Patterico's Pontifications

5/5/2007

Paris Hilton: Unfairly Denied the Chance to Be Treated Better Than You

Filed under: Crime,General — Patterico @ 9:04 pm

Some bloggers are saying that Paris Hilton is receiving unfairly harsh treatment, because she’s being denied the chance to receive unfairly lenient treatment — you know, like other rich people and celebrities often receive.

As you may know, Paris was sentenced to 45 days in jail for repeatedly violating her probation by driving on a license that was suspended due to a DUI conviction. The judge who sentenced her didn’t take any guff:

She will not be allowed any work release, furloughs, use of an alternative jail or electronic monitoring in lieu of jail, Superior Court Judge Michael T. Sauer ruled after a hearing….

She was then ordered to report to a women’s jail in suburban Lynwood by the set date or face 90 days behind bars. The judge’s ruling excluded her from paying to serve time in a jail of her choice, as some violators are allowed to do….

The phenomenon of richer inmates paying for a safer and cleaner jail experience was recently reported in the New York Times. At the time, Jeralyn Merritt said:

The counties defend the jails on grounds that they increase revenue for other programs. It seems unfair and elitist to me.

And you know what? I agree. It’s unfair for a rich person to be able to get a better jail experience. But now, Jeralyn seems to think it’s unfair for Paris Hilton not to have that opportunity:

Why can other rich people pick their jail but she can’t?

Why should poor people not be able to pick their jail, while Paris Hilton can?

Ann Althouse adds:

It seems obvious to me that she’s being treated worse because of her celebrity . . .

It seems to me that she’s not being treated better simply because of her celebrity. And that’s a refreshing change. Why don’t others see that?

75 Responses to “Paris Hilton: Unfairly Denied the Chance to Be Treated Better Than You”

  1. Paris Hilton should be glad she didn’t get her DUI in Indiana. She would have been spending a year in jail, mandatory. They don’t mess around and they don’t care how rich you are either. You can lose your license from one to ten years.

    Leslie (73f60a)

  2. I agree with you, but you have missed the ancillary good news that there will be many new, eager applicants for correctional officers.

    Andrew J. Lazarus (9fd5fc)

  3. She’s probably being treated worse than a rich non-celebrity, but better than a poor non-celebrity.

    Kevin (e89cee)

  4. Leslie,

    As a DUI convict (two times!!), I’ll tell you that Illinois is… Enpredictable, as are most places.

    Honestly? I’l glad she got some jailtime. She ignored without regard the terms of her probation. Bad things happen when you do that…

    Honestly? much like Britany, I hope Paris takes this time to reflect, and think about her life and her choices. I hope she take the oppertunity to get help…

    I honestly do. I hope to god she does.

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  5. Agreed. Now if only the rich bastards who manage to weasel out of prison for drug crimes could be locked up, maybe we’d see some genuine thinking about drug policy reform.

    Russell (13a51a)

  6. We’ll see whether she actually serves any time.

    If so, it should give Goldstein a chance to reprise The Martha Stewart Chronicles

    (having trouble getting comments to stick – this is the third attempt, in case the first two belatedly appear…)

    LagunaDave (8d4715)

  7. testing, please ignore

    (having trouble with comments including a link)

    LagunaDave (8d4715)

  8. Most legal experts familiar with the law in CA agree that the sentence was typical for her offense, given her previous history.

    You might argue that CA has unduly harsh DUI laws, but if so, they are no harsher for Paris Hilton than for thousands of other people convicted and sentenced under them.

    It’s mostly conservative blogs calling the sentence “excessive”. I wonder why. I suspect they become nervous when they see that wealth might not protect you from being treated equally under the law. Upsets their world-view.

    davemt (f1b34e)

  9. Heck, according to CNN, she gets to serve time at a women’s jail in suburban Lynwood. What could be fairer? It’s not like she’s in a jail in South Central or something.

    Kevin Murphy (0b2493)

  10. Actually, given her wealth, jail time is the only way to get her attention. A fine would only cause her accountant to write another check. And she’d have just done it again.

    Now, if one wants to argue that it should have been 30 days or 20, well maybe. She’ll probably do less than half anyway. But this was the only handy 2×4 and I’m glad someone had the guts to use it.

    Kevin Murphy (0b2493)

  11. Note that, according to CNN (links not working), Paris is being sent to a jail in “suburban Lynwood.” Sounds like special treatment to me. 😉

    Kevin Murphy (0b2493)

  12. Eh. She probably is being singled out, but her defiance was pretty darn flagrant. Unlike most people, Paris could easily have a driver.

    I remember back when (the name escapes me–it’s late) a former Sheriff was due to do jail time and the OC Post quoted one of the owners of a private jail as saying he’d be safe from reprisals there, basically something along the lines of him being safe at night there.

    The concept that this guy basically had to pay hundreds a month just to avoid being killed really, really bothered me. I mean, it’s not like he had a death sentence, huh? :(

    David N. Scott (71e316)

  13. Paris Hilton treated like one of the little people. How shocking.

    A spoiled rich brat actually answer for her crimes, what’s wrong with the country. Isn’t being rich the modern nobility?

    Gerald A (3d7817)

  14. The order not to allow her to pay for a jail of her choice smacks of malice and abuse of discretion on the part of the judge. I see no rationale for it in the absence of any evidence that Paris Hilton is an escape risk or a danger to other inmates and even in that case the evaluation should be made by the Department of Corrections. Is he even allowed to enter such an order? Could he order Charles Manson to minimum security?

    nk (db0112)

  15. OK, OK, but I was in the local slammer once and all I can tell you is that if Paris Hilton is released into the main prison population she will most likely be either killed or disfigured by the “poor” prisoners. I understand that she will be in solitary (at a cost of almost a thousand per day), will have her food checked for substances, and not allowed TV. Many judges have sentenced influential white criminals to serve in mostly Black jails, just hoping the threat of great bodily harm from racist Blacks will get the perp to “sing” (see Gordon Liddy who was such a nut case that the prisoners became afraid of him, but a liberal judge deliberatly put him in that particular jail). Read “Will” his first book.

    Howard Veit (4ba8d4)

  16. I wonder what the going prison-house rate is for spoiled, empty-headed skanks is…

    Gotta be at least a carton.

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  17. I agree. And didn’t she slap the judge in the face by being 10 or 15 minutes late, on top of everything else?

    rightwingprof (5649f5)

  18. This is an interesting discussion … how exactly do we define fair?

    — Is it fair that a rich unknown can buy a nicer jail but Ms. Hilton is specifically denied that opportunity?

    — Is it fair that a rich person can buy a nicer jail but a poor person must serve in the standard facility?

    I think that in BOTH cases, the answer is NO. But I don’t think that overall fairness is something that a system such as ours can be expected to provide, particularly when each of us has a different idea of what constitutes fair. What we should expect is consistency, but even that is tough given the size and scope of the system.

    As an aside – I don’t have access to the records, but I wonder if the judge treated Paris Hilton differently than he has treated similar non-celebrity violators?

    tomjedrz (562284)

  19. I wonder if Hilton’s car will be sold at auction. A first violation of 14601.1 VC permits a 30-day impound. Subsequent violations permit confiscation and auction sale of the car. If this didn’t occur I’d say that she got a break – although her time behind bars will cost more to her pathetic life than the insignificant loss of a MBZ…

    Clark Baker (b8f198)

  20. I don’t like Paris Hilton any more than you do, but the judge strikes me as a real prick. It’s one thing to argue for socialized prisons in the abstract, on the dubious theory that rich criminals ought to cost the system just as much as poor criminals do. It’s quite another to arbitrarily order that result in one particular case simply because this particular rich criminal is well-known and not particularly well-liked. It sounds to me like at least part of her punishment was meted out for the non-crime of being Paris Hilton.

    Xrlq (0e6733)

  21. And lets not confuse what she is being sent to jail for. She is not going to jail for first offense DUI. That would probable not be consistent with other, less famous, defendants. She is going for jail for “repeated violations of probation”. Most judges would do the same thing. “I cut you a break by putting you on probation. The deal was, you behave and you don’t go to jail. You spit in my face and misbehave, and I lock you up.” She misbehaved, she spat, she goes to jail. Same rules apply for everyone.

    Lew Clark (b6cd2d)

  22. there will be many new, eager applicants for correctional officers

    Well then if this story is at all valid, these new corrections officers better keep their hands off of her…LOL!

    juandos (c47e6f)

  23. Pfft… They won’t catch anything from her they haven’t already caught from some of the other prison-tail they’ve been tapping…

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  24. NK and XRLQ,

    Did you factor in that Paris Hilton was 15 minutes late for her hearing? That alone would cause a judge in my community to impose a more severe sentence. In other words, I don’t think we can assume this judge is a Paris Hilton hater. Maybe he’s an equal opportunity stickler.

    DRJ (c6d1df)

  25. The women’s jail facility in Lynnwood is NOT a “suburban” private jail. Its the pits.

    Hilton will be segregated from the main population because she would be at risk of an attack from another prisoner trying to gain notoriety. But, her time there will not be fun.

    I expect her to emerge as an advocate for better housing on behalf of prisoners a la Martha Stewart.

    I also think her partying days are over unless she’s in a limo.

    wls (859dc4)

  26. WLS:

    “I expect her to emerge as an advocate for better housing on behalf of prisoners a la Martha Stewart.”

    You may be overestimating her intelligence.

    DRJ (c6d1df)

  27. No kidding DRJ. First she’d have to know what the hell the word “advocate” means…

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  28. I don’t have any idea how LA jails work. But in most areas I know of, some segment of violators are permitted to do their jail time outside of jail, whether it’s an ankle bracelet or work release or whatever. Generally, even some poor people can figure out ways to spend the money to stay out of jail for eligible offenses.

    Certain crimes and certain actions (like FTA’ing for your first jail sentence) will get you remanded. Misdemeanor remand is rare in my neck of the woods.

    In my opinion, we should build lots of jail space and actually stick probation violators in jail. Jail is educational for rich and poor alike; for most, they discover they dislike jail. Hilton will not like jail; often the steak you ordered medium rare will be served medium, and the horseradish sauce is a little runny.

    But *if* (and I stress: *if*) the normal run for people who repeatedly violate DUI probation is to be eligible for not-jail jail, she should get it. Imposing things because she is Paris Hilton is, indeed, improper. And, fine host, consider this: Assuming that everyone else who can afford it gets a non-jail alternative, the fact that Paris would get to go free like the rest of them would be a *good* thing.

    Why? Because then people will realize that a system which sentences people to jail as an amusing joke – really, they’re just sentenced to play Nintendo at home – isn’t working right. Jail ought to be jail. More people will realize that if so.

    Aside to Scott Jacobs: If I read you right, you’ve got two DUI’s. I’d be really interested in any thoughts you have on the system, the punishment, any changes you made, or anything else you’d care to share further. (I routinely keep DUI convicts on DUI juries because most plead and most know the lies DUI folks tell.)

    (I hope that’s not considered a threadjack, fine host.)

    –JRM

    JRM (355c21)

  29. JRM,

    I agree Paris Hilton shouldn’t be treated worse because of who she is but it is my understanding she has multiple DUI offenses. Is there anyplace that won’t put you in jail if you have multiple DUIs?

    DRJ (c6d1df)

  30. 3 probations violations including failure to enroll in the court ordered alcohol program, and this:

    Asked whether she had understood the terms of the drunk-driving plea that she agreed to Jan. 22, Hilton, 26, said: “I just sign what people tell me to sign…. I’m a very busy person.”

    …tell me that the judge wanted to be sure she wrapped her head around the seriousness of her situation.

    I suspect that his point will now be taken by Ms. Hilton.

    Pablo (08e1e8)

  31. First, let me be quite upfront — sentencing Paris Hilton to a 45-day county jail term made me smile. It is appropriate for multiple external (new offenses) and internal (failing to fulfill her obligations) violations of probation. However, I’m still betting that she never sleeps a night in County Jail.

    It appears to me that Paris Hilton pled no contest to a reduced charge from her original DUI to a “wet reckless,” 23103.5 of the California Vehicle Code, which does count as a DUI prior if she is caught driving under the influence again but has a lesser maximum sentence (90 vs. 180 days) and lesser consequences than a regular first-time DUI. Entirely appropriate given her borderline breath test result of .08, without a traffic accident or other factors. In hindsight her high-priced attorneys maybe should have fought the case further, though I’m sure Ms. Hilton and her handlers just wanted an expedient resolution to the initial proceedings. Among the ordinary consequences were: Summary probation, to the court, with orders to obey all laws and comply with all of the other conditions, with the jail time over her head. An alcohol education program, which requires signing up (she didn’t) and taking hourly classes for twelve weeks at nominal cost (she didn’t). A suspension to her driver’s license, by the DMV (automatic after a lag period, unless a hearing exonerates her) AND by the court (which is part of her sentence).

    She violated probation in at LEAST three ways: First, by driving again and picking up a 14601.2(a), driving with a suspended license because of alcohol (which requires a mandatory period in jail) at which point she was notified AGAIN that her license and privilege to drive was suspended. Second, by driving with a suspended license AGAIN because of alcohol, which requires a longer minimum time in custody. Third, by failing to register for or complete her alcohol education program, which she agreed to as a condition of her probation.

    Now I’m assuming that the suspended license cases are not going to be filed in lieu of the probation violation, as is customary. From one of the posts above, I’m also assuming that her car was not impounded as a result of either of the previous arrests, a huge break already. I don’t know whether she will still be required to complete the alcohol education program, but from the judge’s imposition of the 90 days should she fail to surrender, I’m guessing that is being excused.

    So let’s look at what a “normal” Angelino would be facing in Paris Hilton’s situation without the benefit of money and fame: A probation violation for the “wet reckless” (maximum 90 days). A new case and a PV for the 14601.2(a) (minimum 10 days). A new case for the second 14601.2(a) with a potential prior offense (minimum 30 days). An internal PV for failing to do the alcohol program (5-10 additional days).

    Her sentence is entirely appropriate. But will she serve any time? If she appeals the probation violation she will be entitled to bail, which she certainly can make in whatever amount. This stretches things out for probably a year or two. Even though the legal standard for a probation violation is far less than beyond a reasonable doubt, and the internal violation alone is indefensible.

    I certainly hope that the City Attorneys prosecuting the case were not stupid enough to have dismissed the two suspended license new offenses before everything is resolved, giving up any leverage they have. But we are a LONG WAY from Paris Hilton actually serving a night in County Jail.

    nosh (de5a83)

  32. One last thing — Yes, the judge can TRY to prevent time in a private jail or home detention or electronic monitoring, but much of that is up to the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department who oversees the county jail. He cannot preclude her from getting her good time/work time credits, so 45 days becomes 30 days. He cannot prevent early release due to overcrowding, so the remaining 30 days can shrink to anywhere from a couple of weeks to nothing. He cannot interfere with the internal workings of the LASD and their ever-present claims that they are underfunded and understaffed and overworked and overstressed and therefore must release her early or give her house arrest or electronic monitoring or CalTrans work or everything else that they do.

    So mark my words — an appeal, a surrender, a highly publicized incarceration for a day or maybe two. And once the cameras go away, she walks.

    nosh (de5a83)

  33. DRJ:

    Yes, lots of places you can have lots of DUI’s and serve your time on an alternate program. Or serve some tiny fraction of your time. It bites.

    Nosh:

    Nice writeup, but 14601.2 expressly is only for 23152 (DUI) convictions, not for 23103.5 (wet reckless) convictions. It’s a 14601, not a 14601.2. Right?

    Look how fascinated the onlookers are at this fascinating discussion! Oooh, the details of California suspended license law.

    –JRM

    JRM (de6363)

  34. Thank you, nosh, for confirming what I thought was the way the system is suposed to work.

    DRJ #22,

    With absolutely no sarcasm intended, I doubt that being fifteen minutes late to court is a statutory sentencing factor. If the judge took that into account then he is what Xrlq said. An ordinarily good, not exceptional, judge will deprive a person of life, liberty or property only to the extent that the law obligates him to do so.

    nk (db0112)

  35. JRM,

    What about the little-used VC 14601.5? I can’t look it up now, but if distant memory serves, that’s a suspension for excessive blood alcohol. It might apply in the “wet reckless” situation. I think the minimum penalties are between those required for a standard 14601 and a 14601.2.

    Patterico (a14d7c)

  36. JRM – I’ve not SAID it, but yeah… Two DUIs for my 28 year-old self.

    Yes yes, I’m a monster. I could have killed someone. I’ve heard it. I’ve said it. Moving on…

    My first DUI I got damned lucky. Friend of a friend of my mom went to services (temple) with a guy, and he was AMAZING! (former CAPT in the Army, as a JAG, only made me like him more). I got recommended treatment, no additional loss of liscence (I had it BACK when verdict was handed down – it took us that long to go through the court system) and a couple of years of court supervision.

    I was DANCING.

    I also didn’t learn anything (You could have guessed that bit, as I said I had two, after all). My second one happened within my Court supervision (soooooo close) and when I went back to my lawyer, I looked him in the eye and said “Look, I fucked up. At this point, you are damage control. Minimize the jailtime. I know I’ll do some, and I’m ok with that. Just do what you can…”

    I had 3 months sober (coin in hand) when I went before the judge the second time. I suspect partly because of my having already entered treatment, already started attending AA, all that.

    I got 48 hours in Tazwell County (I’m in IL, btw folks, if you didn’t know). 5 year revocation (I get it back in mid-to-late ’08 in theory).

    The cops that got me? I can’t be too pissed. I mean, the second one was an ASSHOLE – totally horrid human being – but aside from him being a dick, I can’t be pissed. I was drunk, I was driving… Hard to miss the “guilty” aspect there…

    People that bitch about having gotten pulled over will do it again.

    The ones that go “yu know what, I did it, my fault” have a better chance of not…

    And the ones that fake their way though recommended treatment are about 90% for a second DUI. It took a second trip around for it to stick.

    That’s why I don’t think Paris will be helped at all. She would first have to accept that it was her fault, and then be willing to accept that she needs to change herself to change her outcomes…

    I think she’s far too self-absorbed, far too vapid, far too dense to even have a shot at coming out a changed person…

    A shame, too… She’s not THAT attractive (I like my women to have, you know, more than a layer of skin and some bones), she’s rich enough that I’d definately do her…

    … What?

    Screw you for judging me, man…

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  37. 33/Pat:

    OK, here’s your full training:

    14601(a): Explicitly applies to convictions for reckless driving. First offense: 5 days. Second offense: 10 days and $500 fine. All fines should be multiplied by 3.4 (penalty assessment) and add about $200 for other mandatory fines; so that’s really about $2K.

    14601.1(a): Applies to everything not covered anywhere else. First offense: Fine (PC fine minimum=$300; with mandatory penalty assessments, other fines and fees, over $1K mandatory.) Second offense: 5D+$500 (Really $2K)

    14601.2(a): Applies to DUI convictions. First offense: 10D+$300. Second: 30D+$500.

    14601.3: Applies to habitual traffic offenders. Most vitally, for people who are HTO’s for their third DUI, and got a new suspended license case within three years of their last conviction, that’s mandatory 180 days+$2K (which, with other assessments, is $7K.) That’s mandatory consecutive to any other sentence. So when you’ve got your fourth deuce within three years of your third, that’s mandatory 180D (4th deuce) + 180D (suspended license) + about $8,500 in fines. Don’t deal those fourths out so easy!

    14601.5: Suspension for high blood alcohol test or refusal to take such test. You get an interim suspension when you test above .08%. First: $300 fine. Second: 10D/$500. Not for wet convictions. Refusal includes when you refuse to take the test and four cops and two large medical personnel pin you down while they take your blood. Implied consent rocks.

    –JRM

    JRM (de6363)

  38. (May be resend, looks like it got eaten in transit the first time.)

    33/Pat:

    OK, here’s your full training:

    14601(a): Explicitly applies to convictions for reckless driving. First offense: 5 days. Second offense: 10 days and $500 fine. All fines should be multiplied by 3.4 (penalty assessment) and add about $200 for other mandatory fines; so that’s really about $2K.

    14601.1(a): Applies to everything not covered anywhere else. First offense: Fine (PC fine minimum=$300; with mandatory penalty assessments, other fines and fees, over $1K mandatory.) Second offense: 5D+$500 (Really $2K)

    14601.2(a): Applies to DUI convictions. First offense: 10D+$300. Second: 30D+$500.

    14601.3: Applies to habitual traffic offenders. Most vitally, for people who are HTO’s for their third DUI, and got a new suspended license case within three years of their last conviction, that’s mandatory 180 days+$2K (which, with other assessments, is $7K.) That’s mandatory consecutive to any other sentence. So when you’ve got your fourth deuce within three years of your third, that’s mandatory 180D (4th deuce) + 180D (suspended license) + about $8,500 in fines. Don’t deal those fourths out so easy!

    14601.5: Suspension for high blood alcohol test or refusal to take such test. You get an interim suspension when you test above .08%. First: $300 fine. Second: 10D/$500. Not for wet convictions. Refusal includes when you refuse to take the test and four cops and two large medical personnel pin you down while they take your blood. Implied consent rocks.

    –JRM

    JRM (de6363)

  39. Scott, Interesting post. I’ve defended literally thousands of DUI defendants in some capacity and the “I screwed up…I appreciate anything you can do to minimize the damage” does not ring that bell of familiarity and expectation. I’m sure that the three months of self-initiated sobriety in a program had a huge impact on your emerging relatively unscathed.

    One of the major personal impacts of my job, in addition to concern about my physical safety and security, is to impose on my friends to drive if there is any chance we might be imbibing. I am reluctant to drive even well within the legal limit, with the scent of even the proverbial “one beer” or residual alcohol on my breath. And if they are pulled over when escorting me, I’m sure I can talk the cops out of any trouble!

    nosh (de5a83)

  40. I walked away that day from court thinking “only 48? I was thinking at least 2 weeks…”

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  41. More ruminations:

    — Aren’t many of us here about to have a nightmare flashback going back to law school where the “cool” professor writes an exam question based on esoteric exponential leaps from COUNTY of LOS ANGELES v. Paris Hilton? —

    Ethics/Torts: Does Paris Hilton have a cause of action against her original attorneys?

    When Paris entered her plea to the “wet reckless” was she in court or did her attorney(s) represent her with authorization? They are permitted to do so in a misdemeanor. It is one of the selling points in the DUI attorney ads — “We can usually appear for you.”

    An attorney prepares and signs a written waiver form and declares that all matters have been explained to the defendant. The defendant signs as well. Yet Paris Hilton AND her publicist both testify during the probation violation hearing that she relies on said publicist for legal information and interpretation.

    Please discuss any and all theories involving potential claims and assertions.

    nosh (de5a83)

  42. I hate you for that Nosh…

    Because I have a friend about to go into Law School…

    She’s going to see that, I just know it…

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  43. It doesn’t matter if she doesn’t actually serve her full sentence, I am happy she’s going to spend a few days behind bars.
    And I think celebrities should receive more severe punishment when they break the law, because some people consider them role models.
    I hope she cries at night 😆

    jm4847 (49e796)

  44. Rather than kvetching back and forth, there would seem to be one good way to obectively determine whether or not Hilton was treated “fairly” relative to other similarly situated defendants: can anyone look up the stats on how many California DUI probation violators with otherwise clear records get jail time, and the length of sentence for those offenders?

    NYC 2L (e16c0b)

  45. I’m just wondering if, as an L A County prosecutor, our esteemed host will get dibs on the Paris Hilton in the Prison Shower video that you just know someone will take.

    Dana (1f0f07)

  46. She’s lucky she didn’t get the judge I got on my first and only DWI.

    1980 in Washington state, .12 bac = 1 year in jail, $1000 fine. He gives it to everyone. Suspended to state minimum 1 day in jail and $312 fine, with the court maintaining jurisdiction. Not enrolled in alcohol class in 45 days, suspension revoked. Late paying the fine, suspension revoked. Show up in his court for something stupid……. Basicly, he owns your ass for a year.

    Gerald A (b0279c)

  47. I’ll admit to mixed feelings on this one. Yeah, it’s good to see that Miss Hilton isn’t being treated (too) differently from us ordinary peons, but when I see some of the absolute glee associated with those who are celebrating her incarceration, I almost wish taht she’d have gotten off.

    Dana (1f0f07)

  48. She IMO thought that her celebrity elevated her above the law. She has now encountered a Missouri judge who knows how to deal with recalcitrant jack-asses.

    And it was all so unneccessary. She had the where-withall to avoid having to drive. All she had to do was hire a driver, or use a limo service. So stupid.

    Hope she doesn’t graduate to felony stupid.

    If I were the judge, I would reduce Paris’ sentance one day for every two days her mother spends for her contempt (un-cited I believe, but definitely committed).

    Another Drew (8018ee)

  49. The women’s jail facility in Lynnwood is NOT a “suburban” private jail. Its the pits.

    D’Oh. Lynwood is adjacent to Compton and Watts, in the heart of South Central. But CNN’s reporter didn’t know that, which was the point of the jibe.

    Kevin Murphy (0b2493)

  50. As far as her getting harmed in there, I’m pretty sure that her people will arrange something with the powers-that-be inside, so that she’s protected 24/7. I’m sure that it’s a regular gang service by now.

    Kevin Murphy (0b2493)

  51. Maybe she’ll make a run for it?

    She could join Roman Polanski in…Paris.

    alphie (015011)

  52. Althouse: “It seems obvious to me that she’s being treated worse because of her celebrity . . .”

    She isn’t being treated like other celebrities because of her celebrity!

    It’s so unfair!

    Daryl Herbert (4ecd4c)

  53. Daryl–

    But she’s only famous because of her celebrity.

    Just think of all those other famous people who had to work for their celebrity. It’s not fair to them, either.

    Kevin Murphy (0b2493)

  54. i’m 51 years old. if i released a video on the internet of me having sex with someone, would you folks write about me and click on links about me for the rest of your lives?

    assistant devil's advocate (b68685)

  55. maybe…

    Would you be screwing Paris?

    :)

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  56. Kajillionth try; the submitting comment thing isn’t working for me:

    33/Pat:

    OK, here’s your full training:

    14601(a): Explicitly applies to convictions for reckless driving. First offense:
    5 days. Second offense: 10 days and $500 fine. All fines should be multiplied by
    3.4 (penalty assessment) and add about $200 for other mandatory fines; so that’s
    really about $2K.

    14601.1(a): Applies to everything not covered anywhere else. First offense: Fine
    (PC fine minimum=$300; with mandatory penalty assessments, other fines and fees,
    over $1K mandatory.) Second offense: 5D+$500 (Really $2K)

    14601.2(a): Applies to DUI convictions. First offense: 10D+$300. Second: 30D+$500.

    14601.3: Applies to habitual traffic offenders. Most vitally, for people who are
    HTO’s for their third DUI, and got a new suspended license case within three
    years of their last conviction, that’s mandatory 180 days+$2K (which, with other
    assessments, is $7K.) That’s mandatory consecutive to any other sentence. So
    when you’ve got your fourth deuce within three years of your third, that’s
    mandatory 180D (4th deuce) + 180D (suspended license) + about $8,500 in fines. Don’t
    deal those fourths out so easy!

    14601.5: Suspension for high blood alcohol test or refusal to take such test. You
    get an interim suspension when you test above .08%. First: $300 fine. Second: 10D/$500.
    Not for wet convictions. Refusal includes when you refuse to take the test and four
    cops and two large medical personnel pin you down while they take your blood. Implied
    consent rocks.

    –JRM

    JRM (355c21)

  57. Look on the bright side: this will give Goldstein a chance to reprise The Martha Stewart Chronicles

    LagunaDave (cb0e49)

  58. Well, wahhhh! :)

    Paris fires publicist, calls jail term ‘cruel’
    Heiress claims veteran spokesman Mintz told her it was OK to drive

    LOS ANGELES – In her first public comments since she was handed a 45-day jail sentence for a driving related offense, celebrity heiress Paris Hilton has described her punishment as cruel and unwarranted.

    She also fired her spokesman, veteran publicist Elliot Mintz, whom she blamed for getting her into the mess.

    Visibly shocked and tearful, the 26-year-old socialite was sentenced to 45 days in a suburban Los Angeles jail after a judge ruled she knowingly violated her probation on a previous traffic offense by driving without a valid license.

    At the hearing, Hilton said Mintz had told her she was permitted to drive for work-related reasons. But Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Sauer rejected her claims and ordered her to turn herself in by June 5.

    “I told the truth,” Hilton told photographers waiting outside her Los Angeles home on Saturday night.

    “I feel that I was treated unfairly and that the sentence is both cruel and unwarranted. I don’t deserve this.”

    Her lawyer, Howard Weitzman, has said he will appeal “to modify the sentence.”

    Mintz, whose clients have included John Lennon and Bob Dylan, took the stand in Hilton’s defense, but his testimony was rejected as worthless by the judge.

    Dana (3e4784)

  59. What Paris can expect behind bars
    Inmates at the Century Regional Detention Center get low-sodium meals

    LOS ANGELES – Hopefully, Paris Hilton likes chicken.

    She was sentenced Friday to 45 days at the Century Regional Detention Center, Los Angeles County’s jailhouse for women just south of downtown in Lynwood.

    Inmates there get three low-sodium meals a day, with dinner the only hot meal. Beef and pork aren’t permitted — “it’s all poultry-based,” said Capt. Alice Scott, who oversees the 2,200-inmate facility she describes as “a very nice place.”

    Like other high-profile Los Angeles County inmates — O.J. Simpson, Robert Blake, Robert Mitchum, Sirhan Sirhan and Charles Manson — Hilton will be segregated from the general population for her own safety, living in a one- or two-person cell.

    Her cell will be Spartan: 12-by-8 feet with a toilet, sink and a window 6 inches wide. She’ll comb her blonde locks in a mirror made of polished metal.

    Breakfast is served between 6 a.m. and 7:30 a.m., hours when Hilton sometimes gets in after a night of partying.

    Inmates in segregation are allowed outside their cells for at least an hour each day to shower, watch television in the day room, participate in outdoor recreation or talk on the telephone, Scott said. There are a bank of phones that use prepaid phone cards — cellular telephones and Blackberries aren’t allowed.

    Dana (3e4784)

  60. if anyone on earth deserves to be treated worse because of her celebrity, it’s Ms Hilton

    quasimodo (edc74e)

  61. As I suspected, she’ll take nothing useful away from her time in jail, because she refuses to admit fault for what she did.

    I actually feel sorry for her. Well, as sorry as I can feel for a complete moron who has more money than I will ever see in 4 lifetimes and is able to effectively get zero punishment for anything she does…

    So I guess I don’t feel sorry for her at all…

    Oh, and if you really hate yourself, read her “memours” God damn priceless. We should force GitMo detainees to read it…

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  62. Mintz, whose clients have included John Lennon and Bob Dylan, took the stand in Hilton’s defense, but his testimony was rejected as worthless by the judge.

    ‘The judge then made a similar ruling regarding Mintz’s (now former) client.’

    Scott Jacobs (a1de9d)

  63. If there were any justice in this country she would be incarcerated forever and 1 day. As it is now, Paris will be out and we will have to suffer her celebrity in 45 days. Woe unto us.

    If there were a merciful God, she wouldn’t be returning. Perhaps someone will cancel her AMEX card.

    hdhouse (ed6ba0)

  64. It seems to me that she’s not being treated better simply because of her celebrity. And that’s a refreshing change. Why don’t others see that?

    I could not agree more, and it’s about time. Look at the sentence Martha Stewart got: five months for obstruction of justice. Anybody else without money would have gotten a lot longer sentence.

    McCafferty HimselfMcCafferty Himself

    McCafferty Himself (08fa16)

  65. It seems to me that she’s not being treated better simply because of her celebrity. And that’s a refreshing change. Why don’t others see that?

    I see it. I couldn’t agree with you more. This issue seems mind-numbingly obvious:

    With Paris violating her parole, my own safety as a pedestrian is just as threatened as when some other drunk-driving bozo violates parole. To give her special privileges just because she has money and fame would reinforce exactly the wrong message: laws are important to follow–unless you’re rich, in which case you can do whatever you want.

    Tom (cc8c08)

  66. Oh, and if you really hate yourself, read her “memours” God damn priceless. We should force GitMo detainees to read it…

    I, for one, will take a principled stance against this form of cruel and unusual punishment for detainees–whether or not they qualify for Constitutional protections.

    Tom (cc8c08)

  67. pfft..

    It’s the Hilton-trash, or beatings with hoses and some bamboo shoots. Take yer pick… :)

    Scott Jacobs (feb2f7)

  68. Too bad but she should quit acting so high and mighty and get a life

    krazy kagu (d61c23)

  69. I am sick to death of Paris Hilton. PLEASE GIVE HER 90 DAYS AND GET HER FACE OFF THE TV!!!!!!!!!!
    Haven’t we all had enough of her whining, antics, and spoiled brat ways?
    Come on, if any of us were convicted of DUI and violated our license suspension TWICE, wouldn’t we be appealing from prison?!!!!!!
    Does anyone else out there in blog-land agree with me?

    Donna Lee (b8e6e6)

  70. IIt seems to me there is much prejudice here. And for what? Do you all get your news from tabloids or reputable news sources?

    Many people may know the law here but unfortunately they don’t know the facts in this case. Have you even noticed that almost all stories that you read are from one source – the AP? When a one-source story is repeated a million times which is not well researched and contains errors it does not make it true.

    a friend (5a642b)

  71. Paris hilton did wrong.
    she needed to serve her sentence just as it was
    and old wag like me. although i object very
    much of the way it’s been handled. say to anyone
    the sheriff the mayor who ever releases you it
    should stand. i say now send the sheriff to prison
    for going over the judges head. what is this
    country coming to when we can’t handle a small
    case like hiltons without making such blunders.
    James Gillum Dover Florida

    James Gillum (731fdf)

  72. Impeach/Dethrone/Disbar/Disrobe Superior Court Judge Michael T. Sauer
    Whether we like, love, hate, dislike or are oblivious to Paris Hilton and her seemingly narcissistic nature (in some eyes), she is a wealthy, socialite young woman that does work for a living. What she does with and within her life is her choice. We all supposdely have that choice option, she is lucky enough to be able to afford any and all choices. Then we have the crime, conviction of a single drink breath test that just barely showed her to be legally drunk. (go research the breath test proceudres and their flaws). She did not have an accident, nor run over anything or do anything illegal that endangered life. Think about it. You drinkers, after having one or two drinks, and you drive home or just across the street, it makes no difference, you were as guilty as she was. She has a better life than we do, so she is what, automatically a piece of crap because some judge is having a bad day.
    Paris is such a dangerous person though so we really need to take that into account, right?. I mean she a loud mouth, (NOT) belligerent, (NOT) alcoholic, (NOT) drug addict, (NOT) stupid (NOT) gang banger.(NOT) bum, (NOT).dangerous criminal type (NOT). What she is is wealthy, she is egotistical and like it or not, she is attractive. All I can say for that is – you go girl, more power to you, enjoy your life and do it for all of us that never will.
    Then we have Superior Court Judge Michael T. Sauer
    A man elected to office to serve the public in a nonbiased, just and fair sense of sentencing convicted wrongdoers. So he takes this high profile criminal (NOT) and treats her like some scum of the earth.This is the type of man that would take ten equal convictions and treat their sentence according to: their color, stature, looks, ethenticity, gender, looks etc. or his mood of the day.
    This Judge, a Southern California elected official, serving the public in a heavily populated area of high profile or so called famous people, apparently has no sympathetic, fair or just reality of justice. The sentence was severe enough in itself, but he has to add levying all the sanctions on that restriction; no work furlough, no electronic monitoring, no pay to stay jails. If it were up to me I would, for the sake of all southern CA residents, impeach, disrobe, dethrone and disbar this person from the legal system.
    Perhaps its time for Governor Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger to step in and put an end to this nonsense.
    Perhaps Paris should have murdered her husband by shooting him in the back with a shotgun while he was sleeping and get 120 days in jail for doing it.
    The American Judicial System people, wake up.

    Jerry (6ec2d0)

  73. Perhaps Paris should have murdered her husband by shooting him in the back with a shotgun while he was sleeping and get 120 days in jail for doing it.

    The battered-woman defense, a tried and true technique. It doesn’t matter how imminent the treat, just that you married a bad person.

    “I just snapped.”

    steve (5e9c62)

  74. Make that “threat.”

    steve (5e9c62)


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