Patterico's Pontifications

4/4/2010

The Politically Diverse Tea Party

Filed under: Obama,Politics — DRJ @ 9:27 pm



[Guest post by DRJ]

New poll results show the media’s portrayal of Tea Party supporters as overwhelmingly Republican is a myth:

The national breakdown of the Tea Party composition is 57 percent Republican, 28 percent Independent and 13 percent Democratic, according to three national polls by the Winston Group, a Republican-leaning firm that conducted the surveys on behalf of an education advocacy group. Two-thirds of the group call themselves conservative, 26 are moderate and 8 percent say they are liberal.”

Overall, the poll shows that Tea Party supporters are united by financial issues:

The group is united around two issues – the economy/jobs and reducing the deficit. They believe that cutting spending is the key to job creation and favor tax cuts as the best way to stimulate the economy. That said 61 percent of Tea Party members believe infrastructure spending creates jobs. Moreover, given the choice Tea Party members favor 63-32 reducing unemployment to 5 percent over balancing the budget.”

… and this:

The group also vehemently dislikes President Barack Obama – even more so than those who called themselves Republicans in the survey. Over 80 percent of Tea Party members disapprove of the job he’s doing as president, whereas 77 percent of Republican respondents said they disapprove of Obama. The Tea Party members are also strongly opposed to the Democrats’ healthcare plan, with 82 percent saying they oppose it — only 48 percent of respondents overall were opposed.”

Some will inevitably say these respondents are just racists but I suspect what they don’t like is Obama’s socialism.

— DRJ

94 Responses to “The Politically Diverse Tea Party”

  1. C’mon, DRJ! Get with the program! This movement is composed entirely of white right wing extremists.

    Keith Olbermann says so. So do our trolls. It must be true.

    Eric Blair (ea0564)

  2. Eric – The only people obsessed with race are liberals. Heck, Chris Matthews sometimes forgets Obama is black and has to remind himself. What’s up with that?

    daleyrocks (718861)

  3. Facts will not get in the way of Teh Narrative. No way. No how.

    JD (e190da)

  4. The assertion that Tea Partiers’ dislike of Obama’s policies is race-based implies that they would be just fine with socialism if, say, Hillary Clinton was pushing it. That implication is, of course, absolutely ridiculous.

    Mike LaRoche (0ffb55)

  5. It’s just Teh Narrative, sadly.

    Eric Blair (ea0564)

  6. “8 percent say they are liberal.””

    ““The group also vehemently dislikes President Barack Obama – even more so than those who called themselves Republicans in the survey.”

    These sound like quite the prescription for political diversity.

    imdw (2d82e7)

  7. Unlike people like yourself, imdw, who are wildly divergent in opinions!

    Man, you goose-step to the DNC, and you honestly criticize others for a lack of political diversity. Honestly?

    Rave on, troll.

    Eric Blair (ea0564)

  8. The Democratic Party is about as ideologically diverse as the Politburo.

    Mike LaRoche (0ffb55)

  9. Here’s the thing about that 8 percent of TEA Party activists who self-describe as liberal: Only 20 percent of the voting public self-describe as liberal. So the TEA Party activists have a 40 percent weighting compared to the public at large. Imagine that.

    John Hitchcock (e26efa)

  10. John – Those liberals are fiercely independent thinkers, though. They never cover the same things or take the same positions on their blogs, that is until the White House tells them what to say or the talking points of the day are agreed upon.

    daleyrocks (718861)

  11. everyone who replies to this thread, or even reads it is a racist.

    (except me, of course, since i denounced you all. %-)

    redc1c4 (fb8750)

  12. Clean-up of non sequitur spew on aisle 6!

    Icy Texan (241fa2)

  13. Imdw thinks diversity stands for using different adjectives to discribe how awesome his leader is.

    Mr. Pink (50a062)

  14. “Unlike people like yourself, imdw, who are wildly divergent in opinions!”

    Yes I mean here I am finding myself supporting a plan whose outlines the GOP proposed as early as 1993, was further developed by the Heritage foundation, and finally implemented by a republican governor in Massachusetts. Clearly I’m so narrow minded and partisan.

    imdw (6b4e5c)

  15. Sorry, imdw, but comment #15 just beat you out for the troll of the week award. Try again next week!

    Sean P (334463)

  16. I still don’t think the Dems are going to worry about the TP. From the description of what they’re concerned about, it seems that they’re primarily people who may not be Republican but were likely to have voted Republican (Dems aren’t worry about deficits, except as an excuse to raise taxes)… and people who tend to vote GOP are precisely those who aren’t going to like the job Obama is doing.

    steve sturm (369bc6)

  17. No, no, and NO!

    If I wasn’t black every one would support my
    policies.

    You bitter, clinger racists.

    Barak Obama (e383ed)

  18. “15. Sorry, imdw, but comment #15 just beat you out for the troll of the week award. Try again next week!

    This has turned out mighty amusing.

    imdw (c5488f)

  19. Yes, imdw, you are correct: have a number of people look at a collection of your posts here and you will indeed be found to be partisan and narrow minded.

    Also rude. Again, no big deal that you are rude to people who respond to your “wingnut” witticisms in kind. But rude to people who have never been rude to you.

    Sure, you will think differently. But then, your mind exists in a very, very different location than that of polite individuals.

    Just a prat, as the inimitable Vivian Louise would put it.

    Eric Blair (ea0564)

  20. Even Naomi Wolf is dimly coming to the same realization, sort of in her own crazy way:

    http://blogs.news.com.au/dailytelegraph/timblair/index.php/dailytelegraph/comments/its_what_does_every_dictator_do/desc/#commentsmore

    ian cormac (349188)

  21. “Yes, imdw, you are correct: have a number of people look at a collection of your posts here and you will indeed be found to be partisan and narrow minded.”

    I admit my admiration for John Marshall does get out of hand sometimes.

    imdw (241c75)

  22. Because RomneyCare was implemented, that means what, exactly? How has that worked out for MA so far, dimwit?

    JD (959071)

  23. Gallup has a similar poll out, finding that “Tea Partiers Are Fairly Mainstream in Their Demographics

    Kevin Murphy (3c3db0)

  24. Off topic warning, ignore as you see fit, delete even. But it does concern outrage over the federal governments taking too much tax money (and spending way more than too much of it).

    I have not done our taxes for several years, as the Mrs. and now a son have worked for H+R Block, but I visited IRS.gov yesterday on behalf of my parents…The last time I went to that site several years ago, it was very easy to locate the most common forms to download, even though many were still included in hard copy in the tax instruction book.

    Yesterday I found no list of most commonly used forms, but a list by form # of 1,131 forms. Now, I see today that most of what I wanted were schedules that were sublisted under 1040 (on the page after where 1040 first appeared on my monitor), but I’m going to rant anyway.

    I’m thinking if there is any increase in jobs for this month, some of it will be for tax return professionals of all types, as things not only get more complicated but additional burdens are being put on those who have done their own taxes on paper for the last 50 years.

    A last question, if I may. I’ve never been audited, don’t know anyone that’s been audited (that I know of), even though I’ve never contributed to a Democratic election fund. If someone gets audited at random and has made a mistake of, say $200, from some odd source, does one get raked over the coals with fines and interest and stuff, or do you get to pay the owed tax and a percentage fine? If this is an inapproprite question, my apologies and ignore/delete. Obviously, no official counsel is given at this site, just as my medical $.02 are never the substitute for a “real” consultation with a professional.

    MD in Philly (59a3ad)

  25. “Yes I mean here I am finding myself supporting a plan whose outlines the GOP proposed as early as 1993, was further developed by the Heritage foundation, and finally implemented by a republican governor in Massachusetts.”

    imdw – I’m sure if people checked they would find ObamaCare implements exactly the reforms Heritage recommended. The Massachussets experiment has failed as knowledgeable observers admit, so why would you support something you claim is a repeat of that. In terms of the GOP and 1993, is that like all those Democrats voting for the Iraq war and then changing their minds less than two years later? Is there a point you are trying to make? Is there a point anybody should care about?

    daleyrocks (718861)

  26. According to Gallup, “In several other respects [other than being half Republicans], however — their age, educational background, employment status, and race — Tea Partiers are quite representative of the public at large.”

    The only real discrepancy noticeable is that Tea Partiers are only half as likely to be black (6% vs 11% in the population). Otherwise the demographics track. One-in-18 being black is somewhat higher than the Klan’s demographics, never mind how imdw would make them out to be.

    Kevin Murphy (3c3db0)

  27. “Because RomneyCare was implemented, that means what, exactly? How has that worked out for MA so far, dimwit?”

    CATO doesn’t like it. I don’t see much support for repeal. In fact I see a supporter of the plan being elected by MA residents. But to be fair I’m not a very regular follower of polling in MA.

    “imdw – I’m sure if people checked they would find ObamaCare implements exactly the reforms Heritage recommended.”

    I wouldnt’ say its exact. In fact the word I used was “outlines.” For example the plan the GOP advanced in 1993 had a mandate — which is a key part of the pre-existing coverage, but also had tort reform. When 2008 came around and the democrats decided to implement something like that 1993 GOP plan, the GOP made the decision that they wouldn’t cooperate and try to make it more to their liking, but would instead try to kill it. I think they could have gotten a policy much more to their liking. And one which wouldn’t have left them making the claim that something they supported in 1993 is unconstitutional when the democrat kenyan socialist tries to implement it.

    imdw (842182)

  28. “The only real discrepancy noticeable is that Tea Partiers are only half as likely to be black (6% vs 11% in the population). Otherwise the demographics track. One-in-18 being black is somewhat higher than the Klan’s demographics, never mind how imdw would make them out to be.”

    I was surprised that 12% of tea party supporters (not activists) think the health care bill is a “Good Thing.” I’ve seen black people at a tea party rally, but never seen a sign expressing the idea that the health care bill is a “Good thing.”

    imdw (c5488f)

  29. You know, imdw, if I had you present real time without Wikipedia, I would bet you a hundred bucks you couldn’t answer ten basic questions about Marshall.

    Nothing but a rude poseur. Again, not a surprise given your history.

    Marshall would not have had a thing to do with you, based on how and what you post here, and you know it. John Randolph put it best.

    Eric Blair (c8876d)

  30. I say everytime they bring up race we ask them to account for all of the money spent in the inner cities, all the racial set-asides, and all of the corruption, crime, and poor education they have bought. Talk about the success of welfare reform – the threat of which brought welfare rolls down by half. What ever happened to the people who went out and got jobs then? How are they doing compared to others?

    Run with it, but stay on message – government waste hurts people, women and minorities hardest hit.

    Amphipolis (b120ce)

  31. I did not ask about polling or who voted for it when it was passed, imdw. I asked how it is doing. Has it increased access? Decreased medical costs? Decreased premiums? Improved medical care?

    JD (959071)

  32. It’s all about the pom-poms, JD.

    Eric Blair (c8876d)

  33. “You know, imdw, if I had you present real time without Wikipedia, I would bet you a hundred bucks you couldn’t answer ten basic questions about Marshall.”

    The things I like about him comes from what I’ve read about or by him, not things I’ve memorized about or by him. Like when I was writing about McCullough v. Maryland. I, like anyone else, have to go look it up.

    “Has it increased access? Decreased medical costs? Decreased premiums? Improved medical care?”

    I know there’s way more coverage. The rest I don’t know. As for the polling and support, I find it significant whether people like it and defend it and continue to support its defenders. Since we have representative government, those things matter in telling us how things are working out — if the people support a policy, and don’t want it changed, that’s evidence of it working out.

    imdw (e66d8d)

  34. Eric – It is off searching for the appropriate talking point to spit out when someone asks about exactly how RomneyCare is working out for the state. Or any other plan implemented for that matter. You will notice that they did not point to any real-world examples of success, since there aren’t any.

    JD (959071)

  35. SHOCKA – imdw, your response was non-responsive. Increasing coverage for individuals is A metric, and ironically, not the one I asked about.

    JD (959071)

  36. The rest I don’t know.

    Dontcha think that maybe you might want to concern yourself with the details of a plan prior to pushing it as an example?

    JD (959071)

  37. Gotta run, folks. Lots of meetings today and then heading down to watch Butler c@ckslap the Dookies.

    JD (959071)

  38. “Dontcha think that maybe you might want to concern yourself with the details of a plan prior to pushing it as an example?”

    Like I said, the Obama plan has the same outlines as Romneycare and what the Heritage foundation proposed. I used the word “outlines” on purpose, and further discussed how some details of what just passed differed from previous GOP proposals. So for example, the details of how MA implements a mandate may not be the same as health reform, but the outline is similar in that they both have a mandate. As to details of how it has turned out, googling can provide more of that — as if that was needed to find, say CATO being opposed to it. Do you know and want to share? or not?

    imdw (603c39)

  39. McCullough tells us that if Congress needs to create a bank in order to administer Obamacare, they can. Perhaps they could even create a health insurer or a pharmacy.

    It does not tell us that Congress can compel people to buy a service or a product.

    SPQR (26be8b)

  40. …not things I’ve memorized about or by him….”

    Oh, you mean that you just look for quotes and move on, without well, learning anything. Or determining context. I see students all the time who confuse memorization with knowledge. Those who disdain memorization seem to not do so well in classes. But I am sure you are a real Nobel Prize winner.

    Go read for a while. Books are a good thing, imdw.

    But you will need to put your pom-poms down first.

    Eric Blair (c8876d)

  41. “I see students all the time who confuse memorization with knowledge”

    This is why I said “not the things I’ve memorized about him.” Though some of the things he’s written are quite memorable.

    “McCullough tells us that if Congress needs to create a bank in order to administer Obamacare, they can. Perhaps they could even create a health insurer or a pharmacy.”

    I was more introducing it for its broader idea expounding on the necessary and proper clause, and the specific things it had to say to people who get the tenth amendment wrong. I gave the sketch of how the mandate fits into the regulation before McCullough v. MD — it’s necessary and proper to create a system of incentives and disincentives to prevent free-riding on the regulation that requires that pre-existing conditions be covered in order for the regulation on pre-existing condition coverage to work.

    And that’s just the necessary and proper argument. In an era where there is pre-existing condition coverage, the economic impact of free-riding will be huge: premiums will just skyrocket. So congress has the power to prevent this free-riding from having the impact it does.

    imdw (0069f8)

  42. Although ridicuously late to the party (as it were), the MSM is finally beginning to wake up to the reality out there in Fly – Over country. The same people who were hoodwinked by Obama’s idiotic BS are not amused at being treated like fools, and their alleged betters in the Government (including both the Dem and the GOP) are going to pay for their princely arrogance. Watching the Dem congresscritters run rapidly away from any and all public meetings last week in their districts was truly hilarious, and more than a warning shot across their bow. They’re screwed, and now they know it. The anger will not subside, it’s only going to fester until the pound of flesh is taken.

    Dmac (21311c)

  43. Folks, arguing with the troll is what feeds him. I tried reasoning with him a few months ago and gave up.

    My objections to Obamacare are based on the fact that it does nothing to control costs and, in fact, continues the first dollar coverage that drives the cost escalation.

    The fact that it is stuffed with waste, pork and corruption is another reason. The Mass plan is similar to Obamacare although without the corruption. It has raised costs and premiums. The Mass residents are mostly trying to modify it rather than repeal it. I think that is s good thing so we can see whether it can be modified to something that works. I doubt it because the basic premise is flawed. Everybody would like to have prepaid care so they don’t have to pay anything.

    In a free economy, price is what tells you whether you can buy something. It also tells the producer whether he can make a business succeed selling the product. If the price is less than his cost, he figures out how to lower cost, raise price, or go out of business, at least in that line.

    Government doesn’t have those restraints. If he price is too high, it can make a law that you have to buy or drive out of business any alternative, or both. That’s where we are now.

    Mike K (2cf494)

  44. The site is running better now but earlier this morning, it was very slow and was timing out. What gives ?

    Mike K (2cf494)

  45. Patterico’s just too popular.

    Bradley J. Fikes, C. O.R. (a18ddc)

  46. Politico, of course, reports the Gallup poll all wrong. They say:

    Forty-three percent of the independents surveyed said they support the tea party, while 49 percent of Republicans said the same. Only 8 percent of self-identified Democrats back the tea parties.

    In fact, the Gallup poll says that 62% of Republicans support the Tea Parties (and that 49% of Tea Party supporters are Republicans, a much different statement).

    Someone needs a better understanding of statistics. Or English.

    Kevin Murphy (3c3db0)

  47. “The group is united around two issues – the economy/jobs and reducing the deficit.”

    This are issues that the Democrats in Congress and the White House seem to have no interest.

    Neo (7830e6)

  48. The TEA Party movement scares the hell out of a wide range of entrenched interests: both political parties, mainstream media, the federal bureaucracy, labor unions, lobbyists and other Washington DC insiders, members of the Military/Industrial/Congressional complex, dependent constituencies, and client industries.

    Taxpayers, loyal Americans, and legal immigrants seeking a better life understand that limited government and fiscal responsibility are essential to return our nation to Constitutional government.

    Just like the original few dozen patriots at the Boston Tea Party ignited the rebellion which established our nation, today’s Tea Party patriots have the potential to ignite that same passion and return America to the principles which made us free and prosperous.

    If that scares you, you’re part of the problem.

    ropelight (37ae40)

  49. ““I see students all the time who confuse memorization with knowledge”

    This is why I said “not the things I’ve memorized about him.” Though some of the things he’s written are quite memorable.”

    I see you aren’t a very careful reader. Which is not a surprise.

    Also—quite rude, particularly to people who are polite to you. Folks won’t forget that, Cheerleader.

    Eric Blair (2708f4)

  50. “I see you aren’t a very careful reader.”

    Next you’ll be giving us your definition of “plagiarism.”

    imdw (0069f8)

  51. “These sound like quite the prescription for political diversity.”

    Political diversity? LOL!… the Tea Party folks are against Big Government encroachment on their freedom, ever-increasing taxation and run-amok spending. Don’t expect to see your garden-variety, contemporary liberal among their ranks… they fervently believe in ALL OF THOSE.

    GeneralMalaise (556297)

  52. Ya know, if the democrats had tried to keep spending down, lower taxes, and reduce the deficit (I know, to a liberal this is just not even worth considering), and pointing out that both sides have failed to consistently deliver on the TEA party’s list of good ideas, I don’t think we’d have much of a movement.

    Instead, the democrats have spent a lot of effort insulting the protestors. Trying to frame them for communist terrorists and frame them for fake racial attacks on congressmen. And a lot more, of course. And now the TEA party sees the democrats as a group of people who hate them and will never listen to them.

    The GOP, which really doesn’t deserve any credibility on spending aside from being much better than democrats, is reaping the rewards of the democrat’s amazing mistake.

    dustin (b54cdc)

  53. Hey, imdw? I’m happy to define words, right after you define “apology.” Also “manners.”

    I have finally found a person who merits the term “poltroon.” It’s so…you. Partisan hack.

    Eric Blair (c8876d)

  54. I’ve been to enough of these things to realize that, despite imdw’s typical silliness, these rallies are very politically diverse.

    I think it’s delusional not to realize that Obama’s promising all things to all people also leads to breaking promises that appealed to all people. Of course plenty of far leftists are mad at Obama for his lies. Of course! You’d have to be pretty stupid not to understand how it works when you lie to everyone for a long time.

    These are pragmatic people, too. There will be no third party disaster in most cases. These are still people Obama has to convince to vote for him again, too.

    dustin (b54cdc)

  55. “Yes I mean here I am finding myself supporting a plan whose outlines the GOP proposed as early as 1993″

    imdw – Regarding your latest favorite talking point, the 1993 GOP bill was about health insurance reform, so in that sense it was broadly similar to the ObamaCare bill. You’re going to have to fill in some details to convince anybody further, which is something you don’t like to do.

    I’m sure Massachusetts voters are still having second thoughts over electing Scott Brown with his campaign promise to be the 41st vote against ObamaCare, which is strange, because you claim it’s the same system they have in Massachusetts.

    daleyrocks (718861)

  56. “I’ve been to enough of these things to realize that, despite imdw’s typical silliness, these rallies are very politically diverse.”

    One aspect of the diversity that I just learned is that apparently 12% of tea party supporters (twice the number of black supporters) think that health care reform was a “good thing.” I did not get that from what i’ve seen of the rallies. how about you?

    “You’re going to have to fill in some details to convince anybody further, which is something you don’t like to do.”

    One of the key details — actually i would call it not so much a detail, but part of the outline — is that the GOP plan included a mandate.

    imdw (603c39)

  57. Mandates, per se, are not the problem although national ones may be unconstitutional. The problem is that the left will load the mandated policies up with left wing goodies like substance abuse treatment, chiropractic and acupuncture, other alternative therapy, mental health, etc. Every group with a lobby who’s willing to spend enough will get in.

    A mandate to buy a cheap catastrophic care policy would be much less objectionable and could be tied to auto insurance or some other mechanism. It would cost about $150/year.

    The real purpose of the mandates is to pay for the other pork.

    Mike K (2cf494)

  58. The real purpose of the mandates is to pay for the other pork. chain you to the government (ie: to change us from “citizens” to “subjects”)!

    FTFY

    AD - RtR/OS! (0d3e7e)

  59. Not to quibble over the details Mike, but when I got my catastrophic policy back in 2004, it was a hell of a lot more than $150/year. Try something along the lines of $3K a year. And that was with a $5K deductible.

    Dmac (21311c)

  60. “One of the key details — actually i would call it not so much a detail, but part of the outline — is that the GOP plan included a mandate.”

    imdw – A mandate for what? When did it take place? Who did it apply to? If it involved individual insurance were insurerers forced to essentially community rate policies as under ObamaCare?

    daleyrocks (718861)

  61. imdw – This is your usual mode of operation – throw out a red herring. Say something is similar to something else with no verification. People here have learned not to trust your statements. Fetch details.

    daleyrocks (718861)

  62. a translation of imdw’s latest: “Squirrel!”

    SPQR (26be8b)

  63. Of course, imdw is right that most, and most by far, of Tea Partiers oppose Obamacare. I don’t understand why he thinks that debunks the notion that they are politically diverse, unless he thinks only a narrow set of Americans could oppose Obamacare.

    Hell, even Primary Obama opposed this type of ‘reform’ quite loudly and proudly.

    It’s politically diverse, despite agreeing on a few basic things that obviously comprise the basis for the movement. Good grief.

    dustin (b54cdc)

  64. SPQR – Well, they were both related to health care, so in that sense they’re similar.

    daleyrocks (718861)

  65. dustin – There was bipartisan opposition to ObamaCare in Congress, but not bipartisan support. Go figure.

    daleyrocks (718861)

  66. “Mandates, per se, are not the problem although national ones may be unconstitutional.”

    Oh see, this is new. Here I thought mandates were a problem to some folks.

    “he problem is that the left will load the mandated policies up with left wing goodies like substance abuse treatment, chiropractic and acupuncture, other alternative therapy, mental health, etc. ”

    I did not know that substance abuse treatment or mental health coverage was a “left wing goodie.”

    “Of course, imdw is right that most, and most by far, of Tea Partiers oppose Obamacare. ”

    Actually I thought it would be all. Twice as many support obamacare as are black. That’s quite a bit diversity.

    imdw (abf08a)

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  69. > I know there’s way more coverage. The rest I don’t know.

    Really? So you support a plan which already has a concrete “writ small” example of it IN USE which could point to problems in it which absolutely need to be addressed, but can’t be bothered to actually learn about it?

    In other words, you support it because Obama and the Dems support it. The facts don’t matter.

    CRIS. No question.

    IgotBupkis (79d71d)

  70. All of the tea-partiers I have talked to were ill-informed knee-jerk reactionaries spitting out talking points. They were so misinformed that they didn’t even know what they were protesting. If they are the future of any political party, I feel seriously sorry for that party. Of course, there are not too many other people left to support the crazy-speak from the right, so beggars can’t be choosers.

    Chris Hooten (bc3301)

  71. “Really? So you support a plan which already has a concrete “writ small” example of it IN USE which could point to problems in it which absolutely need to be addressed, but can’t be bothered to actually learn about it?”

    It’s a republican plan from heritage. Should I be skeptical?

    [note: fished from spam filter. –Stashiu]

    imdw (b2227f)

  72. Chris – A sample of one is not statistically significant.

    daleyrocks (718861)

  73. Sounds like the only tea party supporter that Chris could find was “Homeless Joe” who wandered by for a free hot dog & soda.

    AD - RtR/OS! (cf9e75)

  74. I found this in an article from the AP today:

    As a nascent grassroots movement with no registration or formal structure, there are no racial demographics available for the tea party movement; it’s believed to include only a small number of blacks and Hispanics.

    How can the AP possibly claim there are no demographics available? So much for multiple layers of editing….

    Some chump (c2555f)

  75. All of the tea-partiers I have talked to were ill-informed knee-jerk reactionaries spitting out talking points. They were so misinformed that they didn’t even know what they were protesting. If they are the future of any political party, I feel seriously sorry for that party. Of course, there are not too many other people left to support the crazy-speak from the right, so beggars can’t be choosers.

    Comment by Chris Hooten —

    If you had self awareness, you would realize that this comment, in a post that proves the massive tea party is very diverse, actually exposes certain facts about you, Chris. You don’t get out much to interact with people who aren’t just like you, or you would realize the Tea Party is not at all what you think it is. The hatred you have at these people you don’t even understand, for having traits like insular, knee-jerk, talking point spitting, misinformed…. traits you prove yourself as having, probably means you’re not the healthiest person out there.

    April 15th, I challenge you to go to the Tea party closet to you. Make your own sign. Criticize Bush for TARP spending, or Tom Delay for K Street, or some other overspending or overtaxing problem. Point out that liberal democrats can want fiscal restraint too. Join us!

    dustin (b54cdc)

  76. Hatred? I don’t have any hatred toward tea-partiers. They just don’t have what it takes politically to make an impact. Once they realize just how diverse they are, and that they don’t agree with one another, they will just spend all of their time shouting at one another. If you want to believe that they are the GOP’s savior, though, go ahead. They are not the cream of the crop, so to speak.

    Chris Hooten (bc3301)

  77. Who is the cream of the American political crop?

    DRJ (daa62a)

  78. Oh, no, CH. Not a bit of hatred. So I guess you rant beginning “ill-informed knee-jerk reactionaries spitting out talking points“—which is kind of a talking point of the DNC recently, if your diet is irony-poor—is a sign of your calm, reasoned, fair minded approach to politics.

    You aren’t real. More performance art.

    Keep it up, and people will ask to subscribe to your newsletter.

    Eric Blair (5cf38e)

  79. How do my ballz taste, Chris? Do you ever tire of making sh@t up?

    JD (76f87c)

  80. Why, DRJ! CH is “..the cream of the American political crop…,” of course.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnzHtm1jhL4.

    Eric Blair (5cf38e)

  81. “All of the tea-partiers I have talked to……”

    Somehow I can’t picture Chris actually talking to any Tea Tarty supporters. I picture him more as the type who shouts obscenities at them from the middle of a crowd a very safe distance away.

    daleyrocks (718861)

  82. DRJ’s so much better at this than I’ll ever be.

    Indeed, post 77 asks the right question.

    ‘cream of the political crop’ is not part of the equation in a government of the masses of democrats, republicans, independents, kooks, normals, employers, employees, and funemployed.

    We are sick and tired of these damn ruling class elites mocking how common we are. We include flyover country, some of us actually need trucks to make a living, many do not even contemplate an Ivy League education.

    And we don’t want a government like the one we have. We think people should handle their own food, clothing, shelter, personal needs, unless they are particularly unfortunate. We think the intrusions and unsustainable costs completely overcome the benefits of the entitlement culture. We are tired of our ‘rulers’ telling us what we need them to give us, and how much they need from us and our kids and our future prosperity. And we see through this entire project as a lie meant to fund corruption.

    “cream of the crop” ??????

    A protest movement is not about the cream of the crop.

    dustin (b54cdc)

  83. daleyrocks – he is the one that offers a receptacle for their teabagging exericises.

    JD (76f87c)

  84. The cream of the crop, what I assume that refers to anyway, overwhelmingly voted for Martha Coakley.

    This is not about the GOP being saved, but that is obviously what the Tea Party has done. They are relevant despite being thought of as dead for a generation. They completely reshaped Obamacare, almost defeated it despite being outnumbered greatly, and have won the public debate (the public doesn’t like Obamacare, btw). That isn’t thanks to John Mccain and Michael Steele. That’s thanks to the Tea Party and perhaps the politicians smart enough to harness it.

    If all you care about is whether or not the GOP is pwned, then you are missing the entire point, missing your chance to join us, and you’ll be really sickened by what’s going to happen in November to your precious political domination.

    Democrats are welcomed in the Tea Party. And all but the truly lost agree on the basics of a balanced budget and open government with less intrusion.

    dustin (b54cdc)

  85. What are you guys talking about? You read all of that into what I wrote? Give me a break.

    BTW #79, I am guessing salty, but you ought to ask your mom. That was really mature of both of us.

    Chris Hooten (bc3301)

  86. You read all of that into what I wrote? Give me a break.

    Yeah, we did read that into what you said.

    You are commenting on a post proving your talking points to be incorrect, your generalization to be unfair, and your reaction to a protest of millions to be knee jerk to the extreme.

    And you are complaining about these very traits in your mythical Tea Party.

    Why aren’t you making your sign for the April 15th protest? If you’re in the Austin Area, I will gladly buy you lunch if you make a fiscal sustainability plea (directed at the GOP is fine) and attend the protest. We are not a bunch of insular zombies, though I sometimes think Obama supporters at this point, especially those who buy the ‘teabagger’ trope, are zombies.

    dustin (b54cdc)

  87. Cream of the crop….like the friends and associates of Louis and Marie?
    Or, perhaps you’re talking about Al Hiss?
    Top drawer, all; very top drawer.
    How well did that work out for them BTW?

    AD - RtR/OS! (cf9e75)

  88. I didn’t prove anything. I gave an opinion based on my experience. If it does not agree with your opinion and experience, so be it. Are you guys asking me to justify an opinion? Yeah, I don’t have any video or anything, so… #87: what are you talking about? I have no idea who those people are. I merely gave an opinion based on experience. Now I am a charlatan and a liar? Based on what?

    Chris Hooten (bc3301)

  89. I didn’t prove anything.

    You misread what I said, perhaps my fault. This post (you and I are making comments to a single post) proves things that your opinions conflict greatly with.

    dustin (b54cdc)

  90. Do you want diverse opinions and ideas? It doesn’t sound like you do. So why would you be trumpeting this article?

    Chris Hooten (bc3301)

  91. Do you want diverse opinions and ideas? It doesn’t sound like you do. So why would you be trumpeting this article?

    Comment by Chris Hooten

    I assume you’re talking to me. Who knows anymore with you. I am willing to bet serious money that you suffer from the effects of smoking a great deal of pot. I can always pin you folks. I don’t mean this as an attack, but you are behaving strangely. Paranoid, failing to process and apply various points. Kinda snotty for no good reason.

    Anyway, I sure as hell want diversity. The kind that counts most, diversity of views. I think the Tea party is about sustainable, reasonable government, so the diversity has to be compatible with and love that concept, but that’s my only limitation.

    Pot heads who want a reduction in the drug war are welcome, though don’t expect everyone to agree with you. Why does it not sound like I want a diversity of views? Because I oppose Obamacare, like most folks?

    Face it, Chris, you argued that the Tea party was a small segment of no political worth, and close minded and full of nothing but talking points. you’re the one who isn’t interested in different opinions, and you lost this argument. Actual evidence was provided to refute what you claim and admit has no basis.

    dustin (b54cdc)

  92. The Tea Parties are going to fall victim to internecine squabbling?

    What a silly wet dream. Their strength lies in each group’s independence and the grass-roots structure of it all, real, actual grass-roots.

    Their goal is to reduce government and the Democratic Party as it currently exists. Simple as that. Paulnuts and other weirdos aside. There’s zero chance whatsoever of Tea Partiers losing their focus and somehow forgetting to not go vote against Democrats in November.

    Haven’t liberals forgotten that basic tenet of politics? People don’t vote for a guy they vote against the other guy. People are more and more inclined to go voting against Democrats every day, that’s all there is to it. The image of the GOP doesn’t matter so much as does the image of the Democrats, and their image is just abysmal.

    skwiself (b69230)

  93. Now I am a pothead? Based on what? There sure is a lot of name calling in here. Can’t we be more civil than that?

    Chris Hooten (bc3301)

  94. Chris, I explained what I based it off of.

    I also was civil about my claim. I think you have a problem, but perhaps you can use that problem to find some common ground against intrusive government.

    Are you a pot smoker?

    dustin (b54cdc)


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