Patterico's Pontifications

10/27/2008

I Voted For Sarah Palin Today

Filed under: 2008 Election — DRJ @ 11:50 am



[Guest post by DRJ]

Of course, that means I also voted for John McCain … but I think of it as a vote for Palin and it’s been a long time since I enjoyed voting this much. Many Obama voters will probably feel the same excitement but I suspect a lot more will feel like Glenn Reynolds in this Forbes article entitled “Is This the Best We Can Do?”

Reynolds analyzes several reasons why our nation’s best people don’t want to be politicians and I think his analysis is spot on. I also share his concerns, up to a point. I think qualified people will consider political careers when they see it as something important and worth doing. Thus, I expect we will see more talented Republicans get interested in politics if Obama wins, just as the Bush years brought in new blood to the Democratic Party.

As for a systemic fix, current laws favor incumbents and I think the best thing we can do for politics is to support laws that limit or eliminate the advantages of incumbency. Then may the best man — or woman! — win.

— DRJ

77 Responses to “I Voted For Sarah Palin Today”

  1. Yes, and I will be voting for Sarah Palin on November 4th. I just hope McCain does not do anything else to drive away his base in search of non-existent “moderate” voters.

    longwalker (850cda)

  2. Is there proof that in the past “our best people” have become politicians? That’s the great thing about democracy: we get to choose the best person amongst those who have chosen to run. There seems to be a particular obsession this year with saying that ‘we have to pick the lesser of two evils’. While some years are certainly better than others, in a sense that is always the case, and it really comes down to whether you have a pessimistic or optimistic (glass half-empty or half-full) view of the world.

    The Chosen One’s worshipers notwithstanding, we are not elevating a human being to sainthood here. We are electing a flawed human being to be the Chief Executive of our nation of flawed human beings. As Dennis Prager says: the ONLY perfect candidate in everyone’s mind is themselves. Well, unless you are Barack Obama and you “approved this message” [sarc] no one you EVER vote for will be perfect. The best ANYONE should EVER hope for is that we elect someone who is good and who shares most of our values and philosophy on the role of government.

    I, for one, will be proudly voting for John McCain & Sarah Palin tomorrow.

    As to “the advantages of incumbency,” I’m not sure what laws DRJ is referring to but I’m in favor of reasonable term limits (say, 10 terms — or at the most 15 — in the House and 5 in the Senate . . . that’s 30 years for chrissakes!).

    Icy Truth (1468e4)

  3. Yep. Mrs. Desiato and I voted for Palin/McCain last week; then we contemplated what kind of guns we should buy when we get our CC permits.

    As far as our “leaders” go, I’m almost to the point where congressional term limits (with no grandfathering) are my #1 issue. I’m so tired of seeing the same old fossils (Stevens, Kennedy, KKKByrd, etc.) spending about 10% of their time “working” for “us” and 90% of their time getting re-elected. Serve two terms in either house, seek higher political office or go back to your life in the private sector (Republicans) or academia (Democrats).

    The other thing is the issue of “serving.” I don’t think our founders intended for government leadership to be a career. Rather, I think they intended it to be something one is called to do in service to their country, much like the military. Most of our current leaders are called in service to themselves, their party and way down on the list, their constituents.

    All that being said, I’m still finding it hard to rank politicians or members of the media as lowest on my “sub-feces species” list.

    CW Desiato (614aa7)

  4. Is there proof that in the past “our best people” have become politicians?

    Yes… Most of them are on our money… :)

    Scott Jacobs (a1c284)

  5. 30 years, Icy???

    Too much by half. 12 years should be plenty…

    Scott Jacobs (a1c284)

  6. Sorry, Scott (I’m a Scott as well); had to extend it long enough to include McCain.

    Icy Truth (1468e4)

  7. Icy,

    I think you are a constituent of and like John McCain and maybe you are right about him, so let’s set aside the Presidential race for now. Instead, let’s talk about our Senators and Representatives. In the last 20-30 years, it seems fewer and fewer have careers that would support them if not for their political jobs.

    That’s one reason I like politicians like John Cornyn and Tom Coburn, people who have had successful jobs apart from their political careers. They have the common sense and restraint that comes from making it in the real world that is sorely lacking in Washington.

    Unfortunately, many politicians have problems communicating simple ideas. Some of them may be dim bulbs but I think it is more likely they are trying not to say anything offensive or controversial. We’ve seen that often enough in the business world and it’s easy to spot in the political world: They are people who care more about being elected/employed than being right.

    DRJ (cb68f2)

  8. I nominate myself for the least politically interested person who regularly reads this site. That said, I filled in my mail-in ballot [CA] last week, and without any assistance from an Acorn representative I might add. The glee I took was in voting against anything that remotely smacked of more govt spending in any form, or at any level. I’ll keep the other particulars to myself, other than to say I may have cast my first vote for an Alaskan person.

    Mostly in deference to the Chicagoans here, in whose familiarity with the other side’s presidential candidate I have taken seriously. My relatives in Arkansas, bless their democrat hearts, spilled the beans on Clinton, too. But did I listen then? I’ve since learned to trust much more in a native’s “insider” perspective on such matters. Biden’s less than odiferous finance and banking connections was another nudge. Frankly, I have no faith in any of the 4 people addressing my concerns regarding bureaucracies and agencies as major hindrances to progress whether monetarily, socially, or economically…

    allan (119be9)

  9. In twenty years of national, state, and local elections, my wife has voted for over a hundred Democrat candidates and only once for a Republican. She is pro-choice and has never knowingly voted for a candidate who was against abortion.

    She is disgusted with Obama and will not vote for him, and she is very impressed with Sarah Palin. She says that she will probably take the plunge and vote McCain-Palin.

    aunursa (1b5bad)

  10. You like Palin? Wow, that’s depressing. And you usually seem much smarter. It still amazes me that people who were/are rightly critical of Obama’s lack of experience can be positive about Palin. Being mayor of a town of less than 10K and governor for less then 2 years just doesn’t cut it for me

    joe (33ce8e)

  11. DRJ, many, many, many years ago, as a high school student, I traveled to Washington DC. This was in the aftermath of Watergate, so the surviving Republicans had plenty of time to chat with high school juniors. My Democratic senators—Tunney and Cranston, as it happened—had no time to meet with kids.

    The Democrats were filled with glee and purpose. It’s something I worry about, currently. Since the Carter administration did such a bang up job, domestically and overseas.

    Anyway, I got to meet several politicians. You know the names of some of them. I met Bob Dole, who was indeed hysterically funny and warm; I didn’t recognize the guy on television years later. But the one who might interest you was Barry Goldwater. I had lunch with him twice during my two weeks in DC.

    He was profane and funny and interesting. At the time (though I was not from Arizona) I became a real Goldwater supporter, because he flat out told me that politicians of any stripe should not serve more than two terms. He told me he was stepping down, in fact, in the next cycle.

    Sigh. Except he didn’t. Power and all that.

    All of that being what it was, here was the fellow who told me that I needed to read from the Left and the Right. To think and not react. And that he was sorry I had missed the era of real politics, where, as Senator Goldwater put it to me (these words are pretty exact; the experience has stayed with me since 1975):

    “…you could call the other fella an SOB on the Floor, and then go get a couple of drinks later and tell blue jokes. It’s a lot healthier than what’s happening now in here…”

    And it has only gotten worse.

    But I do believe that career politicians are part of the problem. That’s me. Your mileage may vary.

    Eric Blair (c8876d)

  12. joe,

    My litmus test is where the candidates stand on the issues, and Palin is the most conservative candidate in this race. I also care about experience but I care about it in my President more than my Vice President.

    DRJ (cb68f2)

  13. Eric Blair,

    What a terrific 2 weeks that must have been! You saw the real person behind the politician, and few of us have the chance to see that anymore.

    DRJ (cb68f2)

  14. DRJ #7, and Icy #2-
    While I favor the idea of term limits, it also includes the poison pill of eliminating anyone who’s actually good at government service.

    IMO, without accountability, you’ll just see an acceleration of the same problems you get with the existing fossils.

    Anyone familiar with the existing system knows all too well that the politicians and bureaucrats simply play a game of musical chairs when their ‘term’ runs out. Government is their existence, which explains the reluctance to eliminate that existence.

    The trick is to organize a system by which politicians that step over the line are held accountable and barred from any future government service. (and that includes any private sector company with even one government contract)

    If you tie their behavior in office to their ability to interact with the government, I bet you’d see positive behavioral changes.

    Apogee (366e8b)

  15. I AM a constituent of & like John McCain; I also would not necessarily characterize myself as a ‘hard-core conservative’, although with the exception of one state representative I will most likely be voting for all GOP candidates this year. I realize and understand that McCain is not the darling of “the base” or “Christian conservatives” or the right-wing of the party . . .

    And I don’t care.

    Barack Obama is — politically speaking — the anti-Christ as far as I’m concerned, and on that basis alone I am willing to whole-heartedly give my support to his opponent. Beyond that, I am confident that McCain will do a good job and will leads this country in a better direction. People latch on to things like “McAmnesty” or McCain-Feingold or “the gang of 14″ (the latter of which I will debate with anyone to the end of infinity was the correct thing to do at the time) and say “See? Here’s proof that he isn’t really one of us”.

    And many of them are the same ones that conveniently overlook Ronald Reagan’s mistakes and imperfections, just as most of the Dems are currently wearing rose-colored glasses when they look back to the Clinton years.

    They are people who care more about being elected/employed than being right.
    — Sounds like a reference to McCain, when he said “I would rather lose an election than lose a war.”

    people who have had successful jobs apart from their political careers.
    — I wouldn’t describe McCain’s military career as ‘political'; I’d call it “serving his country”.

    Icy Truth (1468e4)

  16. Apogee,

    Most Governorships are subject to term limits and that doesn’t keep many States from attracting competent leaders. It might be more efficient to have consistent leadership but government isn’t known for efficiency anyway.

    However, government is known for corruption so passing legislation that promotes turnover in leadership makes it a little more difficult for hard-to-find corruption to take hold.

    DRJ (cb68f2)

  17. It was all “Watergate Luck,” since the Republicans had little to do at that time. I even filched a fork from the “Watergate Terrace” restaurant for a souvenir.

    The fascinating thing to me was Bob Dole. I observe people pretty closely. But this fellow shook my hand, held onto it, looked me in the eye, asked me about my science project and such for a few minutes…and moved on.

    I never noticed that he shook with his left hand.

    When I marveled to my brother about this, he did point out gently that Senator Dole had shaken a lot of hands.

    Barry Goldwater was just plain fascinating. I had never met anyone with gravitas before. Plenty of “pleezedtameetcha” council critters and such. This was different.

    Ah, well a different time. And LBJ would claim that things worked out for the best. I’m not so sure, atom-bomb commercial or not.

    Eric Blair (c8876d)

  18. #DRJ #7, and Icy #2-
    While I favor the idea of term limits, it also includes the poison pill of eliminating anyone who’s actually good at government service.

    IMO, without accountability, you’ll just see an acceleration of the same problems you get with the existing fossils.

    Anyone familiar with the existing system knows all too well that the politicians and bureaucrats simply play a game of musical chairs when their ‘term’ runs out. Government is their existence, which explains the reluctance to eliminate that existence.

    The trick is to organize a system by which politicians that step over the line are held accountable and barred from any future government service. (and that includes any private sector company with even one government contract)

    If you tie their behavior in office to their ability to interact with the government, I bet you’d see positive behavioral changes.

    Comment by Apogee — 10/27/2008 @ 12:59 pm

    I totally understand that it cuts both ways.

    I honestly don’t care though.

    Even with term limits, there would be enough avenues for a person to explore every avenue and accumulate a rich career in politics. There’s the local level, state and federal level. One can be a mayor, governor, congressman, senator and run for president. Heck, get tagged as a VP and one could spend a good 40 years in politics _with_ terms limits.

    CW Desiato (614aa7)

  19. DRJ – Agreed. But my point was that if the idea of ‘turnover’ in leadership is to combat corruption, the result is far less effective when the leader turned out of power is appointed to a commission, a cabinet post, or is recruited to some other place (foundation chairman?) where their former relation to the government allows them to gain funding and influence legislation, quite often by the leader that takes his place.

    Again, IMO, it’s a shell game. If bureaucrats know that their actions in their current office will affect the next ‘appointment’ or elected office, the stakes of corruption just got higher and, I would expect, less common.

    Without removal from the government ‘system’, there’s no downside to corruption.

    Apogee (366e8b)

  20. Icy,

    I thought I made it clear that the statements in my comment aren’t about McCain but if you insist on talking about McCain, so be it. I readily agree that McCain is more likely than most politicians to act out of principle or sincere beliefs rather than out of self-interest, and that’s admirable. In fact, it’s enough to earn my vote but it’s not enough to earn my excitement. So while I admire McCain because he votes his conscience, I don’t think he has the conscience of a conservative.

    DRJ (cb68f2)

  21. Apogee,

    The solution to that is transparency. Let people see the connections and decide if they are good or bad.

    DRJ (cb68f2)

  22. Ted Stevens….

    GUILTY!

    Another Drew (cdf426)

  23. Since term-limits at the Federal level require a constitutional amendment, perhaps we could attack it with an amendment coming at the problem from another direction.
    A lot of things are different today than they were 230+ years ago. A significant difference is life expectancy. Perhaps we need to raise the minimum age for Federal Elected Office to:
    40-years for Representatives;
    50-years for Senators;
    60-years for President/Veep?

    This would not discourage “service”, and enable those who look forward to some life in politics, to go out into the world/market, and lead a real life first. They would still be able to stay as long as they could convince voters to re-elect them (I leave the 22nd-Amendment for discussion at a future time).

    Another Drew (cdf426)

  24. Sarah Palin used to be a sportscaster. Ronald Reagan used to be a sportscaster. Do you see where I’m going with this?

    Official Internet Data Office (7800f2)

  25. Comment by Official Internet Data Office — 10/27/2008 @ 1:37 pm

    After sportscasting, RR went into acting, and then eventually into politics.
    Sarah Palin cut to the chase, and went directly to politics, which (according to one of Rush’s Undeniable Truths of Life) is show-business for less attractive (he hadn’t met Gov. Palin when he postulated that principle) people.

    Another Drew (cdf426)

  26. DRJ, I was reacting to the “Is This the Best We Can Do?” question. In my opinion the answer is YES, but that’s not a terrible thing. The circumstances are not right for another Reagan right now; however, given his propensity (read: stated desire) to repeat Carter’s mistakes, after 4 years of Obama it may well be the case again. This election resembles 1976 a lot more than it does 1980, except that McCain is a much stronger candidate than was Ford.

    So I’m not throwing in the towel. I make no predictions, other than to say that a landslide in either direction will not happen, but I’m thinking that the election results will not reflect the same numbers as do the current polls. And I do think that the fact that he is not Barack Obama is enough of a reason to get behind McCain.

    Icy Truth (1468e4)

  27. I agree with all that, Icy, and I’m not terribly concerned that the brightest Republicans don’t go into politics. After all, our core belief includes that there is more to America than government.

    DRJ (cb68f2)

  28. I felt the same way when I voted. I was voting for Sarah Palin, the first woman veep.

    Fallon (b362c4)

  29. [Comment by Levi deleted by DRJ. It was not deleted for content but because Levi has been banned.]

    Something Clever (cb68f2)

  30. Wow, a new (or newly renamed) troll for our amusement!

    Another Drew (cdf426)

  31. Well, I guess he wasn’t that clever.

    Thanks DRJ!

    Another Drew (cdf426)

  32. Me, the spouse & 2 parents – 4 votes for Palin in the mail, last Friday.

    TakeFive (7c6fd5)

  33. I love how people like Joe compare the R-VPresidential candidate to the D-Presidential candidate.

    I am going to wait until Nov. 4th to vote against Baracky.

    JD (5b4781)

  34. Don’t get run down by a car, we’re going to need that vote in your state.

    Another Drew (cdf426)

  35. I promise not to play in traffic between now and then, AD … You can rest assure that Better Half and I will gladly cast out ballots against Baracky, gloriously cancelling out timmah and jharpy’s votes for Teh One that advocates on behalf of socialist positions, but it would be racist to call him a socialist.

    JD (5b4781)

  36. Now, that made me chuckle, if I am reading it correctly. Levi, banned, tried to post something under the name of “Something Clever.”

    But was recognized and deleted forthwith.

    To quote Slappy Squirrel from “Animaniacs“:

    Now THAT’S comedy!

    Thank you, DRJ.

    Eric Blair (c8876d)

  37. Would it be socialist to call him a racist?

    Icy Truth (1468e4)

  38. That would be insensitive!

    Another Drew (cdf426)

  39. I guess I’ll vote – but what a waste it will be. As it has ever been thus in my home state of political decreptitude.

    Dmac (e30284)

  40. FWIW – Timmah was flat out wrong a couple weeks ago when he left y’all with the impression that the Sec. of State in Indiana had looked at the ACORN problems. Sec. Rokita’s announcement today suggests that timmah either jumped the gun or lied, in his prior pronouncements.

    JD (5b4781)

  41. Of course my vote here in McCain’s home, and safely red, state of Arizona will only add to the popular vote tally.

    Maybe I can take a last minute trip to Ohio and meet up with an ACORN worker . . .

    Icy Truth (1468e4)

  42. Eric Blair,

    I don’t know why but every comment you’ve made has ended up in moderation today. I think it’s all relating back to the link in your first comment.

    DRJ (cb68f2)

  43. “..timmah either jumped the gun or lied…”.

    SHOCKAH!

    Another Drew (cdf426)

  44. Comment by DRJ — 10/27/2008 @ 2:49 pm

    Just another radical voice that needs to be segregated for the common good.

    Another Drew (cdf426)

  45. My wife and I voted country first last Monday, being in CA we probably only added to the popular vote total. In-light of that, I would never consider not voting and I am praying really hard that CA somehow someway goes for McCain like it went Reagan back in the 80’s.

    Miracles can happen.

    This election could be really different if Cali wasn’t a winner take all state, I wish we would change that.

    ML (14488c)

  46. The actual reporting on actual vote fraud in Ohio at palestra.net should absolutely embarass the MSM, and should give rise to real questions of the Baracky campaign. Sadly, it will not.

    JD (5b4781)

  47. Follow the Yellowbrick Rd

    Once The Curtain goes back and Dorothy realizes the Wizard is just a man what happens? Obama has OVERSOLD and OVERPROMISED with the help of his media enablers. He can only fail with such expectations.

    Dennis D (ae900a)

  48. On that earlier comment “Is there any proof that our best people have ever run”? The response, yes, they are on our money was a good one.

    I’ve lived most of my life on the West Coast–and the bulk of that in California. But I frequently had occasion to travel to Washington D.C. in my business career.

    For the snarky guy who asked if our best people ever did run, I’d suggest an early evening or a night time visit to the Lincoln Memorial. I always found it comforting to sit with Mr. Lincoln for a while in the evening. He was as close to a secular saint as this country will see.

    Somehow I doubt both that Obama will ever have such a memorial, or that sitting below the Obamessiah’s faux plaster statue will give anyone comfort. It will be a big statue though to match his ego. Barackopolis on the stage at the Democrat Convention allegedly cost $5.3 million to construct. Somewhere in a sculpture studio, someone has just signed a contract to do the statue. The man does like to plan ahead. Verum Possumus as the faux presidential seal went–The One True Possum as I translated it–has never had much self doubt.

    Mike Myers (31af82)

  49. But it isn’t “just” that you need a good candidate, you need a good candidate with a family willing to put up with the ever-increasing amount of crap that gets thrown around. (At least if you’re a Republican).

    MD in Philly (3d3f72)

  50. I don’t think many on the left feel Obama is the lesser of two evils. Quite the opposite: We’re excited about him. Many are breathlessly enthusiastic (youth), but most of us are just happy to have a real contender up there. Someone we actually agree with (mostly) in terms of policies.

    The sentiment I keep hearing is that we’re scared the same magicians that got W elected (and re-elected) are going to swoop in and cast a spell over everyone that makes them feel they must vote Republican or face certain death… yet again.

    i like america (d2f951)

  51. I voted for Sarah Palin……..in my dreams. Then I awoke. Boy! Never felt so scared in my life!

    love2008 (1b037c)

  52. I also voted for Palin, and while wearing high heels in honor of her. My clothes were my own, however.

    It also includes the poison pill of eliminating anyone who’s actually good at government service.

    Apogee, considering Cali- its a godsend. On one hand the good ones can be counted. Meh.

    Dana (658c17)

  53. How could you not vote for somebody as well dressed as Palin? Heh.

    daleyrocks (60704b)

  54. I ‘vote’ that every one of you dopes who has the racist beliefs and lack of intelligence to vote for Palin dies in their sleep that night, because I really don’t want to have to meet anyone that ignorant in the next 4 or (god help us!) EIGHT years.

    I was bad enough listening to all these phony Illinois republicans saying that that there was NO WAY they voted for George Bush! Somebody voted for the moron, because I sure as hell didn’t!!

    It must be hell to not have a family that you care about.

    P Moore (e77a84)

  55. P Moore, your incoherent bile is devoid of any actual intelligible argument. Your implied claim that someone who votes for McCain/Palin is a racist is offensively stupid.

    SPQR (26be8b)

  56. The next time I need an example of liberals who wish death on anyone that disagrees with them, P Moore’s comment will be Exhibit “A.”

    DRJ (cb68f2)

  57. Comment by P Moore — 10/27/2008 @ 7:56 pm

    PMoore, while I freely admit to constructing two poorly worded sentences in #52, it so pales in comparison to the racist meme brought up by you – coupled with a death wish. It’s a shame you people always resort to such ugliness.

    Dana (658c17)

  58. SPQR………. It’s a good thing that you’re the only one that believes what you think or say, because the majority rules and you’re as lost as a puppy in the woods when it comes to candidate choices.

    Here in Republican farm country there isn’t ONE presidential candidate’s sign in these farmers’ yards. Why? Because – like you – none of these cowards has the balls to admit that they’re:

    1: Voting for Obama and crossing party lines.

    Or ….2. They’re embarrassed by the fact that they’re voting for McCain and that lying imbecile Palin, and don’t want to publicly admit their stupidity!!!!!!!!!

    IF THAT’S NOT THE REASON\, THEN TELL US OH WISE ONE – WHAT IS THE REASON??

    My words are only “bile” only to those who are as ignorant, prejudiced and naive as you are.

    P Moore (e77a84)

  59. P Moore, I’m a coward now … how? Your coherence did not improve.

    one reason that there may not be a McCain/Palin sign in their yard is that the Obama supporters stole them – as they’ve stolen several of mine.

    SPQR (26be8b)

  60. 4 MORE YEARS…..4 MORE YEARS……..4 MORE YEARS……….4 MORE YEARS………..4 MORE YEARS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    But will you have the guts to say you voted for McCain or Palin NEXT year at this time?………or will you “conservatives” all go bury your heads like you did when you voted for bush? we all know the correct answer to THAT question – don’t we??

    P Moore (e77a84)

  61. P Moore, is there an eight year old handy in your household who could translate your comments for us?

    SPQR (26be8b)

  62. Anyone that won’t say that his life was better when Bill Clinton or JFK was in office is a total imbecile. Oh, I know….. George Bush is your boy and there’s nothing you’d change about him.

    Maybe you should go listen to that babble mouth Rush Lim-jew and hear the crap that comes from his fat head!!!!! You stupid republicans wouldn’t know the truth if it smacked you right across your silly faces!!!!

    P Moore (e77a84)

  63. P Moore, ah, I was having trouble classifying you, but the anti-semitism helps.

    SPQR (26be8b)

  64. The reason you dopes can’t decipher what I’m saying is the SAME reason you’re going to piss and moan for the next 4 years – Because you lack the intelligence to see what’s been going on around you for the past EIGHT years.

    ………..And NO there isn’t an 8 year old in my household, but if there’s one in yours you’d best yank your heads out of your collective asses before you make a REALLY big mistake and vote for that imbecile McCain, who has NO concern about your family…………. or don’t you care about them either???

    c
    Can you understand THAT??

    P Moore (e77a84)

  65. P Moore, so you are going to vote for Obama because he’ll save you and your family from the jews, eh?

    SPQR (26be8b)

  66. Well, I’ll take the time to fully smack down this most recent idiot. You see, I grew up in rural Illinois. I know rural Illinois. Illinois, my friends, is not a blue state. Illinois is a red state with one big annoying blue city that ruins everything for the rest of us. (Though, sadly, a few racist, ranting idiots do sneak through the cracks, as proven by our new friend.)

    Chris (77ceeb)

  67. ‘My words are only “bile” only to those who are as ignorant, prejudiced and naive as you are.”

    OK
    So I am in good company then… thanks for the compass reading there P. Moore freely.

    SteveG (71dc6f)

  68. It looks like the consensus among conservative intellectuals concerning McCain/Palin has shifted to this: http://www.slate.com/id/2203125/,

    Cyrus Sanai (4df861)

  69. I ‘vote’ that every one of you dopes who has the racist beliefs and lack of intelligence to vote for Palin dies in their sleep that night, because I really don’t want to have to meet anyone that ignorant in the next 4 or (god help us!) EIGHT years.

    But the Right is full of hate and anger, right?

    P Moore, so you are going to vote for Obama because he’ll save you and your family from the jews, eh?

    I think that pretty well sums it up.

    JD (5b4781)

  70. If only PMoore would slip on a nice pair of high heels in honor of Sarah, the voting for her would be just that much more enjoyable! Then there wouldn’t be all this hatred. Always with the hate.

    Dana (658c17)

  71. Now Applebaum is a “conservative intellectual” ? Well, that matches Sanai’s attempt to redefine every other word in the english language.

    SPQR (26be8b)

  72. I think Pee Moore needs a timeout. Perhaps someone can change his diaper while singing that Obama song in effort to soothe his anti-semitic nerves.

    CW Desiato (614aa7)

  73. Ironic how the left calls the right racist.

    Obama’s racist anti-Semitic church bulletin, the Hamas Manifesto.

    Pastor’s Page

    ML (14488c)

  74. Maybe you should go listen to that babble mouth Rush Lim-jew

    Nice of you to add a signature line so we know where you are coming from. I can certainly understand your vote for Obama.

    Mike K (2cf494)

  75. “I voted for Sarah Palin today”
    And against:
    George Will
    Kathleen Parker
    Joshua Trevino of Redstate
    David Frum
    Ken Adelman
    Charles Fried!!
    Matthew Dowd
    Christopher Buckley
    Chuck Hagel
    Peggy Noonan
    and others

    Robert Draper: “A couple of McCain higher-ups have told me that Palin simply knew nothing about national and international issues. Which meant, as one such adviser said to me: ‘Letting Sarah be Sarah may not be such a good thing.’

    Politico: “***In convo with Playbook, a top McCain adviser one-ups the priceless “diva” description, calling her “a whack job.”

    a;lkjsdhf (d079ec)

  76. Look, its an Obama campaign donor.

    SPQR (26be8b)

  77. Query which name sounds the most like that of an Obama donor: a;lkjsdhf, SPQR, Xrlq or QWERTYUIOP.

    Xrlq (62cad4)


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