Patterico's Pontifications

11/15/2008

Obama’s Evolving National Security Policy

Filed under: Obama — DRJ @ 12:33 pm



[Guest post by DRJ]

These Obama policy waffles noticed by Ed Morrissey at Hot Air are examples of why I don’t trust Obama and his supporters on national security:

“Earlier today, I noted that Barack Obama’s team has started hinting that they will move back towards John McCain’s position on interrogation techniqiues. Now supporters of Obama who have criticized the Bush administration’s position on indefinite detention have begun rethinking that policy as well[.]”

Presidents must adjust their policies as events unfold but there’s nothing new here except Obama has shifted from candidate to President-elect.

If Obama follows through on his campaign promises, he would prohibit many CIA interrogation techniques and close GTMO, even if that meant releasing detainees into American society. Those seem like particularly bad ideas in light of renewed warnings that the world should brace for a terror attack, warnings that must weigh heavily on President-elect Obama.

So I hope Obama decides to adopt President Bush’s policies as a good balance of civil liberty and national security concerns. Whatever he decides, it seems Obama’s consideration of national security issues is far more nuanced now that his opponent is Al Qaeda instead of Hillary or McCain. Unfortunately this is simply more evidence of just how naive or disingenuous candidate Obama and his supporters really are.

— DRJ

59 Responses to “Obama’s Evolving National Security Policy”

  1. disengenuous – Obama
    naive – his supporters

    headhunt23 (4b934b)

  2. And the countdown to the denouncements from DKos begins….

    Another Drew (bb1716)

  3. Obama is naive if he thinks that his supporters won’t eventually see through his disingenuousness.

    Icy Truth (aedb2f)

  4. I am more inclined to believe his voting record

    Joe - Dallas (85ffd2)

  5. Considering Kos’s hostile rejection of Bill Clinton’s moderate stance on many issues, it’s only a matter of time.

    Icy Truth (aedb2f)

  6. You know when you’re a rookie (and God knows, the Anointed One is a real rookie) you’re all toes–and the world is a place to stub each and every one of those toes.

    I know that in drag racing they say that the bullshit stops when the clock starts. Well Obama is having his burnout in the pits, and since he’s got a big blue seal and is “The Office of The President Elect” well, the clock has started. Can he replace the vague but sweeping rhetorical bull shit with actual performance? For the nation’s sake, I hope so. (But my vote said I didn’t think he could.)

    Mike Myers (31af82)

  7. I just wonder how many people are leaving/have left our intelligence services because they don’t want to work for lying idiots like Obama?

    PCD (7fe637)

  8. Bush’s policy’s are a good balance? The biggest threat to America right now is Bush’s failed foreign policy. Russia, Venezuela, Iran are on the rise and terrorism is still an imminent threat (as you noted in your post). And indirectly weakening America’s world power is the fiscal fiasco that we’re going through. I’m not saying all of this in support of Obama, but you guys have to realize that Obama’s win was not just a vote against Bush, but the Republican party itself. The so-called die hard Republicans are to blame for the current state of America, and all you guys can do is sit around and blame and question others. As an independent, I would have happily voted for McCain, but my vote was against what the Republican party has become–idealogues promoting self interest. For the good of the Republican party and, more importantly, the good of America, you guys need to spend some time looking inwards and reflecting on why things have come to this point.

    Paul Hsu (f890a6)

  9. If Obama follows through on his campaign promises, he would prohibit many CIA interrogation techniques and close GTMO, even if that meant releasing detainees into American society.

    The problem for any detainees released into American society is that they’re going to be marked men: if there’s another 9-11, I wouldn’t bet a plugged nickel they’ll still be alive by sundown the same day.

    His Majesty Barack the First may magnanimously release these surah-spouting creeps into American society…but that doesn’t mean he’ll be able to protect them once they’re out the front gate.

    MarkJ (7fa185)

  10. Comment by Paul Hsu — 11/15/2008 @ 2:17 pm
    The biggest threat to America right now is Bush’s failed foreign policy. Russia, Venezuela, Iran are on the rise and terrorism is still an imminent threat…”

    Well, lets look at that…
    Russia is essentially a toothless tiger. They can threaten the near-abroad who are defenseless (ie, Georgia, since it had yet to be made a member of NATO), but they are not a threat to the U.S. With the decline of the price of oil, their hard-currency reserves are drying up, and the financial crisis (which is world-side) has caused the Moscow stock-market to crash. On top of that, they have failed for so long to invest in their oil infrastructure, that their production is declining with little likelihood of reversing the trend-line. The decline in oil prices has also been a shock to the Venezuelan gov’t. It has far fewer funds to spread about Latin America to revolutionary/radical groups. And, how can the policies undertaken by the Bush Admin re Iran have been a failure when they have been the multi-lateral policies espoused by the foreign-policy professionals ensconced in their Ivory-Tower think-tanks? We were told not to go it alone by the pointy-heads and the Euro-weenies, so Bush acquiesced to the Euro’s and stood aside while the Brits, French and Germans talked, and talked, and talked with the Mullahs – and the UN twirled their thumbs, saying constantly if you don’t do X, we’re going to vote on sanctions against you (which they have yet to do).

    “…weakening America’s world power is the fiscal fiasco that we’re going through…”

    Except, we are in a better position relative to the other major players in that the Dollar is strengthening due to everyone around the world parking their Dollars in US Treasuries which they assume are safe, unlike the MBS instruments that they were losing money on.

    “…The so-called die hard Republicans…”
    Which ones are these, the “Big Government Compassionate Conservative” ones; or the “Wall Street/Rockefeller Republicans”; or is it the Mid-West “Country Club Republicans”; or are they the “Main street/Small Business Republicans”?
    Please, we want to know?

    “…my vote was against…idealogues (sic) promoting self interest…”
    And so you voted for the largest collection of ideologues in politics today, led by an empty-suit who personifies the term “ideologue”.

    “… good of the Republican party…”
    If you had any real interest in shaping the Republican Party, you would register as one, and volunteer with your local GOP Central Cmte for party-building events.

    “…you guys need to spend some time looking inwards…”
    No, what we need to do is to get back to the basic individualistic, freedom and liberty message we have always found to be effective, and leave the “navel gazing” to the mushy-headed liberals such as you.

    Another Drew (bb1716)

  11. As an independent, I would have happily voted for McCain, but my vote was against what the Republican party has become–idealogues promoting self interest.

    Yeah, sure – you’re an “independent.” That’s quite convincing, really.

    for the good of America, you guys need to spend some time looking inwards and reflecting on why things have come to this point.

    In other words, shut up and get on board the Obama bandwagon, and don’t question anything he does over his first year, just like the Lefties did during Bush’s two terms in office.

    Right, Mr. Independent?

    Dmac (e30284)

  12. Is Mr. Independent Paul Hsu a relative of funny moneyman for Hillary, Mr. Hsu, who was in the newhsus during primary season for bilking investors for tens of millions of dollars to contribute to dem candidates?

    eaglewingz08 (c46606)

  13. What Obama has decided to do is to go through all files on those detained at GITMO before he releases them into the USA. Seems like the ideal thing to do. However, I personally feel they should all be released as due process! They have not had legal advice, are not allowed to see or hear ANY evidence against them, they are not allowed to confront the accusers and they have been locked up forever. This is not the Americans way. Even Bush has said he is keeping some that have NOT commited any crimes because he can’t find a country to take them in. Lord, that is a piss pour excuse to keep them in prison for 7 years. Obama knows about the innocent. Bush also had the DOJ pass laws that say anyone can lock up us americans for no reason and we loose all our rights guaranteed under the Constitution and Bill of Rights. How would you like this to be done to you and all evidence surpressed in the name of security. God get a life and check your facts before making dumb statements. These people deserve to at least know the charges and evidence.

    sandy valencour (26d9e3)

  14. I just wonder how many people are leaving/have left our intelligence services because they don’t want to work for lying idiots like Obama?

    I suspect, the intelligence agencies are quite happy with obama, they are littered with valeria plames’ and joe wilsons’.

    Joe - Dallas (85ffd2)

  15. Comment by Paul Hsu — 11/15/2008 @ 2:17 pm

    “The so-called die hard Republicans are to blame for the current state of America, and all you guys can do is sit around and blame and question others.”

    Incorrect; the “so-called die hard Republicans” were one of President Bush’s biggest critics (the most notable exceptions being tax-cuts which led to a prosperous economy and security policies that led to ZERO attacks by our enemies on the soil of our Country).

    Problems, challenges, and circumstance change in the course of any nation’s history. Sometimes these changes are good, sometimes not. Rather than reflexively blame a single individual or whining that things are not going our way, should we not examine the facts in an adult way and create dialog and discussion centered on solutions?

    Ironically, the “you guys” are going to be “the guys” who will be called upon to do the work of fighting and fixing all the problems that our nation faces, as usual. In some cases we will have success, sometimes not. One consistent fact will remain; the whining that will most certainly be expressed by those who do nothing, say anything and blame those that try.

    (Sitting around blaming others, isn’t that EXACTLY what you just did.)

    Pons Asinorum (e56816)

  16. Even Bush has said he is keeping some that have NOT commited any crimes because he can’t find a country to take them in.

    Gee, why do you think that’s the case? If they’re indeed innocent as you claim, why is there no country willing to accept them into the fabric of their society?

    Dmac (e30284)

  17. sandy valencour:

    Bush also had the DOJ pass laws that say anyone can lock up us americans for no reason and we loose all our rights guaranteed under the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

    The DOJ passed laws locking up Americans and taking away all rights? Wow, I want to work there. Who needs Congress?

    God get a life and check your facts before making dumb statements.

    Aye, aye, sir, and I urge you to take your own advice.

    DRJ (a50047)

  18. Russia has nuclear weapons and an insane/paranoid prime minister. The fiscal crisis in Russia actually makes it feel more insecure and there’s not telling what Putin might decide to do one day.

    The die-hard Republicans are the ones who make decisions based on their party affiliation, and not on logic and reasoning. My godmother told me she watches Fox news because she’s a Republican and I find that disturbing. It’s the same with die-hard Democrats who make decisions based on ideology.

    I agree, we need to get back to the basic individualistic, freedom, and liberty message, but holding detainees indefinitely does not follow that message and weakens America’s standing in the world. Despite our best intentions, other countries will feel that “democracy” has become an excuse for furthering our interests.

    Yes, I am independent. I would be considered socially liberal and fiscally conservative. For me, being independent means I try to make decisions that are based on logic and reason, and not on ideology. I don’t always succeed and it’s hard to gather all of the information to make an informed decision, but I would never vote for McCain because he’s a Republican or Obama because he’s black. Those qualities do not determine the effectiveness of a leader and president.

    No, I don’t want you guys to shut up and get on board because it is important to have critical voices. Reflecting and critiquing are not mutually exclusive. I’m actually not happy that the Democrats have majorities in both houses of Congress because they could become just as complacent as the Republicans were. One of the reasons I chose Obama is because he is reflective, which is an ability that Bush didn’t develop till recently. I believe McCain has the ability to be reflective as well, but his hands are tied by his party. He didn’t show me that he could make good decisions while trying to please the, again, “die-hard” Republicans. Effective leaders reflect and take action.

    I don’t understand why people don’t “navel gaze?” Is it because they’re afraid to find out what’s inside?

    Paul Hsu (f890a6)

  19. Comment by sandy valencour — 11/15/2008 @ 3:08 pm

    What you fail to realize is that the detainees at GITMO are not criminals arrested on the streets of Chicago.

    The detainees are prisoners of war captured on the battlefield. In prior wars, prisoner of war were held until the end of the war. Now, we are trying to determine which prisoners of war can be released because they will not return to the battlefield. So far, we have done very poorly because 30-40% of those released went right back to the battlefield to fight us.

    In prior wars, the United States Supreme Court and the lower Federal courts did not interfer in the the detention of prisoners of war by the military even when they were held on US soil.

    slp (adbb56)

  20. As a big “A” American, I guess I’m exempt from those laws that were passed by the Department of Justice.

    Then again, I was under the impression that — other than the one sentence “The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several States” — there were no rights guaranteed under the original Constitution. Kinda explains why there was a need for a Bill of Rights in the first place, huh?

    Icy Truth (aedb2f)

  21. By the way, there are more Hsu’s in Los Angeles than just me. I’m an average joe concerned for the future of my 3 year-old daughter and newborn in this crazy world. I don’t work for any campaigns because I believe the party system holds America back. Unfortunately, I can’t think of how political systems can work without parties–a necessary evil it is.

    Paul Hsu (f890a6)

  22. Man! And I thought that I was infected with the TMI/narcissism disease.

    Icy Truth (aedb2f)

  23. Congrats on your new-born, Paul.

    Unfortunately, I can’t think of how political systems can work without parties–a necessary evil it is.

    Me too, bro

    Pons Asinorum (e56816)

  24. One of the reasons I chose Obama is because he is reflective, which is an ability that Bush didn’t develop till recently.

    Huh? Reflective?

    You mean a person whose perceptions and biases are so screwed up that he will ingratiate himself with kooks like Jeremiah Wright and fanatics like Bill Ayers, and then, when the heat of scrutiny becomes too intense, renounce those associations? But perhaps publicly only, because we still don’t know just how extreme Obama is, in regards to both the inner workings of his mind and his behavior behind closed doors. But all signs point to Obama being quite dogmatic, if only because the record indicates he loves hanging around with, and sharing the sentiments of, ultra-liberals.

    That’s why I wouldn’t put it past Obama, if he thought he could get away with it, to have Jeremiah Wright standing right next to him on the podium, hand on the Bible, at the presidential inaguration in January.

    And if all of this is an indication of Obama being “reflective,” then, yep, he’s a very reflective fellow.

    Mark (411533)

  25. Comment by Paul Hsu — 11/15/2008 @ 3:32 pm

    “One of the reasons I chose Obama is because he is reflective…”

    Paul, one of us is in for a real shock (and I really hope it is me, not you).

    Pons Asinorum (e56816)

  26. One of the reasons I chose Obama is because he is reflective, which is an ability that Bush didn’t develop till recently

    Sorry, but you gave the game away with that one – completely. What on earth gives you any idea that The One’s actually “reflective?” The way he holds his chin while thinking of an answer? Or perhaps it’s the all – encompassing head tilt? Did you actually see his performances during the debate, or at Warren’s church? If it’s not in the script, he looks lost out there.

    Purty words and a nice suit – that’s not “reflective,” that’s packaging.

    Dmac (e30284)

  27. I don’t understand why people don’t “navel gaze?”

    You seem unclear as to the differences between overweeing narcissism and an introspective personality. Navel – gazing is a example of the former, and self – criticism an example of the latter.

    Dmac (e30284)

  28. Why is it that every “lifelong Republican” and “independent” spews standard boilerplate Leftist claptrap?

    JD (5f0e11)

  29. Oh, and sandy valencour … thanks for the laugh.

    JD (5f0e11)

  30. I think we’re going to see more waffles in Obama’s administration than Aunt Jemima makes in a year. Why?

    -The American public fell for the old Bill Clinton theme of “change”, this time championed eloquently by a guy with credentials so shallow that he should never even have been nominated if anyone really cared about competence and experience. He is just the mouthpiece for Democratic party agenda; he has no record of visionary leadership or new ideas to exact positive change for America — and I doubt he will be able to start now.

    -As part of the political patronage process to reward his supporters, he will need to appoint some moderates to key positions which do not necessary correspond well politically to his campaign promises and will have different agendas

    -The Democratic party is a bit misguided, but not totally stupid. If they really want to retain the White House and their majorities in congress, there is no way they can leave Obama to his own devices — that will produce a cataclysm which the Dems will be blamed for.

    Mark Turner (0a927a)

  31. Obama got elected by people like Paul Hsu and valencoer above.

    Its unbelievable how silly and naive their worldview was, to think that Obama was the correct response to any foreign policy issue.

    SPQR (26be8b)

  32. Bush also had the DOJ pass laws that say anyone can lock up us americans for no reason and we loose all our rights guaranteed under the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

    The DOJ isn’t a legislative body! Translation: It doesn’t have the ability to pass laws.

    Tip: You may be able to find the short bus schedule online!

    Mossberg500 (9fd170)

  33. …and with regard to foreign policy, while the Bush administration has been weak in this area, Obama brings nothing better to the table. He has no significant experience with any of our closest allies, and the reason why he is liked in Europe and parts of Asia is more due to his personal charisma and articulate speeches (and politically, his propensities seem to gravitate toward Euro-style democratic socialist models of government).

    Note: For those of you who may be inclined to favor or experiment with Euro-style government in America, be careful what you wish for. I have lived in Australia and Singapore over the past several years – both of which employ models of government derived from Euro-style democratic socialism, and while they may solve some political issues, they are likely to create others which will be much more difficult to solve later.

    Mark Turner (78ce25)

  34. –The detainees are prisoners of war captured on the battlefield. In prior wars, prisoner of war were held until the end of the war.

    No- Under the Geneva Convention they are not prisoners of war. Comabatants who wear uniforms, fight for a nation-state, avoid blending into civilian populations are soldiers and are entitled to Prisoner of War status. Al Queda and other jihadists to the extent that they do not comply with these requirments are war criminals. They should be rapidly tried and if guilty – executed.

    red (c80113)

  35. Why should we expect bold leadership and fresh, new constructive ideas from a man (Obama) who has no track record of either?

    Mark Turner (563c73)

  36. Comment by red — 11/15/2008 @ 5:45 pm

    Absolutely!
    If proceedures that had always prevailed on the battlefield had been followed,
    there would have been no need to establish Camp Delta at GTMO –
    you don’t need to incarcerate dead bodies.

    Another Drew (bb1716)

  37. Paul Hsu,

    “Reflective?” Oh, so by “reflective,” you mean like gazing soulfully off into the distance, having your photo taken at upward, god-like angles a la Leni Reifenstahl, talking in soaring tones for 25 minutes about absolutely nothing, invoking “change” like a mantra, and cupping your hands in a prayer-like attitude at your chin as if you’re trying spit out a lump of “Red Man” without being seen?

    Y’mean that kind of “reflective?”

    MarkJ (7fa185)

  38. Obama said what he had to say to get votes. It worked. Our elections have become a joke. It’s now a matter of voting for your favorite empty image.

    AppleLady (b965a3)

  39. On the interrogations and GTMB, have you seen the documentary “Taxi to the dark side”? It explains a lot about the people who are in GTMB! Watch it! Please :))
    Paul Hsu, I always thought of republicans as a bunch of paranoid close minded men. I don’t see how US talking to countries like Russia is a bad news? Or a step back? Do you want another cold war?

    galia (6c3b5f)

  40. The biggest threat to America right now is Bush’s failed foreign policy. Russia, Venezuela, Iran are on the rise … my vote was against what the Republican party has become–idealogues promoting self interest.

    So the self interest of the Republican “idealogues” is what exactly?

    Gerald A (adb85a)

  41. Republicans promote separation (remember Bushes “You are with us or against us) and unilaterialism of power. I agree other countries are not ready to lead, but they are emerging and they don’t like to be told how to handle their business. THerefore, cooperation would be a more appropriate approach at this time.
    US foreig policy is a reflection of promoting self interest. US is in a need of oil… Ok let’s go invade Iraq and get it!

    galia (6c3b5f)

  42. Reality check needed on aisle 42!

    Another Drew (bb1716)

  43. re Comment by PCD — 11/15/2008 @
    I just wonder how many people are leaving/have left our intelligence services because they don’t want to work for lying idiots like Obama?

    You mean the ones that have been “working for” Bush??!! lol hmm lying idiot hmmm??

    Dave (b58453)

  44. So I hope Obama decides to adopt President Bush’s policies as a good balance of civil liberty and national security concerns. Whatever he decides, it seems Obama’s consideration of national security issues is far more nuanced now that his opponent is Al Qaeda instead of Hillary or McCain. Unfortunately this is simply more evidence of just how naive or disingenuous candidate Obama and his supporters really are.
    DRJ let me tell you how it really is.

    It is President Bush’s policies that have increased the hate that the world feels toward America. Do you think that we were attacked for no reason? Americas inconsideration of other countries and there people is part of why we are were we are today. If you think illegal wiretapping, guantonomo concentration camps and forced occupation of other countries balanced policies.I am scared of what you think extreme would be.I think it is you who is naive.(No Offense) I am sure you probably believe the utter nonsense you write.Just be thankful that you live in a country that still allows you to publish your point of view. I find it proposterous to think Obama would adopt Bush’s policies. That is why they voted for Obama and not MCain.What has Bush done for civil liberties besides violating them under the disguise of national security? Am I now a terroist because I don’t agree with you or Bush’s policies? Oops I guess I will be taking my vacation in Guantonomo..

    Wise man (6bc54e)

  45. Mossberg500, I’m going to disagree with you on that. The DOJ, EPA, etc., can put out regulations which have the same practical effect as laws. Congress can specifically invalidate them, and the courts can say they can’t be enforced, but absent those two events, the regulations empower people with government guns to do things to you.

    This is why Barak’s line during the campaign is that he wasn’t interested in passing laws to “ban guns.” He knows full well that he can do it through regs and executive orders with precious little opportunity for us to stop it before it takes effect and does harm.

    SDN (e2bfdc)

  46. Comment by PCD — 11/15/2008 @ 2:11 pm

    The only real expected losses from the government service are those in the senior executive ranks. Many will opt to retire instead of taking on the headache of getting used to a new political appointee. It is common when a change in administration occurs.
    As for the rest of the work force most will stay on and continue to work toward retirement.

    voiceofreason2 (dab6db)

  47. So, now Obama is going to reverse Bush’s policies soon as he is able? So what!! Isn’t that exactly what Bush did his first few weeks in office? He couldn’t wait to give away money so he could get rid of Clinton’s excess and cause us a deficeit.
    Obama is just going to reverse Bush’s policies that started all our trouble. I didn’t vote for Obama, but, let’s be fair and not let the kettle call the pot black. Anyway.politics are a screwy, crazy, inept bunch of policies that don’t make sence except for a bunch of guys from one party that is in power doing a lot of lint pickin’ at their own navals.

    Besscannon (4e57e4)

  48. Ed also had an article up concerning the abrupt about face on Israel and the Middle East.

    His speech to AIPAC said one thing, it appears he is going to at first do the precise opposite.

    I say, at first because I have been concerned about his Walt & Mearshimer team, especially the nefarious Robert Malley (he of the rabid anti-Semitic red diaper upbringing) before he was not an “official” member…and after…when he suddenly was no longer dismissed from the campaign as a “nobody” and miraculously became a “somebody” again.

    Israel will not accept its Barack Kervorkian assisted suicide and THEN…we will see the real policy positions begin to come to light.

    Evil is, as evil does. Life is a box of chalk lines.

    http://hotair.com/archives/2008/11/16/obama-will-back-saudi-peace-plan/

    cfbleachers (1f4df1)

  49. The trolls seem to have increased since the election. The quality has declined if possible.

    It is President Bush’s policies that have increased the hate that the world feels toward America. Do you think that we were attacked for no reason?

    This has to be a parody.

    Americas inconsideration of other countries and there people is part of why we are were we are today.

    “There” people especially. Can the trolls at least try to write English sentences ?

    Comment by Wise man

    I still think this has to be a parody but, if not, thank you for an illustration of the “thinking” of an Obama voter.

    Mike K (2cf494)

  50. “Wiseman” is indeed a moron. America was attacked because of Al Queda’s / Bin Laden ideology required the West to be attacked and America foremost as an expression of Bin Laden’s rejection of our entire culture – not the policies of a President elected years after Bin Laden set his plan in motion.

    Stupid twit.

    As for “civil liberties”, the Bush administration was more careful of civil liberties than any previous administration in wartime, especially Democratic ones.

    Ignorant twit.

    SPQR (26be8b)

  51. Ignorant twits? So what is it, our educational system guided by commie assholes like Bill Ayers? I believe capitalism works best and the less government the better, but where is accountability and self-responsibility in the equation. Bush has his shortcomings, but why didn’t Nagin and Blanco bear more responsibility for the Katrina fiasco? Why do ignorant people not see that way before 911 the Clinton minions called for ouster of Saddam and warned about his WMD? The slaughter of the Kurds was just one example? We see despicable turds like Joe Wilson and Valerie Plame idolized by the left.
    Sure seems like the NY Times, the media in general and many fever swamp leftards have great concern for our enemies and their “rights”. Much like the concern for shitheads like Mumia or Hollywood love for Castro, ImADamnNutJob and monkey boy Chavez. Perhaps that ominous warned about terrorist attack will awaken some liberal assclown to reality? Or will it be the evil W’s fault once again? A good excuse for martial law?
    We’re reading about the conflagrations in S. California. Someone mentioned that it would behoove Islamofascists pigfeckers to use arson with little threat to themselves. Or imagine a 24 type scenario with a dirty bomb unleashed in LA area?
    Hoping Israel turns parts of Iran into a glass parking lot before the mad mullahs unleash their own hell on earth or the idiot bastard’s son Baracky sells the Jews down the river. And yes, Bush should have cleaned house of the Arabists at state and CIA long ago. Call me clueless why anyone kisses Muslim ass if other than $$$ reasons. Even Rice bought the cater to Wahabi BS.

    madmax333 (0c6cfc)

  52. Its looking like Obama’s brilliant move in the Middle East will be to revive a proposal that died six years ago, the Saudi / Jordanian proposal that had no support either in the PA nor in Israel.

    Brilliant change!

    SPQR (26be8b)

  53. Victor Davis Hanson is usually better able than I to state the opponents’ positions. Here is his take and I think it is fair to them.

    So the closing of Guantánamo, repeal of the Bush anti-terrorism legislation, rapid withdrawal from Iraq (though we are already past Obama’s original target date of March 2008 for withdrawal of all combat troops), cessation of pressure to democratize and the end of hectoring against Arab authoritarianism, soothing rhetoric from a new Chief Executive, renewed diplomatic reaching out to Teheran and Damascus, more even-handed approach to the Israeli-Palestinian problem, and rejection of the notion we are in some sort of war, much less one of a “global” nature, should ensure greater American popularity, win-over our critics, defuse tensions with Iran and Syria, and ensure another seven years of safety from a major terrorist attack at home.

    I think we should have an idea by next summer how this is working out but, what I fear is Obama adopting the tactics of Bush and pretending that it is what he was proposing all along. We are already starting to see this. Then he can claim success while imitating the hated Bush. His supporters, who never new what he was proposing anyway, will never know the difference. I just don’t see the Bush haters blowing the whistle as some suggest.

    Mike K (2cf494)

  54. Comment by Mike K — 11/16/2008 @ 9:40 am

    VDH does a superb job of arranging the tables for the Kool-Aid Fair.

    Another Drew (e3760b)

  55. An interesting quote from the President of the EU Commission:

    “Can I tell you something? Certain leaders in the developing world, most of them on the left, have told me privately that they would have preferred a Republican candidate to win. That’s because they fear the protectionist policies of a Democratic President and Democratic Congress. I hope that President Obama will not yield to this protectionist temptation. I believe that would be bad for us all, in particular for Europe.”

    SPQR (26be8b)

  56. Does Smoot-Hawley ring a bell?

    Others remember the damage it did, even if some of our “leaders” can’t be bothered.

    Another Drew (e3760b)

  57. The intelligence briefings that Pres.-elect Obama has begun to receive since election night would sober a Kennedy. That the buck will stop with him beginning Jan. 20 has to weigh on his mind and will almost certainly take the edge of some of his more naive hopefulness.

    Pres.-elect Obama’s opponents are no longer Republicans; instead they are his responsibility to protect every bit as much as Democrats, something that Pres. Bush has never forgotten.

    I’ve quoted you and [object].

    Consul-At-Arms (e94aa6)

  58. Unfortunately this is simply more evidence of just how naive or disingenuous candidate Obama and his supporters really are.

    I came across the following item below, in an op-ed piece in a major newspaper, which struck me as one of the few times over the past several months that a non-conservative writer (and I say apparently non-conservative, based on only a few inferences I have of the person) — based either in the US or abroad — of an opinion essay mentioned some less-than-flattering things about Obama, things that happen to mirror my opinions.

    And I did watch Obama’s lengthy interview on 60 Minutes tonight and do admit that purely apolitical, purely social-only reactions towards a person — such as Obama and his family overall — can influence one’s sense of that person.

    Now if that person is fortunate enough to have the gift of charm or charisma, that’s okay if he (or she) is truly genuine, honest and well grounded. But if that person instead has all the integrity (or history) of a used-car or snake-oil salesman, reactions twisted by his charisma can lead to a mix of the so-called Stockholm or battered-wife syndrome.


    Ayako Doi, Washington Post, 11-16-08:

    Surfing Japanese news Web sites for commentaries on the Obama victory from a key U.S. ally, I was taken aback by the skeptical, even negative, tone that prevailed….The most astounding article appeared in Sentaku, a monthly magazine with a reputation for objectivity and solid analysis.

    Writing in anticipation of an Obama victory, the magazine raised most of the same charges the Republicans had leveled against the Democratic candidate, including Obama’s associations with the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, former Weather Underground leader William Ayers and “communist and socialist professors.” It called him “the most dubious character in history to occupy the White House.”

    Criticizing Obama’s foreign policy statements as “abstract” and “strings of empty words such as ‘consultation’ and ‘cooperation,’ ” the article concluded that under Obama, the United States would lose its position of global leadership and drag the world into “enormous chaos.”

    Mark (411533)


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