Patterico's Pontifications

12/6/2008

Coldplay: Plagiarists?

Filed under: Music — Patterico @ 10:18 pm

Via David Post at Volokh comes this effective YouTube video that makes the case:

Maybe I should use this sort of video editing to press my plagiarism case against John Williams. (I’m being a bit tongue-in-cheek with that description, obviously.) I have posted a YouTube video that places clips next to each other — but not right on top of one another.

16 Responses to “Coldplay: Plagiarists?”

  1. wow… Just wow. Playing them on top of each other would likely find you wondering why one wasn’t playing…

    The similarities is just freaking amazing…

    Scott Jacobs (90ff96)

  2. That’s uncanny.

    If I was more skilled in web video, I would do the same with Billy Swan’s “I Can Help” (1974) and Bruce Springsteen’s subsequent “Cover Me” (1984). Click, compare, and opine.

    L.N. Smithee (34e392)

  3. L.N.,

    Not hearing that one.

    Patterico (cc3b34)

  4. Sounds like some money will be owed if his ever reaches a jury trial.

    Charlie (03643a)

  5. Satriani isn’t even the first to claim that Coldplay took “Viva la Vida” from him. Check out this link for more deets.

    I’m always fascinated by these discussions, not because of plagiarism, but because I wonder if we’re reaching the finite possibilities of the 12-tone scale. I mean, how much can one expect from a guy who puts colored tape around his fingers as a “fashion” statement?

    CW Desiato (614aa7)

  6. Makes you wonder why George Harrison didn’t sue Paul Weller of the Jam for stealing 90% of “Taxman” when he wrote “Start!”

    Not to mention the similarities between Aldo Nova’s “Fantasy” and Jefferson Starship’s “Jane.”

    otcconan (d6afba)

  7. Also: Lionel Ritchie’s “Hello” chorus melody was used as the main guitar line for Gary Moore’s “Still Got The Blues.”

    otcconan (d6afba)

  8. I wonder if I could go after Shawn Mullins for using my poem title, “The Ballad of Kathryn Johnston”, for his song.

    nk (5a0e72)

  9. I love both Satriani and Coldplay (seen both in concert) but I have to say this is damning. What makes it worse is that I once saw an interview with Coldplay in which they more or less admitted that the song Speed of Sound was basically stolen from Kate Bush’s Running Up That Hill. I haven’t done the comparison myself, but they admitted to listening to her track over and over to learn the parts.

    Unless they stole Clocks and God Put a Smile on Your Face, they’re still a great band.

    John (3e13e7)

  10. Three note riff, and then they start to vary.
    They both stick in time because they both stick in time.

    Satriani’s is more varied (because he’s Satriani) and Coldplay doesn’t do anything after the riff except back the singer who doesn’t follow Satriani’s riffs.

    I’m betting it won’t be considered enough. There’s only so many combinations of three-note riffs, and that’s not enough for monetary damages.

    luagha (298fd8)

  11. Oh come on, people. This isn’t a surprise.

    As lefty enviromentalists, Coldplay is into recycling.

    Paul (creator of "Staunch Brayer") (1f5390)

  12. […] found the video at Patterico’s, along with this astute comment: “This isn’t a surprise. As lefty enviromentalists, […]

    dustbury.com » Something borrowed (78f5f2)

  13. Wow! I’m famous!

    Paul (creator of "Staunch Brayer") (1f5390)

  14. […] palate cleanser via Patterico. Think of it as the musical equivalent of the Coleman/Franken ballot challenge, with Franken as a […]

    Hot Air » Blog Archive » Audio: The obligatory “Coldplay rips off Joe Satriani, maybe” clip (371ae1)

  15. Not. I think Joe is in need of cash.

    Bigceltic (b2de24)

  16. John @ No 9:

    Brace yourself: they did steal Clocks. Go on YouTube and find ‘Breath of Life’ by Erasure

    Mike (a85c11)


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