Patterico's Pontifications

11/23/2003

WEEKEND BEAR FLAG LEAGUE REVIEW

Filed under: Bear Flag League — Patterico @ 8:01 am

It’s four days since the last Bear Flag Review. What can Bear Flaggers do in just four days? Take a look and see:

Aaron has this provocative rant about Islam.

Ith’s blood boils.

Deb, who is very busy, gets her 20,000 visitor while she snoozes.

The Angry Clam has a photo of a goofy guy and a pun to go with it.

Baldilocks notes the anniversary of the death of a good man on November 22, 1963: C.S. Lewis.

Blogosferics does its own linkfest.

BoiFromTroy attempts to bump up his Google standings for the benefit of people looking for the Paris Hilton video.

Justene is now truly the mother hen.

CaliforniaRepublic.org now has e-mail updates. You can subscribe by e-mailing them at subscribe@californiarepublic.org

Citizen Smash says that, like Howard Dean, he has had back pain. But he came by it in a different way.

Cobb notes some interesting public opinion polls, including religious divides on gay marriage.

Bill Quick says (in strong words) that the Dean medical deferment is irrelevant to his campaign for President.

Dale Franks says that Afghanis feel safer than they did three years ago. Can we let them vote in the 2004 presidential election?

Xrlq has a brilliant translation of the Infotel demand letter to Justene.

E-Claire has disturbing information about turkey & gravy-flavored soda pop — that information being that such a thing exists.

Spooky reports on the prescription drug plan.

Howard Owens says that real writers write because they love to do it, not to build a large audience. That’s also why you do a Bear Flag Review.

Infinite Monkey David says Lee Harvey Oswald was sent from the future.

The Interocitor whacks the wacky Ninth Circus.

The Irish Lass reminds us of her post on 100 Things You Should Do in California — a post well worth a reminder.

The Left Coast Conservative has ended his affair with Mountain Dew. I say you’re better off without her. By the way, the secret ingredient in turkey and gravy-flavored soda pop is: turkey and gravy.

Lex Communis is on a road trip, but had a post noting a discussion on inclusive language.

Michael Williams slams the ACLU’s incessant yapping, and has a scary theory to boot.

Miller’s Time discusses a real-life episode of Gilligan’s Island.

Molly recommends a stocking stuffer, for those who like this kind of thing: a talking Ann Coulter doll. I can think of a few liberal in-laws who would enjoy this. . .

The Mulatto Advocate sheds the s88239886 identity. Isn’t it nice to be a name and not a number?

Pathetic Earthlings has a different gift idea for those who don’t want the Ann Coulter doll: flourescent fish.

Patio Pundit has this disturbing picture of a turtle chowing down.

Patrick Prescott asks you not to wish him a “Happy Turkey Day.” I would add only this: make every day Thanksgiving. Every person reading this has a lot to be thankful for. Don’t take life for granted.

Patterico has comments! (Well, I have a comments feature, anyway. I’m still working on the actual comments. Help me out by leaving one!)

PrestoPundit discusses Hayek and gay marriage.

The Right Coast has a recipe for scotch and water. It’s more involved than you might think. The secret ingredient is: scotch. (Blended scotch.)

Breaker blasts John Dvorak’s dissing of blogs. Drop Breaker a comment to prove Dvorak wrong.

Bryon Scott is back!

The Shark fisks notorious jerk Ted Rall.

SoCalLawyer keeps us up to date on lap dancing in L.A.

Tone Cluster says World War III is on our doorstep.

The Window Manager discusses the Pulitzer awarded to genocide denier Walter Duranty.

UPDATE: As a bonus, BoiFromTroy (who often shoulders the work of the Review) is presenting a Rocky Top Sampler. It is given in honor of the “alliance” (whatever that means) between the Bear Flag League and the Rocky Top Brigade.

RIGHT-WINGERS

Filed under: Politics — Patterico @ 1:46 am

In a fairly rare “Nixon goes to China” moment, I would like to open a discussion about some things that right-wingers tend to believe that I think are wacky positions. (And now that I have comments, you can tell me why I’m wrong.) For example:

The environment. Any position in support of the environment is derided as “tree-hugging” by conservatives. Why? Do we really want the whole country to have the same air quality I enjoy here in Los Angeles?

Cigarette smoking. It’s unhealthy. It’s annoying. It’s an unfortunate addiction some people have. Like most addictions, most of the addicts would like to kick it. Why is the ability to smoke all over the place somehow a big civil rights issue for conservatives?

Animal rights. Yes, PETA is a pack of idiots. But we can’t define those who support animal rights by the actions of the morons at PETA. (I hate it when left-wingers define my beliefs according to some stupid thing Ann Coulter said.) Many animals have thoughts, emotions, and some ability to communicate. Why is it considered comical to speak on their behalf?

I am sure there are more, but let’s start with these. Plenty here to offend most regular readers, I’m sure.

BERLIN PHIL AT DISNEY

Filed under: Music — Patterico @ 1:46 am

I saw the Berlin Philharmonic at Disney Hall Friday night. They performed Bartok’s “Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta” and Schubert’s Ninth Symphony. The Bartok is familiar to anyone who has seen Kubrick’s “The Shining.” It is great music — very spooky, and well suited to a horror film. Unlike Esa-Pekka conducing Haydn’s Creation (which I saw recently), Rattle trusted the acoustics of Disney Hall to carry the softest pianissimos to the highest points in the hall. When the few dozen audience members afflicted with tuberculosis were not hacking away, Rattle’s calculation was very successful.

As when the Vienna Phil performed the Schubert Ninth in Orange County a year or two ago, I noticed a wonderful crispness to the woodwind section, especially during the repeated triplets in the first movement. But unlike the Vienna Phil, the Berliners really have swing. You can tell that each individual player really feels like both an accomplished artist on his/her own, and a part of an organic unit. The players really get into the music in a visible way I have never seen with any other orchestra.

The usual L.A. standing ovation was greeted with unusual behavior by a conductor. Rattle travelled throughout the orchestra. shaking hands with individual players in the woodwind, brass, and percussion sections. He rarely bowed from the podium, choosing instead to stand among orchestra members, as if to deprecate his own position as conductor, and rather to acknowledge the huge talent of the orchestra itself. It was a welcome and appreciated gesture.


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