatient services too. They also just charged more per patient-day.

    Because starting in 1983, the cost of a day ina hospital skyrocketed. Yes, the number of inpatient days declined from 112 million in 1983 to 66 million in 2010, but the amount Medicare paid per day rose from $300 to $1800….But what’s more interesting is that they [hospials] raised their “costs” even more. When the DRGs were enacted, hospitals were billing Medicare $4,700 per discharge, and accepting payments from the government of $3,000 – roughly 65 percent of the bill. By 2010, hospitals were billing $40,152 per discharge but accepting payments of only $9,500 – less than 25 percentof the billed amount. so not only are hospitals arning six times their previous per-day revenues, they’ve somehow managed to claim that Medicare’s getting an even better deal than before.
    – Catastrophic Care: How American Health Care Killed my Father – and How We Can Fix It by David Goldhill (Alfred A. Knoph, 2013) page 154-155.

    In any case since it is not a real cost element, reducing the length of hospital stays can’t reduce medical costs, except maybe when the overhead for an entire hospital is gone

    But still, there’s been continuous pressure against people staying in the hospital, and it’s become a game of musical chairs.

    Of course, if they are fortunate enough to have them, people don’t want accessible hospitals
    to close. It’s like fire houses, maybe, only more so. But some hospitals are losing money.

    Joe Lhota talked about Montifiore did in the Bronx, opening up annexes basically, but de Blasio wasn’t interetsed in that – only in protesting and even getting himself arrested.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (4eddd7) — 1/2/2014 @ 9:14 am

  75. 47. Comment by Gerald A (bfbd30) — 1/1/2014 @ 6:51 pm

    If de Blasio has several terms we could perhaps see NYC become bankrupt again.

    There’s a two-term limit for all city officeholders starting in 1993. Bloomberg got it extended, without another referendum,in 2009 in a deal with the Speaker of the City Council. But it was only for one election. Bloomberg probably believes the term exension is why he almost lost in 2009. He did not try again.

    Comptroller Bill Thompson decided totun anywa, but lost. Bill De Blasio in 2005, during his try for City Council Speaker had promised the other City Council members he would try to extend their terms if he was chosen. He lost that race. In 2009, when he was planning to run for Public Advocate and didn’t need another term, he was against extending term limits.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (f2d620) — 1/2/2014 @ 9:20 am

  76. I don’t disagree with your analysis, Sammy. Especially Bloomberg being good for the city, because I think he was. We’ll see. Now that the farmer has gone away and the animals picked one of their own to run the farm: Will de Blassio learn to walk on two legs (a good thing)? Who will get sent to the knackers (I fear it will be the middle class)?

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/2/2014 @ 9:24 am

  77. 49. Comment by Ag80 (eb6ffa) — 1/1/2014 @ 7:18 pm

    It didn’t get better until the ’90s.

    Yesterday, Bill deBlasio gave credit to Mayor David Dinkins for starting the reduction in crime – but not his (second) Police Commissioner.
    (the idea was to say, not Giuliani, Dinkins!)

    And he did give some thanks to Mayor Bloomberg, focusing on health and environmental issues, but did not mention his Police commssioner.

    And he talked about continuing the good work the police were doing, but did not mention the police commissioner.

    Now guess what was the name of the person whose name he avoided mentioning even though he had several chances to do so?

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (411489) — 1/2/2014 @ 9:24 am

  78. Well she is teaching in New York,sort of;

    http://www.truthrevolt.org/news/cuny-law-professor-blames-southern-white-radicals-obamacare-failure

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 10:24 am

  79. The People – even in NYC – need to be reminded every few years why contemporary leftism can be depended on to run things into the ground.

    Comment by Colonel Haiku (a2f5ea) — 1/2/2014 @ 10:27 am

  80. ready aim, fisk;

    “It’s important that people realize this is a multi-year process,” says Timothy S. Jost, a healthcare expert at Washington and Lee University. “I feel we’re bottoming out this year in terms of the disruption of change.” The hard work, he says, still lies ahead.

    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-hiltzik-20131224,0,1425488.column#ixzz2pGi9Abil

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 10:51 am

  81. 51. Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/1/2014 @ 7:33 pm

    Gloria. The most realistic portrayal of New Yorkers, i.e., surly, foul-mouthed, a-holes.

    Is Gloria the name of a movie?

    I checked and itis. 1980.

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/1/2014 @ 7:38 pm

    That’s kind of obscure, don’cha think.

    I probably wouldn’t even know moe famous movies.

    I do know Ghostbusters (1984) – also a movie about New York City.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (411489) — 1/2/2014 @ 11:15 am

  82. 60. Comment by Tom (bea0bc) — 1/1/2014 @ 10:33 pm

    Exposing humans to the city’s dangerous streets is just fine, however.

    One of de Blasio’s campaign promises (or stated goals) is toreduce traffic deaths to zero.

    Not lower them, as Giuliani and Bloomberg did – ZERO.

    http://www.billdeblasio.com/issues/street-safety

    …The City must take decisive and sustained action to reduce street fatalities each year until we have achieved “Vision Zero” – a city with zero fatalities or serious injuries caused by car crashes on the streets of New York.

    In Chicago, City officials have set a goal to eliminate all pedestrian, bicyclist and motorist traffic fatalities within ten years. In New York, we can do the same….

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (411489) — 1/2/2014 @ 11:24 am

  83. Cramming too many animals in a confined space drives them insane. Humans who do this are punished.

    Cramming too many humans in a confined space driving them insane and violent is called sustainability which leftists don’t take part of, but inflict on others.

    Now, does anyone question Liberalism being a mental disease?

    Comment by PCD (7a7072) — 1/2/2014 @ 11:35 am

  84. Coming soon to NYC…
    and in the death, as the last few corpses
    lay rotting in the slimy thoroughfare,
    the shutters lifted an inch in City Hall
    high on crack. And red mutant eyes gazed down on New Jack City.
    No more big wheels.
    Fleas the size of rats sucked
    on rats the size of cats.
    And tens of thousands of liberals split into small tribes,
    coveting the highest of the sterile sky-scrappers,
    like packs of dogs assaulting the
    glass fronts of Park Avenue.
    Ripping and re-wrapping mink and
    shiny silver fox, now leg warmers.

    Comment by Colonel Haiku (6726b1) — 1/2/2014 @ 11:37 am

  85. If Heinlein is off-limits, what do you do about Gore Vidal?

    Comment by askeptic (b8ab92) — 1/2/2014 @ 11:59 am

  86. Let them eat Broadway plays.

    Comment by daleyrocks (bf33e9) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:00 pm

  87. Colonel Haiku 84. You may not think much of this poem, but it is a whole lot better than the poem (?) read at Mayor de Blasio’s inauguration.

    http://www.democracynow.org/2014/1/2/we_will_no_longer_stay_silent

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (411489) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:01 pm

  88. it was all about him wanting to have sex with his mother.

    In his dotage, perhaps. Nothing before the end of Time Enough for Love even suggests that. He did clearly have a thing for redheads, though.

    For “safe” but worthwhile Heinlein, try “Double Star”, “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress” or “The Door into Summer”. The first 2 won Hugos, and the latter is quite good as well. Any of the Heinlein juveniles, such as Red Planet, are safe. A Tunnel in the Sky is my favorite of these.

    Books to avoid: Farnham’s Freehold, Sixth Column and his “World as Myth” books starting with The Number of the Beast.

    Friday and Stranger in a Strange Land may be too adult for some, but are both excellent (although the “uncut” version of Stranger is long-winded and proves the need of editors).

    Comment by Kevin M (536c5d) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:05 pm

  89. If Heinlein is off-limits, what do you do about Gore Vidal?

    Or David Gerrold’s The Man Who Folded Himself?

    Comment by Kevin M (536c5d) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:07 pm

  90. Oh, wait, “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress” does have a line marriage in it, so maybe it isn’t safe. The idea never bothered me so much (nor was it very attractive). A similar one in “Friday” had the predictable issues exposed.

    Comment by Kevin M (536c5d) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:11 pm

  91. Can he do this? Can the mayor simply announce law? Is his word law?

    Comment by ErisGuy (76f8a7) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:12 pm

  92. I thought at first the inauguration was not televised on the main broadcats channels, or on the radio.

    I had thought it was an hour later. I have two clocks (one digial) that have not been turned back from Daylight Savings Time and they mix me up sometimes. I also have a clock that has bene turned back.

    It may also be that I see the wrong hour. It happened two times before.

    But it was on Channel Two Plus [2-2] and Channels 4-2 and 7-2 and 7-3 and streamed on the Internet.

    The whole thing laasted a total of one hour and 45 minutes or so. De Blasio’s introduction and swearing in was saved for the end.

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/bill-de-blasio-inauguration-march-toward-fairer-more-just-more-progressive-place-full-transcript/

    The tape seems a bit less than 1 hour and 45 minutes because it didn’t start precisely at noon.

    Here are the places where de Blasio could have, but doesn’t mention Ray Kelly:

    Thank you, Mayor Dinkins, for starting us on the road to a safer city…We will reform a broken stop-and-frisk policy, both to protect the dignity and rights of young men of color, and to give our brave police officers the partnership they need to continue their success in driving down crime….New York has faced fiscal collapse, a crime epidemic, terrorist attacks, and natural disasters. But now, in our time, we face a different crisis – an inequality crisis.

    (he’s saying a crime crisis is in the past.)

    He didn’t say anything about the horses here..

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (411489) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:17 pm

  93. 91. Comment by ErisGuy (76f8a7) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:12 pm

    Can the mayor simply announce law? Is his word law?

    No, he can’t. But he may get to the pooint where having the City Council pass a law is a formality, and can be done in a month.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/de-blasio-touts-mark-viverito-council-speaker-article-1.1551066

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/20/nyregion/trail-of-fractured-political-friendships-on-way-to-advancement-in-city-council.html

    …Ms. Mark-Viverito announced on Wednesday evening that she had been “chosen” the next speaker of the City Council, which is the second most powerful position in city government.

    Her announcement should have come with at least one asterisk: No vote has yet been taken on the position in the Council, and none can be held be until next year, when 20 new members who were elected in November take office.

    Nevertheless, Ms. Mark-Viverito declared that she was “humbled” by this great event, which has not yet actually happened.

    The New York Times does not like this: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/30/opinion/mr-de-blasio-picks-his-speaker.html

    …The mayoral meddling in Council business was unsurprising but unseemly, especially from someone who used to accuse Speaker Christine Quinn of being too close to Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

    But that was then. Now we’re about to get a speaker with an enormous debt to the mayor, leading a legislative body that is supposed to be an independent counterweight to the executive….

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (411489) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:24 pm

  94. If you get rid of the horses, you get rid of the entire horse. No horse’s asses, less competition!

    Comment by htom (412a17) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:25 pm

  95. http://100percentbronx.blogspot.com/2013/12/is-governor-cuomo-backing-dan-garodnick.html

    According to Fred Dicker of the New York Post New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is secretly working with Bronx Democratic County Leader Assemblyman Carl Heastie and Queens Democratic County Leader Congressman Joseph Crowley to line up support for Councilman Dan Garodnick to be the next speaker of the city council. Dicker writes that it is not in the interest of the governor to have Melissa Mark-Viverito as the speaker to Mayor Bill de Blasio because both are of the left leaning thought.

    Another reason for not wanted Mark-Viverito as speaker would be that it would be a serious defeat for incoming Mayor de Blasio and would weaken his perceived power base. De Blasio wants Cuomo to raise taxes to pay for pre-k and after school programs, while Cuomo wants to lower taxes in an election year not raise them…

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (411489) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:30 pm

  96. When the next bail-out request comes, mark me down as against.

    Comment by Kevin M (536c5d) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:44 pm

  97. Stringer as Comptroller, how was Spitzer worse again:

    http://newsbusters.org/blogs/mike-ciandella/2014/01/02/frozen-out-98-stories-ignore-ice-bound-ship-was-global-warming-missi

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:45 pm

  98. And, as a Californian, I am concerned that my fine state is facing such strong competition for the Lunacy prize.

    Man’s gotta take pride in what he can.

    Comment by Kevin M (536c5d) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:46 pm

  99. Spitzer was going to crusade against – Wall Street whatever, while not paying attention to his actual job, where he might have done some good. The difference between Comptroller and Attorney General is that if he’s completely wrong as Comptroller you can ignore him. But if he is right he might do something. Stringer took that part of the job more seriously and said he wanted to establish a think tank in his office.

    Even though Stringer will do a little bit of that crusading in the field corporate governance, it will only be in conjunction with other pension funds.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:58 pm

  100. Yes, but do they have a local ‘Summarizing Proust’
    competition, the craziness seems to be at the state level, primarily.

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 1:00 pm

  101. 96. Comment by Kevin M (536c5d) — 1/2/2014 @ 12:44 pm

    When the next bail-out request comes, mark me down as against.

    The next bailout request will come from the insurance companies who listed policies on healthcare.gov and the state exchanges.

    The bailout requests for the hospitals de Blasio does not want to close will come later.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/2/2014 @ 1:00 pm

  102. Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, after 8 years in a doctor-caused coma (they gave him Coumadin to treat his stroke) is reported near death.

    It will 8 full solar calendar years on January 4.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/2/2014 @ 1:02 pm

  103. 100. Poetry craziness?

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/2/2014 @ 1:02 pm

  104. de Blovio starts NYC’s Big Decline of 2014 with a re-write of the historical record vis-a-vis Dinkins and replaces Giuliani’s “broken window” policy with his own Broken Record policy. Look for a rapid descent coupled with much Marxist bloviating.

    Comment by Colonel Haiku (6726b1) — 1/2/2014 @ 1:15 pm

  105. No, just illustrating absurdity,

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 1:23 pm

  106. Sammy… if I clicked on a Democarcy Now! link I fear that I’d be struck with Amy Goodman disease and never smile again.

    Comment by Colonel Haiku (6726b1) — 1/2/2014 @ 1:23 pm

  107. i picture her living alone with cats and hummels

    Comment by happyfeet (c60db2) — 1/2/2014 @ 1:31 pm

  108. Yeah, she’s not terribly kean on the leading democracy, even before the immaculation, pikachu;

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2014/01/small-business-group-says-not-a-single-member-has-seen-health-care-costs-go-down-under-obamacare/

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 2:30 pm

  109. Some Mayors attempt to offer their citizenry little nuggets of wisdom, such as, “Let’s not put the cart before the horse !”
    But this new dictator Mayor dick of NYC says, “Let’s not have any horses or carts ! Let’s just have dystopia !”

    ‘Cause he’s enlightened.
    Or something.

    Comment by Elephant Stone (6a6f37) — 1/2/2014 @ 2:38 pm

  110. “The difference between Comptroller and Attorney General is that if he’s completely wrong as Comptroller you can ignore him.”

    Sammy – Right, NYC running out of money and people robbing it blind through fraud and corruption are no big thing.

    Comment by daleyrocks (bf33e9) — 1/2/2014 @ 2:42 pm

  111. I do not foresee a warm or collaborative relationship between Gov. Cuomo and mayor DeBlasio. In fact I predict that particular power struggle could get kinda ugly.

    Comment by elissa (fb9ae9) — 1/2/2014 @ 2:46 pm

  112. de Blasio needs to start paying pensions to sex workers in NYC, a long ignored part of the work force.

    War on Wimyn!

    No Justice, No Peace!

    Comment by daleyrocks (bf33e9) — 1/2/2014 @ 2:49 pm

  113. ==de Blovio starts NYC’s Big Decline of 2014 with a re-write of the historical record vis-a-vis Dinkins==

    Colonel, I just don’t see how that re-write lie is going to fly with anybody of any color or creed who had the misfortune of living in, doing business in, or visiting, NYC during the short but painful Dinkins era.

    Comment by elissa (fb9ae9) — 1/2/2014 @ 2:55 pm

  114. @ Colonel Haiku 84. 87. 106

    OK, I’ll copy it, altough maybe I could link to a Google cache of find it somwhere else.

    The “poem” was by “NYC Youth Poet Laureate Ramya Ramana.”

    It goes, according to the transcript, which they probably got from somewhere else:

    A constellated skyscraper moving gracefully to jazz beat, finding the Gil Scott-Heron in all her footwork, gripping the streetlights like an eclipse of hymnals, this is home. The lost voices, the heart’s devotion to beat and pulse, slow-dancing colonels, home to hustle, home to work hard, dream harder, home to move in silence, let success shatter the glass of hostage echoes New York City—not lights, not Broadway, not Times Square. It is single mother donating her last meal’s worth of money to church. It is the faith in that heart that makes a dead dream worth resurrecting. It is coffee-colored children playing hopscotch on what is left of a sidewalk. It is chalk-outlined, colonized map on a street as dark as the bones of the dead. This we call holy. This we call tough skin, thick-boned. This is New York.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (411489) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:03 pm

  115. I predict that by the end of his corrupt term, this de Blasio person will surpass Derek Jeter as the most famous New Yawker wearing pinstripes.

    Sing Sing it, Mayor !

    Comment by Elephant Stone (6a6f37) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:04 pm

  116. A constellated skyscraper moving gracefully to jazz beat, finding the Gil Scott-Heron in all her footwork, gripping the streetlights like an eclipse of hymnals, this is home. The lost voices…

    God I hate poetry.

    Comment by Birdbath (716828) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:07 pm

  117. metaphors, how do they work exactly?

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:13 pm

  118. LOL, Birdbath. That “poem” may be by the Youth Poet Laureate, but it sounds like she borrowed liberally from Rod McKuen.

    Comment by elissa (fb9ae9) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:15 pm

  119. It’s not supposed to work this way;

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/03/health/access-to-health-care-may-increase-er-visits-study-suggests.html?ref=sabrinatavernise

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:18 pm

  120. New Yawkers are very tough and resillient.
    That’s why they always want the government to provide them with everything.
    …’cause they’re tough. Or something.

    Comment by Elephant Stone (6a6f37) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:28 pm

  121. No Justice, No Peace!

    Err, you mean “No Justice, No Piece!”, right, daleyrocks?

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:31 pm

  122. How does the new mayor think the early pioneers and settlers should have made their across the country during the great westward expansion? And what does he think horses are bred for?

    Comment by Dana (46bf87) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:40 pm

  123. 118. Comment by elissa (fb9ae9) — 1/2/2014 @ 3:15 pm

    Poetry needs guitars and drums. Otherwise you can kick a dictionary and write down the words that fall out.

    Comment by Birdbath (716828) — 1/2/2014 @ 4:00 pm

  124. How does the new mayor think the early pioneers and settlers should have made their across the country during the great westward expansion?

    If New Yorkers could visualize westward travel, they would not be New Yorkers, now, would they?

    And what does he think horses are bred for?

    To bet on.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/2/2014 @ 4:05 pm

  125. 104. Comment by Colonel Haiku (6726b1) — 1/2/2014 @ 1:15 pm

    de Blovio starts NYC’s Big Decline of 2014 with a re-write of the historical record vis-a-vis Dinkins and replaces Giuliani’s “broken window” policy with his own Broken Record policy.

    They’ve been saying that for some time. You see, the highest number of murdewrs ever recorded in New York City was 2,245 in 1990. That was David Dinkins’ first year as mayor. After that it went down. It is attributed to Dinkins because he hired more police.

    Page 117 of Freakonomics says:

    …Between 1991 and 2001, the NYPD grew by 45 percent, more than three times the national average. as argued above, an increase in the number of police, regardless of new strategies, has been proven to reduce crime. By a conservative calculation, this huge explansion of New York’s police force would be excpected to reduce crime in New York by 18 percent relative to the national average. If you subtract that 18 percent from New York’s homicide reduction, thereby discounting the effects of the police hiring surge, New York no longer leadfs the nation with its 73.6 percent drop; it goes straight to the middle of the pack. Many of these new police were in fact hired by David Dinkins., the mayor whom Giuliani defeated. Dinkins had been desperate to secure the law-and-order vote, having known all along that his opponent would be Giuliani, a former federal prosecutor…So those who wish to credit Giuliani wiith the crime drop may still do so, for it was his own law-and-order reputation that made Dinkins hire more police.

    I’d say maybe just the fact he was running and the Korean boycott and Crown Heights pogrom.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/2/2014 @ 4:44 pm

  126. It can’t be an easy thing to leave New York, anyway. If you manage to find a parking spot in front of your place to load your car you need to post a couple of security guards to keep it from being stolen as you load; then it’s seven hours hunched over the steering the wheel at three miles per hour through traffic with cabbies cutting you off and swearing at you; then you finally see the light at the end of the Tunnel; and it’s New Jersey. Ah, poor people.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/2/2014 @ 4:47 pm

  127. 126. Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/2/2014 @ 4:47 pm

    It can’t be an easy thing to leave New York, anyway. If you manage to find a parking spot in front of your place to load your car you need to post a couple of security guards to keep it from being stolen as you load;

    That’s Newark, New Jersey.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/29/nyregion/an-epidemic-of-carjackings-afflicts-newark.html?pagewanted=all

    Not New York.

    Already this year, there had been 475 carjackings in Essex County as of Friday, the vast majority of those in Newark, according to the Essex County prosecutor’s office. In contrast, New York City had seen 159 carjackings this year as of Friday, and there has been a general decline over the last five years, the Police Department said.

    Now adjust that for population.

    then you finally see the light at the end of the Tunnel; and it’s New Jersey. Ah, poor people.

    Don’t drive an expensive late model car to Newark Airport. Or any car at all to certain sections of Newark.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (bf7669) — 1/2/2014 @ 5:39 pm

  128. 112. de Blasio needs to start paying pensions to sex workers in NYC, a long ignored part of the work force.

    War on Wimyn!

    No Justice, No Peace!

    Comment by daleyrocks (bf33e9) — 1/2/2014 @ 2:49 pm

    Given the recent news about how Elliot Spitzer likes to choke prostitutes, and how other NY pols treat women, they also need to pay them hazardous duty pay.

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/2/2014 @ 5:57 pm

  129. An awkward detail about that story, which is heavy into Rule 5 territory;

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/31/rebecca-woodard_n_4524717.html

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 6:03 pm

  130. But the story about Eliot Spitzer choking her is a lie. He has no known connection to either of the prostitution rings she was involved with.

    She also claims that the Manhattan DA’s office in effect pimped her.

    They say they told her not to continue with prostution, and they did not tell her to continue (so she could act as an informant more easily) but to turn over all her earnings to the DA.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (bf7669) — 1/2/2014 @ 6:03 pm

  131. narciso at 129. What is Rule 5? In what list of rules, or “rules”, about what?

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (bf7669) — 1/2/2014 @ 6:33 pm

  132. Already this year, there had been 475 carjackings in Essex County as of Friday, the vast majority of those in Newark, according to the Essex County prosecutor’s office. In contrast, New York City had seen 159 carjackings this year as of Friday,

    An example of the dynamics and power of demographics, which can trump politics and ideology by themselves—since both NYC and the part of New Jersey in question are infused with liberalism run amok. I always remember that when I become too obsessed with political matters, or assume that ideology A, B or C will automatically guarantee result D, E or F. But all things being equal, common-sense-oriented conservatism or rightism will always help a place or people, or at least not make a bad situation even worse.

    I keep in mind that a country in the American continent whose populace is of predominantly European origin, referring to Argentina, but a country also of loony-liberal bent — enthralled with Eva Peron-ism — has a very high crime rate.

    Comment by Mark (58ea35) — 1/2/2014 @ 6:40 pm

  133. If the conservatism is focused on budgetary matters, and they don’t understand why somehting is needed, it could make matters worse, by cutting money for police and prosecutors.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (bf7669) — 1/2/2014 @ 6:49 pm

  134. If the conservatism is focused on budgetary matters,

    Sammy, when you write things like that, that’s when I can tell you truly do lean left.

    You know full well that the typical conservative, when wringing his or her hands about excessive government spending, will grimace if the issue of budget cutbacks involves law enforcement.

    Comment by Mark (58ea35) — 1/2/2014 @ 6:52 pm

  135. Rule 5, attractive women, illustrating a story, to get more hits, the Post and Daily News re Woodard is illustrative,

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/2/2014 @ 6:57 pm

  136. Comment by Mark (58ea35) — 1/2/2014 @ 6:52 pm

    You know full well that the typical conservative, when wringing his or her hands about excessive government spending, will grimace if the issue of budget cutbacks involves law enforcement

    It didn’t happen that way during the New York City fiscal crisis during the 1970s, but then, maybe, the people who promoted that weren’t conservatives.

    Of course, no true Scotsman…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_true_Scotsman

    At least they weren’t social conservatives.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (bf7669) — 1/2/2014 @ 7:03 pm

  137. 2,245 murders in New York City in 1990.

    649 murders in 2001 (not counting September 11th)

    333 murders in 2013.

    A lot of the Bloomberg era decline in in the last three years. It’s dropping precipitiously right now. Down over 25% from 2012. Boy does de Blasio have a potential problem, if he doesn’t act right. There’s no margin for error.

    332 murders in much, much, smaller Detroit in 2013, but a drop of 54 from 2012, though.

    Chicago is at 415 – more murders in a city with well less than half he population. It is still below 2012, and back at 1965 levels – but in New York City it is in the 1950s.

    LA is at 255, Philadelphia at 246.

    In Baltimore and Washington murders are increasing – it’s up 8% in Baltimore, and in Washington, D.C. rose from 88 in 2012 to 104 in 2013 – but 12 of them were by Aaron Alexis at the Washington Navy Yard and overall crime is reported to be slightly down in Washington.

    But other crime statistics are easier to fudge.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (bf7669) — 1/2/2014 @ 7:30 pm

  138. Did we already ban the mounted police?
    Or did the union decline to go along due to the special pay and overtime?

    Comment by steveg (794291) — 1/2/2014 @ 7:53 pm

  139. “i picture her living alone with cats and hummels”

    that is some genius right there

    Comment by steveg (794291) — 1/2/2014 @ 8:06 pm

  140. 67. All those animal rights folks worrying about the poor cougars have done it in the Los Angeles suburb of Glendale. We’ve had 3 dogs killed by mountain lions in just the last 12 months–the last one was Monday night. Two of the three dogs were 80 pound plus Labrador retrievers. I’ve got a particular interest in this since I have lived in a home in the brushline in Glendale for a long time. The lions weren’t here when I bought my home almost 40 years ago. In short–I was here first.

    3 lions in the Verdugo Hills –behind Glendale and Burbank; one lion in Griffith Park. Thank you eco-wackos…

    Comment by Comanche Voter (bd140e) — 1/2/2014 @ 7:59 am

    A friend of mine works in public relations for a local government on the SF peninsula. When a lab treed a mountain lion, and police shot it because it was within yards of an elementary school, liberals wrote nasty letters to the local papers accusing the lab of being a “traitor to animal kind.”

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/2/2014 @ 8:07 pm

  141. In Tahoe, a family is getting death threats because they called the police on a bear that kept coming into the their yard. Yes, that’s all they did. They violated the no-snitch rule.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/2/2014 @ 8:11 pm

  142. It’s probably best to compare the ships in terms of Kilowatts, as that’s how the Chicom and Aussie ships are rated.

    The Aurora Australis makes 10,000kW total.

    The Xue Long makes 13,200.

    The Healey, which isn’t built to take on 10 ft thick ice, is rated at 34,560kW. And the Healey has been to the North Pole.

    It’s seems to me kind of nuts to try to take on ice that thick with the boats they’re using.

    By way of comparison the Polar Star can make 18,000kW on diesel engines or 56,000kW on her gas turbines. Which is the kind of power you need to get through ice like this.

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/2/2014 @ 9:22 pm

  143. Sorry, wrong thread. I had two opened, and it looks like I accidentally dragged one into the other’s place.

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/2/2014 @ 9:24 pm

  144. 141. In Tahoe, a family is getting death threats because they called the police on a bear that kept coming into the their yard. Yes, that’s all they did. They violated the no-snitch rule.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/2/2014 @ 8:11 pm

    This is why liberals are such nasty pieces of work. They demand to intrude on third parties and force them to live with conditions for which they won’t pay.

    The liberals in Palo Alto who called the dog a “traitor to animal kind” don’t have kids at the school the cat was casing out.

    The people issuing these death threats don’t have to live with this bear.

    The liberals wishing this poor Italian girl were dead don’t have to deal with her disease.

    http://www.memeorandum.com/131231/p59

    http://www.smh.com.au/world/i-would-have-been-dead-at-nine-caterina-simonsen-in-hospital-after-backlash-over-defence-of-animal-testing-20131230-hv75n.html

    Remember when a business owner told Hillary! that Hillarycare would put him and other small businessmen out of business? She replied she wasn’t responsible for ever “undercapitalized” business. No skin off her teeth; she doesn’t have to pay the price for her intrusion into your life.

    It takes a village to raise a kid? Not her kid, your kid. She’s was never going to let you raise Chelsea, but she damned well wanted to dictate to you how yours was going to be raised. And if she screws up your kid, oh well. On to the next one.

    Obamacare is the same thing. Your old policy was only “junk” because it didn’t meet the liberals’ redistributive goals. You don’t have health care because it’s so crappy almost no doctor will take it. And the few who will have crowded waiting rooms, and now you can’t afford the deductibles. But it doesn’t matter to the crowd which imposed it on you, because they’re exempt.

    Al Gore will not pay the price of his global warming policies. You will.

    I could go on. I often do. I won’t this time.

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/2/2014 @ 9:49 pm

  145. In all of this, in all of the crud urinated upon society by the left, the one thing — the one thing — that irks me the most about so many (or just about all) of them is their believing that left-leaning biases imbue one with great compassion and generosity, but also a lack of bigotry.

    With surveys and studies indicating that’s not only not the case, but that just the opposite actually is true, my contempt for a whole slew of liberals goes up a notch.

    Comment by Mark (58ea35) — 1/2/2014 @ 11:10 pm

  146. Mark, they’re soulless ghouls. Because they don’t have any compassion, and don’t know what it is, they mistake their lust for the power to micromanage ever aspect of other people’s lives for compassion.

    After all, since they know everything, how can they deprive the masses of their brilliance. And, naturally they deserve to be rewarded for it. Lavishly.

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/2/2014 @ 11:28 pm

  147. http://www.forbes.com/sites/harrybinswanger/2013/12/31/obama-to-americans-you-dont-deserve-to-be-free/

    If you replace Obama’s name with de Blasio’s it still works.

    Obama To Americans: You Don’t Deserve To Be Free

    President Obama’s Kansas speech is a remarkable document. In calling for more government controls, more taxation, more collectivism, he has two paragraphs that give the show away. Take a look at them.

    there is a certain crowd in Washington who, for the last few decades, have said, let’s respond to this economic challenge with the same old tune. “The market will take care of everything,” they tell us. If we just cut more regulations and cut more taxes–especially for the wealthy–our economy will grow stronger. Sure, they say, there will be winners and losers. But if the winners do really well, then jobs and prosperity will eventually trickle down to everybody else. And, they argue, even if prosperity doesn’t trickle down, well, that’s the price of liberty.

    Now, it’s a simple theory. And we have to admit, it’s one that speaks to our rugged individualism and our healthy skepticism of too much government. That’s in America’s DNA. And that theory fits well on a bumper sticker. (Laughter.) But here’s the problem: It doesn’t work. It has never worked. (Applause.) It didn’t work when it was tried in the decade before the Great Depression. It’s not what led to the incredible postwar booms of the ’50s and ’60s. And it didn’t work when we tried it during the last decade. (Applause.) I mean, understand, it’s not as if we haven’t tried this theory.

    Ignoring the classic Obama strawmen, his economic instincts (they’re too half baked to be called theories) are even simpler. Put experts like him in charge of the economy, or experts like de Blasio in charge of New York, and things will be more fair.

    But even more to the point, we haven’t tried this theory. As the author points out.

    …That’s the political philosophy on which Obama is trying to hang the blame for the recent financial crisis and every other social ill. But ask yourself, are we few radical capitalists in charge? Have radical capitalists been in charge at any time in the last, oh, say 100 years?

    I pick 100 years deliberately, because it was exactly 100 years ago that a gigantic anti-capitalist measure was put into effect: the Federal Reserve System. For 100 years, government, not the free market, has controlled money and banking. How’s that worked out? How’s the value of the dollar held up since 1913? Is it worth one-fiftieth of its value then or only one-one-hundredth? You be the judge. How did the dollar hold up over the 100 years before this government take-over of money and banking? It actually gained slightly in value.

    …Even you, dear reader, are probably wondering how on earth anyone could challenge things like Social Security, government schools, and the FDA. But that’s not the point. The point is: these statist, anti-capitalist programs exist and have existed for about a century. The point is: Obama is pretending that the Progressive Era, the New Deal, and the Great Society were repealed, so that he can blame the financial crisis on capitalism. He’s pretending that George Bush was George Washington.

    Obama/de Blasio heart central planning. This is why they’re Keynesians. Not like Keynes would even have called them Keynesians. They’re Keynesians because Keynesianism empowers the central planners. And if Keynesian economics fail, well, the central planners haven’t been sufficiently empowered.

    Their ideas are right because their ideas justify their control over everything. Not because they work. Enough with the “their hearts are in the right place” BS. They have no hearts. They just love power.

    Which is why liberals never talk about results. There’s only one result that matters. Greater concentration of power.

    Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:05 am

  148. Yes, DeBlasio is a fellow community organizer, with tickets punched in Nicaragua and Cuba, it makes one think we lost the Cold War, Obama’s preacher visited the latter and was a friend of Kaddafi, his other mentor Ayers, was trained in the latter, as the Brigatte Rossi were in Prague,

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/3/2014 @ 5:56 am

  149. 148. Speaking of losing the Cold War:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/winnipeg-deep-freeze-as-cold-as-uninhabited-planet-1.2479967

    Comment by gary gulrud (e2cef3) — 1/3/2014 @ 7:16 am

  150. Comment by Steve57 (eb0f3a) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:05 am

    The point is: Obama is pretending that the Progressive Era, the New Deal, and the Great Society

    If this is he speech I think it is, Obama did not speak of the “Progressive Era” but Theodore Roosevelt and the “Square Deal”

    Woodrow Wilson is almost a non-person, now.

    He left out the “Fair Deal” of Harry S Truman. But then, it was never enacted.

    JFK had something too. What was it called?

    were repealed,

    Not repealed, but — well, it’s like this, in that speech millions of people were dying when LBJ got Medicare and Medicaid. This was not apparently not a problem when FDR was doing something about million being in poverty.

    There’s no progression.

    so that he can blame the financial crisis on capitalism.

    Well, maybe you can, but with this proviso: capitalism is a government program. and like all government programs… you finish he sentence.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (bf7669) — 1/3/2014 @ 7:25 am

  151. …They have no hearts. They just love power.

    Which is why liberals never talk about results. There’s only one result that matters. Greater concentration of power.

    They never talk about results, because they are not practical. As Rush Limbaugh says: Results don’t matter. Only intentions count.

    Very often their “remedies” make no sense, or would be futile, even on heir own terms, but they can sound virtuous. Reduce carbon dioxide release, even though it won’t make a noticeable difference in the amount of CO2 in he atmosphere any given year, if they do it or they don’t. Don’t spread sulfer dioxide over the Arctic or fertilize the ocean, because that’s doing something new. Don’t try to mitigate say, the rising of the ocean, because that’s not the perfect answer. Just make it not happen, or rather make gestures that you don’t want it to happen.

    The whole idea is to claim to be good people (not experts. Experts was 100 years ago.)

    They can be good because they claim to be good, or because they come from the right background, or have a track record of being good – they are always on the right side. How do you know what side is right? Easy. It’s the one that pretends to be the most virtuous. It’s the one that seems to be devoid of anyone’s self-interest.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (bf7669) — 1/3/2014 @ 7:36 am

  152. The Mensheviks are still kicking:

    http://spectator.org/articles/57314/karl-rove-and-gop-socialists

    Comment by gary gulrud (e2cef3) — 1/3/2014 @ 7:49 am

  153. Notice how no one in the media ever talks about the jobs lost because of these edicts?

    Light bulb factories, closed.
    Carriage operators, unemployed.
    Plastic bag companies, closed.

    Oh well. Breaking a few eggs…

    Comment by Patricia (be0117) — 1/3/2014 @ 8:50 am

  154. The thing about the plastic bags, is that most of them are re-used as garbage bags.

    There is anotehr problem. Paper bags break more than plastic bags, which also break. How are people without cars to shop?

    They can buy stronger plastic bags for 15 cents maybe. And to some extent re-use them.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 9:47 am

  155. 114. I missed the second half of that poem. (which was a second paragraph on the democracynow website.)

    I hadn’t remembered any of the words, except the part about the mother giving her last meals’s worth of money to her church, so didn’t notice that half of the poem was misisng.

    But I do remember that “Amen!” the crowd said at the end. But I didn’t when I copied it.

    Here is the second half of the poem by New York City’s 2014 Youth Poet Laureate Ramya Ramana rad at the inaguration of New York Mayor Bill de Blasio (and posisbly composed specially for the occasion):

    We will no longer stay silent to this classism. No more brownstones and brown skin playing tug-of-war with a pregnant air hovering over them like an aura of lost children. No more colored boy robbed of their innocence. This city always will be the foundation of this country. We are root. We are backbone. We brown, we black, we yellow, we white, we young, we collage of creatures stomping to be reminded of the mammal inside of us. We chance, we deserve, us opportunity, us new mayor, us new beginning, like dancing cocoons, us hope, us fight, us happen, us love, us some good human, us happy, we happy, we happy with change. It is a constant baptism to remind us of our holy. We welcome, we family, we congratulate Mayor Bill de Blasio. We are so very honored and pleased to have you. And the congregation says:

    CROWD: Amen!

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 9:54 am

  156. I remember that word mammal too, now.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 9:55 am

  157. My (former) mother-in-law will hit the fresh market, the butcher, and the baker, with her cloth shopping bags that she launders. She’s getting on years, her daughters should buy her a folding shopping cart that she can also use as a walker. ;)

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/3/2014 @ 9:56 am

  158. These shopping carts don’t cost too much, but they would mostly be limited to places within walking distance.

    Most people don’t launder them.

    Laundering is probably not important except for fruit and vegetables and meat, if they are not in their own packages..

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 10:21 am

  159. Another poem: (or song)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThogWesUQog

    Miami 2017, written in the late 1970s, but about former New Yorkers:

    Seen the lights go out on Broadway
    I saw the Empire State laid low
    And life went on beyond the Palisades
    They all bought Cadillacs
    And left there long ago.

    They held a concert out in Brooklyn
    To watch the island bridges blow
    They turned our power down
    And drove us underground
    But we went right on with the show.

    I’ve seen the lights go out on Broadway
    I saw the ruins at my feet
    You know we almost didn’t notice it
    We’d seen it all the time on Forty-second Street.

    They burned the churches up in Harlem
    Like in the Spanish civil war
    The flames were ev’rywhere
    But no one really cared
    It always burned up there before.

    I’ve seen the lights go out on Broadway
    I’ve watched the mighty skyline fall
    The boats were waiting at the Battery
    The union went on strike
    They never sailed at all.

    They sent a carrier out from Norfolk
    And picked the Yankees up for free
    They said that Queens could stay
    They blew the Bronx away
    And sank Manhattan out at sea.

    You know those lights were bright on Broadway
    That was so many years ago
    Before we all lived here in Florida
    Before the Mafia took over Mexico
    There are not many who remember
    They say a handful still survive
    To tell the world about
    The way the lights went out
    And keep the memory alive.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 10:23 am

  160. we collage of creatures stomping to be reminded of the mammal inside of us.

    Was that really part of the swearing in ceremony? (I assume it is, just asking in my incredulity).

    It is progress to be stomping around (like animals) recognizing the animal inside of us?
    Better to be a non-human mammal?
    One could say that is at least logically consistent with the idea that one needs to be more humane to horses than to humans.

    So this is what they teach in school these days, when they succeed in teaching, that to downplay our humanity for the sake of our animal nature is a good thing?
    Makes it easier for some to be keepers of the keys to the pen.
    “Thinking they were wise, they became fools…”
    In ever expanding variations.

    Comment by MD in Philly (f9371b) — 1/3/2014 @ 10:24 am


  161. we collage of creatures stomping to be reminded of the mammal inside of us.

    Comment by MD in Philly (f9371b) — 1/3/2014 @ 10:24 am

    Was that really part of the swearing in ceremony? (I assume it is, just asking in my incredulity).

    Well, part of the proceedings, which lasted one hour and 22 minutes and 25 seconds.

    This was some time before Bill Clinton and then Bill de Blasio went on stage.

    This is video of the entire proceedings, along with a transcript of mayor de Blasio/s speech:

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/bill-de-blasio-inauguration-march-toward-fairer-more-just-more-progressive-place-full-transcript/

    It says there:

    Comptroller Scott Stringer takes the oath of office at approximately 33:45; Letitia James takes the Public Advocate oath and gives her remarks at 41:30; and Bill Clinton speaks then administers the oath of office to Mayor Bill de Blasio at 1:02:00.

    I think the times given here must be the time past the hour of noon, not time on the video.

    The poem is at 21:30 to 25 minutes on the video, after the four chaplains, and before the swearing in Comptroller Scott Stringer. The swearing in began right after.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 10:44 am

  162. At 45 minutes actress Cynthia Nixon introduced Broadway actress Petina Miller who sang John Lennon’s “Imagine” to guitar music.

    Then, at 53:45 came Bill Clinton. He asked the 109th mayor of New York to step forward at 59 minutes and 10 seconds or so. He approached the podium with his family.

    At just 1 hour into the tape Clinton mentioned the Bible was from FDR and it was altogetehr appropriate..

    Oh, Clinton did give de Blasio the words “the Constitution of the state of New York and the Charter of the City of New York.”

    de Blasio’s speech starts at 1:01:43 on the video.

    He said that 20 years ago when a conservative philosphy seemed dominanent he “broke through” and told people to beleive in a place called Hope.

    Now that businessa about Hope was basically a lie. Bill Clinton was really from Hot Springs, Arkansas, the mob dominated town (at that time) whose political boss was the founder of organized crime in America, Owen Vincent “Owney the Killer” Madden.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 11:08 am

  163. de Blasio’s “progressive ” heroes: (limited to New Yorkers in this speech:

    Nearly a century ago, it was Al Smith who waged war on unsafe working conditions and child labor. It was Franklin Roosevelt and Frances Perkins who led the charge for the basic bargain of unemployment insurance and the minimum wage. It was Fiorello La Guardia who enacted the New Deal on the city level, battled the excesses of Wall Street, and championed a progressive income tax.

    From Jacob Riis to Eleanor Roosevelt to Harry Belafonte — who we are honored to have with us here today — it was New Yorkers who challenged the status quo…

    Harry Belafonte spoke at the start, seven minutes into the video. He dropped his cane when he came to the podium, and de Blasio’s son Dante picked it up. His voice sounded hoarse, and he was entirely bald.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 11:17 am

  164. Harry Belafonte (in part)

    While it is encouraging to know that the statistics have indicated a recent drop in our city’s murder rate, New York, alarmingly, plays a tragic role in the fact that our nation has the largest prison population in the world.

    Much of that problem stems from issues of race, perpetuated by the depth of human indifference to poverty.

    Changing the stop-and-frisk law is—as important as it is, the change of a law is only the tip of the iceberg in fixing our deeply Dickensian justice system.

    Bill de Blasio has been overwhelmingly mandated to make many, who for much too long danced with despair, believe again that the American dream is attainable, a dream filled with hope, a dream filled with opportunity and justice..

    Only a recent drop?

    The crime rate has dropped so much that, at long last, the prison population is going down!

    Then the 4 chaplains.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 11:23 am

  165. About that Public Advocate,

    http://nypost.com/2014/01/03/public-advocate-caught-in-homeless-fib-upon-taking-office/

    shades of Lena Guerrero,

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/3/2014 @ 11:23 am

  166. Harry Belafonte’s heroes (in that speech)

    1. Franklin Delano Roosevelt

    2. his wife Eleanor

    3. Martin Luther King Jr.

    4. Fannie Lou Hamer

    5. Bobby Kennedy

    6. Cesar Chavez

    7. Rabbi Abraham Heschel

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 11:25 am

  167. I think Fidel, Chavez and Nelson Mandela were a more honest selection,

    http://washington.cbslocal.com/2014/01/03/doctors-office-spends-2-hours-on-hold-with-health-insurer-for-patients-surgery-authorization/

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/3/2014 @ 11:33 am

  168. Faannie Lou Haamer was involved with voting rights efforts in the early 1960s and wass badly beaten once, and was the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party at the Democratic convention in 1964.

    Rabbi Abraham Heschel must have worked a little with Harry Belafonte. He marched in Selma. He was an activist for civil rights among many other things.

    From Wikipedia: He was born in Poland in 1907, from a family of prominent of Orthodox Rabbis, and studied in Germany eclectically, was one of those deported to Poland before the Kristalnacht, and managed to get out of Poland six weeks before the German invasion of Poland, leaving for London with the help of Julian Morgenstern, president of Hebrew Union College, who had been working to obtain visas for Jewish scholars in Europe.

    A sister was killed by a German bombing, and his mother and two other sisters were later killed by the Nazis. For the rest of his life he never visited Germany, Austria or Poland.

    He served on the faculty of Hebrew Union College (HUC), the main seminary of Reform Judaism, in Cincinnati for five years. In 1946, he took a position at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTS), the main seminary of Conservative Judaism, where he served as professor of Jewish ethics and Mysticism until his death in 1972.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 11:40 am

  169. narciso: It is true, the names were designed to appeal to a New York audience.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 11:41 am

  170. Carriage rides will be the least of the City’s problems after a couple of years of abolishing sound policing like “stop, talk, and frisk” which has confiscated many illegal weapons and parole violations.

    But don’t worry, tourists, your lives will be sacrificed for the greater good of allowing minorities to feel better about themselves.

    Comment by Estragon (19fa04) — 1/3/2014 @ 11:41 am

  171. Oh, “stop-quewstion-and frisk won’t be abolished. de Blasio only talked about reforming it.

    It is in fact impossible to abolish it.

    Here’s something:

    http://nypost.com/2014/01/03/de-blasio-stands-by-speakers-who-blasted-bloomberg/

    Requesting airtime on WNYC radio, former Deputy Mayor Howard Wolfson took issue with entertainer Harry Belafonte’s claims Bloomberg had contributed to the nation’s high lockup rates of minorities.

    In fact, Wolfson said, the incarceration rate plummeted in the city — even as crime was dropping.

    “We reduced incarceration by about a third. We did substantially better than the rest of the nation. We didn’t lock more people up. We substantially locked up fewer people,’’ Wolfson pointed out.

    Incarceration rates did go up in the 1990s. But now they are going down – for the right reasons mostly. Because there’s less crime.

    They did release some drug offenders, often convicted of that because of the sentence but whose real crimes were something more. But we seem to ahve absoorbed and weathered that impact.

    Harry Belafonte was kind of a little bit out of date about the prison situation, and in general. He could have made plausible species argument 15 years ago. Now he can’t do even that.

    and he’s still stuck on race – i.e. if more blacks are convicted, that means there must be something wrong with the criminal justice system, not with the blacks of that generation and locality. It’s all simple. Differential association. You can compare it to an epidemic. One person affects the next. Is hepatitus also race-blind?

    Actually, the bias is or was the other way. You could away with more for longer if you lived where blacks lived and did your crimes there..

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:01 pm

  172. The last law I think passed by the old City Council and signed by Bloomberg was one outlawing e-cigs any place real cigs are banned.

    I don’t know why they wanted to do that in advance of de Blasio becoming mayor.

    Well, de Blasio did say:

    Thank you, Mayor Bloomberg. To say the least, you led our city through some extremely difficult times. And for that, we are all grateful. Your passion on issues such as environmental protection and public health has built a noble legacy. We pledge today to continue the great progress you made in these critically important areas.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:07 pm

  173. The Daily News has conniption fit, over this fellow, who unlike Rutten, did interview Bin Laden;

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/bratton-taps-cbs-john-miller-counter-terror-post-article-1.1564576

    Comment by narciso (3fec35) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:12 pm

  174. A high-ranking counterterrorism official told the Daily News that the head-scratching decision to put a former television reporter in such a critical position could have serious ramifications. The official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the pick will be ridiculed around the globe by terrorists.

    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/bratton-taps-cbs-john-miller-counter-terror-post-article-1.1564576#ixzz2pMuw6z6L

    This must be a federal source. Now surely he knows John Miller has other experience besides TV. The statement here is not something the leaker can possibly believe is a valid criticism, but they are hoping not too many people are familar with John Miller’s previous record.

    It wasn’t the Daily News that had the conniption fit. It was federal officials, who leaked to the Daily News.

    This criticism is good. It indicates they are afraid, and that de Blasio will not stop the separate New York City war on terror. Tough for the moles or incompetents in the NSA, CIA etc.

    And they were hoping for so much.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:23 pm

  175. You know, I think de Blasio said this because it was NOT true:

    Now I know there are those who think that what I said during the campaign was just rhetoric, just “political talk” in the interest of getting elected. There are some who think now, as we turn to governing – well, things will continue pretty much like they always have.

    Of course he singles out a few things – the most wekk known.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:26 pm

  176. “Five Boroughs all created equal” – Bill sde Blasio.

    So he is proposing to bring back the Board of Estimate?

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:28 pm

  177. I heard a brief quote on the radio this morning: Bill de Blasio rather sternly telling people they should leave the houses as little as possible and go to their cars as little as possible.

    Like somebody told him people would die. Every body else was reasonable.

    In the meantime city workers were told to come in, and if they don’t they havr to take one vacation day. Mass transit is running, but the schools are closed. The LIRR got put on a weekend schedule.

    The airports were closed for a while and many planes grounded, but the airports re-opened about 9 am as soon as visibility came back and runways were cleared.

    The Long Island Expressway was closed from midnight to 8 am. This, I am told, is because cars can get stuck. Cars can’t go on soft snow. They can if it is a two inches or so, but not close to a foot. It doesn’t matter what tires they have and you shouldn’t believe the Firestone commercials.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:37 pm

  178. This includes the transcript of Letitia James’s speech also, by an extremely liberal blogger:

    http://nyceye.blogspot.com/2014/01/elections-are-never-culmination-of.html

    So far I did not find a transcript of Scott Strionger’s speech.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (d22d64) — 1/3/2014 @ 12:46 pm

  179. Replace them with Gay Pony Boys. just google it… :-p

    Comment by Neo (c405d3) — 1/3/2014 @ 6:35 pm

  180. You know its bad when the NY Times calls you “graceless and smug.” And they should know.

    Comment by Kevin M (536c5d) — 1/3/2014 @ 6:43 pm

  181. One advantage of ending the horse-drawn carriage trade:

    Tourists won’t have an “ah-ha” moment when they realize the horse in front of them looks just like Hizzonor.

    Comment by askeptic (2bb434) — 1/4/2014 @ 9:27 am

  182. Ok, my [lack of] faith in Democrat politicians is reaffirmed. http://pjmedia.com/instapundit/181918/

    ISN’T IT ROMANTIC? NYC’s new mayor to replace Central Park horse carriages with EVs [w/poll]. I’m sure tourists will flock to New York City for this.

    UPDATE: From the comments at the linked post: “Why do journalist continue to ignore the money? You forgot to mention that one of the largest donations for his candidacy came from Steve Nislick and he has been eyeing the property where the stables are for years. Is this really about the animals or to pay off a donor?”

    Yeah, that’s a real poser.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/4/2014 @ 10:24 am

  183. New York Police Dept has approximately 60 horses used in its Mounted Unit. Their use as a deterrent to crime and high visibility to the public are well known. Will DeBlasio be putting these out to pasture as well?

    The added height and visibility that the horses give their riders works both ways, he noted: it allows officers to see what is going on in a wider area, but it also allows people in that wider area to see the officers. That helps deter crime, and it also helps people find officers when they need them, as happened last May, when two street vendors in Times Square sought help after they saw smoke rising from what turned out to be a crude car bomb. “They looked around, and the first thing they saw of anyone in authority was two mounted police officers, who responded and cleared the area of bystanders before the bomb squad arrived”.

    Comment by Dana (9a8f57) — 1/4/2014 @ 10:44 am

  184. When the next bail-out request comes, mark me down as against.

    And before this you were for?! Is there any conceivable circumstance in which you would be for? I would imagine all of us are automatically against any bailouts for anyone.

    Comment by Milhouse (b95258) — 1/5/2014 @ 12:05 pm

  185. This ban needs to stop, now, period. If it doesn’t stop, I’ll let them fight! And if I let them fight, fight for the buggy rides! Let them say “If it doesn’t have a horse, it is not a ride!” Let’s hope that there will be failure to that ban!!! CHARGE!!!

    Comment by Andrew Park (06e8ce) — 1/5/2014 @ 6:04 pm

  186. 183. Comment by Dana (9a8f57) — 1/4/2014 @ 10:44 am

    New York Police Dept has approximately 60 horses used in its Mounted Unit. Their use as a deterrent to crime and high visibility to the public are well known. Will DeBlasio be putting these out to pasture as well?

    This is not about anything real. This is about the contents of people’s imaginations.

    Besides, the police horses are owned by the government. When things are owned privately, in de facto liberal thinking, there is no real reason to do it and the burden of proof that something is NOT wrong is on the owner once a semi-plausible prima facie case has been made; when things are owned or operated by the government, the burden of proof is on the critic.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (dec35d) — 1/6/2014 @ 7:19 am

  187. This is about Steve Nislick and Edison Properties and the tons of money to be made by developing the land the stables are sitting on. Told you that de Blasio is going to loot and raze, and he’s doing both here.

    Comment by nk (dbc370) — 1/6/2014 @ 7:22 am

  188. nk–bingo. As always, follow the money.

    Comment by elissa (27bbc2) — 1/6/2014 @ 7:59 am

  189. nk, that’s the point: If DeBlasio truly feels that using horses to cater people to and fro is inhumane, then to be consistent he must also feel the same way with the mounted police force – after all, the inhumane behavior is still being perpetrated against the horses. But because it is not about the inhumane treatment of horses, DeBlasio clearly exposes himself as already being bought and paid for…which I would like to think matters to some voters, but alas…

    Stacy McCain covered this in depth:

    Two major supporters of Democratic mayoral nominee Bill de Blasio, including his biggest campaign fundraiser, gave heavily to an outside group that targeted his primary rival City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, newly released records show.

    The group, New Yorkers for Clean, Livable and Safe Streets (NYCLASS), spent nearly $124,000 on anti-Quinn phone banking and leafleting for the September primary election, which Mr. de Blasio won with more than 40% of the vote. NYCLASS also gave an above-the-legal-limit, six-figure donation to the anti-Quinn group “New York Is Not For Sale,” which spent more than $1 million to defeat Ms. Quinn, and played a role in knocking the speaker from her frontrunner status early in the race. …

    In March, Mr. de Blasio, who also has taken direct donations from NYCLASS founder Steve Nislick and close associates, promised to the ban horse carriage industry in Central Park on his first day as mayor, a top priority for NYCLASS.

    The newly filed records at the Campaign Finance Board also list the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals as making a $50,000 contribution to NYCLASS in March. Nonprofits registered as 501(c)3 entities such as the ASPCA are barred from giving political donations because charitable contributions to a 501(c)3 are tax-deductible.

    http://spectator.org/blog/57345/de-blasios-horse-drawn-carriage-ban-it-really-about-campaign-cash

    Comment by Dana (9a8f57) — 1/6/2014 @ 10:21 am

  190. It’s been going on for some time.

    It’s Parkingtown, Jake
    Posted by Michael Gross in GripeBox | February 11th, 2009

    Could a real-estate grab by a parking lot mogul be the hidden agenda behind the latest development in the campaign against Central Park’s beloved carriage horses? I would never question the motives of animal activists, even though I disagree with some of their goals and tactics. But a document that landed in my in-box last night makes me wonder if those wailing about the allegedly mistreated horses aren’t in fact unknowing dupes of rich and powerful real estate interests — specifically Edison Properties, a real estate development and management company based in Newark, New Jersey, though its businesses operate in Manhattan. Two of those businesses — Manhattan Mini-Storage and Edison ParkFast — have multiple locations in the same Far West Midtown neighborhood as the stables where the Central Park horses are housed. It appears they are anything but good neighbors.

    It turns out that the prime mover behind the latest anti-horse gambit — the proposal that they be replaced by cheesey electric-powered faux Model Ts (that don’t even exist but if they did would be far better suited to a theme park in Orlando than to midtown Manhattan) — is Steve Nislick, chief executive officer of Edison. His connections to local politics are deep, and his company, according to New York City’s web site, employs legions of lobbyists to influence city decisions on real estate and zoning in its favor. So what? Nislick revealed his real (estate) agenda late last year when he produced and signed a brochure touting the Model-T plan — the same brochure a carriage-horse-lover sent to me last night. In it, Nislick shows his hand when he discusses those five stables where the horses are housed, all sitting between 10th Avenue and the West Side Highway in midtown, the same neighborhood where Edison operates many of its parking lots and storage warehouses. In a curious twist for a parking lot mogul, Nislick paints his proposal as “a green transportation alternative.” But my guess is that the green light in his eyes may be money not ecology. Why? The answer lies on page five of that brochure, which promises “a windfall for the carriage industry from the sale of its multi-million-dollar stables alone,” Nislick writes, before getting to his real point. “Currently, the stables consist of 64,000 square feet of valuable real estate on lots that could accomodate up to 150,000 square feet of development…

    I love how back in ’09 Nislick was touting this as the Model T plan, and de Blasio is recommending the horse carriages be replaced by antique-style electric golf carts.

    Symmetry, no? It’s almost like they’re showing off.

    Comment by Steve57 (d35759) — 1/6/2014 @ 10:33 am

  191. 137. “333 murders in 2013.”

    Actually, New York City closed out 2013 at 334. denis Hamill, in his column in the New York Daily News of Tuesday, December 31, 2013 (and other sources) said 333, but that was obviously one day early.

    I have some numbers for scattered dates:

    1990: First year of David Dinkins: 2,245 murders, highest number ever recorded.

    1993: First full year of Raymond Kelly as Police Commissioner, and last year of David Dinkins: 1,946 murders

    1994: First year of Bill Bratton as Police Commisssioner and first year of Rudy Giuliani: 1,561 murders.

    1995: 1,177 murders. (Bratton was fired for not entirely clear reasons – Giuliani thought he wasn’t being honest, probably justifiably. I myself suspect he was protecting police corruption or dishonesty, of it was at a high enough level.)

    2001: Last year of Giuliani: 587 murders (not counting those killed by Osama bin Laden et al on September 11, 2001)

    2013: Last year of Bloomberg and Ray Kelly’s second stint as Police Commissioner: 334 murders.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (7bdfbf) — 1/6/2014 @ 5:37 pm

  192. A carriage ride is expensive?

    $50. is for up to 4 people riding in the carriage- NOT per person. That comes out to$12.50 each for the carriage ride. Abut the price if a movie but with real people and animals working for a living in NYC, not some CG version of “reality”!

    Comment by Susan (f9fa41) — 1/14/2014 @ 10:41 pm

  193. The New York Post ran an editorial today (Tuesday that is) about the horses. That may bean indication something soon is in the works, although the editorial mentioned nothing about anything happening soon. de Blasio still has to find a solution for hhe drivers.

    Comment by Sammy Finkelman (e6d54e) — 1/15/2014 @ 12:20 am

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